National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination solution processable

  1. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    Solution-Processed Graphene Electronics,” Nano Letters, vol.applications,” Organic Electronics, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 249-design in organic electronics by dual-gate technology,” in

  2. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  3. Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution A photovoltaic device having a first...

  4. GE Lighting Solutions: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4901)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to General Electric Lighting Solutions finding that various models of traffic signal modules do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  5. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  6. An exact solution to determination of an open orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideki Asada

    2006-10-23

    We present an exact solution of the equations for orbit determination of a two body system in a hyperbolic or parabolic motion. In solving this problem, we extend the method employed by Asada, Akasaka and Kasai (AAK) for a binary system in an elliptic orbit. The solutions applicable to each of elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic orbits are obtained by the new approach, and they are all expressed in an explicit form, remarkably, only in terms of elementary functions. We show also that the solutions for an open orbit are recovered by making a suitable transformation of the AAK solution for an elliptic case.

  7. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  8. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  9. Solution-Processed Solar Cells using Colloidal Quantum Dots ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sargent001000 Abstract: Solution-processed photovoltaics offer a cost-effective path to harvesting the abundant resource that is solar energy. The organic and polymer...

  10. Oxidation-resistant, solution-processed plasmonic Ni nanochain...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solution-processed plasmonic Ni nanochain-SiOsub x (x < 2) selective solar thermal absorbers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Oxidation-resistant,...

  11. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    for further improvement on CZTS solar cells efficiency.improvement. Figure 6.1 Efficiency progress for hydrazine solution processing CIGS and CZTS thin film solar cells

  12. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    Processed Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 Solar Cells,” Advanced Energyfor solution processed CuInSxSe2?x solar cells and itson defect properties,” Solar Energy Materials and Solar

  13. Analysis of PostProcessing for Nonconforming Finite Element Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieweck, Friedhelm

    Analysis of Post­Processing for Nonconforming Finite Element Solutions F. Schieweck \\Lambda of a conforming finite element function v C h 2 V C h . One ``nice'' feature of our analysis­processing procedure where a conforming approximation is computed from a nonconforming finite element solution

  14. Small Molecule Solution-Processed Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Small Molecule Solution-Processed Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Arthur Aebersold Supervisors: J in solution processed BHJ solar cells, which are made from a PCBM Squaraine DyeCyanine Dye Absorber Molecules solar cell performance show a trend for better devices with an intemediate active layer thickness

  15. Determination of dissolved organic carbon in concentrated brine solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannaker, P.; Buchanan, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    An absolute method is reported for the determination of soluble organic carbon in concentrated brine solutions. Wet oxidation with K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/ is used in a sealed ampule at 130/sup 0/C, followed by hot CuO treatment of the gas stream, to fully oxidize organic species to CO/sub 2/. The CO/sub 2/ is measured gravimetrically after gas purification. Results are presented for a wide range of soluble organic species, both with and without NaCl present. This procedure now allows for the accurate determination of organic carbon in brines over a range from about 5 ppm to values in excess of 1000 ppm. The technique overcomes the difficulties of calibration curvature, catalytic clogging, and instrumental fogging, often encountered in modern instrumental methods, when applied to concentrated brine solutions. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  16. Engineering Recent progress on solution processable polymeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport plays an important role in determining the performance of polymer solar cells. In addition) data, we will present a model to explain the loss mechanism in polymer solar cells based on these donor-acceptor polymers. Finally, we will report on our recent progress of high efficiency polymer solar cells based

  17. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

    1985-03-04

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  18. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  19. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  20. Actinide solution processing at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1039, for radioactive solution removal and processing at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for solution removal and processing is in response to independent safety assessments and an agreement with the State of Colorado to remove mixed residues at Rocky Flats and reduce the risk of future accidents. Monthly public meetings were held during the scoping and preparation of the EA. The scope of the EA included evaluations of alternative methods and locations of solution processing. A comment period from February 20, 1995 through March 21, 1995 was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to offer written comment on the EA. Comments were received from the State of Colorado and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A response to the agency comments is included in the Final EA.

  1. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  2. Environmental Determinants of Lexical Processing Effort 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Scott

    A central concern of psycholinguistic research is explaining the relative ease or difficulty involved in processing words. In this thesis, we explore the connection between lexical processing effort and measurable ...

  3. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste...

  4. Time-resolved fluorometric determination of terbium in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemmilae, I.

    1985-07-01

    The fluorescent properties of water-soluble binary and ternary complexes of terbium(III) were studied and their applications in time-resolved fluorometric analysis were tested. Solutions composed of different ..beta..-diketones, tri-n-octylphosphine oxide as the synergistic agent, and Triton X-100 as the detergent were optimized to maximize fluorescence emission in Tb measurement. The results were then compared with seven published methods which included the use of the following respective solutions, ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis((o-hydroxy-phenyl)acetic acid), dipicolinic acid, iminodiacetic acid with Tiron, EDTA with Tiron, EDTA with 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, EDTA with sulfosalicylic acid, and EDTA with salicylate. Fluorinated aliphatic ..beta..-diketones showed the most promising properties in acidic solution. They were especially suitable for use in time-resolved fluorometric analyses where Tb was used as the label after being conjugated to the analyte via bifunctional complexones. An acidic pH is required for Tb release before conversion into a fluorescent chelate. The applicability of the developed measurement solutions to the measurement of Eu was also tested. 22 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

  5. CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

    2008-01-15

    High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

  6. Motivation Set-theoretic solutions Strategy 1 to determine set-theoretic solutions and Problems Groups, Group rings and the Yang-Baxter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digne, François

    Motivation Set-theoretic solutions Strategy 1 to determine set-theoretic solutions and Problems (Baie de Somme) May 30th ­ june 2nd 2012 Eric Jespers #12;Motivation Set-theoretic solutions Strategy 1 to determine set-theoretic solutions and Problems Lecture Outline Motivation #12;Motivation Set

  7. Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oulman, Charles S. [Ames, IA; Chriswell, Colin D. [Slater, IA

    1981-07-07

    Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

  8. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: s-inoue@jaist.ac.jp [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); School of Material Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Ariga, Tomoki [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Matsumoto, Shin [School of Material Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki [ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); School of Material Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi?NbO? fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic ?-BiNbO? crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  9. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voigt, James A. (Corrales, NM); Sipola, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuttle, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Anderson, Mark T. (Woodbury, MN)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications.

  10. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1999-06-01

    A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

  11. Improving the Quality of Software Quality Determination Processes \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Improving the Quality of Software Quality Determination Processes \\Lambda Leon J. Osterweil a systematic, orderly, process­based approach to stating software quality objec­ tives and knowing if and when they have been achieved. We suggest that quality in software is a complex, multifaceted array

  12. Solution of relativistic quantum optics problems using clusters of graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, D.F., E-mail: daviel.gordon@nrl.navy.mil; Hafizi, B.; Helle, M.H.

    2014-06-15

    Numerical solution of relativistic quantum optics problems requires high performance computing due to the rapid oscillations in a relativistic wavefunction. Clusters of graphical processing units are used to accelerate the computation of a time dependent relativistic wavefunction in an arbitrary external potential. The stationary states in a Coulomb potential and uniform magnetic field are determined analytically and numerically, so that they can used as initial conditions in fully time dependent calculations. Relativistic energy levels in extreme magnetic fields are recovered as a means of validation. The relativistic ionization rate is computed for an ion illuminated by a laser field near the usual barrier suppression threshold, and the ionizing wavefunction is displayed.

  13. New Solutions for Substation Sensing, Signal Processing and Decision Making M. Kezunovic, Fellow IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Solutions for Substation Sensing, Signal Processing and Decision Making M. Kezunovic, Fellow describes a new solution for integrating substation sensing, signal processing and decision making for more multiplexed network, distributed signal processing, and neural network based decision making are discussed

  14. MODELING OF A NOVEL SOLUTION POTASH MINING PROCESS Sergio Almada, Harvey Haugen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by drilling followed by a number of steps to develop a solution mining cavern. Water is injected to dissolve a sump area within the salt at the base of the solution mining cavern. The sump allows insoluble materials settle within the cavern to avoid affecting the solution mining process and the dissolved salt can

  15. Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  16. Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method and system are disclosed for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 24 figs.

  17. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800326 Solution Processed Photovoltaic Devices with 2% Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800326 Solution Processed Photovoltaic Devices with 2% Infrared Monochromatic generations of solar cells. Solution processed materials offer the promise of flexible and inexpensive of the sun's power reaching the earth lies beyond 700 nm, and one third beyond 1000 nm. Many of the promising

  18. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 Solar Cells,” Advanced Energy Materials,processed CuInSxSe2?x solar cells and its effect on defectEnergy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 95, no. 8, pp. 2384–

  19. Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cochran, H.D. Jr.

    1993-04-20

    A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

  20. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  1. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore »deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  2. High-efficiency solution processable polymer photovoltaic cells by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Polymer solar cells have shown potential to harness solar energy in a cost-effective way. Significant as a promising cost-effective alternative to silicon-based solar cells1­3 . Some of the important advantages of these so-called `plastic' solar cells include low cost of fabrication, ease of processing, mechanical

  3. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jony

    Qurz 2 SOLUTIONS, SECTION ALL. (10 pts.) Find the length of the curve. Solution. Using the formula for the arclength, of a curve onthe interval [0, 2],. 0. (5 pts.) ...

  4. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Hoyer, K.K.; Humenik, K.E.

    1995-10-17

    A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor are disclosed. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 17 figs.

  5. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Hoyer, Kristin K. (Chicago, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  6. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Hoyer, K.K.; Humenik, K.E.

    1997-05-13

    A method and system are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 17 figs.

  7. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Hoyer, Kristin K. (Chicago, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

    1995-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  8. Development of low-temperature solution-processed colloidal quantum dot-based solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Liang-Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Solution-processed solar cells incorporating organic semiconductors and inorganic colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are potential alternatives to conventional solar cells fabricated via vacuum or high-temperature sintering ...

  9. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120?meV and 200?meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37?ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724?mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  10. Solvent extraction and recovery of the transuranic elements from waste solutions using the TRUEX process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Schulz, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    High-level liquid waste is produced during the processing of irradiated nuclear fuel by the PUREX process. In some cases the treatment of metallurgical scrap to recover the plutonium values also generates a nitric acid waste solution. Both waste solutions contain sufficient concentrations of transuranic elements (mostly /sup 241/Am) to require handling and disposal as a TRU waste. This paper describes a recently developed solvent extraction/recovery process called TRUEX (transuranium extraction) which is designed to reduce the TRU concentration in nitric waste solutions to <100 nCi/g of disposed form (1,2). (In the USA, non-TRU waste is defined as <100 nCi of TRU/g of disposed form.) The process utilizes PUREX process solvent (TBP in a normal paraffinic hydrocarbon or carbon tetrachloride) modified by a small concentration of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (abbrev. CMPO). The presence of CMPO enables the modified PUREX process solvent to extract trivalent actinides as well as tetra- and hexavalent actinides. A major feature of the TRUEX process is that is is applicable to waste solutions containing a wide range of nitric acid, salt, and fission product concentrations and at the same time is very compatible with existing liquid-liquid extraction technology as usually practiced in a fuel reprocessing plant. To date the process has been tested on two different types of synthetic waste solutions. The first solution is a typical high-level nitric acid waste and the second a typical waste solution generated in metallurgical scrap processing. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

    1998-01-13

    A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution. 7 figs.

  12. Determination of the paradihlorobenzene and paradibromobenzene solid solutions nanoparticles structure via Raman spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korshunov, M A

    2012-01-01

    We measured the small frequencies Raman spectrum of the paradihlorobenzene and paradihlorobenzene solid solution nanoparticles with the size about 100 nanometers. Values of frequencies of lines decrease. The size of nanoparticles was determined by the electronic microscope. Calculations of nanoparticles structure were done using the method of molecular dynamics and histograms of nanoparticles spectra were calculated via the Dyne's method. The result is that the Raman spectrum is the sum of spectra from the central part of the nanoparticle and superficial structures with smaller concentration of paradihlorobenzene.

  13. Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-09

    Tank Mania! (1) Consider a 200 liter tank used to hold a dye solution with a concentration of 1g/liter. The tank needs to be rinsed with fresh water flowing in a

  14. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jony

    2011-09-04

    Quiz 2, Section 11. P1. Find the cosine of the angle between the vectors bbb. AB and bbb. AC, where A = (2,b1,3), B = (1,1,2),. C = (3,1,0). Solution: First, we ...

  15. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-09

    Solution: We're looking for the presale cost of the shirt, so let x be the price of ... The sale price is $10 and we've called the presale price x, so we need to solve.

  16. Solution Synthesis and Processing of PZT Materials for Neutron Generator Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.A.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Montoya, T.V.; Moore, R.H.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.

    1998-12-01

    A new solution synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of lead-based ferroelectric materials (patent filed). The process produces controlled stoichiometry precursor powders by non-aqueous precipitation. For a given ferroelectric material to be prepared, a metal acetate/alkoxide solution containing constituent metal species in the appropriate ratio is mixed with an oxalic acid/n-propanol precipitant solution. An oxalate coprecipitate is instantly fonned upon mixing that quantitatively removes the metals from solution. Most of the process development was focused on the synthesis and processing of niobium-substituted lead zirconate titanate with a Zr-to-Ti ratio of 95:5 (PNZT 95/5) that has an application in neutron generator power supplies. The process was scaled to produce 1.6 kg of the PNZT 95/5 powder using either a sen-ii-batch or a continuous precipitation scheme. Several of the PNZT 95/5 powder lots were processed into ceramic slug form. The slugs in turn were processed into components and characterized. The physical properties and electrical performance (including explosive functional testing of the components met the requirements set for the neutron generator application. Also, it has been demonstrated that the process is highly reproducible with respect to the properties of the powders it produces and the properties of the ceramics prepared from its powders. The work described in this report was funded by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  17. Determining the Link and Rate Popularity of Enterprise Process Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    -oriented information logistics (POIL) to bridge this gap. POIL allows for the process-oriented and context the applicability of our approach. Key words: process-oriented information logistics, process information relevance specific process information with process tasks. However, this approach often fails due to high maintenance

  18. Process for recovering chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

    1999-03-30

    A solid/liquid process for the separation and recovery of chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid support comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the chaotropic anions are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved salt (lyotrope). A solid/liquid phase admixture of separation particles containing bound chaotropic anions in such an aqueous solution is also contemplated, as is a chromatography apparatus containing that solid/liquid phase admixture. 19 figs.

  19. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jony

    sz 6, SECTION 171, T 2:30 PM. P1. Find the points in the cone 22 = x2 + y2 that are closest to the point (4, 2, 0). Solution 1: First, we note that given the point (4, ...

  20. The Role of Advanced Process Control in Your Energy Management Solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, K.; Van Wyk, L.

    2010-01-01

    , Customization, Innovation NovaTech EAMS The Role of Advanced Process Control in your Energy Management Solution IETC Conference May 2010 Presentation title Service, Customization, Innovation NovaTech @ a Glance ? Three Primary Business Units: ? Nova... Who is NovaTech Presentation title Service, Customization, Innovation NovaTech @ a Glance ? Agro Processing ? Brewing ? Food & Beverage ? Energy/Utilities ? Heavy Industry ? Pharmaceutical ? Specialty Chemical NovaTech?s Industry Focus...

  1. Solution-processed photodetectors from colloidal silicon nano/micro particle composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lih Y.

    -inorganic nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution," Science 310(5747), 462­465 (2005). 2. J. M. Luther, M. Law, M. C. Beard, Q. Song, M. O. Reese, R. J. Ellingson, and A. J. Nozik, "Schottky solar cells based. Arango, and V. Bulovic, "Photodetectors based on treated CdSe quantum- dot films," Appl. Phys. Lett. 87

  2. Charge Dynamics in Solution-Processed Nanocrystalline CuInS¬2 Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpert, Jonathan E.; Morgenstern, Frederik S. F.; Ehrler, Bruno; Vaynzof, Yana; Credgington, Dan; Greenham, Neil C.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate charge dynamics in solar cells constructed using solution-processed layers of CuInS2 (CIS) nanocrystals (NCs) as the electron donor and CdS as the electron acceptor. By using time-resolved spectroscopic techniques, we are able...

  3. MODELING OF A NOVEL SOLUTION POTASH MINING PROCESS Sergio Almada, Harvey Haugen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by drilling followed by a number of steps to develop a solution mining cavern. Water is injected to dissolve that is designed to increase the effi- cacy and reduce the cost. The process uses in- terconnected horizontal wells drilled through a high grade potash zone that should eventually dissolve out all the potash in the zone

  4. Synthesis and characterization of perovskite PbTiO3 nanoparticles with solution processability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Synthesis and characterization of perovskite PbTiO3 nanoparticles with solution processability Jun with perovskite structure (ABO3), for example, lead titanate (PbTiO3), are the most studied ferroelectric oxides polarization direction. Ferroelectrics with perovskite structure (ABO3), such as barium titanate (BaTiO3

  5. Solution-processed colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics: A perspective Ratan Debnath,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    ) photovol- taic devices offer considerable promise as a third-generation photovoltaic candidateInGaSe2, offer dramatically improved costs per square meter, but at the price of lower efficiencies. Third-generationSolution-processed colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics: A perspective Ratan Debnath,a Osman Bakrbc

  6. Modeling and the Adaptive Solution of CVD Fiber-Coating Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjerid, Slimane

    Modeling and the Adaptive Solution of CVD Fiber-Coating Processes S. Adjerid, J. E. Flaherty, J. B, New York 12180, USA Abstract We develop a mathematical model for the coating of ceramic bers, a convection-di usion system for the reacting precursor species, a ber coating model, and a ber heat conduction

  7. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No cellphone. Question Points Score|. 1 15 1g ... (15 points) Determine the radius of convergence p of the following power series. (1) (5 points) 2 (—1)” x2n+1.

  8. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

    1999-03-30

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

  9. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark L. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX); Barrans, Jr., Richard E. (Downers Grove, IL); Rausch, David (Naperville, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

  10. Salmonella detection and critical control point determination during poultry processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Suzanne D.

    2000-01-01

    sampling, thoracic skin flap sampling, and the FSIS approved sponge method in a turkey processing plant. Carcass rinse was consistently and significantly superior to tested alternatives for the detection of Salmonella in this plant. Salmonella recovery...

  11. Sequence determinants of pri-miRNA processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auyeung, Vincent C. (Vincent Churk-man)

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs that regulate many processes in physiology and pathology by guiding the repression of target messenger RNAs. For classification purposes, miRNAs are defined as ~22 nt RNAs that are produced ...

  12. Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazan, Guillermo C. (Santa Barbara, CA); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Moses, Daniel (Santa Barbara, CA); Peet, Jeffrey (Goleta, CA)

    2013-09-25

    Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

  13. Enhancing performing characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazan, Guillermo C; Moses, Daniel; Peet, Jeffrey; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-05-13

    Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

  14. Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazan, Guillermo C; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Moses, Daniel; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Peet, Jeffrey; Soci, Cesare

    2012-11-27

    Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

  15. Solution processable organic polymers and small molecules for bulk-heterojunction solar cells: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, G. D. [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India)

    2011-10-20

    Solution processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained wide interest in past few years and are established as one of the leading next generation photovoltaic technologies for low cost power production. Power conversion efficiencies up to 6% and 6.5% have been reported in the literature for single layer and tandem solar cells, respectively using conjugated polymers. A recent record efficiency about 8.13% with active area of 1.13 cm{sup 2} has been reported. However Solution processable small molecules have been widely applied for photovoltaic (PV) devices in recent years because they show strong absorption properties, and they can be easily purified and deposited onto flexible substrates at low cost. Introducing different donor and acceptor groups to construct donor--acceptor (D--A) structure small molecules has proved to be an efficient way to improve the properties of organic solar cells (OSCs). The power conversion efficiency about 4.4 % has been reported for OSCs based on the small molecules. This review deals with the recent progress of solution processable D--A structure small molecules and discusses the key factors affecting the properties of OSCs based on D--A structure small molecules: sunlight absorption, charge transport and the energy level of the molecules.

