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1

SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dissolution of filaments[111]. The KCM method considersmethod is claimed to produce high-yield films, there is an obvious processing complication involving the transfer and dissolution

Bakhishev, Teymur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

PROCESSES OF RECLAIMING URANIUM FROM SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for reclaiming residual enriched uranium from calutron wash solutions containing Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Mn as impurities. The solution is adjusted to a pH of between 2 and 4 and is contacted with a metallic reducing agent, such as iron or zinc, in order to reduce the copper to metal and thereby remove it from the solution. At the same time the uranium present is reduced to the uranous state The solution is then contacted with a precipitate of zinc hydroxide or barium carbonate in order to precipitate and carry uranium, iron, and chromium away from the nickel and manganese ions in the solution. The uranium is then recovered fronm this precipitate.

Zumwalt, L.R.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

GE Lighting Solutions: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4901) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4901) Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4901) GE Lighting Solutions: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4901) January 11, 2013 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to General Electric Lighting Solutions finding that various models of traffic signal modules do not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the products were noncompliant based on the company's own testing. GE Lighting Solutions must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom GE Lighting Solutions distributed the noncompliant products that the products do not meet Federal standards. In addition, GE Lighting Solutions must provide to DOE documents and records showing the number of units GE Lighting Solutions distributed and to whom. The manufacturer

6

PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Entropy production determination of the ambipolar solution nearest equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

A general derivation of the steady state entropy production equation is presented for a confined plasma which loses particles and energy via radial transport and, perhaps, end loss. The resulting equation is employed to determine which root or solution is closest to thermodynamic equilibrium when more than one self-consistent or ambipolar solution is possible.

Catto, P.J.; Myra, J.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Solution-based Processing for Ceramic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active R&D efforts continue in the development of materials with novel or improved properties, processes that offer enhanced control, reliability, reproducibility,...

11

Solution-Based Processing for Ceramic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active R&D efforts continue in the development of materials with novel or improved properties, processes that offer enhanced control, reliability, reproducibility...

12

Solution-Based Processing for Ceramic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 2, 2012 ... Active R&D efforts continue in the development of materials with novel or improved properties, processes that offer enhanced control, reliability,...

13

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions  

SciTech Connect

The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to separation processes and particularly to isotope separation processes performed near the critical point of solvents for separation of solutes therefrom, and was developed pursuant to a contract with 5 the United States Department of Energy, contract number DE-AC05-84OR21400, and funded under WPF number ERKCT07.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to separation processes and particularly to isotope separation processes performed near the critical point of solvents for separation of solutes therefrom, and was developed pursuant to a contract with 5 the United States Department of Energy, contract number DE-AC05-84OR21400, and funded under WPF number ERKCT07.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Actinide solution processing at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1039, for radioactive solution removal and processing at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for solution removal and processing is in response to independent safety assessments and an agreement with the State of Colorado to remove mixed residues at Rocky Flats and reduce the risk of future accidents. Monthly public meetings were held during the scoping and preparation of the EA. The scope of the EA included evaluations of alternative methods and locations of solution processing. A comment period from February 20, 1995 through March 21, 1995 was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to offer written comment on the EA. Comments were received from the State of Colorado and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A response to the agency comments is included in the Final EA.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Solution-processed coreshell nanowires for efficient photovoltaic cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution-processed core­shell nanowires for efficient photovoltaic cells Jinyao Tang1,3 , Ziyang are promising for photovoltaic appli- cations1­11 , but, so far, nanowire-based solar cells have had lower efficiencies than planar cells made from the same materials6­10,12,13 , even allowing for the generally lower

Yang, Peidong

23

Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Processing nitric-phosphoric acid solutions to nitroammophoska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technology for comprehensive processing of apatite with recovery of all valuable components in the starting material is based on its nitric acid decomposition with crystallization of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. The results of operation on a pilot installation for complex processing of apatite with production of strontium carbonate, calcium fluoride, a rare earth phosphate concentrate, calcium carbonate and a nitric-phosphoric acid solution (NPAS) are given below. The article presents the data of the operation of the experimental unit for production of complex fertilizers of the nitroammophoska type from the NPAS.