  16. Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2013-09-10

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  17. Ground-water solutes and eolian processes: An example from the High Plains of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Eolian dunes associated with saline-lake basins are important geologic features in arid and semiarid areas. The authors propose that eolian processes may also be important in controlling solute concentration and composition of ground water in these environments. A study of Double Lakes on the Southern High Plains of Texas suggests that approximately 200 megagrams of chloride enters this topographically closed basin from the surrounding water table aquifer, direct precipitation and surface runoff. Solute-transport simulation suggest that approximately 70 of the 200 megagrams of the chloride annually leaves the basin by diffusion and ground-water advection through a 30 meter-thick shale underlying the lake. The remaining 130 megagrams is hypothesized to be removed by eolian processes. Closed water-table contours around the lake and a hydrologic analysis suggest that it is improbable that solutes will reach the surrounding water-table aquifer by ground-water transport from this lake system. The conceptual eolian-transport model is further supported by observed chloride profiles in the unsaturated zone. When analyzed with estimates of recharge fluxes, these profiles suggest that approximately 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride are removed from the basin annually by eolian process and redeposited downwind of the lake. Eolian input to the ground water is consistent with the observed plume shape as well as with the solute and isotopic composition of ground water in the water-table aquifer downwind of the lake basin.

  18. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1997-11-11

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  20. Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for OLED SSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-07-15

    An interconnected network of silver nanowires has been used as transparent anode in OLED devices. This layer was deposited by spin-coating and slot-die coating from an aqueous nanowire suspension. The sheet resistance of the film was 10ohms/sq with a transmission (including the glass substrate) of higher than 85%. The first phase of the project focused on the implementation of this nanowire layer with a hole-injection-layer (HIL) which has been developed at Plextronics and has been shown to provide good stability and efficiency in conventional OLED devices. We modified the HIL solution such that it coated reasonably well with suitable surface morphology so that actual devices can be manufactured. During the second phase we investigated the hole-injection and stability of hole-onlydevices. We determined that the use of the nanowire network as anode does not introduce an additional degradation mechanism since the observed device characteristics did not differ from those made with ITO anode. We then proceeded to make actual OLED devices with this nanowire / HIL stack and achieved device characteristics similar state-of-the-art OLED devices with a single junction. In order to gain traction with potential OLED manufacturers, we decided to contract Novaled to prepare large-area demonstrators for us. For these devices, we used an allevaporated stack, i.e. we did use Novaledâ??s HIL material instead of Plextronicsâ??. We successfully fabricated demonstrators with an area of 25cm2 with a double or triple junction stack. Minor stack optimizations were necessary to achieve efficacies and lifetime equivalent with ITO devices made with the same devices stack. Due to the reduced microcavity effect, the color of the emitted light is significantly more stable with respect to the viewing angle compared to ITO devices. This fact in conjunction with the promise of lower production cost due to the elimination of the ITO sputtering process and the direct patterning of the anode layer are the obvious advantages of this technology. The project has shown that this nanowire technology is a viable option to achieve OLED devices with good lifetime and efficiency and we are currently working with manufacturers to utilize this technology in a production setting.

  1. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  2. Determining the Criticality of Processes in Kahn Process Networks for Design Space Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the critical path must have a criticality of 1 since none of them can be slowed down without increasing the length of the critical path. As another example, a process which is executed in parallel with a process on the critical path can be slowed down by a factor equal to the execution time of the process on the critical

  3. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  4. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  5. Analytical solution of the unsteady Pennes equation for burn depth determination from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Mihir

    ]. In recent years the sensitivity of infrared sensors has improved considerably and is now close to 0.025 C infrared thermographs R. Romero-M´endez1 , Dirk F. DeLange1 , Mihir Sen2 and F.J. Gonz´alez3 1 Facultad de was evaluated by comparing with an axisymmetric numerical solution. The parametric dependence of the temperature

  6. Studies of solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes and their materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellerich, Emily

    2013-05-15

    A hitherto unexplored approach is presented in which a small molecule is used as a host to polymer guests in solution-processed OLEDs. We find that the small molecule host results in much more efficient devices than the often-used alternative polymer host when used for the guests presented. It is likely that nano- and microstructural differences between the hosts contribute to the improvements, which highlights some interesting characteristics that can help to better understand the nature of these mixtures. A number of the guests used in this study were newly synthesized benzobisoxazole-based copolymers. New organic copolymers are presented that are based on the chemical structure of benzobisoxazoles, which have been shown in the past to have good electron transporting properties. The novel concept in this publication pertains to a change in the direction of polymerization, also known as the conjugation pathway, which we show increases the emission efficiency. This work highlights a unique and useful property of organic semiconducting materials in that they can be synthesized to create the desired characteristics. Earlier work is described that kick-started in our research group the use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs. Originally these devices were to be used in magnetoresistance studies, but the project took a different path when the devices were more efficient than expected. The efficient use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs is highlighted, which at the time was not often the case. Also, the important observation of the effect of solvent choice on the resultant film is emphasized, with discussion of the likely cause of these effects. Microcavity OLEDs are introduced in which the transparent anode ITO is replaced with semi-transparent thin silver, which creates an optical cavity within the devices. The goal was to expand a previous work that created an on-chip spectrometer covering wavelengths 493 to 639 nm. In this case, a spin-coated mixed emitting layer (EML) is used, consisting of a polymer and a small molecule that both emit in the near UV and blue. The resulting combined spectra gives a wide band that can be used to create narrow microcavity emission peaks of 373 to 469 nm, depending on the device thickness (i.e. the cavity’s optical length). In the process of this effort, the mixed EML presented interesting complexities that we attempt to explain via simulation and morphology study.

  7. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  8. A water-processable organic electron-selective layer for solution-processed inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Zhou, Hu; Cai, Ping; Sun, Shi; Ye, Hua; Su, Shi-Jian Cao, Yong

    2014-02-03

    A triazine- and pyridinium-containing water-soluble material of 1,1?,1?-(4,4?,4?-(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)) tris(methylene)tripyridinium bromide (TzPyBr) was developed as an organic electron-selective layer in solution-processed inverted organic solar cells due to its strong anti-erosion capacity against non-polar organic solvents commonly used for the active layer. Ohmic-like contact with the adjacent active materials like fullerene derivatives is speculated to be formed, as confirmed by the work-function measurements with scanning Kelvin probe and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Besides, considering the deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of TzPyBr, excellent hole-blocking property of the electron-selective layer is also anticipated. The inverted organic photovoltaic devices based on the TzPyBr/ITO (indium tin oxide) bilayer cathode exhibit dramatically enhanced performance compared to the control devices with bare ITO as the cathode and even higher efficiency than the conventional type devices with ITO and Al as the electrodes.

  9. Self-Assembly, Molecular Ordering, and Charge Mobility in Solution-Processed Ultrathin Oligothiophene Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,A.; Chang, P.; VanDyke, P.; Liu, J.; Frechet, J.; Subramanian, V.; Delongchamp, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

    2005-01-01

    Symmetrical {alpha}, {omega}-substituted quarter-(T4), penta-(T5), sexi-(T6), and heptathiophene (T7) oligomers containing thermally removable aliphatic ester solubilizing groups were synthesized, and their UV-vis and thermal characteristics were compared. Spun-cast thin films of each oligomer were examined with atomic force microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to evaluate the ability of the material to self-assemble from a solution-based process while maintaining complete surface coverage. Films of the T5-T7 oligomers self-assemble into crystalline terraces after thermal annealing with higher temperatures required to affect this transformation as the size of the oligomers increases. A symmetrical {alpha}, {omega}-substituted sexithiophene (T6-acid) that reveals carboxylic acids after thermolysis was also prepared to evaluate the effect of the presence of hydrogen-bonding moieties. The charge transport properties for these materials evaluated in top-contact thin film transistor devices were found to correlate with the observed morphology of the films. Therefore, the T4 and the T6-acid performed poorly because of incomplete surface coverage after thermolysis, while T5-T7 exhibited much higher performance as a result of molecular ordering. Increases in charge mobility correlated to increasing conjugation length with measured mobilities ranging from 0.02 to 0.06 cm2/(V{center_dot}s). The highest mobilities were measured when films of each oligomer had an average thickness between one and two monolayers, indicating that the molecules become exceptionally well-ordered during the thermolysis process. This unprecedented ordering of the solution-cast molecules results in efficient charge mobility rarely seen in such ultrathin films.

  10. Determination of Gap Solution and Critical Temperature in Doped Graphene Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenmei Xu; Yisong Yang

    2015-09-27

    It is shown that the gap solution and critical transition temperature are significantly enhanced by doping in a recently developed BCS formalism for graphene superconductivity in such a way that positive gap and transition temperature both occur in arbitrary pairing coupling as far as doping is present. The analytic construction of the BCS gap and transition temperature offers highly effective globally convergent iterative methods for the computation of these quantities. A series of numerical examples are presented as illustrations consolidating the analytic understanding achieved.

  11. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed tank--1.6 gallons; (c) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--1.6 gallons; (d) Contactor drain tank--0.40 gallons; (e) Strip effluent hold tank--0.33 gallons; (f) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--0.37 gallons; (g) Strip effluent decanter--0.14 gallons; (h) Solvent hold tank--0.30 gallon; and (i) Corrugated piping between contactors--16-21 mL. (5) After the initial vessel draining, flushing the vessels with 100 gallons of water using a spray nozzle that produces complete vessel coverage and draining the flush water reduces the source term by the following amounts: (i) Salt solution receipt tank--63X; (ii) Salt solution feed tank--63X; (iii) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--63X; (iv) Contactor drain tank--250X; (v) Strip effluent hold tank--300X; (vi) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--270X; (vii) Strip effluent decanter--710X; (viii) Solvent hold tank--330X. Understand that these estimates of film thickness are based on laboratory testing and fluid mechanics theory. The calculations assume drainage occurs by film flow. Much of the data used to develop the models came from tests with very ''clean'' fluids. Impurities in the fluids and contaminants on the vessels walls could increase liquid holdup. The application of film thickness models and source term reduction calculations should be considered along with operational conditions and H-Tank Farm/Liquid Waste operating experience. These calculations exclude the PVV/HVAC duct work and piping, as well as other areas that area outside the scope of this report.

  12. Calcium niobate nanosheets as a novel electron transport material for solution-processed multi-junction polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    Calcium niobate nanosheets as a novel electron transport material for solution-processed multi-junction polymer solar cells Lilian Chang,a Michael A. Holmes,b Mollie Waller,b Frank E. Osterlohb and Adam J-processed tandem polymer solar cells are demonstrated using stacked perovskite, (TBA,H) Ca2Nb3O10 (CNO

  13. Efficient solution-processed infrared photovoltaic cells: Planarized all-inorganic bulk heterojunction devices via inter-quantum-dot bridging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    Efficient solution-processed infrared photovoltaic cells: Planarized all-inorganic bulk-processed photovoltaics. The authors demonstrate quantum size-effect tuning of device band gaps relevant to multijunction solar cells. © 2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2735674 Low-cost, large-area solar

  14. Process Biochemistry 37 (2002) 10571065 Dynamics of yard trimmings composting as determined by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    2002-01-01

    Process Biochemistry 37 (2002) 1057­1065 Dynamics of yard trimmings composting as determined of the composting process. In the present study, four different biochemical parameters (dehydrogenase activity, ATP of yard trimmings composting; and (2) to relate these parameters to changes in microbial numbers, physico

  15. Synthesis and Structural Determination of a Hexanuclear Zirconium Glycine Compound Formed in Aqueous Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Synthesis and Structural Determination of a Hexanuclear Zirconium Glycine Compound Formed, Fujian 350002, P. R. China Received February 14, 2008 Single crystals of a zirconium-glycine compound-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure revealed that it is composed of hexa-zirconium octahedral clusters

  16. A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, Gregory C; Perez, Louis A.; Hoven, Corey V.; Zhang, Yuan; Dang, Xuan-Dung; Sharenko, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.; Kramer, Edward J.; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the design, synthesis and characterization of light harvesting small molecules for use in solution-processed small molecule bulk heterojunction (SM-BHJ) solar cell devices. These molecular materials are based upon an acceptor/donor/acceptor (A/D/A) core with donor endcapping units. Utilization of a dithieno(3,2-b;2',3'-d)silole (DTS) donor and pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT) acceptor leads to strong charge transfer characteristics, resulting in broad optical absorption spectra extending well beyond 700 nm. SM-BHJ solar cell devices fabricated with the specific example 5,5'-bis{7-(4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine}-3,3'-di-2-ethylhexylsilylene-2,2'-bithiophene (6) as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor component showed short circuit currents above -10 mA cm-2 and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) over 3%. Thermal processing is a critical factor in obtaining favorable active layer morphologies and high PCE values. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, conductive and photo-conductive atomic force microscopies, dynamic secondary mass ion spectrometry (DSIMS), and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) experiments were carried out to characterize how thermal treatment influences the active layer structure and organization.

  17. Solution-processed infrared photovoltaic devices with >10% monochromatic internal quantum efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    tandem or multijunction solar cells.6 These first solution-cast photovoltaics operating beyond 1 m, solution-cast photovoltaics are of urgent interest to realize low-cost solar cells. Polymer, polymer

  18. NEW ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS OF CADMIUM, LUTETIUM, AND OSMIUM IN THE r-PROCESS ENRICHED STAR BD +17 3248

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, John

    NEW ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS OF CADMIUM, LUTETIUM, AND OSMIUM IN THE r-PROCESS ENRICHED STAR BD +17 ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS OF CADMIUM, LUTETIUM, AND OSMIUM IN THE r-PROCESS ENRICHED STAR BD +17 3248, Ian U

  19. ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

  20. Solution-Processed Organic Solar Cells with Power Conversion Efficiencies of 2.5% using Benzothiadiazole/Imide-Based Acceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Solution-Processed Organic Solar Cells with Power Conversion Efficiencies of 2.5% using achieved 0.1% power-conversion efficiency. KEYWORDS: organic electronics, solar cells, photovoltaic devices significantly different behav- iors in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT

  1. Vacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Hsin-Fei

    -coated organic light-emitting diode is transferred from a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold by lamination, or blade coating [1,2] for organic light emitting diode (OLED) as well as solar cell. The top electrodeVacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE UAV POSITION BY AUTOMATIC PROCESSING OF THERMAL IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Konrad

    DETERMINATION OF THE UAV POSITION BY AUTOMATIC PROCESSING OF THERMAL IMAGES Wilfried Hartmann.hartmann, sebastian.tilch, henri.eisenbeiss, konrad.schindler)@geod.baug.ethz.ch KEY WORDS: Thermal, UAV, Camera, Calibration, Bundle, Photogrammetry, GPS/INS ABSTRACT: If images acquired from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs

  3. Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image Processing Techniques to Determine Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image Processing Techniques to Determine Location by Aubrey the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image Head Marine and Environmental Systems . #12;iii Abstract Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image

  4. Laser Assisted Nanomanufacturing with Solution Processed Nanoparticles for Low-cost Electronics and Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Heng

    2009-01-01

    Printing and Low Temperature Laser Processing”, Sensor andCo. , Inc B Bäuerle, D. , Laser Processing and Chemistry (Conductor Microstructures by Laser Curing of Printed Gold

  5. Characterization of solution processed, p-doped films using hole-only devices and organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang (Frank) [Frank; Rainbolt, James E.; Koech, Phillip K.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2012-12-01

    We report a solution-processed approach for a p-type doped hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra identified the charge transfer between the donor and acceptor in the solution processed doped films. Single carrier device and field-effect transistor were utilized as test vehicles to study the charge transport property and extract important parameters such as bulk mobile carrier concentration and mobility. OLEDs with p-type doped hole transport layer showed significant improvement in power efficiency up to 30% at the optimal doping ratio. This approach has the great potential to reduce the power consumption for OLED solid state lighting while lowering the cost and boosting the throughput of its manufacturing.

  6. Precipitation of jarosite-type double salts from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, G.

    1990-09-21

    The precipitation of jarosite compounds to remove Na, K, Fe, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} impurities from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process was studied. Simple heating of model solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}). Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} could be precipitated from those solutions at 95{degree}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simple heating of model solutions containing only Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} up to 95{degree}C for {le}12 hours produced low yields of jarosite compounds, and the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid the formation of undesirable Fe compounds. Precipitate yields could be increased dramatically in model solutions of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} containing excess Fe by using either CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, or ZnO to neutralize H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} released during hydrolysis of the Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and during the precipitation reactions. Results obtained from the studies with model solutions were applied to spent acids produced during laboratory countercurrent washing of coal which had been leached with a molten NaOH/KOH mixture. Results indicated that jarosite compounds can be precipitated effectively from spent acid solutions by heating for 6 hours at 80{degree}C while maintaining a pH of about 1.5 using CaCO{sub 3}.

  7. Process for preparing chemically modified micas for removal of cesium salts from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Stephen Frederic (1539 S. Kennicott Dr., Arlington Heights, IL 60005); DeFilippi, Irene (208 E. Edgewood La., Palatine, IL 60067); Gaita, Romulus (6646 Davis Rd., Morton Grove, IL 60053); Clearfield, Abraham (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Lyudmila (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Anatoly (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843)

    2000-09-05

    A chemically modified mica composite formed by heating a trioctahedral mica in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride having a concentration of at least 1 mole/liter at a temperature greater than 180 degrees Centigrade for at least 20 hours, thereby replacing exchangeable ions in the mica with sodium. Formation is accomplished at temperatures and pressures which are easily accessed by industrial equipment. The reagent employed is inexpensive and non-hazardous, and generates a precipitate which is readily separated from the modified mica.

  8. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  9. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  11. Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

    1985-01-01

    An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

  12. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Oyenekan, Babatunde A. (Katy, TX)

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  13. Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processible Small-Molecule OLEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jie Jerry

    2012-07-31

    The objective of this program is to develop key knowledge and make critical connections between technologies needed to enable low-cost manufacturing of OLED lighting products. In particular, the program was intended to demonstrate the feasibility of making high performance Small-Molecule OLEDs (SM-OLED) using a roll-to-roll (R2R) wet-coating technique by addressing the following technical risks (1) Whether the wet-coating technique can provide high performance OLEDs, (2) Whether SM-OLED can be made in a R2R manner, (3) What are the requirements for coating equipment, and (4) Whether R2R OLEDs can have the same performance as the lab controls. The program has been managed and executed according to the Program Management Plan (PMP) that was first developed at the beginning of the program and further revised accordingly as the program progressed. Significant progress and risk reductions have been accomplished by the end of the program. Specific achievements include: (1) Demonstrated that wet-coating can provide OLEDs with high LPW and long lifetime; (2) Demonstrated R2R OLEDs can be as efficient as batch controls (Figure 1) (3) Developed & validated basic designs for key equipment necessary for R2R SM-OLEDs; (4) Developed know-hows & specifications on materials & ink formulations critical to wetcoating; (5) Developed key R2R processes for each OLED layer (6) Identified key materials and components such as flexible barrier substrates necessary for R2R OLEDs.

  14. Light-induced hysteresis and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed metal-oxide thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Park, Sung Kyu E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Hoon E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr

    2014-07-28

    In this report, photo-induced hysteresis, threshold voltage (V{sub T}) shift, and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are investigated. It was observed that a white light illumination caused negative V{sub T} shift along with creation of clockwise hysteresis in electrical characteristics which can be attributed to photo-generated doubly ionized oxygen vacancies at the semiconductor/gate dielectric interface. More importantly, the photochemically activated IGZO TFTs showed much reduced overall V{sub T} shift compared to thermally annealed TFTs. Reduced number of donor-like interface states creation under light illumination and more facile neutralization of ionized oxygen vacancies by electron capture under positive gate potential are claimed to be the origin of the less V{sub T} shift in photochemically activated TFTs.

  15. Low-voltage and hysteresis-free organic thin-film transistors employing solution-processed hybrid bilayer gate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Tae-Jun [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-28

    This study presents a promising approach to realize low-voltage (<3?V) organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) exhibiting improved electrical and optical stability. Such device performance results from the use of solution-processed hybrid bilayer gate dielectrics consisting of zirconium dioxide (high-k dielectric) and amorphous fluoropolymer, CYTOP{sup ®} (low-k dielectric). Employing a very thin amorphous fluoropolymer film reduces interfacial defect-states by repelling water molecules and other aqueous chemicals from an organic semiconductor active layer due to the hydrophobic surface-property. The chemically clean interface, stemming from decrease in density of trap states improves all the key device properties such as field-effect mobility, threshold voltage, and sub-threshold swing. Furthermore, degradation by electrical bias-stress and photo-induced hysteresis were suppressed in OTFTs employing hybrid bilayer gate dielectrics.

  16. Oxidation-resistant, solution-processed plasmonic Ni nanochain-SiO{sub x} (x?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiaobai; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Juchuan

    2014-08-21

    Metal oxidation at high temperatures has long been a challenge in cermet solar thermal absorbers, which impedes the development of atmospherically stable, high-temperature, high-performance concentrated solar power (CSP) systems. In this work, we demonstrate solution-processed Ni nanochain-SiO{sub x} (x?processed by low-cost solution-chemical methods for future generations of CSP systems.

  17. Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boboia, S.; Moldovan, M.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-13

    The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

  18. Determination of Transport Properties From Flowing Fluid Temperature LoggingIn Unsaturated Fractured Rocks: Theory And Semi-Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2008-08-01

    Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has been recently proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this paper, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock, and develop a semianalytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. Based on the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this paper is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel paper [Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008], we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. We also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks.

  19. Determination of dispersivities and reactionkinetics of selected basalts of columbia river plateau using an inverse analytical solution technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlquist, Lisa Armstrong

    1994-01-01

    on the determination of transport parameters by modeling sodium transport in the Priest Rapids and Roza flow tops of the Wanapum formation, and Rocky Coulee and Umtanum flow tops of the Grande Ronde formation, within the Cold Creek Syncline of the Hanford Nuclear Waste...

  20. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Hafnium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Simmerman, S. G.

    2009-02-01

    A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of hafnyl chloride [HfOCl{sub 2}], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous hafnium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 70-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

  1. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wolf, Emil [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States

    2010-09-01

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  2. Modulation of physical and photocatalytic properties of (Cr, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} nanorods using soft solution processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Wen-Chung [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Hoang-Diem; Wu, Chun-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kao-Shuo, E-mail: kschang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Yoshimura, Masahiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research (PCGMR), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-14

    Facile polymerized complex reactions together with a hydrothermal reaction were implemented to make single crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanorods for the first time. Chromium (Cr) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) co-doping was performed to tailor the physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction study illustrated that highly reactive facets of (101), (111), and (001) dominated rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods. A growth model, based on formation of complex species, was proposed to elucidate effectiveness of the soft solution processing in making TiO{sub 2} nanorods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and consideration of fundamentals of charge neutrality showed N{sub 2} doping could inhibit formation of Cr{sup 6+} and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}{sup 2+}). An investigation of the photocatalytic properties exhibited high efficiency of photodegradation of methylene blue in 15?min under pH?=?10, using a nanocomposite of (7% Cr, 0.0021% N) codoped and 3% Cr doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

  3. Improving the FPGA Design Process Through Determining and Applying Logical-to-Physical Design Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent E.

    this knowledge can be used, we de- scribe, in detail, how to determine the logical-to-physical mapping of Xilinx. Effort sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Rome Laboratory, Air Force

  4. Improving the FPGA Design Process Through Determining and Applying LogicaltoPhysical Design Mappings #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent E.

    this knowledge can be used, we de­ scribe, in detail, how to determine the logical­to­physical mapping of Xilinx. # Effort sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Rome Laboratory, Air Force

  5. Determination of the Presence Conditions of Pavement Markings using Image Processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Hancheng

    2012-10-19

    in maintaining pavement markings as the retroreflectivity or durability values of the markings fall below a minimum level. Currently, the most widely adopted method used to determine the presence conditions of pavement markings is by expert observation, a...

  6. Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O.sub.3 thin films and powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O.sub.3 precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650.degree. C. and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures.

  7. Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} thin films and powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, T.J.

    1999-01-12

    A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650 C and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures. 2 figs.

  8. Control of carbon nanotube stiffness via tunable fabrication process parameters that determine CNT geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullinan, Michael A. (Michael Arthur)

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents tunable process parameters that may be used to control the geometry of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The results may be used to grow MWCNTs with desired stiffness properties. This is important ...

  9. Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

  10. Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (Marietta, GA); Chai, Xin Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Junyoung (Marietta, GA)

    2008-06-24

    The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

  11. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort by sound monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elkington, W. Brice (Grand Junction, CO)

    1978-01-01

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring for sound produced in the retort, preferably by monitoring for sound at at least two locations in a plane substantially normal to the direction of advancement of the processing zone. Monitoring can be effected by placing a sound transducer in a well extending through the formation adjacent the retort and/or in the fragmented mass such as in a well extending into the fragmented mass.

  12. Quantitative Determination of Chemical Processes by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Haifeng

    2012-07-16

    of indirect spectral dimensions similarly to conventional 2D NMR. Additionally, small flip angle pulses can be used to obtain a succession of scans separated in time. A model describing the combined effects of the evolution of a chemical process and of spin...

  13. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Cerium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Chi, Anthony [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    A simple test tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous cerium oxide microspheres via the internal gelation process.1 Broth formulations of cerium ammonium nitrate [(NH4)2Ce(NO3)6], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous cerium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60 to 90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations to be able to equate the test-tube gelation times to actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broth formulations.

  14. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

  15. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

  16. Method and system for determining precursors of health abnormalities from processing medical records

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2013-06-25

    Medical reports are converted to document vectors in computing apparatus and sampled by applying a maximum variation sampling function including a fitness function to the document vectors to reduce a number of medical records being processed and to increase the diversity of the medical records being processed. Linguistic phrases are extracted from the medical records and converted to s-grams. A Haar wavelet function is applied to the s-grams over the preselected time interval; and the coefficient results of the Haar wavelet function are examined for patterns representing the likelihood of health abnormalities. This confirms certain s-grams as precursors of the health abnormality and a parameter can be calculated in relation to the occurrence of such a health abnormality.

  17. Computer vision determination of the stem/root joint on processing carrots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, Matthew McMahon

    1987-01-01

    , a linear photo-diode array camera, and a microprocessor to control an orientating mechanism. The photo- diode array measured the diameter of ears of corn as they were transported by a conveyor belt. Because the corn was being transported in a... direction perpendicular to the plane of the photo- diode array, the measure produced by the array was the width or diameter of the ear on the belt. This diameter information described the shape of the ear. Ear shape was analyzed to determine whether...

  18. Understanding how processing additives tune nanoscale morphology of high efficiency organic photovoltaic blends: From casting solution to spun-cast thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Ming [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Kumar, Rajeev [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Chen, Wei [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Jianhui, Hou [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Institute of Chemistry; Do, Changwoo [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Sanjib, Das [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Adding a small amount of a processing additive to the casting solution of organic blends has been demonstrated to be an effective method for achieving improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs). However, an understanding of the nano-structural evolution occurring in the transformation from casting solution to thin photoactive films is still lacking. In this report, we investigate the effects of the processing additive diiodooctane (DIO) on the morphology of OPV blend of PBDTTT-C-T and fullerene derivative, PC71BM in a casting solution and in spun-cast thin films by using neutron/x-ray scattering, neutron reflectometry and other characterization techniques. The results reveal that DIO has no effect on the solution structures of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM. In the spun-cast films, however, DIO is found to promote significantly the molecular ordering of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM, and phase segregation, resulting in the improved PCE. Thermodynamic analysis based on Flory-Huggins theory provides a rationale for the effects of DIO on different characteristics of phase segregation as a solvent and due to evaporationg during the film formation. Such information may enable improved rational design of ternary blends to more consistently achieve improved PCE for OPVs.

  19. Combined Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of Processes Determining Cathode Performance in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukla, Maija M.; Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Merkle, R.; Mastrikov, Yuri; Maier, J.

    2013-02-11

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are under intensive investigation since the 1980’s as these devices open the way for ecologically clean direct conversion of the chemical energy into electricity, avoiding the efficiency limitation by Carnot’s cycle for thermochemical conversion. However, the practical development of SOFC faces a number of unresolved fundamental problems, in particular concerning the kinetics of the electrode reactions, especially oxygen reduction reaction. We review recent experimental and theoretical achievements in the current understanding of the cathode performance by exploring and comparing mostly three materials: (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM), (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 (LSCF) and (Ba,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 (BSCF). Special attention is paid to a critical evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of BSCF, which shows the best cathode kinetics known so far for oxides. We demonstrate that it is the combined experimental and theoretical analysis of all major elementary steps of the oxygen reduction reaction which allows us to predict the rate determining steps for a given material under specific operational conditions and thus control and improve SOFC performance.

  20. Cooling process for inelastic Boltzmann equations for hard spheres, Part II: Self-similar solutions and tail behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Mischler; Clément Mouhot

    2006-07-21

    We consider the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres, in the framework of so-called constant normal restitution coefficients. We prove the existence of self-similar solutions, and we give pointwise estimates on their tail. We also give general estimates on the tail and the regularity of generic solutions. In particular we prove Haff 's law on the rate of decay of temperature, as well as the algebraic decay of singularities. The proofs are based on the regularity study of a rescaled problem, with the help of the regularity properties of the gain part of the Boltzmann collision integral, well-known in the elastic case, and which are extended here in the context of granular gases.

  1. Quiz 7 w: Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owner

    2013-08-16

    Apr 18, 2013 ... The annual effective risk free interest rate is 4%. Determine the maximum loss that you could incur on a long 6 month forward contract. Solution:.

  2. Hollow-fiber gas-membrane process for removal of NH{sub 3} from solution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Y.; Cabral, J.M.S.; Wang, S.

    1996-07-01

    A hollow-fiber supported gas membrane process for the separation of NH{sub 3} from aqueous solutions containing both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A lumen laminar flow and radial diffusion model was applied to calculate the membrane wall transfer coefficient from the data stripping a single volatile component, NH{sub 3} or CO{sub 2}, from their individual aqueous solutions. Influence of the type of membranes and operating conditions on mass-transfer rate were discussed, especially the influence of the membrane transfer coefficient on the film mass-transfer coefficient in the lumen. Appropriate configurations of the hollow-fiber modules for stripping of a single component were analyzed to optimize mass transfer. To predict the stripping of NH{sub 3} from a solution containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, a mathematical model incorporating local chemical equilibria and Nernst-Planck diffusion was developed to describe the mass transport. The models described the experimental data fairly well. The experimental results showed that the supported gas membrane process can be used to remove NH{sub 3} effectively from aqueous media containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  3. Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

    1994-11-22

    In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

  4. Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

    1994-01-01

    In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

  5. An evaluation of membrane materials for the treatment of highly concentrated suspended salt solutions in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration processes for desalination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Trenton Whiting

    2009-05-15

    membrane materials that are most suitable for the process. In the study, a one plate SEPA Cell module by GE Osmonics was used to determine which membranes were most susceptible to fouling and/or membrane hydrolysis. A cellulose acetate (CA), polyamide (PA...

  6. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  7. In situ retreival of contaminants or other substances using a barrier system and leaching solutions and components, processes and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Walsh, Stephanie; Richardson, John G.; Dick, John R.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2005-06-28

    Processes and methods relating to treating contaminants and collecting desired substances from a zone of interest using subterranean collection and containment barriers. Tubular casings having interlock structures are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The subterranean barrier includes an effluent collection system. Treatment solutions provided to the zone of interest pass therethrough and are collected by the barrier and treated or recovered, allowing on-site remediation. Barrier components may be used to in the treatment by collecting or removing contaminants or other materials from the zone of interest.

  8. Over the past years, an interest has arisen in resolving two major issues: increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and depleting energy resources. A convenient solution would be a process that could simultaneously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Over the past years, an interest has arisen in resolving two major issues: increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and depleting energy resources. A convenient solution would be a process that could the photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO2) is such a process. However, this process is presently inefficient

  9. Automated MAD and MIR structure solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Structural Biology Group, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Berendzen, Joel [Biophysics Group, Mail Stop D454, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Structural Biology Group, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    A fully automated procedure for solving MIR and MAD structures has been developed using a scoring scheme to convert the structure-solution process into an optimization problem. Obtaining an electron-density map from X-ray diffraction data can be difficult and time-consuming even after the data have been collected, largely because MIR and MAD structure determinations currently require many subjective evaluations of the qualities of trial heavy-atom partial structures before a correct heavy-atom solution is obtained. A set of criteria for evaluating the quality of heavy-atom partial solutions in macromolecular crystallography have been developed. These have allowed the conversion of the crystal structure-solution process into an optimization problem and have allowed its automation. The SOLVE software has been used to solve MAD data sets with as many as 52 selenium sites in the asymmetric unit. The automated structure-solution process developed is a major step towards the fully automated structure-determination, model-building and refinement procedure which is needed for genomic scale structure determinations.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  11. Water Determination Using Karl Fischer Titration Water content needs to be determined at all stages of the manufacturing process from raw materials to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    of the manufacturing process from raw materials to finished goods. The quality of the product depends on it and effectiveness. In the food industry, the water content of both raw materials and the finished foodstuff needs

  12. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    Graphene Conductors .. 41 Fabrication .. 44 Printing Conditions Optimization 44 ii Experimental Setup and Sample Preparation

  13. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    of plastic- compatible electrolyte, this memory technologylow-cost plastic substrates and makes this technology lesstechnology would require flexible substrates, such as plastics.

  14. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    Conductors for Flexible Electronics,” Journal of Thefor low-cost and flexible electronics. Parts of his workwidespread use in flexible electronics. From an economic

  15. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    review,” Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 91,cells,” Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 75, no.conductors as solar energy materials: A panoramic

  16. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    layers for organic diodes and solar cells, and contacts tosensitized solar cells, as well as organic and inorganicorganic semiconductors in both diode (OLED and solar cell)[

  17. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasmooth Graphene Nanoribbon Semiconductors,” Science,layer graphene is a zero-bandgap semiconductor, although amade of graphene as a contact for organic semiconductors in

  18. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01

    4.7. It consists of a solid electrolyte stacked between twoa reactive electrode, a solid electrolyte, and an inert

  19. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  20. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  1. Determination of oil/water and octanol/water distribution coefficients from aqueous solutions from four fossil fuels. [MS thesis; in oil-water and octanol-water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, B.L.

    1984-07-01

    Liquid fossil fuels, both petroleum and synthetically derived oils, are exceedingly complex mixtures of thousands of components. The effect of many of these energy-related components on the environment is largely unknown. Octanol/water distribution coefficients relate both to toxicity and to the bioaccumulation potential of chemical components. Use of these partition data in conjunction with component concentrations in the oils in environmental models provides important information on the fate of fossil fuel components when released to the environment. Octanol/water distribution data are not available for many energy-related organic compounds, and those data that are available have been determined for individual components in simple, one-component octanol/water equilibrium mixtures. In this study, methods for determining many octanol/water distribution coefficients from aqueous extracts of oil products were developed. Sample aqueous mixtures were made by equilibrating liquid fossil fuels with distilled water. This approach has the advantage of detecting interactions between components of interest and other sample components. Compound types studied included phenols, nitrogen bases, hydrocarbons, sulfur heterocyclic compounds, and carboxylic acids. Octanol/water distribution coefficients that were determined in this study ranged from 9.12 for aniline to 67,600 for 1,2-dimethylnaphthalene. Within a compound type, distribution coefficients increased logarithmically with increasing alkyl substitution and molecular weight. Additionally, oil/water distribution data were determined for oil components. These data are useful in predicting maximum environmental concentrations in water columns. 96 references, 26 figures, and 40 tables.

  2. Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Teng

    2012-04-27

    Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs’ performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

  3. Determination of Optimal Process Flowrates and Reactor Design for Autothermal Hydrogen Production in a Heat-Integrated Ceramic Microchannel Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damodharan, Shalini

    2012-07-16

    of the study included the determination of system energy density; a gravimetric energy density of 169.34 Wh/kg and a volumetric energy density of 506.02 Wh/l were achieved from brass architectures for 10 hrs operation, which is higher than the energy density...

  4. Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer the potential for physical flexibility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer chemistry. In particular, we focus on dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs)1 , organic photovoltaics2

  5. A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2011-08-31

    The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

  6. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    and other Gases for Coal-Gasification Processes", Chemicalof Liquid Effluents from Coal Gasification Plants", Economicand other Gases for Coal-Gasification Processes", Chemical

  7. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Acid and Sour Gas: Waste Water Treating Process", Chern.of Coal Gasification Waste Water", Department of ChemicalAcid and Sour Gas: Waste Water Treating Process", Chern.

  8. New Abundance Determinations of Cadmium, Lutetium, and Osmium in the r-process Enriched Star BD+173248

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roederer, Ian U; Lawler, James E; Cowan, John J

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of Cd I (Z = 48), Lu II (Z = 71), and Os II (Z = 76) in the metal-poor star BD+173248. These abundances are derived from an ultraviolet spectrum obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This is the first detection of these neutron-capture species in a metal-poor star enriched by the r-process. We supplement these measurements with new abundances of Mo I, Ru I, and Rh I derived from an optical spectrum obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph on Keck. Combined with previous abundance derivations, 32 neutron-capture elements have been detected in BD+173248, the most complete neutron-capture abundance pattern in any metal-poor star to date. The light neutron-capture elements (38 <= Z <= 48) show a more pronounced even-odd effect than expected from current Solar system r-process abundance predictions. The age for BD+173248 derived from the Th II/Os II chronometer is in better agreement with the age derived from other chronome...

  9. Solution-Processable Low-Molecular Weight Extended Arylacetylenes: Versatile p-Type Semiconductors for Field-Effect Transistors and Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvestri, F.; Marrocchi, A.; Seri, M.; Kim, C,; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio; Taticchi, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of five extended arylacetylenes, 9,10-bis-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}-anthracene (A-P6t, 1), 9,10-bis-[(p-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy) phenyl]ethynyl}phenyl)ethynyl]-anthracene (PA-P6t, 2), 4,7-bis-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTZ-P6t, 5), 4,7-bis(5-{[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}thien-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (TBTZ-P6t, 6), and 7,7?-({[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]ethynyl}-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,4?-ethynyl)-2,5-thiophene (BTZT-P6t, 7), and two arylvinylenes, 9,10-bis-{(E)-[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]vinyl}-anthracene (A-P6d, 3), 9,10-bis-[(E)-(p-{(E)-[m,p-bis(hexyloxy)phenyl]vinyl}phenyl)vinyl]-anthracene (PA-P6d, 4). Trends in optical absorption spectra and electrochemical redox processes are first described. Next, the thin-film microstructures and morphologies of films deposited from solution under various conditions are investigated, and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and bulk heterojunction photovoltaic (OPV) cells fabricated. We find that substituting acetylenic for olefinic linkers on the molecular cores significantly enhances device performance. OFET measurements reveal that all seven of the semiconductors are FET-active and, depending on the backbone architecture, the arylacetylenes exhibit good p-type mobilities (? up to ?0.1 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}) when optimum film microstructural order is achieved. OPV cells using [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the electron acceptor exhibit power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 1.3% under a simulated AM 1.5 solar irradiation of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}. These results demonstrate that arylacetylenes are promising hole-transport materials for p-channel OFETs and promising donors for organic solar cells applications. A direct correlation between OFET arylacetylene hole mobility and OPV performance is identified and analyzed.