Gol'dinov, A.L.; Abramov, O.B.; Afanasenko, B.P.; Baibakov, P.Y.; Kiselevich, P.V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

TRUEX processing of plutonium analytical solutions at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The TRUEX (TRansUranic EXtraction) solvent extraction process was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Department of Energy. A TRUEX demonstration completed at ANL involved the processing of analytical and experimental waste generated there and at the New Brunswick Laboratory. A 20-stage centrifugal contactor was used to recover plutonium, americium, and uranium from the waste. Approximately 84 g of plutonium, 18 g of uranium, and 0.2 g of americium were recovered from about 118 liters of solution during four process runs. Alpha decontamination factors as high as 65,000 were attained, which was especially important because it allowed the disposal of the process raffinate as a low-level waste. The recovered plutonium and uranium were converted to oxide; the recovered americium solution was concentrated by evaporation to approximately 100 ml. The flowsheet and operational procedures were modified to overcome process difficulties. These difficulties included the presence of complexants in the feed, solvent degradation, plutonium precipitation, and inadequate decontamination factors during startup. This paper will discuss details of the experimental effort.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.; Wygmans, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Deriving Osmotic Pressures of Draw Solutes used in Osmotically Driven Membrane Processes  

SciTech Connect

In osmotically driven membrane processes (ODMPs), such as forward osmosis (FO), the concentration of the draw solute and the related osmotic pressure play a critical role in mass transport and overall process performance. Search of the literature reveals that the concentration units used to describe draw solutes vary and the methods of deriving osmotic pressure from those concentrations are often unclear or not discussed. This paper recommends the use of molality and identifies the benefit of experimentally determined van t Hoff indices when calculating osmotic pressures.

Frederick F. Stewart

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Determination of the Effects of Cooling Rate from Solution Treatment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

notch rupture life are possible through control of the cooling rate after solution .... Notch stress rupture testing was conducted at 1000F with a constant load.

29

An efficient two-step solution for vision-based pose determination of a parallel manipulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vision sensor for the direct pose determination of a parallel manipulator can extend the manipulators capabilities in many aspects. The existing approaches to a solution to the pose problem fall into two distinct categories: analytical solutions and ... Keywords: Analytical methods, Iterative methods, Parallel manipulator, Parallelogram, Point correspondence, Pose determination, Two-step solution, Vision sensor

Shuping Zhang; Yongsheng Ding; Kuangrong Hao; Dan Zhang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%. 5 figs.

Oulman, C.S.; Chriswell, C.D.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

Oulman, Charles S. (Ames, IA); Chriswell, Colin D. (Slater, IA)

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (US)

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Determination of Energy Requirements for Ironmaking Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title ... J3: Corrosion Behavior of Differently Heat Treated Steels in CCS Environment with Supercritical CO2 ... Life Cycle Assessment of Different Gold Extraction Process.

34

Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Solution Processing of PLZT Thin Films with a Giant Electrocaloric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the promise of realizing dielectric refrigeration which is more efficient and environmentally ... Solution-Based Synthesis and Design of self Assembled Oxide...

36

Functional Polymer Architectures for Solution Processed Organic Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OLED emitter and indium tin oxide (ITO) as the transparentanode (typically indium tin oxide, ITO) and the cathode (solution on pre-treated indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass

Poulsen, Daniel Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Efficient Processing of Ultramafic Ni Ores: Challenges and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, NEW TECHNOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION IN METALLURGICAL PROCESSES ... DRI-based Continuous Steelmaking: From Theory to Practice.

38

Structured solution methods for non-Markovian decision processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Markov Decision Processes (MDPs), currently a popular method for modeling and solving decision theoretic planning problems, are limited by the Markovian assumption: rewards and dynamics depend on the current state only, and not on previous history. Non-Markovian ...

Fahiem Bacchus; Craig Boutilier; Adam Grove

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, Jr., Henry D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PRECISE DETERMINATION OF URANIUM IN URANYL NITRATE-ALUMINUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed for the determination of uranium in aqueous solutions that contain aluminum and in tributyl phosphate. Uranium was separated from aluminum by an ion exchange technique and was then determined gravimetrically by the 8-hydroxyquinoline method. The coefficient of variation was O.3%. (auth)

MacDonald, C.M.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An Exact Solution Procedure for Determining the Optimal Dispatching Times for Complex Rail Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an optimal way is an important research issue in rail freight transportation. In this paper, we propose a new train service in order to compete with alternative modes of freight transportation. To achieve this1 An Exact Solution Procedure for Determining the Optimal Dispatching Times for Complex Rail

Dessouky, Maged

43

Solvent extraction and recovery of the transuranic elements from waste solutions using the TRUEX process  

SciTech Connect

High-level liquid waste is produced during the processing of irradiated nuclear fuel by the PUREX process. In some cases the treatment of metallurgical scrap to recover the plutonium values also generates a nitric acid waste solution. Both waste solutions contain sufficient concentrations of transuranic elements (mostly /sup 241/Am) to require handling and disposal as a TRU waste. This paper describes a recently developed solvent extraction/recovery process called TRUEX (transuranium extraction) which is designed to reduce the TRU concentration in nitric waste solutions to <100 nCi/g of disposed form (1,2). (In the USA, non-TRU waste is defined as <100 nCi of TRU/g of disposed form.) The process utilizes PUREX process solvent (TBP in a normal paraffinic hydrocarbon or carbon tetrachloride) modified by a small concentration of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (abbrev. CMPO). The presence of CMPO enables the modified PUREX process solvent to extract trivalent actinides as well as tetra- and hexavalent actinides. A major feature of the TRUEX process is that is is applicable to waste solutions containing a wide range of nitric acid, salt, and fission product concentrations and at the same time is very compatible with existing liquid-liquid extraction technology as usually practiced in a fuel reprocessing plant. To date the process has been tested on two different types of synthetic waste solutions. The first solution is a typical high-level nitric acid waste and the second a typical waste solution generated in metallurgical scrap processing. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Schulz, W.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution.

Rogers, Robin (DeKalb, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bond, Andrew H. (Tallahassee, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution. 7 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

Solution Synthesis and Processing of PZT Materials for Neutron Generator Applications  

SciTech Connect

A new solution synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of lead-based ferroelectric materials (patent filed). The process produces controlled stoichiometry precursor powders by non-aqueous precipitation. For a given ferroelectric material to be prepared, a metal acetate/alkoxide solution containing constituent metal species in the appropriate ratio is mixed with an oxalic acid/n-propanol precipitant solution. An oxalate coprecipitate is instantly fonned upon mixing that quantitatively removes the metals from solution. Most of the process development was focused on the synthesis and processing of niobium-substituted lead zirconate titanate with a Zr-to-Ti ratio of 95:5 (PNZT 95/5) that has an application in neutron generator power supplies. The process was scaled to produce 1.6 kg of the PNZT 95/5 powder using either a sen-ii-batch or a continuous precipitation scheme. Several of the PNZT 95/5 powder lots were processed into ceramic slug form. The slugs in turn were processed into components and characterized. The physical properties and electrical performance (including explosive functional testing of the components met the requirements set for the neutron generator application. Also, it has been demonstrated that the process is highly reproducible with respect to the properties of the powders it produces and the properties of the ceramics prepared from its powders. The work described in this report was funded by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

Anderson, M.A.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Montoya, T.V.; Moore, R.H.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS BY REDUCTION-PRECIPITATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process employing carbonate leaching of ores and an advantageous methcd of recovering the uranium and vanadium from the leach solution is described. The uranium and vanadium can be precipitated from carbonate leach solutions by reaction with sodium amalgam leaving the leach solution in such a condition that it is economical to replenish for recycling. Such a carbonate leach solution is treated with a dilute sodium amalgam having a sodium concentration within a range of about 0.01 to 0.5% of sodium. Efficiency of the treatment is dependent on at least three additional factors, intimacy of contact of the amalgam with the leach solution, rate of addition of the amalgam and exclusion of oxygen (air).

Ellis, D.A.; Lindblom, R.O.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

PROCESS OF SECURING PLUTONIUM IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS IN ITS TRIVALENT OXIDATION STATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>Various processes for the recovery of plutonium require that the plutonium be obtalned and maintained in the reduced or trivalent state in solution. Ferrous ions are commonly used as the reducing agent for this purpose, but it is difficult to maintain the plutonium in a reduced state in nitric acid solutions due to the oxidizing effects of the acid. It has been found that the addition of a stabilizing or holding reductant to such solution prevents reoxidation of the plutonium. Sulfamate ions have been found to be ideally suitable as such a stabilizer even in the presence of nitric acid.

Thomas, J.R.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Process for recovering chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid process for the separation and recovery of chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid support comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the chaotropic anions are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved salt (lyotrope). A solid/liquid phase admixture of separation particles containing bound chaotropic anions in such an aqueous solution is also contemplated, as is a chromatography apparatus containing that solid/liquid phase admixture. 19 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Process for recovering chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid process for the separation and recovery of chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid support comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the chaotropic anions are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved salt (lyotrope). A solid/liquid phase admixture of separation particles containing bound chaotropic anions in such an aqueous solution is also contemplated, as is a chromatography apparatus containing that solid/liquid phase admixture.

Rogers, Robin (DeKalb, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bond, Andrew H. (Tallahassee, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 17 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Hoyer, K.K.; Humenik, K.E.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0208-1695) Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

208-1695) Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC - 208-1695) Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC - Cryogenic Carbon Capture (Phase 2) Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Utah; Wyoming Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of a cryogenic carbon capture (CCC) process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas via desublimination of the flue gas and compression of the resulting solid and liquid products. Proposed work will consist of (1) design, fabrication/acquisition, and testing of components for the pilot-scale prototype CCC system; (2) integration of the components into a skid-mounted, pilot-scale prototype CCC system; and (3) testing of the skid-mounted, pilot-scale prototype CCC system using actual or simulated flue gas streams.