  10. Final Closeout report for grant FG36-08GO18018, titled: Functional Multi-Layer Solution Processable Polymer Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam J. Moule

    2012-05-01

    The original objectives were: (1) Develop a method to deposit multiple conjugated polymer film layers and avoid the problem of dissolution from mutually solubility; (2) Use this deposition method to develop multi-layer polymer based solar cells with layers that are function specific; (3) characterize these layers and devices; (4) develop electrical and optical models that describe and predict the properties of the multi-layers; and (5) Ultimate efficiency goals are {approx}6.75% with J{sub sc} = 12 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 0.75, and V{sub oc} = 0.75. The question of whether photovoltaic (PV) cells will ever be able to replace fossil fuels as the main provider of electrical power is not just a question of device efficiency; it is a question of how much power can be provided for what price. It has been well documented that PV devices at 10% power efficiency can provide for all of the world's power needs without covering too much of the earth's surface. Assuming desert like cloud coverage, an area equivalent to the land area of Texas would have to be covered. However, it has also been shown that using the current state-of-the-art silicon devices, the price-per-Watt will never be low enough to be economically feasible for large-scale development. Solution-processable PV devices based on polymers are a very attractive alternative to traditional Silicon PV because this technology is much lower in materials cost and in environmentally toxic waste production. Solution-based polymers can be rapidly deposited using printing technologies and are compatible with light-weight flexible substrates that can increase the range of available PV applications. In the past ten years, the efficiency of polymer based PV devices has increased from {approx}1% to over 10%. The highest efficiency organic solar cells are based upon a single layer than consists of a mixture of donor and acceptor moieties. This one layer has multiple optical and electrical functions, so the design of a single heterojunction layer is based upon the idea of balancing good and bad properties within a single film. This proposal addresses the idea that the use of multiple layers that have differing electrical and optical functions could lead to greater efficiency because fewer materials compromises must be made. This idea is not new, multiple functional layer have been successfully used in cross-linked OLED's and organic small molecule evaporated PV devices. The main reason that multiple layers of polymers are not commonly deposited is that most conjugated polymers are mutually soluble in the same solvents. The work outlined in the proposal was intended to develop a new deposition strategy that would allow multiple organic layers to be deposited from solution using spin coating. The deposition method that we proposed was successful, sometimes, but ultimately not reliable. Instead we focused on more reliable methods to implement doping along the interface between layers. This work has been very successful. We found that using PEDOT:PSS, the PSS would form a surface layer of {approx}2-3 nm thickness that would mix with and electrochemically react with P3HT upon heating. This mechanism is also a crosslinking reaction in that H{sub 2} is released and permanent new bonds are formed. Using the Plextronics Inc. replacement to PEDOT:PSS, for which there are no mobile dopants, we were able to show that a second and different mechanism can be used to p-type dope organic materials. We are currently working with Plextronics to develop a new product. Finally we produced n-type doping of a thin fullerene layer near the cathode also using a self-assembly method. Low work function metals will diffuse into the BHJ layer and dope the fullerene upon heating. This doping also affects the vertical segregation of BHJ materials in a predictable way. We accomplished all of the scientific goals that we set out in the proposal written in May 2007. Some of the methods we proposed were not fully successful, but we did come up with better methods to achieve the same goal. We did not achieve the efficiency g

  11. Solvent wash solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  12. Solvent wash solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  13. Unique Hardware and Software Data Acquisition and Processing Solutions in a Small Engine Test Cell for Enhanced Kinetic Engine Modeling Accuracy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Novel use of AVL data acquisition/processing units provides simultaneous real-time acquisition, processing, and storage of low-speed, high-speed, and heat release data.

  14. Solution A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-27

    MA 261 - Quiz 7 (20 minutes). Tuesday, March 8, 2011. Solution. Statistics (out of 20): Section. 23. 24. Average. 14.4 13.4. Standard Deviation 4.5. 4.6. Median.

  15. Solutions 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-12-07

    Solutions 5. 1. A ring A is called a Boolean ring if x2 = x for all x ? A. (a) Let E be a set and 2E its power set. Show that a Boolean ring structure is defined.

  16. Comparing matched polymer:Fullerene solar cells made by solution-sequential processing and traditional blend casting: Nanoscale structure and device performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Processed “Bilayer” Organic Solar Cells. Adv. Mater. 2011,Polymer: Fullerene Solar Cells Using the External Quantumin Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells. J. Phys. Chem. C

  17. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    of Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by anDerived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing", Proceedings, 2ndWastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters

  18. Fissile solution measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, T.W.; Collinsworth, P.R.

    1984-06-11

    An apparatus for determining the content of a fissile material within a solution by detecting delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material after it is temporarily irradiated by a neutron source. The apparatus comprises a container holding the solution and having a portion defining a neutron source cavity centrally disposed within the container. The neutron source cavity temporarily receives the neutron source. The container has portions defining a plurality of neutron detector ports that form an annular pattern and surround the neutron source cavity. A plurality of neutron detectors count delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material. Each neutron detector is located in a separate one of the neutron detector ports.

  19. Summary report of the screening process to determine reasonable alternatives for long-term storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-29

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials (primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium) have become surplus to national defense needs both in the US and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety and health consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. As announced in the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Department of Energy is currently conducting an evaluation process for disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials determined surplus to National Security needs, and long-term storage of national security and programmatic inventories, and surplus weapons-usable fissile materials that are not able to go directly from interim storage to disposition. An extensive set of long-term storage and disposition options was compiled. Five broad long-term storage options were identified; thirty-seven options were considered for plutonium disposition; nine options were considered for HEU disposition; and eight options were identified for Uranium-233 disposition. Section 2 discusses the criteria used in the screening process. Section 3 describes the options considered, and Section 4 provides a detailed summary discussions of the screening results.

  20. Assessment of Current Process Modeling Approaches to Determine Their Limitations, Applicability and Developments Needed for Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2006-11-30

    This report describes the status of the current process modeling approaches to predict the behavior and flow of fiber-filled thermoplastics under injection molding conditions. Previously, models have been developed to simulate the injection molding of short-fiber thermoplastics, and an as-formed composite part or component can then be predicted that contains a microstructure resulting from the constituents’ material properties and characteristics as well as the processing parameters. Our objective is to assess these models in order to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). First, the concentration regimes are summarized to facilitate the understanding of different types of fiber-fiber interaction that can occur for a given fiber volume fraction. After the formulation of the fiber suspension flow problem and the simplification leading to the Hele-Shaw approach, the interaction mechanisms are discussed. Next, the establishment of the rheological constitutive equation is presented that reflects the coupled flow/orientation nature. The decoupled flow/orientation approach is also discussed which constitutes a good simplification for many applications involving flows in thin cavities. Finally, before outlining the necessary developments for LFTs, some applications of the current orientation model and the so-called modified Folgar-Tucker model are illustrated through the fiber orientation predictions for selected LFT samples.

  1. Polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  2. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-08-11

    This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  3. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-10-08

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  4. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  5. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    19,20). In the coking step, coal is heated III the absencethe "coking" process in In the second step the which coal isCoal Liquefaction Wastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters from Petroleum Refining Sour Waters from Coking

  6. A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel Process Employing Heterometallic Alkoxides A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel...

  7. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  8. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Orland Park, IL); Krumdick, Greg K. (Crete, IL)

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  9. Miniaturized Turbine Offers Desalination Solution | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    salt from ice New solution draws from the GE Store, integrating GE's experience with steam turbine, oil & gas compressors, 3D printing and water processing NISKAYUNA, NY,...

  10. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

  11. Engineering report (conceptual design) PFP solution stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, J.B.

    1997-07-17

    This Engineering Report (Conceptual Design) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  12. Jeffrey D. Kelly Honeywell Process Solutions, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    flows through the system. Usually refers to raw materials, intermediate and final products · Graphically-Task-Network (STN) ­ Pantelides (1994) ­ "Resources" · Non-renewable resources (e.g.: raw materials, intermediate of Manufacturing · Types of Production Objects · Logistics Modeling · Quality Modeling · Industrial Cases

  13. Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Gur, Ilan; Milliron, Delia

    2013-05-14

    A photovoltaic device having a first electrode layer, a high resistivity transparent film disposed on the first electrode, a second electrode layer, and an inorganic photoactive layer disposed between the first and second electrode layers, wherein the inorganic photoactive layer is disposed in at least partial electrical contact with the high resistivity transparent film, and in at least partial electrical contact with the second electrode. The photoactive layer has a first inorganic material and a second inorganic material different from the first inorganic material, wherein the first and second inorganic materials exhibit a type II band offset energy profile, and wherein the photoactive layer has a first population of nanostructures of a first inorganic material and a second population of nanostructures of a second inorganic material.

  14. Commercial Lighting Solutions, Webtool Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Carol C.; Meyer, Tracy A.

    2009-06-17

    The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the beta version of the CLS webtool, which contains retail box lighting solutions. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed about which feedback should be addressed for the release of version 1.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in New York City in May 2009. Due to the volume of data (~500 comments) the methodology for addressing the peer review comments was central to the success of the ultimate goal of improving the tool. The comments were first imported into a master spreadsheet, and then grouped and organized in several layers. Solutions to each comment were then rated by importance and feasibility to determine the practicality of resolving the concerns of the commenter in the short-term or long-term. The rating system was used as an analytical tool, but the results were viewed thoughtfully to ensure that they were not the sole the factor in determining which comments were recommended for near-term resolution. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 1.0 as well as appendices containing the short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 1.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

  15. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  16. Robotic Efficiency Solutions for Ductwork 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, F.

    2012-01-01

    That Work Robotic Efficiency Solutions for ductwork Frank Forrest Electrical Energy Consumption in Office Buildings Building Energy Upgrades ? Lighting upgrade ? Supplemental load reduction ? Air distribution system upgrade ? Windows, window... and ? Brushed or ? Sprayed ? Rolled Sealant Sprayable ? Lower viscosity than other methods ? Substantially better elasticity ? Sprays at a continuous pressure Robotic Spray Application Process ? Duct interior cleaning Click image to play video...

  17. Infinite Energy Dyon Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Singleton

    1996-02-18

    Three dyon solutions to the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs system are presented. These solutions are obtained from the BPS dyon by allowing the gauge fields to be complex, or by letting the free parameter of the BPS solution become imaginary. In all cases however the physically measurable quantities connected with these new solutions are entirely real. Although the new solutions are mathematically simple variations of the BPS solution, they have one or more physically distinct characteristics.

  18. CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Transforming Photovoltaic Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.15 Date: 10172013 Location(s): Oregon...

  19. FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Slater

    2011-08-15

    The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

  20. Technical Basis for the Determination that Current Characterization Data and Processes are Sufficient to Ensure Safe Storage and to Design Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMPSON, B.C.

    1999-08-12

    This document presents the technical basis for closure of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5 Implementation Plan milestone 5.6.3.13, ''Core sample all tanks by 2002'' (DOE-RL 1996). The milestone was based on the need for characterization data to ensure safe storage of the waste, to operate the tanks safely, and to plan and implement retrieval and processing of the waste. Sufficient tank characterization data have been obtained to ensure that existing controls are adequate for safe storage of the waste in the 177 waste tanks at the Hanford Site. In addition, a process has been developed, executed, and institutionalized to systemically identify information needs, to integrate and prioritize the needs, and to reliably obtain and analyze the associated samples. This document provides a technical case that the remaining 45 incompletely sampled tanks no longer require sampling to support the intent of the Implementation Plan milestone. Sufficient data have been obtained to close the Unreviewed Safety Questions (USQs), and to ensure that existing hazard controls are adequate and appropriately applied. However, in the future, additional characterization of tanks at the site will be required to support identified information needs. Closure of this milestone allows sampling and analytical data to be obtained in a manner that is consistent with the integrated priority process.

  1. University of Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine Best Solutions for Diesel Emission Reductions University of Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine Best...

  2. Determination of a cost-effective air pollution control technology for the control of VOC and HAP emissions from a steroids processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    A steroids processing plant located in northeastern Puerto Rico emits a combined average of 342 lb/hr of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various process operations. The approach that this facility used to implement maximum achievable control technology (MACT) may assist others who must contend with MACT for pharmaceutical or related manufacturing facilities. Federal air regulations define MACT standards for stationary sources emitting any of 189 HAPs. The MACT standards detailed in the NESHAPs are characterized by industry and type of emission control system or technology. It is anticipated that the standard will require HAP reductions of approximately 95%. The steroid plant`s emissions include the following pollutant loadings: VOC/HAP Emission Rate (lb/hr): Methanol 92.0; Acetone 35.0; Methylene chloride 126.0; Chloroform 25.0; Ethyl acetate 56.0; Tetrahydrofuran 5.00; and 1,4-Dioxane 3.00. The facility`s existing carbon adsorption control system was nearing the end of its useful life, and the operators sought to install an air pollution control system capable of meeting MACT requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. Several stand-alone and hybrid control technologies were considered for replacement of the carbon adsorption system at the facility. This paper examines the following technologies: carbon adsorption, membrane separation, thermal oxidation, membrane separation-carbon adsorption, and condensation-carbon adsorption. Each control technology is described; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing each technology for the steroid processing plant are examined; and capital and operating costs associated with the implementation of each technology are presented. The rationale for the technology ultimately chosen to control VOC and HAP emissions is presented.

  3. Commuting Matrix Solutions of PQCD Evolution Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Goshtasbpour; Seyed Ali Shafiei

    2013-03-16

    A method of obtaining parton distributions directly from data is revealed in this series. In the process, the first step would be developing appropriate matrix solutions of the evolution equations in $x$ space. A division into commuting and non-commuting matrix solutions has been made. Here, well-developed commuting matrix solutions are presented. Results for finite LO evolution match those of standard LO sets. There is a real potential of doing non-parametric data analysis.

  4. CX-003145: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC - Cryogenic Carbon Capture ProcessCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/02/2010Location(s): UtahOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  5. CX-010141: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Process Solutions and Solids CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/06/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-001153: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Wilmington) Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): Wilmington, DelawareOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. An operational method and device for the determination of an output signal in a selected spatial section of an information processing system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Zafiris

    2009-03-30

    Current strategies in system science with a focus on neuroscience do differ in their methodological approach when exploring and trying to analyze a system in order to detect supposed underlying principle processes in its inherent actions, which one might would call rules or laws. The here suggested procedure and measuring device, performs a mapping of characteristic parameters of the regional output signal, of the supposed structural properties, onto a selected regional part of the information processing system, in which the output signal and its characteristics occur. Explicitly it is pointed out here: Here are not considered input signals, which for instance might have an influence upon (few) nuclear kernels of the atom, electrons, protons, spins of these atomic structures or substructures, or phonons, or which in general represent the physical basis for example of NMR-Physics (NMR = nuclear magnetic resonance) or solid state physics. Examples for the type of input signals considered here are visual, olfactory, tactile or auditory input signals or simply a verbal instruction.

  8. Mathematical Programming Models and Solution Strategies for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Mathematical Programming Models and Solution Strategies for the Synthesis of Process Systems Ignacio E. Grossmann Center for Advanced Process Decision-making Dept of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie: Process Systems Engineering Oxygen Air Ethylene Chlorine Vinyl Chloride Hydrogen Chloride Ethylene

  9. Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satkowiak, Lawrence

    2014-05-09

    The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

  10. EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of processing the plutonium solutions to metal form using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  11. Poincaré inequality, the uniqueness of the solutions for the heat ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bumsik Kim

    2013-04-22

    Apr 13, 2013 ... Classic Heat equation in R n. KNOWN : Positive solution u is uniquely determined by the initial condition : Why? (Harnack's inequality) : ? ? Rn ...

  12. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the economics of CO2 emission reductions by added engine technology to determine if there is an overall...

  13. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  14. Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

  15. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  16. 4 Solutions Solution 4.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuyan, Laxmi N.

    4 Solutions Solution 4.1 4.1.1 The values of the signals are as follows: RegWrite MemRead ALUMux MemWrite ALUOp RegMux Branch a. 1 0 0 (Reg) 0 Add 1 (ALU) 0 b. 1 1 1 (Imm) 0 Add 1 (Mem) 0 ALUMux of the ALU and 1 (Mem) selects the output of memory. A value of X is a "don't care" (does not matter

  17. The electromagnetic spike solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernesto Nungesser; Woei Chet Lim

    2013-09-28

    The aim of this paper is to use the existing relation between polarized electromagnetic Gowdy spacetimes and vacuum Gowdy spacetimes to find explicit solutions for electromagnetic spikes by a procedure which has been developed by one of the authors for gravitational spikes. We present new inhomogeneous solutions which we call the EME and MEM electromagnetic spike solutions.

  18. Pervaporation process and assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

    2010-07-20

    The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

  19. CX-008998: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008998: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-scale Physics-based Process Modeling and...

  20. FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

  1. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Apartment Compartmentalization with an...

  2. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beller, L.S.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

  3. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beller, Laurence S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  4. Spherical nitroguanidine process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanchez, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Roemer, Edward L. (Los Alamos, NM); Stretz, Lawrence A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A process of preparing spherical high bulk density nitroguanidine by dissing low bulk density nitroguanidine in N-methyl pyrrolidone at elevated temperatures and then cooling the solution to lower temperatures as a liquid characterized as a nonsolvent for the nitroguanidine is provided. The process is enhanced by inclusion in the solution of from about 1 ppm up to about 250 ppm of a metal salt such as nickel nitrate, zinc nitrate or chromium nitrate, preferably from about 20 to about 50 ppm.

  5. Time dependent perturbation theory from Wheeler De Witt solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Parentani

    1996-10-21

    We describe radiative processes in Quantum Cosmology, from the solutions of the Wheeler De Witt equation. By virtue of this constraint equation, the quantum propagation of gravity is modified by the matter interaction hamiltonian at the level of amplitudes. In this we generalize previous works where gravity was coupled only to expectation values of matter operators. By a ``reduction formula'' we show how to obtain transition amplitudes from the entangled gravity+matter system. Then we show how ``each'' transition among matter constituents of the universe determines dynamically ``its'' background from which a time parameter is defined. Finally, we leave the mini-superspace context by introducing an extended formalism in which the momenta of the exchanged quanta no longer vanish. Then, the concept of spatial displacement emerges from radiative processes like the time parametrization did, thereby unifying the way by which space and time intervals are recovered in quantum cosmology.

  6. Influence of solute-solute interactions on membrane filtration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neale, Peta Anne

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of solute-solute interactions is essential for aquatic systems as this can affect the fate and behaviour of micropollutants in the environment and engineered systems. Despite the importance of solute-solute ...

  7. Solution deposition assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  8. Ash Determinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Germination of Ashe juniper seed were compared in a controlled environment at different levels of fruit maturation, lengths of storage, and seed stratification to determine potential germination. Annual mean germination varied by an order...

  9. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  10. Solution to Quiz 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    jeffb_000

    2013-12-02

    Nov 19, 2013 ... Calculate the total transaction costs incurred by Patrick and Eric combined. Solution: Ask Price = 30. Bid Ask Spread = 0.50 = Ask Price - Bid ...

  11. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenmann, E.T.

    1997-03-11

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

  12. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1997-01-01

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

  13. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  14. Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1997-03-11

    A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

  15. Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

  16. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  17. PROCESS DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF CELLULOSE HYDROLYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Process Design and Economic Evaluation . • Determination ofOPTIMAL PROCESS DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION Based on the

  18. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almon, Amy C. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  19. 1999 Solutions Euclid Contest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    1999 Solutions Euclid Contest (Grade12) for the Awards Canadian Mathematics Competition An activity of The Centre for Education in Mathematics and Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario © 1999 Waterloo Mathematics Foundation #12;1999 Euclid Solutions 2 1. (a) If x­ ­ ­1 1 1 3 4= + , what

  20. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  1. Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Crouse, David J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear fuel processing solution consisting of tri-n-butyl phosphate and dodecane, with a complex of uranium, plutonium, or zirconium and with a solvent degradation product such as di-n-butyl phosphate therein, is contacted with an aqueous solution of a salt formed from hydrazine and either a dicarboxylic acid or a hydroxycarboxylic acid, thereby removing the aforesaid complex from the processing solution.

  2. Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, O.K.; Crouse, D.J.; Mailen, J.C.

    1980-12-17

    Nuclear fuel processing solution consisting of tri-n-butyl phosphate and dodecane, with a complex of uranium, plutonium, or zirconium and with a solvent degradation product such as di-n-butyl phosphate therein, is contacted with an aqueous solution of a salt formed from hydrazine and either a dicarboxylic acid or a hydroxycarboxylic acid, thereby removing the aforesaid complex from the processing solution.