53

New Solutions for Substation Sensing, Signal Processing and Decision Making M. Kezunovic, Fellow IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Solutions for Substation Sensing, Signal Processing and Decision Making M. Kezunovic, Fellow IEEE Texas A&M University Department of Electrical Engineering kezunov@ee.tamu.edu Henry Taylor, Fellow IEEE Texas A&M University Department of Electrical Engineering taylor@ee.tamu.edu Abstract This paper

Kezunovic, Mladen

54

SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent extraction process was developed for separating actinide elements including plutonium and uranium from fission products. By this method the ion content of the acidic aqueous solution is adjusted so that it contains more equivalents of total metal ions than equivalents of nitrate ions. Under these conditions the extractability of fission products is greatly decreased. (AEC)

Bruce, F.R.

1962-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

55

Process for recovering pertechnetate ions from an aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid process for the separation and recovery of TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}1} ions from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid support comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups; whereas the aqueous solution from which the TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}1} ions are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved salt. A solid/liquid phase admixture of separation particles containing bound TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}1} ions in such an aqueous solution that is free from MoO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} ions is also contemplated, as is a chromatography apparatus containing that solid/liquid phase admixture. 15 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Process for recovering pertechnetate ions from an aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid process for the separation and recovery of TcO.sub.4.sup.-1 ions from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid support comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups; whereas the aqueous solution from which the TcO.sub.4.sup.-1 ions are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved salt. A solid/liquid phase admixture of separation particles containing bound TcO.sub.4.sup.-1 ions in such an aqueous solution that is free from MoO.sub.4.sup.-2 ions is also contemplated, as is a chromatography apparatus containing that solid/liquid phase admixture.

Rogers, Robin (DeKalb, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bond, Andrew H. (Tallahassee, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

Bazan, Guillermo C; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Moses, Daniel; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Peet, Jeffrey; Soci, Cesare

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

Solution processable organic polymers and small molecules for bulk-heterojunction solar cells: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained wide interest in past few years and are established as one of the leading next generation photovoltaic technologies for low cost power production. Power conversion efficiencies up to 6% and 6.5% have been reported in the literature for single layer and tandem solar cells, respectively using conjugated polymers. A recent record efficiency about 8.13% with active area of 1.13 cm{sup 2} has been reported. However Solution processable small molecules have been widely applied for photovoltaic (PV) devices in recent years because they show strong absorption properties, and they can be easily purified and deposited onto flexible substrates at low cost. Introducing different donor and acceptor groups to construct donor--acceptor (D--A) structure small molecules has proved to be an efficient way to improve the properties of organic solar cells (OSCs). The power conversion efficiency about 4.4 % has been reported for OSCs based on the small molecules. This review deals with the recent progress of solution processable D--A structure small molecules and discusses the key factors affecting the properties of OSCs based on D--A structure small molecules: sunlight absorption, charge transport and the energy level of the molecules.

Sharma, G. D. [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Inverted organic solar cells comprising a solution-processed cesium fluoride interlayer  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the influence of solution-processed cesium fluoride (CsF) interlayers on the performance of inverted polymer solar cells comprising a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester. The thickness of the CsF layer is optimized in terms of current-voltage characteristics by a variation of the solid content in solution. Capacitance-voltage characteristics reveal a shift of the built-in voltage at the cathode interface by about 0.3 V as compared to devices without a CsF layer, giving rise to an increase in open-circuit voltage by the same value. The vertical distribution of Cs{sup +} and F{sup +} ions is studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, indicating a strong diffusion of the alkaline fluoride into the organic layer stack.

Reinhard, Manuel; Zhang Zhenhao; Colsmann, Alexander; Lemmer, Uli [Light Technology Institute, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engesserstrasse 13, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hanisch, Jonas; Ahlswede, Erik [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg, Industriestrasse 6, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany)

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DETERMINATION OF MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE LEAKAGE FROM THE HRT PROCESS STEAM SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Calculations were made to determine the radiation hazard to HRT personnel as a result of leakage to the atmosphere from the process steam system in the event of a heat exchanger tube rupture. These calculations show that with the present four-minute delay before dumping approximately 1020 lb of fuel solution may be transferred to the steam system. The radiation hazard from fission products in the atomosphere will be negligble if the steam killer blower is operating. If this blower is not operatin. a natural convection loop will be set up in the steam killer which will have a condensing capacity of 4 lb/min of steam at atmospheric pressure. In this latter case. the inhalation hazard will be negligible when the leak rate through the steam stop valves is less than 4lb/ min. (auth)

Gift, E.H.