  3. Synthesis of mono-dispersed nanofluids using solution plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, Yong Kang; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Ueno, Tomonaga; Saito, Nagahiro

    2014-07-14

    Small-sized and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) for nanofluidics have been synthesized by electrical discharge in liquid environment using termed solution plasma processing (SPP). Electrons and the hydrogen radicals are reducing the gold ions to the neutral form in plasma gas phase and liquid phase, respectively. The gold NPs have the smallest diameter of 4.9?nm when the solution temperature was kept at 20?°C. Nucleation and growth theory describe the evolution of the NP diameter right after the reduction reaction in function of the system temperature, NP surface energy, dispersion energy barrier, and nucleation rate. Negative charges on the NPs surface during and after SPP generate repulsive forces among the NPs avoiding their agglomeration in solution. Increasing the average energy in the SPP determines a decrease of the zeta potential and an increase of the NPs diameter. An important enhancement of the thermal conductivity of 9.4% was measured for the synthesized nanofluids containing NPs with the smallest size.

  4. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass andAtomsVehicles and Fuels Site MapW W W W WAward

  5. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections Audits &drivers to see bigAward Fee

  6. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections Audits &drivers to see bigAward FeeAward Fee2 -

  7. Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections Audits &drivers to see bigAward FeeAward Fee2 -4

  8. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  9. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Murphy, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  10. Commercial Lighting Solutions Webtool Peer Review Report, Office Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeson, Tracy A.; Jones, Carol C.

    2010-02-01

    The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the CLS webtool for offices. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed for the release of version 2.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in Las Vegas in May 2010. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 2.0 as well as appendices containing the comments and short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 2.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

  11. Process for recovering actinide values

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Elmhurst, IL); Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A process for rendering actinide values recoverable from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorous extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N,N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECAMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is preferably made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant is recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution.

  12. IBM Software Solution Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or structure--and they generate approximately 15 percent of all green- house gas emissions.2 Excluding staffing management and greenhouse gas emissions. Automated operations management: IBM solutions provide automated

  13. Solutions to Assignment 2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-10-24

    Assignment 2 Solutions. James Vanderhyde. 1. Problem 7-5. (a) Let x1, x2, and x3 be the three values that are picked at random. Since there are 3! = 6 ways to ...

  14. Quiz 5 Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apr 25, 2015 ... Math 373. Spring 2015. Quiz 5. April 16, 2015. 1. In a short sale of a stock, there is credit risk. Define credit risk. Solution: Credit risk is the risk ...

  15. Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our mission is to increase the availability of high-quality, safe, affordable and workforce housing options. Through innovative reuse and rehabilitation we incorporate economic benefits, environmental stewardship/energy efficiency, and social solutions.

  16. Evaporation/ Solution Droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Solvent Evaporation/ Reactions Precursor Solution Droplet Product Densification Product Collection Production of Nano-Materials microporous shell internal macropores Hierarchically Porous Carbons Brandon Ito (20 ppm) Formaldehyde (20 ppm) Control (50% RH) Maryam SayyahKaty Filson Wei Jiang Mechanoluminescence

  17. Solutions to Assignment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-11-25

    Solutions to Assignment 1. 1. Let G be a finite set with an associative law of composition, and e ? G an element with xe = ex = x for all x ? G. If G has the ...

  18. Solutions to Assignment 5.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-12-07

    Assignment 5 Solutions. James Vanderhyde. 1. Problem 31.2-6. Recall F1 = 0, F2 = 1, and Fk+1 = Fk + Fk?1 for k > 2. By the discussion in the book ...

  19. Microsoft Word - Determination of Class to Update Ventilation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), collectively referred to as the Permittees, are requesting a determination of class...

  20. CX-001152: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Niskayuna)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): Niskayuna, New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-001035: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solution Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) Solid State LightingCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/02/2010Location(s): Sunnyvale, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-001036: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solution Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) Solid State Lighting (Pennsylvania)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/02/2010Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. Solution to Quiz 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The simulated stock price for this simulation is 109.7023. Determine X. ... Monte Carlo simulation is used to determine the price of an Asian Option. The ?rst five ...

  4. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  5. Solution mass measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, W.; Marshall, R.S.; Osborn, L.C.; Picard, R.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the efforts to develop and demonstrate a solution mass measurement system for use at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. Because of inaccuracy of load cell measurements, our major effort was directed towards the pneumatic bubbler tube. The differential pressure between the air inlet to the bubbler tube and the glovebox interior is measured and is proportional to the solution mass in the tank. An inexpensive, reliable pressure transducer system for measuring solution mass in vertical, cylindrical tanks was developed, tested, and evaluated in a laboratory test bed. The system can withstand the over- and underpressures resulting from solution transfer operations and can prevent solution backup into the measurement pressure transducer during transfers. Drifts, noise, quantization error, and other effects limit the accuracy to 30 g. A transportable calibration system using a precision machined tank, pneumatic bubbler tubes, and a Ruska DDR 6000 electromanometer was designed, fabricated, tested, and evaluated. Resolution of the system is +-3.5 g out of 50 kg. The calibration error is 5 g, using room-temperature water as the calibrating fluid. Future efforts will be directed towards in-plant test and evaluation of the tank measurement systems. 16 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Universal BPS structure of stationary supergravity solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Bossard; Hermann Nicolai; K. S. Stelle

    2009-09-03

    We study asymptotically flat stationary solutions of four-dimensional supergravity theories via the associated G/H* pseudo-Riemannian non-linear sigma models in three spatial dimensions. The Noether charge C associated to G is shown to satisfy a characteristic equation that determines it as a function of the four-dimensional conserved charges. The matrix C is nilpotent for non-rotating extremal solutions. The nilpotency degree of C is directly related to the BPS degree of the corresponding solution when they are BPS. Equivalently, the charges can be described in terms of a Weyl spinor |C > of Spin*(2N), and then the characteristic equation becomes equivalent to a generalisation of the Cartan pure spinor constraint on |C>. The invariance of a given solution with respect to supersymmetry is determined by an algebraic `Dirac equation' on the Weyl spinor |C>. We explicitly solve this equation for all pure supergravity theories and we characterise the stratified structure of the moduli space of asymptotically Taub-NUT black holes with respect with their BPS degree. The analysis is valid for any asymptotically flat stationary solutions for which the singularities are protected by horizons. The H*-orbits of extremal solutions are identified as Lagrangian submanifolds of nilpotent orbits of G, and so the moduli space of extremal spherically symmetric black holes as a Lagrangian subvariety of the variety of nilpotent elements of Lie(G). We also generalise the notion of active duality transformations to an `almost action' of the three-dimensional duality group G on asymptotically flat stationary solutions.

  7. An exact isotropic solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. John; S. D. Maharaj

    2006-02-08

    The condition for pressure isotropy is reduced to a recurrence equation with variable, rational coefficients of order three. We prove that this difference equation can be solved in general. Consequently we can find an exact solution to the field equations corresponding to a static spherically symmetric gravitational potential in terms of elementary functions. The metric functions, the energy density and the pressure are continuous and well behaved which implies that this solution could be used to model the interior of a relativistic sphere. The model satisfies a barotropic equation of state in general which approximates a polytrope close to the stellar centre.

  8. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10 °C is about 10 g/L. Gadolinium nitrate is very soluble in HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd is linear as a function of HNO{sub 3} from 343 g/L Gd in 2.88 M HNO{sub 3} to 149 g/L in 8.16 M HNO{sub 3}. Below 2.88 M HNO{sub 3}, the solubility of Gd approaches a limit of about 360 g/L. However, there are no data available below 1.40 M HNO{sub 3}, which has a Gd solubility of 353 g/L.

  9. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerung, Henry (Albuquerque, NM); Boyle, Timothy J. (Kensington, MD); Bunge, Scott D. (Cuyahoga Falls, OH)

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  10. NEPTUNIUM OXIDE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J; Watkins, R; Hensel, S

    2009-05-27

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a campaign in which fifty nine cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. The neptunium campaign was divided into two parts: Part 1 which consisted of oxide made from H-Canyon neptunium solution which did not require any processing prior to conversion into an oxide, and Part 2 which consisted of oxide made from additional H-Canyon neptunium solutions which required processing to purify the solution prior to conversion into an oxide. The neptunium was received as a nitrate solution and converted to oxide through ion-exchange column extraction, precipitation, and calcination. Numerous processing challenges were encountered in order make a final neptunium oxide product that could be shipped in a 9975 shipping container. Among the challenges overcome was the issue of scale: translating lab scale production into full facility production. The balance between processing efficiency and product quality assurance was addressed during this campaign. Lessons learned from these challenges are applicable to other processing projects.

  11. Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions #12;Cefas: meeting complex requirements The Centre power ­ to meet its target of achieving 15% of energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. Cefas and sustainable energy supply. The UK is uniquely placed to harness its natural resources ­ wind, wave and tidal

  12. EnergySolution's Clive Disposal Facility Operational Research Model - 13475

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissley, Paul; Berry, Joanne

    2013-07-01

    EnergySolutions owns and operates a licensed, commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Clive, Utah. The Clive site receives low-level radioactive waste from various locations within the United States via bulk truck, containerised truck, enclosed truck, bulk rail-cars, rail boxcars, and rail inter-modals. Waste packages are unloaded, characterized, processed, and disposed of at the Clive site. Examples of low-level radioactive waste arriving at Clive include, but are not limited to, contaminated soil/debris, spent nuclear power plant components, and medical waste. Generators of low-level radioactive waste typically include nuclear power plants, hospitals, national laboratories, and various United States government operated waste sites. Over the past few years, poor economic conditions have significantly reduced the number of shipments to Clive. With less revenue coming in from processing shipments, Clive needed to keep its expenses down if it was going to maintain past levels of profitability. The Operational Research group of EnergySolutions were asked to develop a simulation model to help identify any improvement opportunities that would increase overall operating efficiency and reduce costs at the Clive Facility. The Clive operations research model simulates the receipt, movement, and processing requirements of shipments arriving at the facility. The model includes shipment schedules, processing times of various waste types, labor requirements, shift schedules, and site equipment availability. The Clive operations research model has been developed using the WITNESS{sup TM} process simulation software, which is developed by the Lanner Group. The major goals of this project were to: - identify processing bottlenecks that could reduce the turnaround time from shipment arrival to disposal; - evaluate the use (or idle time) of labor and equipment; - project future operational requirements under different forecasted scenarios. By identifying processing bottlenecks and unused equipment and/or labor, improvements to operating efficiency could be determined and appropriate cost saving measures implemented. Model runs forecasting various scenarios helped illustrate potential impacts of certain conditions (e.g. 20% decrease in shipments arrived), variables (e.g. 20% decrease in labor), or other possible situations. (authors)

  13. Modeling Engineering Change Management Process in Virtual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akgunduz, Ali

    Modeling Engineering Change Management Process in Virtual Collaborative Design Environments Change Management - surveys and reviews - industrial case studies - tools & solutions (scarce) - change

  14. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  15. CONTROLLED CRYSTALLIZATION OF SALTS FROM NUCLEAR WASTE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallivan, Martha A.

    CONTROLLED CRYSTALLIZATION OF SALTS FROM NUCLEAR WASTE SOLUTIONS Daniel Gri n Martha Grover Yoshiaki Kawajiri Ronald Rousseau Published in Proceedings of the Waste Management Conference, Phoenix, AR-activity salt from nuclear waste solutions. The viability of such a process hinges on the ability to partition

  16. Optimization For Grade Transitions In Polyethylene Solution Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    , Comonomer, Catalyst, Solvent, Hydrogen 2 1. Che I Kao et al. Non-adiabatic olefin solution polymerizationOptimization For Grade Transitions In Polyethylene Solution Polymerization Jun Shi1, Lorenz T of Advanced Process Decision-making Department of Chemical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University 2The Dow

  17. Non-linear viscoelastic deformation of polymeric solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Reyes, Javier

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of entangled polymeric solutions were studied using drag of borosilicate discs and conventional shear rheometry devices in order to understand the effect of deformation on the relaxation process and the possible ...

  18. Universal BPS structure of stationary supergravity solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bossard, Guillaume; Stelle, K S

    2009-01-01

    We study asymptotically flat stationary solutions of four-dimensional supergravity theories via the associated G/H* pseudo-Riemannian non-linear sigma models in three spatial dimensions. The Noether charge C associated to G is shown to satisfy a characteristic equation that determines it as a function of the four-dimensional conserved charges. The matrix C is nilpotent for non-rotating extremal solutions. The nilpotency degree of C is directly related to the BPS degree of the corresponding solution when they are BPS. Equivalently, the charges can be described in terms of a Weyl spinor |C > of Spin*(2N), and then the characteristic equation becomes equivalent to a generalisation of the Cartan pure spinor constraint on |C>. The invariance of a given solution with respect to supersymmetry is determined by an algebraic `Dirac equation' on the Weyl spinor |C>. We explicitly solve this equation for all pure supergravity theories and we characterise the stratified structure of the moduli space of asymptotically Taub...

  19. Building America Solution Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivativeColdSealedOverview - 2015August 2011Solution

  20. CX-008993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-008993: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 0822...

  1. CX-006211: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Henniges Automotive - Process Air Compressor Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07182011 Location(s):...

  2. Actinide recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muscatello, Anthony C. (Arvada, CO); Navratil, James D. (Arvada, CO); Saba, Mark T. (Arvada, CO)

    1987-07-28

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

  3. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  4. Industrial Process Surveillance System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-30

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  5. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  6. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

    1992-12-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

  7. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

  8. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i?V{sub 0} + j?W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}?R , W{sub 0}?C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  9. Semiclassical solution for Yang-Mills field with given energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Kuchiev

    2009-04-28

    A new classical solution for the Yang-Mills theory in which the Euclidean energy plays a role of a parameter is discussed. The instanton and sphaleron are shown to be particular examples of this more general solution. The energy parameter for them takes on special values, which are zero and sphaleron mass for the instanton and sphaleron, respectively. The solution is employed to describe the tunneling process, which is accompanied by a variation of the topological charge. A range of temperatures, where the new solution makes this tunneling more effective than the known mechanisms based on the instanton, caloron or sphaleron is found.

  10. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barends, Thomas R. M., E-mail: thomas.barends@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Brosi, Richard W. W. [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Seidel, Ralf [MPI for Molecular Physiology, Dortmund (Germany); Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Bittl, Robert [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  11. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  12. Bearwall Energy Efficient Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sovero,M.

    2014-01-01

    , 2014 ENERGY EFFICIENT SOLUTIONS ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Brief History of Bearwall… Who We Are: ? Manuel Sovero ? Luis Osorio Energy Conservation Experience: ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014...: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Energy Programs… ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Bearwall Methodology… Introduction of Bearwall to the Local Authorities ESL...

  13. Qurz 10 SOLUTIONS, SECTION ALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    jony2_000

    Qurz 10 SOLUTIONS, SECTION ALL. If C is the line segment from (0, 0) to (3, 5), then fc 3x2ds :7. A16 B25 C45 D65 E.75. Solution. To parametrize the line we ...

  14. High energy amplitude in the dipole approach with Pomeron loops: asymptotic solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Levin

    2005-11-07

    In this paper an analytical solution for the high energy scattering amplitude is suggested. This solution has several unexpected features:(i) the asymptotic amplitude is a function of dipole sizes and, therefore, this amplitude shows the gray disc structure at high energy, instead of black disc behaviour which was expected; (ii) the amplitude approaches the asymptotic limit in the same way as the solution to the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation does ($\\propto \\exp(- C Y^2) $), but the coefficient $C$ in eight times smaller than for the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation; (iii) the process of merging of two dipoles into one, only influences the high energy asymptotic behaviour by changing the initial condition from $Z(Y; [u_i = 1]) = 1 $ to $Z(Y; [u_i = 1 - \\gamma_{0,i}]) =1$. The value of $\\gamma_0$ is determined by the process of merging of two dipoles into one. With this new initial condition the Balitsky-JIMWLK approach describes the high energy asymptotic behaviour of the scattering amplitude without any modifications recently suggested.

  15. Sandia Energy - SCADA Engineering Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Solutions Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure National...

  16. Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, J.

    2008-12-01

    Study of PV module encapsulation materials, processing, and testing shows that overall module reliability is determined by all component materials and processing factors.

  17. Gender determination of avian embryo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  18. Solution-based approaches for making high-density sodalite waste...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solution-based approaches were taken to make sodalite minerals as a host for a mixed salt simulating the waste generated during the electrochemical separations process of...

  19. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

    1985-04-30

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  20. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    S. Guha, High-Efficiency Cu2ZnSnSe4 Solar Cells with a TiNfurther improvement on CZTS solar cells efficiency. Finally,Route to High-Efficiency CZTSSe Thin-film Solar Cells, Proc.

  1. Technology Reports Solution Concentration Prediction for Pharmaceutical Crystallization Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Robust Chemometrics and ATR FTIR Spectroscopy Timokleia Togkalidou, Hsien-Hsin Tung,*, Yongkui Sun systems in the presence of impurities and over a wide range of temperature. To our best knowledge in pharmaceutical industry such as crystal size distribution (CSD) and crystal shape of the product pharmaceuticals

  2. Characterization of Solution-Processed Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    it is conductive, was calculated to be 1.0 wt.-% for the MWNTs. Ounaies Full Paper Dispersion of CNTs in polymers) Nanocomposites Atheer Almasri, Zoubeida Ounaies,* Yeon Seok Kim, Jaime Grunlan Introduction Carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites are of great interest due to the unusual combination of CNT properties with apparently paradoxical

  3. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    Energy Materials and Solar Cells (2012), doi:10.1016/j.Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2012, [4-4] Q. Guo,Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2011, 95, 1421–1436. [4-18

  4. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    a renewable, sustainable, and clean energy future whilerenewable energy sources capable of powering a sustainable future.

  5. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    future global energy production. Solar electricity represents a direction of great potential toward a renewable,

  6. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    B. To, R. Noufi, Progress in Photovoltaics: Research andGokmen, D. B. Mitzi, Progress in Photovoltaics: Research andR. Noufi, Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and

  7. Sensitive Solution-Processed Bi2S3 Nanocrystalline Photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    , photodetectors and photovoltaics based on spin-coated nanoparticle films have shown tremendous progress for monolithic low-cost large-scale integration with CMOS electronics. In addition, progress in organic architectures.5 Recently, progress has been reported in light-emitting diodes,6-8 photodetectors,9-11 and solar

  8. Solution-processed photovoltaics with advanced characterization and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Hsin-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    at the 37th IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference (D. B. Mitzi, Prog. Photovoltaics 2011, 20, 6. [23] S. Bag,R. Noufi, IEEE J. Photovoltaics 2012, T. Todorov, J. Tang,

  9. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    3-6,3-7] Chalcopyrite CIGS solar cells, without introducingperformance CISS and CIGS solar cells with efficiencies uptellurium might impede CIGS/CdTe solar cells from reaching

  10. Solution-processed photovoltaics with advanced characterization and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Hsin-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    J. Mann, W. -C. Hsu, A. Goodrich, and R. Noufi, Solar EnergyMaterials and Solar Cells 101, 154–159 (2012). [4] V. ChawlaHillhouse, and R. Agrawal, Solar Energy Materials and Solar

  11. Solution Processed Silver Sulfide Thin Films for Filament Memory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Shong

    2010-01-01

    Film for Flexible Electronics. ” [Online]. Available:Conductors for Flexible Electronics,” Journal of Theelectronics. This field targets novel low-cost, large device area applications such as flexible

  12. Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A photovoltaic device having a first electrode layer, a high resistivity transparent film disposed on the first electrode, a second electrode layer, and an inorganic photoactive...

  13. Solution Processed Silver Sulfide Thin Films for Filament Memory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Shong

    2010-01-01

    produces a dense adherent oxide layer. Although this studiedtransport across a growing oxide layer and reaction at thetransport across a thin oxide layer. The thickness is

  14. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    properties,” Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol.G. Dhere, Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2006 , 90,devices, Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells (2012), doi:

  15. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2006 , 90, 2181–Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 95, no. 8, pp.Energy Materials and Solar Cells (2012), doi:10.1016/j.

  16. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    D. B. Mitzi, Energy & Environmental Science 2012, 5, 7060. [D. B. Mitzi, Energy & Environmental Science 2012, 5, 7060. [precursor inks,” Energy & Environmental Science, vol. 5, no.

  17. Solution-processed photovoltaics with advanced characterization and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Hsin-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    D.B. Mitzi, Energy & Environmental Science 2012, 5, 7060.controllability”, Energy and Environmental Science, 2014, 7,photovoltaics”, Energy and Environmental Science, 2013, 6,

  18. Solution Processed Silver Sulfide Thin Films for Filament Memory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Shong

    2010-01-01

    Electric field-induced filament formation in As---Te---GeBerry, “Growth of Silver Filaments and Dendrites,” Journalstructure, and study of the filament formation in a cationic

  19. Solution Processed Silver Sulfide Thin Films for Filament Memory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Shong

    2010-01-01

    vibrational enthalpy. N A is avogadro’s number. Equation 2-of Species, N A is Avogadro’s number Adding the electricare divided by N A , avogadro’ s number to relate to the

  20. Solution Processed Silver Sulfide Thin Films for Filament Memory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Shong

    2010-01-01

    programmable solid-electrolyte nanometer switch,” Solid-Effects in Heterogeneous Solid Electrolytes,” Journal of Thesilver microwires on a solid electrolyte surface,” Applied

  1. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    to High-Efficiency CZTSSe Thin-film Solar Cells, Proc. IEEEMetal chalcogenide-based thin film solar cells are currentlyof metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells A dissertation

  2. Functional Polymer Architectures for Solution Processed Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Daniel Andrew

    2010-01-01

    developing new OLED displays and lighting devices withOLED technology has reached a point where highly efficient thin film devices which rival other lighting

  3. Horizontal molecular orientation in solution-processed organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (JournalArchitectures. (Journal

  4. In-situ characterization of colloidal soft solution processes. (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)CurvesAnodicthree-nucleonReport) | SciTech

  5. In-situ characterization of colloidal soft solution processes. (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)CurvesAnodicthree-nucleonReport) |

  6. Pseudo-hydroxide extraction in the separation of sodium hydroxide from aqueous solutions using alkyl phenols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Hyun Ah; Moyer, Bruce A

    2006-01-01

    Pseudo-hydroxide extraction of sodium hydroxide from aqueous solution using four alkyl phenols of nearly identical molecular weight in 1-octanol at 25 degrees C was examined to understand the effect of alkyl substituents. The order of extraction strength among the four alkyl phenols tested was 4-tert-octylphenol. 3,5-di-tertbutylphenol. 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol. A good correlation with phenol pK(a) was observed, indicating that extraction strength is determined by phenol acidity, as modified by steric effects in proximity to the phenol - OH group. The effective partition ratios (P-eff) of two phenols from 1 M NaOH solution were determined, showing that the phenols remain predominantly in the 1-octanol phase even when converted to their sodium salts. However, the hydrophobicity of the tested phenols may not be sufficient for process purposes. The equilibrium constants for the governing extraction equilibria were determined by modeling the data using the program SXLSQI, supporting the cation-exchange extraction mechanism. The proposed mechanism consists of two simple sets of equilibria for a. Ion-pair extraction to give Na+OH- ion pairs and corresponding free ions in 1-octanol the phase and b. Cation exchange by monomeric phenol molecules (HAs) to form monomeric organic-phase Na(+)A(-) ion pairs and corresponding free organic-phase ions.

  7. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunker, B.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1998-06-01

    'Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. This project summarizes work performed after almost two years of a three year project. Significant findings include: Particles in Actual Tank Wastes - Transmission electron microscopy of actual wastes shows that most sludges consist of agglomerates of submicron (< 10 -6 m) primary particles of hydrated oxides and insoluble salts. Model colloid suspensions for this work were selected to duplicate the compositions and particle morphologies in actual waste. Agglomeration of Primary Particles - Static light scattering measurements on both model suspensions and actual wastes show that in the basic salt solutions found in most tank wastes, primary particles undergo extensive aggregation to form fractal agglomerates. The fractal nature of the agglomerates has an enormous impact on slurry properties because fractal objects occupy much more space than dense objects at the same solids loading.'

  8. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous time-dependent solutions of massive gravity generalise the plane wave solutions of the linearised Fierz-Pauli equations for a massive spin-two particle, as well as the Kasner solutions of General Relativity. We show that they also allow a clear counting of the degrees of freedom and represent a simplified framework to work out the constraints, the equations of motion and the initial value formulation. We work in the vielbein formulation of massive gravity, find the phase space resulting from the constraints and show that several disconnected sectors of solutions exist some of which are unstable. The initial values determine the sector to which a solution belongs. Classically, the theory is not pathological but quantum mechanically the theory may suffer from instabilities. The latter are not due to an extra ghost-like degree of freedom.

  9. It has been determined that support membrane hydrophilicity plays an important role impacting the water flux in forward osmosis processes. Here we have modified the support layer of commercially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind November 21, 2012; 9:00 AM; ERC 490 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy #12; using 2 different crosslinkers: Maleic acid and Glutaraldehyde. We measure the hydrophilicity, water the hydrophilicity of TFC membranes enabling RO membranes to be used efficiently in FO processes. Chemical

  10. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  11. Nucleic acid isolation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longmire, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Annette K. (La Jolla, CA); Hildebrand, Carl E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

  12. Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodwin, Edwin H. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences. A method by which fluorescence in situ hybridization can be made strand specific is described. Cell cultures are grown in a medium containing a halogenated nucleotide. The analog is partially incorporated in one DNA strand of each chromatid. This substitution takes place in opposite strands of the two sister chromatids. After staining with the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33258, cells are exposed to long-wavelength ultraviolet light which results in numerous strand nicks. These nicks enable the substituted strand to be denatured and solubilized by heat, treatment with high or low pH aqueous solutions, or by immersing the strands in 2.times.SSC (0.3M NaCl+0.03M sodium citrate), to name three procedures. It is unnecessary to enzymatically digest the strands using Exo III or another exonuclease in order to excise and solubilize nucleotides starting at the sites of the nicks. The denaturing/solubilizing process removes most of the substituted strand while leaving the prereplication strand largely intact. Hybridization of a single-stranded probe of a tandem repeat arranged in a head-to-tail orientation will result in hybridization only to the chromatid with the complementary strand present.

  13. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-11-24

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  14. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-06-23

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  15. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, Arnold R. (6006 Allentown Dr., Spring, TX 77379)

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  16. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, Arnold R. (6006 Allentown Dr., Spring, TX 77389)

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  17. Actinide recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

    1985-06-13

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

  18. Extraordinary vacuum black string solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2008-01-15

    In addition to the boosted static solution there are two other classes of stationary stringlike solutions of the vacuum Einstein equation in (4+1) dimensions. Each class is characterized by three parameters of mass, tension, and momentum flow along the fifth coordinate. We analyze the metric properties of one of the two classes, which was previously assumed to be naked singular, and show that the solution spectrum contains black string and wormhole in addition to the known naked singularity as the momentum flow to mass ratio increases. Interestingly, there does not exist new zero momentum solution in these cases.

  19. Building America Solution Center Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with fast, free and reliable building science and efficiency knowledge. At the heart of the Building America Solution Center are the guides -- a compilation of content...

  20. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

  1. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nerad, Bruce A. (Longmont, CO); Krantz, William B. (Boulder, CO)

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  2. Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Ly, Jennifer (San Jose, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2011-08-23

    Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

  3. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Zhang, Sheng-Shui (Tucson, AZ); Xu, Kang (Tempe, AZ)

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents.

  4. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

  5. Commissioning Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The commissioning process for Federal facilities generally follows a four-step process. This process holds true across all forms of commissioning and for both new and existing buildings.

  6. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  7. Cosmic strings: A problem or a solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.P.; Bouchet, F.R.

    1987-10-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. FY-2010 Process Monitoring Technology Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Hines, Wes; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; henkell, J.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Jordan, Elizabeth A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peterson, James M.; Verdugo, Dawn E.; Christensen, Ronald N.; Peper, Shane M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2010, work under the Spectroscopy-Based Process Monitoring task included ordering and receiving four fluid flow meters and four flow visible-near infrared spectrometer cells to be instrumented within the centrifugal contactor system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Initial demonstrations of real-time spectroscopic measurements on cold-stream simulants were conducted using plutonium (Pu)/uranium (U) (PUREX) solvent extraction process conditions. The specific test case examined the extraction of neodymium nitrate (Nd(NO3)3) from an aqueous nitric acid (HNO3) feed into a tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/ n-dodecane solvent. Demonstration testing of this system included diverting a sample from the aqueous feed meanwhile monitoring the process in every phase using the on-line spectroscopic process monitoring system. The purpose of this demonstration was to test whether spectroscopic monitoring is capable of determining the mass balance of metal nitrate species involved in a cross-current solvent extraction scheme while also diverting a sample from the system. The diversion scenario involved diverting a portion of the feed from a counter-current extraction system while a continuous extraction experiment was underway. A successful test would demonstrate the ability of the process monitoring system to detect and quantify the diversion of material from the system during a real-time continuous solvent extraction experiment. The system was designed to mimic a PUREX-type extraction process with a bank of four centrifugal contactors. The aqueous feed contained Nd(NO3)3 in HNO3, and the organic phase was composed of TBP/n-dodecane. The amount of sample observed to be diverted by on-line spectroscopic process monitoring was measured to be 3 mmol (3 x 10-3 mol) Nd3+. This value was in excellent agreement with the 2.9 mmol Nd3+ value based on the known mass of sample taken (i.e., diverted) directly from the system feed solution.

  9. Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Palasz, P.D.; Ratcliff, M.A.

    1984-12-20

    A process is described for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems. It consists of adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8 to 9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids. The solution is oxidized to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes. The aldehydes are removed as they are generated and converted to peracids.

  10. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  11. Point processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic Schoenberg

    2011-01-01

    f(t) = 0 for t Renewal models embody the notion thatmodels are surveyed including Poisson processes, renewalrenewal process originating at the corresponding parent. Self-correcting models

  12. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application...

  13. Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential...

  14. Observations of solute effects on bubble formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmeier, U.; Yaminsky, V.V.; Christenson, H.K.

    1995-09-01

    The authors have studied the effects of solute, in particular aqueous electrolyte, on bubble formation at capillary orifices and frits at varying gas flow rates. Using a stroboscope, video microscope, and rotating mirror, they have obtained pictures which show how bubble formation involves the interaction of bubbles at the orifice. These interactions depend on the value of the surface elasticity E due to positively (ethanol) or negatively (NaCl) adsorbed solute. At low flow rates consecutive bubbles do not interact. Each bubble detaches and leaves the orifice region before the next one starts forming. A intermediate flow rates the more closely spaced, consecutive bubbles begin to interact. In pure liquids there is no barrier to bubble coalescence and the detached bubble is fed by the subsequent bubble as this starts to grow. The process may be repeated several times before the original bubble has risen out of range. In solutions where E is large enough bubble coalescence is inhibited. Instead of feeding into the detached bubble the following bubble pushes it aside, and the bubbles appear to bounce off each other. Bouncing may give rise to a characteristic sequence of larger and smaller bubbles if the emerging bubbles break off prematurely from the orifice due to the inertia of the original bubble. The transition from feeding to bouncing depends critically on E of the solution and leads to a smaller average bubble size for large E values. At high flow rates detached bubbles are invariably fed by several subsequent ones. At very high flow rates the bubbling becomes chaotic, but the interaction of bubbles after leaving the orifice area produces smaller bubbles in solutions. Bouncing is more likely to occur with narrow and irregular capillaries. The dramatically different appearance of gas-sparged columns in salt water and freshwater has its origin in the difference between assemblies of pores showing mainly feeding (freshwater) or bouncing (salt water).

  15. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  16. Comparison of Methods for Determining Soil Hydraulic Characteristics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Humphreys, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    An adequate description of soil moisture movement is necessary for solution of agriculturally oriented problems such as irrigation, drainage and runoff control. Three approaches for determining the hydraulic properties of ...

  17. Brine Rejection from Freezing Salt Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Study Lubos Vrbka and Pavel Jungwirth*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Brine Rejection from Freezing Salt Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Study Lubos Vrbka and Pavel process of brine rejection from freezing salt solutions is investigated with atomic resolution using. The presence of salt slows down the freezing process, which leads to the formation of an almost neat ice next

  18. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  19. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz F. Linkmann; Arjun Berera; Mairi E. McKay; Julia Jäger

    2015-08-22

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Furthermore, it is found that high values of the cross-helicity may have an asymmetric effect on forward and reverse transfer of energy, where forward transfer is more quenched in regions of high cross-helicity than reverse transfer. This conforms with recent observations of solar wind turbulence. For specific helical interactions the relation to dynamo action is established.

  20. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz F. Linkmann; Arjun Berera; Mairi E. McKay; Julia Jäger

    2015-09-01

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Furthermore, it is found that high values of the cross-helicity may have an asymmetric effect on forward and reverse transfer of energy, where forward transfer is more quenched in regions of high cross-helicity than reverse transfer. This conforms with recent observations of solar wind turbulence. For specific helical interactions the relation to dynamo action is established.

  1. Spectroscopic On-Line Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Streams in Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; Lines, Amanda M.; Thomas, Elizabeth M.

    2011-03-01

    The current book chapter presents preliminary work toward the use of spectroscopic on-line monitoring for process control and safeguarding of radiochemical streams. Raman spectroscopy was demonstrated as a method for determining U(VI), nitrate, and nitric acid, while visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy was demonstrated as a method for determining Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI) and Nd(III). This method has been established using fuel reprocessing solution stimulants under dynamic flow conditions and on commercial spent nuclear fuel samples. Partial least squares (PLS) models for each analyte were prepared, and the fits of the data presented. A brief review of literature relevant to the use of vibrational spectroscopy and physicochemical measurements for process monitoring of nuclear fuel solutions is reported.

  2. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, Klaus F.; Netz, Roland R.; Gekle, Stephan

    2014-12-07

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1?M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  3. Hydrocarbon Processing`s refining processes `96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The paper compiles information on the following refining processes: alkylation, benzene reduction, benzene saturation, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, coking, crude distillation, deasphalting, deep catalytic cracking, electrical desalting, ethers, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogenation, hydrotreating, isomerization, resid catalytic cracking, treating, and visbreaking. The application, products, a description of the process, yield, economics, installation, and licensor are given for each entry.

  4. Development of a semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkata Krishnan, R.; Jogeswararao, G.; Parthasarathy, R.; Premalatha, S.; Prabhakar Rao, J.; Gunasekaran, G.; Ananthasivan, K.

    2014-12-15

    A semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter has been indigenously developed. The measurement system comprises modules for sensitive temperature measurement probe, signal processing, data collection, and joule calibration. The sensitivity of the temperature measurement module was enhanced by using a sensitive thermistor coupled with a lock-in amplifier based signal processor. A microcontroller coordinates the operation and control of these modules. The latter in turn is controlled through personal computer (PC) based custom made software developed with LabView. An innovative summing amplifier concept was used to cancel out the base resistance of the thermistor. The latter was placed in the dewar. The temperature calibration was carried out with a standard platinum resistance (PT100) sensor coupled with an 8½ digit multimeter. The water equivalent of this calorimeter was determined by using electrical calibration with the joule calibrator. The experimentally measured values of the quantum of heat were validated by measuring heats of dissolution of pure KCl (for endotherm) and tris (hydroxyl methyl) amino-methane (for exotherm). The uncertainity in the measurements was found to be within ±3%.

  5. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Kalina, Dale G. (Naperville, IL); Kaplan, Louis (Lombard, IL); Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  6. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  7. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  8. CX-008995: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-008995: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Development of Integrated Die Casting Process For Large Thin-Wall Magnesium Applications CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08...

  9. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet, 2011 Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry - Fact Sheet, 2011 Frito-LayPepsiCo, in cooperation with the Energy Solutions Center, is demonstrating...

  10. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    serious risks of their own; third, nuclear power will notrisks associated with the opera- tion of nuclear powernuclear power can be considered as a rational solution to our energy needs. There are risks

  11. Negative Energy Solutions and Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2011-04-01

    We revisit the negative energy solutions of the Dirac equation, which become relevant at very high energies and study several symmetries which follow therefrom. The consequences are briefly examined.

  12. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on “Nuclear Responsibility” on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

  13. ENERGY TRANSFORMED: SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Paul

    ENERGY TRANSFORMED: SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITY SURVEY SUMMARY OF QUESTIONNAIRE RESULTS WHAT IS THE STATE OF EDUCATION FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN AUSTRALIAN ENGINEERING EDUCATION? PREPARED BY: #12;State of Education for Energy Efficiency in Australian Engineering Education Summary

  14. Process for decomposing lignin in biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rector, Kirk Davin; Lucas, Marcel; Wagner, Gregory Lawrence; Kimball, David Bryan; Hanson, Susan Kloek

    2014-10-28

    A mild inexpensive process for treating lignocellulosic biomass involves oxidative delignification of wood using an aqueous solution prepared by dissolving a catalytic amount of manganese (III) acetate into water and adding hydrogen peroxide. Within 4 days and without agitation, the solution was used to convert poplar wood sections into a fine powder-like delignified, cellulose rich materials that included individual wood cells.

  15. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  16. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  17. From Signal Information Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    From Signal to Information Processing Don H. Johnson Computer and Information Technology Institute of signals o Here, all signals are assumed to be stochastic information source information encoder Information extraction systems--determining a from X(a)--fall into two categories h Classification: Which

  18. Freeze Crystallization Processes: Efficiency by Flexibility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heist, J. A.; Barron, T. S.

    1983-01-01

    Energy consumption in fractionating solutions by distillation and evaporation can be reduced by 70% to 90% by using freeze crystallization processes. The thermodynamic bases for the substantially lower energy requirements include: 1) The phase...

  19. Scientific Data Processing and Visualization Software Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Scientific Data Processing and Visualization Software Company Dr. David J. Delene Department #12;The Solution ­ Proper Software Open-source software environment designed to provide scientifically Develop prototype of the Software House. Cloud-based environment. Virtual Machines. Assessment

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutions at Constant Chemical Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perego, Claudio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, that range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, that influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a Grand-Canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work we propose the C$\\mu$MD method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the C$\\mu$MD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystall...

  1. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  2. Integral relations for solutions of confluent Heun equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Léa Jaccoud El-Jaick; Bartolomeu D. B. Figueiredo

    2015-03-02

    Firstly, we construct kernels of integral relations among solutions of the confluent Heun equation (CHE) and its limit, the reduced CHE (RCHE). In both cases we generate additional kernels by systematically applying substitutions of variables. Secondly, we establish integral relations between known solutions of the CHE that are power series and solutions that are series of special functions; and similarly for solutions of the RCHE. Thirdly, by using one of the integral relations as an integral transformation we obtain a new series solution of the spheroidal wave equation. From this solution we construct new solutions of the general CHE, and show that these are suitable for solving the radial part of the two-center problem in quantum mechanics. Finally, by applying a limiting process to kernels for the CHEs we obtain kernels for {two} double-confluent Heun equations. As a result, we deal with kernels of four equations of the Heun family, each equation presenting a distinct structure of singularities. In addition, we find that the known kernels for the Mathieu equation are special instances of kernels of the RCHE.

  3. Automating crystallographic structure solution and refinement of protein–ligand complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Moriarty, Nigel W., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Klei, Herbert E.; Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); Bunkóczi, Gábor [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Headd, Jeffrey J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); McCoy, Airlie J.; Oeffner, Robert D.; Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A software system for automated protein–ligand crystallography has been implemented in the Phenix suite. This significantly reduces the manual effort required in high-throughput crystallographic studies. High-throughput drug-discovery and mechanistic studies often require the determination of multiple related crystal structures that only differ in the bound ligands, point mutations in the protein sequence and minor conformational changes. If performed manually, solution and refinement requires extensive repetition of the same tasks for each structure. To accelerate this process and minimize manual effort, a pipeline encompassing all stages of ligand building and refinement, starting from integrated and scaled diffraction intensities, has been implemented in Phenix. The resulting system is able to successfully solve and refine large collections of structures in parallel without extensive user intervention prior to the final stages of model completion and validation.