1959-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for OLED SSL  

SciTech Connect

An interconnected network of silver nanowires has been used as transparent anode in OLED devices. This layer was deposited by spin-coating and slot-die coating from an aqueous nanowire suspension. The sheet resistance of the film was 10ohms/sq with a transmission (including the glass substrate) of higher than 85%. The first phase of the project focused on the implementation of this nanowire layer with a hole-injection-layer (HIL) which has been developed at Plextronics and has been shown to provide good stability and efficiency in conventional OLED devices. We modified the HIL solution such that it coated reasonably well with suitable surface morphology so that actual devices can be manufactured. During the second phase we investigated the hole-injection and stability of hole-onlydevices. We determined that the use of the nanowire network as anode does not introduce an additional degradation mechanism since the observed device characteristics did not differ from those made with ITO anode. We then proceeded to make actual OLED devices with this nanowire / HIL stack and achieved device characteristics similar state-of-the-art OLED devices with a single junction. In order to gain traction with potential OLED manufacturers, we decided to contract Novaled to prepare large-area demonstrators for us. For these devices, we used an allevaporated stack, i.e. we did use Novaled??s HIL material instead of Plextronics??. We successfully fabricated demonstrators with an area of 25cm2 with a double or triple junction stack. Minor stack optimizations were necessary to achieve efficacies and lifetime equivalent with ITO devices made with the same devices stack. Due to the reduced microcavity effect, the color of the emitted light is significantly more stable with respect to the viewing angle compared to ITO devices. This fact in conjunction with the promise of lower production cost due to the elimination of the ITO sputtering process and the direct patterning of the anode layer are the obvious advantages of this technology. The project has shown that this nanowire technology is a viable option to achieve OLED devices with good lifetime and efficiency and we are currently working with manufacturers to utilize this technology in a production setting.

None

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sequence determinants of pri-miRNA processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs that regulate many processes in physiology and pathology by guiding the repression of target messenger RNAs. For classification purposes, miRNAs are defined as ~22 nt RNAs that are produced ...

Auyeung, Vincent C. (Vincent Churk-man)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Streamlined determination of processive run length and mechanochemical coupling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RecBCD helicase determined from single turnover chemical quenched-flow kinetic studies. J. Mol. Biol, for both basic research and technological applications. Here, we present a streamlined analytical method of kinetic time courses of NTP hydrolysis that have not been addressed in previous analyses, and also

Derényi, Imre

65

Highly conductive p-type amorphous oxides from low-temperature solution processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report solution-processed, highly conductive (resistivity 1.3-3.8 m{Omega} cm), p-type amorphous A-B-O (A = Bi, Pb; B = Ru, Ir), processable at temperatures (down to 240 Degree-Sign C) that are compatible with plastic substrates. The film surfaces are smooth on the atomic scale. Bi-Ru-O was analyzed in detail. A small optical bandgap (0.2 eV) with a valence band maximum (VBM) below but very close to the Fermi level (binding energy E{sub VBM} = 0.04 eV) explains the high conductivity and suggests that they are degenerated semiconductors. The conductivity changes from three-dimensional to two-dimensional with decreasing temperature across 25 K.

Li Jinwang [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-5-3 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Green Devices Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Tokumitsu, Eisuke [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-5-3 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Green Devices Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Precision and Intelligence Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-19 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Koyano, Mikio [Green Devices Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Mitani, Tadaoki [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-5-3 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-5-3 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Green Devices Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed tank--1.6 gallons; (c) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--1.6 gallons; (d) Contactor drain tank--0.40 gallons; (e) Strip effluent hold tank--0.33 gallons; (f) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--0.37 gallons; (g) Strip effluent decanter--0.14 gallons; (h) Solvent hold tank--0.30 gallon; and (i) Corrugated piping between contactors--16-21 mL. (5) After the initial vessel draining, flushing the vessels with 100 gallons of water using a spray nozzle that produces complete vessel coverage and draining the flush water reduces the source term by the following amounts: (i) Salt solution receipt tank--63X; (ii) Salt solution feed tank--63X; (iii) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--63X; (iv) Contactor drain tank--250X; (v) Strip effluent hold tank--300X; (vi) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--270X; (vii) Strip effluent decanter--710X; (viii) Solvent hold tank--330X. Understand that these estimates of film thickness are based on laboratory testing and fluid mechanics theory. The calculations assume drainage occurs by film flow. Much of the data used to develop the models came from tests with very ''clean'' fluids. Impurities in the fluids and contaminants on the vessels walls could increase liquid holdup. The application of film thickness models and source term reduction calculations should be considered along with operational conditions and H-Tank Farm/Liquid Waste operating experience. These calculations exclude the PVV/HVAC duct work and piping, as well as other areas that area outside the scope of this report.

Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

On-line method of determining utilization factor in Hg-196 photochemical separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method for determining the utilization factor [U] in a photochemical mercury enrichment process (.sup.196 Hg) by measuring relative .sup.196 Hg densities using absorption spectroscopy.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Moskowitz, Philip E. (Peabody, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Automated Processing of Sea Surface Images for the Determination of Whitecap Coverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea surface images have been collected to determine the percentage whitecap coverage (W) since the late 1960s. Image processing methods have changed dramatically since the beginning of whitecap studies. An automated whitecap extraction (AWE) ...

Adrian H. Callaghan; Martin White

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CX-003145: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC - Cryogenic Carbon Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

75

Vacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-coated organic light-emitting diode is transferred from a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold by lamination, or blade coating [1,2] for organic light emitting diode (OLED) as well as solar cell. The top electrodeVacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting

Meng, Hsin-Fei

76

Laser Assisted Nanomanufacturing with Solution Processed Nanoparticles for Low-cost Electronics and Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Printing and Low Temperature Laser Processing, Sensor andCo. , Inc B Buerle, D. , Laser Processing and Chemistry (Conductor Microstructures by Laser Curing of Printed Gold

Pan, Heng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

Savolainen, J.E.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

78

ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Characterization of solution processed, p-doped films using hole-only devices and organic field-effect transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a solution-processed approach for a p-type doped hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra identified the charge transfer between the donor and acceptor in the solution processed doped films. Single carrier device and field-effect transistor were utilized as test vehicles to study the charge transport property and extract important parameters such as bulk mobile carrier concentration and mobility. OLEDs with p-type doped hole transport layer showed significant improvement in power efficiency up to 30% at the optimal doping ratio. This approach has the great potential to reduce the power consumption for OLED solid state lighting while lowering the cost and boosting the throughput of its manufacturing.

Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang (Frank); Rainbolt, James E.; Koech, Phillip K.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Evaluation of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization for Applicability to Significance Determination Process Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an industry application of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) framework to the analysis of a plant event previously subjected to a significance determination process (SDP) evaluation. Within the nuclear regulatory system in the United States, the SDP uses risk insights, where appropriate, to help inspectors and regulatory staff determine the safety or security significance of inspection findings identified within the seven cornerstones of safety at ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessing Power Quality Impacts and Solutions for the California Food Processing Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern food processing equipment can easily be impacted by very brief voltage reductions, commonly known as voltage sags, originating from utility distribution and transmission systems. Even minor voltage sags can lead to unscheduled process downtime, delayed client orders, loss of clients, and lost revenue. This project, sponsored by the California Energy Commission (CEC), analyzed the impact of power quality on the California food processing industry and made recommendations for short-term and long-ter...

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Heat and Mass transfer in an absorption process with mixed absorbent solution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Falling film absorption process is studied for the simulation of the absorber of the absorption solar cooling system. In this study, we use different absorbents (more)

Chi, Ten-yen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Extraction and recovery of plutonium and americium from nitric acid waste solutions by the TRUEX process - continuing development studies  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work done to date on the application of the TRUEX solvent extraction process for removing and separately recovering plutonium and americium from a nitric acid waste solution containing these elements, uranium, and a complement of inert metal ions. This simulated waste stream is typical of a raffinate from a tributyl phosphate (TBP)-based solvent extraction process for removing uranium and plutonium from dissolved plutonium-containing metallurgical scrap. The TRUEX process solvent in these experiments was a solution of TBP and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in carbon tetrachloride. A flowsheet was designed on the basis of measured batch distribution ratios to reduce the TRU content of the solidified raffinate to less than or equal to 10 nCi/g and was tested in a countercurrent experiment performed in a 14-stage Argonne-model centrifugal contractor. The process solvent was recycled without cleanup. An unexpectedly high evaporative loss of CCl/sub 4/ resulted in concentration of the active extractant, CMPO, to nearly 0.30M in the solvent. Results are consistent with this higher CMPO concentration. The raffinate contained only 2 nCi/g of TRU, but the higher CMPO concentration resulted in reduced effectiveness in the stripping of americium from the solvent. Conditions can be easily adjusted to give high yields and good separation of americium and plutonium. Experimental studies of the hydrolytic and gamma-radiolytic degradation of the TRUEX-CCl/sub 4/ showed that solvent degradation would be (1) minimal for a year of processing this typical feed, which contained no fission products, and (2) could be explained almost entirely by hydrolytic and radiolytic damage to TBP. Even for gross amounts of solvent damage, scrubbing with aqueous sodium carbonate solution restored the original americium extraction and stripping capability of the solvent. 43 refs., 5 figs., 36 tabs.

Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kalina, D.G.; Fischer, D.F.; Bane, R.W.; Burris, L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarisia, R.; Diamond, H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Process for preparing chemically modified micas for removal of cesium salts from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemically modified mica composite formed by heating a trioctahedral mica in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride having a concentration of at least 1 mole/liter at a temperature greater than 180 degrees Centigrade for at least 20 hours, thereby replacing exchangeable ions in the mica with sodium. Formation is accomplished at temperatures and pressures which are easily accessed by industrial equipment. The reagent employed is inexpensive and non-hazardous, and generates a precipitate which is readily separated from the modified mica.

Yates, Stephen Frederic (1539 S. Kennicott Dr., Arlington Heights, IL 60005); DeFilippi, Irene (208 E. Edgewood La., Palatine, IL 60067); Gaita, Romulus (6646 Davis Rd., Morton Grove, IL 60053); Clearfield, Abraham (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Lyudmila (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Anatoly (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843)

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Determination of dispersivities and reactionkinetics of selected basalts of columbia river plateau using an inverse analytical solution technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Columbia River Plateau consists of over 100 layers of tholemtic flood basaits, ranging in thickness from 1 m to greater than 100 m, with groundwater flow occurring predominantly along the fractured and weathered flow tops. This study focuses on the determination of transport parameters by modeling sodium transport in the Priest Rapids and Roza flow tops of the Wanapum formation, and Rocky Coulee and Umtanum flow tops of the Grande Ronde formation, within the Cold Creek Syncline of the Hanford Nuclear Waste Reservation. Regional scale lateral dispersivities and reaction rate coefficients were determined from sodium concentration distributions, using an inverse analytical solution technique developed by Domenico (1987) to model nonconservative mass transport. Deuterium, a conservative species, was also modeled using the same technique, to determine a "baseline" reaction rate coefficient. Source concentration values and source dimension sizes were also produced by the model. Model results were compared to those determined by LaVenue (1 985) for chloride, and Adamski (1 993) for boron and potassium. Results from the Wanapum formation yielded a source Y dimension ranging from 11581 m to 13583 m and a lateral dispersivity value ranging from 26 m to 96 m. Relative reaction rate coefficients for this formation were determined to be 10-'-10-' and 10-'-10-9, respectively for sodium and deuterium. Results from the Grande Ronde formation yield a source Y dimension ranging from 6500 m to 12360 m, and a lateral dispersivity value ranging from 70 m to 488 m. Relative reaction rate coefficients for sodium and deuterium in the Grande Ronde formation were determined to be approximately 10-' m-1 and 1 O-Il? 0-7 m-1, respectively. Larger variations in values of source Y dimension and lateral dispersivity (ay) for the Grande Ronde formation are probably due to a minimum amount of available data control points. Oxygen-18 and deuterium isotopic data for waters from the flowtops upgradient and downgradient of the Cold Creek Barrier (a hydrologic discontinuity), and from a deep formation well support the hypothesis that deeper formation waters are moving upward along the Cold Creek Barrier and then laterally along the flow tops in the downgradient direction. Fluids found in deeper flow tops have an isotopic signature closer to those of the deep formation well; and fluids of shallower flow tops have an isotopic signature suggesting mixing between local meteoric waters and deep formation waters.

Fahlquist, Lisa Armstrong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The absorbent's solution flow process, non-parametric identification into an absorption chiller for air conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lithium bromide chillers supplied from solar collectors are used to provide proper environmental conditions into industrial and civil buildings. To maintain the appropriate values for the temperature into the chiller's boiler, a control unit is introduced ... Keywords: absorption chiller, flow process, system identification

Adrian Danila

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

New Solutions for Substation Sensing, Signal Processing and Decision Making M. Kezunovic, Fellow IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into one system [1]. Once the concept is implemented, a variety of new applications that utilize overall of IEDs from different vendors can be interconnected to form a substation automation system. The problem in the power system area regarding application of sensors, signal processing and decision-making. To illustrate

88

EDA solutions to new-defect detection in advanced process technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For decades, EDA test generation tools for digital logic have relied on the Stuck-At fault model, despite the fact that process technologies moved forward from TTL (for which the Stuck-At fault model was originally developed) to nanometer-scale CMOS. ...