  4. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    optimization (PSO) can obtain better parameter solutions than other algorithms given fewer number of model runs (less than 2000). Given limited computational time, the PSO algorithm is preferred, while GA should be chosen given plenty of computational resources. When applying GA and PSO for parameter optimization

  5. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Faculty Center Verification & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718

  6. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  7. Optimization For Grade Transitions In Polyethylene Solution Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimization For Grade Transitions In Polyethylene Solution Polymerization Jun Shi1, Intan Hamdan2, Sarat Munjal2, Lorenz T. Biegler1 1Center of Advanced Process Decision-making Department of Chemical perfect mixing · Three types of variables · Manipulated variables · Ethylene, comonomer, hydrogen

  8. Combined Heat & Power (CHP) -A Clean Energy Solution for Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, H.; Hoffman, P.; Kurtovich, M.

    1999-01-01

    (CHP) - A Clean Energy Solution for Industry William Parks, Patricia Hoffman, and Martin Kurtovich U.S. Department of Energy System Laboratory From the late 1970's to the early 1990's cogeneration or CHP saw enormous growth, especially in the process...

  9. Laboratory Scale Dip-Coating and Vacuum Conversion of Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory Scale Dip-Coating and Vacuum Conversion of Solution Deposited YBCO SANDIA NATIONAL) and $100K (ORNL) #12;FY 2003 Plans · Develop rapid solvent pyrolysis for the TFA-YBCO dip-coating process · Demonstrate continuous dip coating and solvent pyrolysis for meter length tapes · Investigate the conversion

  10. Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Choong-Heui

    2012-01-01

    of a CIGS film of 19.9% efficiency solar cells taken fromCIGS grains of 19.9% efficiency solar cells [5] and currentof a CIGS film of 19.9% efficiency solar cells taken from

  11. Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Choong-Heui

    2012-01-01

    cm 2 ) efficiency CIGS solar cells taken from reference [and 20.3% efficiency CIGS solar cells [6] through the use ofcm 2 ) efficiency CIGS solar cells taken from reference [6].

  12. Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Choong-Heui

    2012-01-01

    and for emerging flexible electronics. Calculations predictto flexible solar cells, displays, and other electronics

  13. Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Choong-Heui

    2012-01-01

    CuIn(Se,S) 2 thin film solar cells: secondary phaseChalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry,Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry,

  14. Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2009-01-01

    Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy By MarkDiesendorf, Mark. Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainablevehicles could halve greenhouse emissions within a few

  15. Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating Through the Headwinds of Change Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating Through the...

  16. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf More Documents...

  17. Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012,...

  18. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic...

  19. Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Chen, Guoying

    2006-01-01

    Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes Thomas J.94720 USA Abstract Lithium-magnesium solid solution alloysHeating mixtures of lithium nitride and magnesium provides a

  20. Managing Process Variants in the Process Life Cycle Alena Hallerbach1, Thomas Bauer1, and Manfred Reichert2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Managing Process Variants in the Process Life Cycle Alena Hallerbach1, Thomas Bauer1, and Manfred, which provides a more flexible solution for managing process variants in the process life cycle. In par to it. Provop provides full pro- cess life cycle support and allows for flexible process configuration

  1. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5) Enhanced Stabilization Technologies; (6) Spent Nuclear Fuel; and (7) Challenging Materials. This report provides updates on 35 technology development tasks conducted during calendar year 2008 in the Roadmap and MYPP program areas.

  2. Waste immobilization process development at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlesworth, D L

    1986-01-01

    Processes to immobilize various wasteforms, including waste salt solution, transuranic waste, and low-level incinerator ash, are being developed. Wasteform characteristics, process and equipment details, and results from field/pilot tests and mathematical modeling studies are discussed.

  3. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Filardo, Giuseppe (Palermo, IT)

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  4. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  5. A study of structure and dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions using flow birefringence measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shih Ping

    1996-01-01

    Stress optical data from polyelectrolytes (sodium polystyrenesulfonate) in aqueous solutions have been determined using flow birefringence. The stress optical rule was found to be violated in the semidilute unentangled concentration regime...

  6. Model for phase equilibria in micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Raymond E. Goldstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    temperature-composition phasediagram, and moments ofthat distribution function determine the consolute point of various thermodynamic functions in the neighborhood ofthe critical micelle concentration are relatedModel for phase equilibria in micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Raymond E. Goldstein

  7. Ozone decomposition in water solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewes, Cecil Grayson

    1969-01-01

    OF LITERATUR 1V Vi ~ V111 III ~ EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM AND ITS OPERATION 14 IV. DISCUSS10N OF RESULTS AND COiJCLUSION. . . 24 i~JOMENCLATUHE. BIBLIOGRAPIFY APPENDIX I. WASTE WATER REGENERATION BY OZONATION. II. AMINE REMOVAL BY OZONATION...ATER SOLUTIONS OF pH 8. XIII. REACTION RATE CONSTANTS FOR THE D'COMPOSITION OF OZONE IN INTER SOLUTIONS OF pH 8. XIV COD REMOVAL BY OZONE XV. OZONIZATION OF MATER CONTAINIiNG RESIDUAL AMINE. 57 60 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. FIOW DIAGRAM OF THZ...

  8. Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

    1980-06-16

    Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M; (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound; (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete; and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

  9. Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Buxton, Samuel R. (Wartburg, TN)

    1981-01-01

    Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M, (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound, (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete, and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

  10. A route to explain water anomalies from results on an aqueous solution of salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Corradini; M. Rovere; P. Gallo

    2010-03-26

    In this paper we investigate the possibility to detect the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in supercooled aqueous solutions of salts. Molecular dynamics computer simulations are conducted on bulk TIP4P water and on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride in TIP4P water, with concentration c = 0.67 mol/kg. The liquid-liquid critical point is found both in the bulk and in the solution. Its position in the thermodynamic plane shifts to higher temperature and lower pressure for the solution. Comparison with available experimental data allowed us to produce the phase diagrams of both bulk water and the aqueous solution as measurable in experiments. Given the position of the liquid-liquid critical point in the solution as obtained from our simulations, the experimental determination of the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in aqueous solutions of salts appears possible.

  11. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  12. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-12

    Feb 12, 2015 ... actually used to lift the people, not only dead loads. The most famous use ... the leftovers of a Soviet Polar drift station. Humans who did the ...

  13. Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-30

    Mar 30, 2015 ... After doing optimization, we see that the dimensions are 9 × 9 × 8.25 ... Applying optimization to this, we see that there is a relative ... materials.

  14. Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-09-22

    Sep 17, 2015 ... My(x, y)=2xy + bx2, Nx(x, y)=3x2 + 2xy. The equation is exact if My = Nx, that is b = 3. The equation is exact, so there exists a function ?(x, ...

  15. Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-25

    Jan 23, 2015 ... little bit; however, this answer is good enough). 5. Suppose the growth of a population P (in millions) with t in years follows the following logistic ...

  16. Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owner

    2013-07-28

    Dec 10, 2012 ... (4 points) The S&P 500 Index has a current spot price of 1410. The dividend ..... Jet Fuel Forward Price One Year Forward Interest Rate. 1. 123.

  17. Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-13

    i=1Ai, for all i. Hence Ai ? B, for all i, and then. ?? i=1Ai ? B. To show that this inclusion can be proper, consider for instance the following infinite union.

  18. Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-17

    point is (1,3), we want to use x = 1 and y = 3 in the formulas for the partials. Since we're given dx = 0.3 ... form, we need to eliminate the. -2 above the (2,2) entry.

  19. Determination of the strong coupling constant ({alpha}{sub s...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dissertation: Determination of the strong coupling constant (alphasub s) and a test of perturbative QCD using W + jets processes in the D0 detector Citation Details...

  20. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  1. Service management solutions White paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an end-to-end service perspective. · Service management platform is built on IBM Tivoli Change to help align operations with business context and enable customers to manage change. Tivoli CCMDBService management solutions White paper Netcool + Tivoli: delivering service management innovation

  2. TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL; MENDOZA RE

    2010-08-11

    This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

  3. TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETREIVAL AND PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL

    2010-07-07

    This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

  4. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01

    material obtained by water extraction) were determined forproduct obtained by extraction with water. About 67% of theExtraction of Phenols from Coal Conversion Process Condensate Waters,"

  5. Analysis of the Fisher solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Shoom, Andrey A.

    2010-01-15

    We study the d-dimensional Fisher solution which represents a static, spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat spacetime with a massless scalar field. The solution has two parameters, the mass M and the 'scalar charge' {Sigma}. The Fisher solution has a naked curvature singularity which divides the spacetime manifold into two disconnected parts. The part which is asymptotically flat we call the Fisher spacetime, and another part we call the Fisher universe. The d-dimensional Schwarzschild-Tangherlini solution and the Fisher solution belong to the same theory and are dual to each other. The duality transformation acting in the parameter space (M,{Sigma}) maps the exterior region of the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole into the Fisher spacetime which has a naked timelike singularity, and interior region of the black hole into the Fisher universe, which is an anisotropic expanding-contracting universe and which has two spacelike singularities representing its 'big bang' and 'big crunch'. The big bang singularity and the singularity of the Fisher spacetime are radially weak in the sense that a 1-dimensional object moving along a timelike radial geodesic can arrive to the singularities intact. At the vicinity of the singularity the Fisher spacetime of nonzero mass has a region where its Misner-Sharp energy is negative. The Fisher universe has a marginally trapped surface corresponding to the state of its maximal expansion in the angular directions. These results and derived relations between geometric quantities of the Fisher spacetime, the Fisher universe, and the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole may suggest that the massless scalar field transforms the black hole event horizon into the naked radially weak disjoint singularities of the Fisher spacetime and the Fisher universe which are 'dual to the horizon'.

  6. 2000 Solutions Pascal Contest (Grade 9)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    2000 Solutions Pascal Contest (Grade 9) Canadian Mathematics Competition An activity of The Centre for EDUCATION in MATHEMATICS and COMPUTING © 2000 Waterloo Mathematics Foundation #12;2000 Pascal Solutions 2? , , , , (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) #12;2000 Pascal Solutions 3 Solution Since this sequence repeats itself, once

  7. 2000 Solutions Cayley Contest (Grade 10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    2000 Solutions Cayley Contest (Grade 10) Canadian Mathematics Competition An activity of The Centre for EDUCATION in MATHEMATICS and COMPUTING © 2000 Waterloo Mathematics Foundation #12;2000 Cayley Solutions 2) 13 (B) 18 (C) 22 (D) 21 (E) 19 2 3 6 2 #12;2000 Cayley Solutions 3 Solution The easiest way

  8. Energy solutions?Director Eric Isaacs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric ISaacs

    2013-06-05

    Argonne's Director Eric Isaacs talks about the laboratory's efforts for creating new, clean energy solutions.

  9. Energy solutions—Director Eric Isaacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric ISaacs

    2012-08-08

    Argonne's Director Eric Isaacs talks about the laboratory's efforts for creating new, clean energy solutions.

  10. Model solution State variable model: differential equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    2/26/2014 1 Model solution State variable model: differential equation Models a rate of change equation General solution: the antiderivative Particular solution: require initial and boundary conditions up the general solution to a differential equation in a book Solve for initial and boundary

  11. Project Work Plan: Sequestration of Strontium-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of an Apatite Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, Jim E.

    2006-04-30

    We propose to develop an infiltration strategy that defines the precipitation rate of an apatite-forming solution and Sr-90 sequestration processes under variably saturated (low water content) conditions. We will develop this understanding through small-scale column studies, intermediate-scale two-dimensional (2-D) experiments, and numerical modeling to quantify individual and coupled processes associated with apatite formation and Sr-90 transport during and after infiltration of the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution. Development of capabilities to simulate these coupled biogeochemical processes during both injection and infiltration will be used to determine the most cost-effective means to emplace an in situ apatite barrier with a longevity of 300 years to permanently sequester Sr-90 until it decays. Biogeochemical processes that will be investigated are citrate biodegradation and apatite precipitation rates at varying water contents as a function of water content. Coupled processes that will be investigated include the influence of apatite precipitation (which occupies pore space) on the hydraulic and transport properties of the porous media during infiltration.

  12. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, Dean R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Lonnie G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDowell, Rocklan G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  13. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Terence L.

    2013-07-30

    Our contribution to the larger project (ANL) was the phylogenetic analysis of evolved communities capable of reducing metals including uranium.

  14. TA-53 UNREVIEWED SAFETY ISSUE SCREENING AND DETERMINATION PROCESS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1:PhysicsSyndicated Contentwo major newT heT3

  15. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library. Many recent studies quantify historical trends in streamflow and usually attribute these trends to structure studies of streamflow responses to climate change. A wide variety of trends in streamflow have

  16. Absorption chillers: Part of the solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Occhionero, A.J. (American Gas Cooling Center, Arlington, VA (United States)); Hughes, P.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Reid, E.A. (Columbia Gas Distribution Co., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, and implementation economics are considered as they relate to the advisability of expanding the application of absorption chillers. Introductory and background information are provided to put the discussion in the proper context. Then all four issues are discussed separately as they relate to absorption chillers. Acid rain and ozone depletion concerns, and implementation economics, are found to support the expanded use of absorption chillers. The global warming concern is found to be more of a gray area, but the areas of benefit correspond well with the conditions of greatest economic advantage. All things considered, absorption chillers are believed to be part of the environmental and economic solution. It is further believed that integrated resource planning (IRP) processes that consider electric and gas technologies on an equal footing would come to the same conclusion for many regions of the United States. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Deetherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1985-11-05

    Ethers such as isobutyl tertiary butyl ether are dissociated into their component alcohols and isoolefins by heat stabilized catalyst compositions prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  18. Exact black hole solution with a minimally coupled scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristian Martinez; Ricardo Troncoso; Jorge Zanelli

    2004-06-13

    An exact four-dimensional black hole solution of gravity with a minimally coupled self-interacting scalar field is reported. The event horizon is a surface of negative constant curvature enclosing the curvature singularity at the origin, and the scalar field is regular everywhere outside the origin. This solution is an asymptotically locally AdS spacetime. The strong energy condition is satisfied on and outside the event horizon. The thermodynamical analysis shows the existence of a critical temperature, below which a black hole in vacuum undergoes a spontaneous dressing up with a nontrivial scalar field in a process reminiscent of ferromagnetism.

  19. Extracting alcohols from aqueous solutions. [USDOE patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

    1981-12-02

    The objective is to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols in aqueous solutions into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. This is done by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5-18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is then mixed with one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers to extract the alcohol into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

  20. Asymptotics of solutions of a parabolic equation near singular points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei V. Zakharov

    2014-11-17

    Results of investigation of the asymptotic behavior of solutions to the Cauchy problems for a quasi-linear parabolic equation with a small parameter at a higher derivative near singular points of limit solutions are presented. Interest to the problem under consideration is explained by its applications to a wide class of physical systems and probabilistic processes such as acoustic waves in fluid and gas, hydrodynamical turbulence and nonlinear diffusion. The following cases are considered: a singularity generated by a jump discontinuity of the initial function, collision of two shock waves, gradient catastrophe, transition of a weak discontinuity into a shock wave, a singularity generated by a large initial gradient.

  1. Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dodson, Karen E. (Knoxville, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel processing solution containing (1) hydrocarbon diluent, (2) tri-n-butyl phosphate or tri-2-ethylhexyl phosphate, and (3) monobutyl phosphate, dibutyl phosphate, mono-2-ethylhexyl phosphate, di-2-ethylhexyl phosphate, or a complex formed by plutonium, uranium, or a fission product thereof with monobutyl phosphate, dibutyl phosphate, mono-2-ethylhexyl phosphate, or di-2-ethylhexyl phosphate is contacted with silica gel having alkali ions absorbed thereon to remove any one of the degradation products named in section (3) above from said solution.

  2. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  3. Mushy-zone model with an exact solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. D.; Wilson, D. G.; Alexiades, V.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we propose a very simple model of a mushy zone which admits of an explicit solution. To our knowledge, it is the only instance where an actual observation of the mushy zone width and structure is used as a partial basis for the model definition. The model rests upon two unknown parameters. The first determines the relation between the equilibrium temperature gradient and the mushy zone width. The second depends upon the dendritic structure in the mushy zone, and is related to the solid fraction. Both can be estimated from experiments. We will limit ourselves to defining the model, presenting its closed form solution, and giving tables from which the solution can be found explicitly. It is shown that in most cases the predicted mushy zone is of very negligible importance.

  4. RESULTS OF ROUTINE STRIP EFFLUENT HOLD TANK AND DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT DURING MACROBATCH 3 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-10

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the 'microbatches' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch ('Macrobatch') 3 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate consistent operations. However, the Decontamination Factors for plutonium and strontium removal have declined in Macrobatch 3, compared to Macrobatch 2. This may be due to the differences in the Pu concentration or the bulk chemical concentrations in the feed material. SRNL is considering the possible reasons for this decline. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in ARP. During operation of the ISDP, quantities of salt waste are processed through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and MCU in batches of {approx}3800 gallons. Monosodium titanate (MST) is used in ARP to adsorb actinides and strontium from the salt waste and the waste slurry is then filtered prior to sending the clarified salt solution to MCU. The MCU uses solvent extraction technology to extract cesium from salt waste and concentrate cesium in an acidic aqueous stream (Strip Effluent - SE), leaving a decontaminated caustic salt aqueous stream (Decontaminated Salt Solution - DSS). Sampling occurs in the Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) and Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) in the MCU process. The MCU sample plan requires that batches be sampled and analyzed for plutonium and strontium content by Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to determine MST effectiveness. The cesium measurement is used to monitor cesium removal effectiveness and the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES) is used to monitor inorganic carryover.

  5. Efficient numerical methods for the instationary solution of laminar reacting gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Efficient numerical methods for the instationary solution of laminar reacting gas flow problems Universiteit Delft Efficient numerical methods for the instationary solution of laminar reacting gas flow of laminar reacting gas flow problems Sander van Veldhuizen Production processes of high-purity, high

  6. Solute Diffusion in Poly(vinyl alcohol)/Poly(acrylic acid) Interpenetrating Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    increasingly important for use in separation processes including microfiltration, ultra- filtration, gas on the charges on the membrane and solute.9,10 Solute transport through hydrogels has been exten- sively studied) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by varying the content of PAA in the hydrogel membrane. We also compared

  7. The ATPase Domain of SecA Can Form a Tetramer in Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Tassos

    The ATPase Domain of SecA Can Form a Tetramer in Solution Brian R. Dempsey1 , Anastassios Economou2-associates to form a tetramer in solution, indicating that removal of the C-terminal domain facilitates the formation of a higher-order SecA structure. The associative process is best modelled as a monomer-tetramer equilibrium

  8. Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity the Earth system in high levels of spatial and/or temporal resolu- tion and the processes that they model. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system

  9. Fiber coating with surfactant solutions Amy Q. Shen and Blake Gleason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiber coating with surfactant solutions Amy Q. Shen and Blake Gleason Division of Engineering of the solution. © 2002 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1512287 I. INTRODUCTION Coating flows are ubiquitous in industrial processing. The coating materials protect, functionalize, and lubricate surfaces

  10. Automated structure solution with the PHENIX suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zwart, Peter H [LBNL; Afonine, Pavel V [LBNL; Grosse - Kunstleve, Ralf W [LBNL

    2008-01-01

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution, and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution, and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template- and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix. refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

  11. Automated Structure Solution with the PHENIX Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwart, Peter H.; Zwart, Peter H.; Afonine, Pavel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Hung, Li-Wei; Ioerger, Tom R.; McCoy, A.J.; McKee, Eric; Moriarty, Nigel; Read, Randy J.; Sacchettini, James C.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Storoni, L.C.; Terwilliger, Tomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2008-06-09

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix.refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

  12. Olefins from High Yield Autothermal Reforming Process

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2012-03-06

    The autothermal reforming method employs an improved dehydrogenation process for olefin production, utilizing platinum based dehydrogenation catalysts in the presence of oxygen. The autothermal process requires no external energy input following ignition and produces high conversions and yields from the gaseous hydrocarbon feeds. Autothermal reforming is an effective solution that meets the high demands of the chemical market industry by producing high yields...

  13. Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

    2000-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C...

  14. Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

  15. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-10-14

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  16. Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-06-20

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  17. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-11-11

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  18. Rheology of Active Filament Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. B. Liverpool; M. Cristina Marchetti

    2006-07-11

    We study the viscoelasticity of an active solution of polar biofilaments and motor proteins. Using a molecular model, we derive the constitutive equations for the stress tensor in the isotropic phase and in phases with liquid crystalline order. The stress relaxation in the various phases is discussed. Contractile activity is responsible for a spectacular difference in the viscoelastic properties on opposite sides of the order-disorder transition.

  19. Iterative solutions of simultaneous equations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laycock, Guyron Brantley

    1962-01-01

    ITERATIVE SOLUTIONS OP SIKJLTANEOUS EQUATIONS G~cn Hrantlep I aycock Approved. as to style snd, content by& (Chairman of Committee) E. c. (Head. of Department August 1/62 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes to thank Dr. Hi A. Luther for his time sn4.... . . . ~ ~ . . ~ III. JACOBI AND 6AUSS-SEIDEL METHODS I V ~ C ONCLUS I GN ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ a ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 9 ~ . ~ 18 V BIBLIOGRAPHY ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ VI ~ APPENDIX ~ ~ o ~ ~ e ~ o ~ ~ o o ~ ~ ~ . 22 Px'ogl am Lisliiixlgs...

  20. Heinsight Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchHeber,Heinsight Solutions Jump to:

  1. New Solutions Require New Thinking

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable for Public CommentofCapabilitiesSolutions Require

  2. Adsorption analysis of ammonia in an aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arman, B.; Panchal, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    An analysis is carried out to determine the effects of the diffusional resistance on the rate of the adsorption of ammonia in an aqueous solution. A performance prediction model is developed to calculate the local rate of heat and mass transfer, including physical and thermodynamic property calculations of the mixture. An algorithm is developed for calculating the interfacial conditions. The local heat- and mass-transfer calculation is then incorporated into the performance prediction method for adsorption for a given geometry.

  3. The Localized Energy Distribution of Dark Energy Star Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Halpern; Michael Pecorino

    2013-03-05

    We examine the question of energy localization for an exact solution of Einstein's equations with a scalar field corresponding to the phantom energy interpretation of dark energy. We apply three different energy-momentum complexes, the Einstein, Papapetrou and M{\\o}ller prescriptions, to the exterior metric and determine the energy distribution for each. Comparing the results, we find that the three prescriptions yield identical energy distributions.

  4. Separation and concentration of lower alcohols from dilute aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA); Eakin, David E. (Kennewick, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing, from a dilute aqueous solution of a lower (C.sub.1 -C.sub.5) alcohol, a concentrated liquid solution of the alcohol in an aromatic organic solvent is disclosed. Most of the water is removed from the dilute aqueous solution of alcohol by chilling sufficiently to form ice crystals. Simultaneously, the remaining liquid is extracted at substantially the same low temperature with a liquid organic solvent that is substantially immiscible in aqueous liquids and has an affinity for the alcohol at that temperature, causing the alcohol to transfer to the organic phase. After separating the organic liquid from the ice crystals, the organic liquid can be distilled to enrich the concentration of alcohol therein. Ethanol so separated from water and concentrated in an organic solvent such as toluene is useful as an anti-knock additive for gasoline.

  5. Process for removing carbonyl sulfide from hydrocarbon feedstreams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, E.S.; Kosseim, A.J.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes a process for removing carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from a feedstream containing carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide and hydrocarbons. It comprises: contacting the feedstream in a hydrolysis zone with a first portion of a lean solution stream comprising an aqueous alkaline solution at an effective hydrolysis temperature to convert at least a portion of the carbonyl sulfide to carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, withdrawing a first effluent stream containing a reduced concentration of carbonyl sulfide relative to the feedstream, and withdrawing a first rich solution stream comprising the aqueous alkaline solution, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide; contacting the first effluent stream in an absorption zone with a second portion of the lean solution stream at an effective absorption temperature to absorb carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, and withdrawing a second rich solution stream comprising the aqueous alkaline solution, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide; combining at least a portion of the first rich solution stream and the second rich solution stream and contacting the combined rich solution stream in a regeneration zone at effective conditions to desorb carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, withdrawing a vent gas stream comprising carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, and withdrawing the lean solution stream; separating the lean solution stream into the first and second portions; and recycling the first portion of the lean solution stream to the hydrolysis zone and the second portion of the lean solution stream to the absorption zone.

  6. Functionalized polymers for binding to solutes in aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robison, Thomas W.

    2006-11-21

    A functionalized polymer for binding a dissolved molecule in an aqueous solution is presented. The polymer has a backbone polymer to which one or more functional groups are covalently linked. The backbone polymer can be such polymers as polyethylenimine, polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, and polypropylamine. These polymers are generally water-soluble, but can be insoluble when cross-linked. The functional group can be for example diol derivatives, polyol derivatives, thiol and dithiol derivatives, guest-host groups, affinity groups, beta-diphosphonic acids, and beta-diamides

  7. Issues evaluation process at Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.C.

    1992-04-16

    This report describes the issues evaluation process for Rocky Flats Plant as established in July 1990. The issues evaluation process was initiated February 27, 1990 with a Charter and Process Overview for short-term implementation. The purpose of the process was to determine the projects required for completion before the Phased Resumption of Plutonium Operations. To determine which projects were required, the issues evaluation process and emphasized risk mitigation, based on a ranking system. The purpose of this report is to document the early design of the issues evaluation process to record the methodologies used that continue as the basis for the ongoing Issues Management Program at Rocky Flats Plant.

  8. Raman spectroscopic investigations of hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is still very little information about the stoichiometries, structures and stabilities of metal complexes at high temperatures and pressures. Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited to probe and study concentrated electrolyte solutions at the molecular level. This thesis includes the design and construction of a Raman cell operable up to 300C and 15MPa. In order to obtain quantitative thermodynamic information from Raman spectroscopic measurements, a chemically inert internal standard must be used. Perchlorate is commonly used for this purpose at low temperatures, but it may be unstable at high temperatures and its explosive properties make it undesirable. A new preferred internal standard; trifluoromethanesulfonic acid is introduced and its spectra p to 300C discussed. The use of this compound as a high temperature internal standard enabled stepwise stability constants of zinc-bromo complexes to be determined. Although bromide is not an important ligand in geologic systems, its chemical similarity to chloride can provide insights into the study of zinc-chloro species which do not have very informative Raman spectra. The importance of organic ligands in geologic settings such as the Mississippi-Valley Type Pb-Zn sulfide deposits is now being realized. Chapter four presents the first high temperature spectroscopic measurements of lead and zinc acetate aqueous solutions. Not only do these studies verify the stability of lead and zinc acetate complexes up to 250 C but they also show that the type of complex formed is a function of pH, metal-ligand ratio and temperature, thus having important implications for zoning of Pb-Zn sulfide deposits.

  9. 10 Antibiotic (10AB) stock solution. This recipe makes up a 10X concentrated solution. The solution should be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steury, Todd D.

    10 Antibiotic (10AB) stock solution. This recipe makes up a 10X concentrated solution. The solution Polymixin-B 0.016 g Tetracycline 0.012 g Vancomycin 0.012 g This recipe was published by Polne-Fuller, M Stocks 1.0 mL of each (recipe below) Primary Trace Metals stock solutions To 100 mL of distilled water

  10. Method for rapidly determining a pulp kappa number using spectrophotometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chai, Xin-Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Jun Yong (Marietta, GA)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for rapidly determining the pulp kappa number through direct measurement of the potassium permanganate concentration in a pulp-permanganate solution using spectrophotometry. Specifically, the present invention uses strong acidification to carry out the pulp-permanganate oxidation reaction in the pulp-permanganate solution to prevent the precipitation of manganese dioxide (MnO.sub.2). Consequently, spectral interference from the precipitated MnO.sub.2 is eliminated and the oxidation reaction becomes dominant. The spectral intensity of the oxidation reaction is then analyzed to determine the pulp kappa number.

  11. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

  12. Dual-arm Z-scan technique to extract dilute solute nonlinearities from solution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Dual-arm Z-scan technique to extract dilute solute nonlinearities from solution measurements Manuel-scans on two samples (solvent and solution). By using a dual-arm Z-scan apparatus with identical arms, fitting

  13. Process for separation and preconcentration of radium from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Renato (Elmhurst, IL); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX)

    1999-01-01

    A process for preconcentrating and separating radium from a contaminated solution containing at least water and radium includes the steps of adding a quantity of a water-soluble macrocyclic polyether to the contaminated solution to form a combined solution. An acid is added to the combined solution to form an acidic combined solution having an ›H.sup.+ ! concentration of about 0.5M. The acidic combined solution is contacted with a sulfonic acid-based strong acid cation exchange medium or a organophilic sulfonic acid medium having a plurality of binding sites thereon to bind the radium thereto and to form a radium-depleted solution. The radium-depleted solution is separated from the strong acid cation exchange medium or organophilic sulfonic acid medium. The radium remaining bound to the exchange medium or organophilic reagent is then stripped from the exchange medium or organophilic medium and the activity of the radium is measured.

  14. Process for separation and preconcentration of radium from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, M.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1999-01-26

    A process for preconcentrating and separating radium from a contaminated solution containing at least water and radium includes the steps of adding a quantity of a water-soluble macrocyclic polyether to the contaminated solution to form a combined solution. An acid is added to the combined solution to form an acidic combined solution having an [H{sup +}] concentration of about 0.5M. The acidic combined solution is contacted with a sulfonic acid-based strong acid cation exchange medium or a organophilic sulfonic acid medium having a plurality of binding sites thereon to bind the radium thereto and to form a radium-depleted solution. The radium-depleted solution is separated from the strong acid cation exchange medium or organophilic sulfonic acid medium. The radium remaining bound to the exchange medium or organophilic reagent is then stripped from the exchange medium or organophilic medium and the activity of the radium is measured. 24 figs.

  15. NEPA Determination Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has determined that this proposed project is a major Federal action that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment. To comply with the National Environmental Policy Act ...

  16. Direct molecular diffusion and micro-mixing for rapid dewatering of LiBr solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, S; Isfahani, RN; Moghaddam, S

    2014-03-01

    A slow molecular diffusion rate often limits the desorption process of an absorbate molecule from a liquid absorbent. To enhance the desorption rate, the absorbent is often boiled to increase the liquid vapor interfacial area. However, the growth of bubbles generated during the nucleate boiling process still remains mass-diffusion limited. Here, it is shown that a desorption rate higher than that of boiling can be achieved, if the vapor absorbent interface is continuously replenished with the absorbate-rich solution to limit the concentration boundary layer growth. The study is conducted in a LiBr-water-solution, in which the water molecules' diffusion rate is quite slow. The manipulation of the vapor solution interface concentration distribution is enabled by the mechanical confinement of the solution flow within microchannels, using a hydrophobic vapor-venting membrane and the implementation of microstructures on the flow channel's bottom wall. The microstructures stretch and fold the laminar streamlines within the solution film and produce vortices. The vortices continuously replace the concentrated solution at the vapor solution interface with the water-rich solution brought from the bottom and middle of the flow channel. The physics of the process is described using a combination of experimental and numerical studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  18. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  19. Sol Solution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium deEnergy Information North| OpenSolution Jump to:

  20. Natural Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:Information WildlifeNatural Solutions Name: Natural

  1. Powerit Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, BluePoulsen Hybrid, LLCBiofuels LLCPowerit Solutions

  2. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  3. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-12-08

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

  4. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

    1980-01-28

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  5. Thin film superconductors and process for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1988-01-21

    A process for the preparation of oxide superconductors from high-viscosity non-aqueous solution is described. Solutions of lanthanide nitrates, alkaline earth nitrates and copper nitrates in a 1:2:3 stoichiometric ratio, when added to ethylene glycol containing citric acid solutions, have been used to prepare highly viscous non-aqueous solutions of metal mixed nitrates-citrates. Thin films of these compositions are produced when a layer of the viscous solution is formed on a substrate and subjected to thermal decomposition.

  6. Process for electrochemically gasifying coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.

    1985-10-25

    A process is claimed for electrochemically gasifying coal by establishing a flowing stream of coal particulate slurry, electrolyte and electrode members through a transverse magnetic field that has sufficient strength to polarize the electrode members, thereby causing them to operate in combination with the electrolyte to electrochemically reduce the coal particulate in the slurry. Such electrochemical reduction of the coal produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide at opposite ends of the polarized electrode members. Gas collection means are operated in conjunction with the process to collect the evolved gases as they rise from the slurry and electrolyte solution. 7 figs.

  7. The solution combustion synthesis of nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tornga, Stephanie C

    2009-01-01

    Nanophosphors are defined as nano-sized (1-100mn), insulating, inorganic materials that emit light under particle or electromagnetic excitation. Their unique luminescence properties provide an excellent potential for applications in radiation detection and imaging. Herein, solution combustion synthesis (SCS) is presented as a method to prepare nanophosphor powders, while X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), and other techniques were used to characterize their structural and optical properties. The goal of this work is to synthesize bright, high-quality powders of nanophosphors, consolidate them into bulk materials and study their structural and optical properties using XRD, TEM, PL, and PLE. SCS is of interest because it is a robust, inexpensive, and facile technique, which yields a significant amount of a wide variety of oxide materials, in a short amount of time. Several practical nanophosphors were synthesized and investigated in this work, including simple oxides such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, complex oxides such as Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn, and Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce. Results demonstrate that altering the processing parameters such as water content of the precursor solution, ignition temperature, fuel type and amount, and post-synthesis annealing can significantly improve light output, and that it is possible to optimize the luminescence output of oxyorthosilicates by reducing the amount of silica in the precursor mixture.

  8. A Periodic Solution to Impulsive Logistic Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyong-Chol Kim; Hyong-Chol O; Sang-Mun Kim; Chol Kim

    2014-03-28

    In this paper is provided a new representation of periodic solution to the impulsive Logistic equation considered in [7].

  9. A reverse osmosis treatment process for produced water: optimization, process control, and renewable energy application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mareth, Brett

    2009-06-02

    resources (wind and solar) are analyzed as potential power sources for the process, and an overview of reverse osmosis membrane fouling is presented. A computer model of the process was created using a dynamic simulator, Aspen Dynamics, to determine energy...

  10. Hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baird, M.J.; Gutberlet, L.C.; Miller, J.T.

    1984-02-14

    A process for hydrocracking gas oil boiling range hydrocarbon feeds comprising contacting the feed with hydrogen under hydrocracking conditions in the presence of a catalyst comprising an active metallic component comprising at least one metal having hydrogenation activity and at least one oxygenated phosphorus component, and a support component comprising at least one non-zeolitic, porous refractory inorganic oxide matrix component and at least one crystalline molecular sieve zeolite component.

  11. Hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, P.R.; Bakas, S.T.; Wood, B.M.

    1984-05-08

    A method is disclosed for hydrocracking a hydrocarbon feedstock having a propensity to form polynuclear aromatic compounds without excessively fouling the processing unit. The hydrocracking method includes contacting the hydrocarbon feedstock with a crystalline zeolite hydrocracking catalyst, contacting at least a portion of the resulting unconverted hydrocarbon oil containing polynuclear aromatic compounds with an adsorbent which selectively retains polynuclear aromatic compounds and recycling unconverted hydrocarbon oil having a reduced concentration of polynuclear aromatic compounds to the hydrocracking zone.

  12. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    . Simultaneous time series for electrical conductivity, water temperature, and DO over the four-week study period. The main driver of the observed variations in DO is likely to be periodic melt-freeze cycles. We conclude perturbations have large impacts on hydrological and biological processes, via changes in rates of ice and snow

  13. Hydropyrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

  14. Ultrafast studies of solution dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Callender, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fast chemical dynamics generally must be initiated photochemically. This limits the applicability of modern laser methods for following the structural changes that occur during chemical and biological reactions to those systems that have an electronic chromophore that has a significant yield of photoproduct when excited. This project has developed a new and entirely general approach to ultrafast initiation of reactions in solution: laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump). The results open entire new fields of study of ultrafast molecular dynamics in solution. The authors have demonstrated the T-jump technique on time scales of 50 ps and longer, and have applied it to study of the fast events in protein folding. They find that a general lifetime of alpha-helix formation is ca 100 ns, and that tertiary folds (in apomyoglobin) form in ca 100 {mu}s.

  15. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  16. Three dimensional stationary cyclic symmetric Einstein-Maxwell solutions; energy, mass, momentum, and algebraic tensors characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto A. Garcia-Diaz

    2013-07-25

    The main purpose of this contribution is to determine physical and geometrical characterizations of whole classes of stationary cyclic symmetric gravitational fields coupled to Maxwell electromagnetic fields within the $(2+1)$-dimensional gravity. The physical characterization is based on the determination of the local and global energy-momentum-mass quantities using the Brown-York approach. As far as to the algebraic-geometrical characterization is concerned, the eigenvalue problem for the electromagnetic field, energy-momentum and Cotton tensors is solved and their types are established. The families of Einstein-Maxwell solutions to be considered are: all uniform electromagnetic solutions possessing electromagnetic fields with vanishing covariant derivatives (stationary uniform and spinning Clement classes), all fields having constant electromagnetic field and energy-momentum tensors' invariants (Kamata-Koikawa solutions), the whole classes of hybrid electromagnetic Ayon-Cataldo-Garcia solutions, a new family of stationary electromagnetic solutions, the electrostatic and magnetostatic solutions with Peldan limit, the Clement spinning charged metric, the Martinez-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole solution, and Dias-Lemos electromagnetic solution.

  17. Investigating the Synthesis of Ligated Metal Clusters in Solution Using a Flow Reactor and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivares, Astrid M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2014-09-18

    The scalable synthesis of subnanometer metal clusters containing an exact number of atoms is of interest due to the highly size-dependent catalytic, electronic and optical properties of these species. While significant research has been conducted on the batch preparation of clusters through reduction synthesis in solution, the processes of metal complex reduction as well as cluster nucleation, growth and post-reduction etching are still not well understood. Herein, we demonstrate a temperature-controlled flow reactor for studying cluster formation in solution at well-defined conditions. Employing this technique methanol solutions of a chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold precursor, 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane capping ligand and borane-tert-butylamine reducing agent were combined in a mixing tee and introduced into a heated capillary with an adjustable length. In this manner, the temperature dependence of the relative abundance of different ionic reactants, intermediates and products synthesized in real time was characterized using online mass spectrometry. A wide distribution of doubly and triply charged cationic gold clusters was observed as well as smaller singly charged metal-ligand complexes. The results demonstrate that temperature plays a crucial role in determining the relative population of cationic gold clusters and, in general, that higher temperature promotes the formation of doubly charged clusters and singly charged metal-ligand complexes while hindering the growth of triply charged clusters. Moreover, the distribution of clusters observed at elevated temperatures is found to be consistent with that obtained at longer reaction times at room temperature, thereby demonstrating that heating may be used to access cluster distributions characteristic of different stages of reduction synthesis in solution.

  18. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  19. Techniques for determining physical zones of influence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamann, Hendrik F; Lopez-Marrero, Vanessa

    2013-11-26

    Techniques for analyzing flow of a quantity in a given domain are provided. In one aspect, a method for modeling regions in a domain affected by a flow of a quantity is provided which includes the following steps. A physical representation of the domain is provided. A grid that contains a plurality of grid-points in the domain is created. Sources are identified in the domain. Given a vector field that defines a direction of flow of the quantity within the domain, a boundary value problem is defined for each of one or more of the sources identified in the domain. Each of the boundary value problems is solved numerically to obtain a solution for the boundary value problems at each of the grid-points. The boundary problem solutions are post-processed to model the regions affected by the flow of the quantity on the physical representation of the domain.

  20. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

    1999-07-27

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.