Erik Jan Marinissen; Gilbert Vandling; Sandeep Kumar Goel; Friedrich Hapke; Jason Rivers; Nikolaus Mittermaier; Swapnil Bahl

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solution and Forecast Horizons for Infinite-Horizon Nonhomogeneous Markov Decision Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a nonhomogeneous infinite-horizon Markov Decision Process (MDP) problem with multiple optimal first-period policies. We seek an algorithm that, given finite data, delivers an optimal first-period policy. Such an algorithm can thus ... Keywords: monotone policy, planning horizon, well-posed problem

Torpong Cheevaprawatdomrong; Irwin E. Schochetman; Robert L. Smith; Alfredo Garcia

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, 564-8680 (Japan); Fukui, T.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, 564-8680 (Japan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility of organic matter oxidation as the main source of bicarbonate. Model results indicate that pH and Eh are relatively stable. The dissolution-precipitation trends of hematite, pyrite and calcite also coincide with those indicated by the conceptual model. A thorough sensitivity analysis has been performed for the most relevant microbial parameters as well as for initial and boundary POC and DOC concentrations. The results of such analysis indicate that computed concentrations of bicarbonate, sulfate and DOC are sensitive to most of the microbial parameters, including specific growth rates, half-saturation constants, proportionality coefficients and yield coefficients. Model results, however, are less sensitive to the yield coefficient of DOC to iron-reducer bacteria. The sensitivity analysis indicates that changes in fermentation microbial parameters affect the growth of the iron-reducer, thus confirming the interconnection of both microbial processes. Computed concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate are found to be sensitive to changes in the initial concentration of POC and the boundary concentration of DOC, but they lack sensitivity to the initial concentration of DOC and the boundary concentration of POC. The explanation for such result is related to the fact that POC has a low mobility due to its large molecular weight. DOC, however, can migrate downwards. Although a coupled hydro-bio-geochemical 1-D model can reproduce the observed ''unexpected'' increase of concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate at a depth of 70 m, further modeling work is required in order to obtain a similar conclusion under the more realistic two dimensional conditions of the fracture zone.

Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Oyenekan, Babatunde A. (Katy, TX)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

96

Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processible Small-Molecule OLEDs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop key knowledge and make critical connections between technologies needed to enable low-cost manufacturing of OLED lighting products. In particular, the program was intended to demonstrate the feasibility of making high performance Small-Molecule OLEDs (SM-OLED) using a roll-to-roll (R2R) wet-coating technique by addressing the following technical risks (1) Whether the wet-coating technique can provide high performance OLEDs, (2) Whether SM-OLED can be made in a R2R manner, (3) What are the requirements for coating equipment, and (4) Whether R2R OLEDs can have the same performance as the lab controls. The program has been managed and executed according to the Program Management Plan (PMP) that was first developed at the beginning of the program and further revised accordingly as the program progressed. Significant progress and risk reductions have been accomplished by the end of the program. Specific achievements include: (1) Demonstrated that wet-coating can provide OLEDs with high LPW and long lifetime; (2) Demonstrated R2R OLEDs can be as efficient as batch controls (Figure 1) (3) Developed & validated basic designs for key equipment necessary for R2R SM-OLEDs; (4) Developed know-hows & specifications on materials & ink formulations critical to wetcoating; (5) Developed key R2R processes for each OLED layer (6) Identified key materials and components such as flexible barrier substrates necessary for R2R OLEDs.

Liu, Jie Jerry

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Process and apparatus for determination and utilization of a quantity of preheating energy  

SciTech Connect

A preheating process and apparatus for determination and utilization of a quantity of preheating energy so as to automatically achieve a desired temperature at a given location prior to a predetermined period of usage, especially for preheating an automotive vehicle. In accordance with the process, the respective preheating times required to achieve a desired temperature for various possible actual conditions at the location of usage are determined and stored, at a predetermined point of time prior to the usage commencement time, the correct preheating time is determined from the stored preheating times based upon actual temperature conditions and application of heat to the location is automatically commenced at a time prior to the usage commencement time that corresponds to the difference between the usage commencement time and the correct preheating time determined previously. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the apparatus, a preset-table timer actuated switching control means is provided for actuating a heating device. An actual temperature value sensor means is utilized to sense the actual temperature at the location to be preheated and is used to address a memory unit containing, as stored data, preheating times to be read out that correspond to the respectively required heating time to achieve a desired temperature for each of various possible actual temperatures at the location. The stored preheating time read out by the memory unit based upon actual temperature value sensed by the sensor means at a point of time prior to the preset usage commencement time is utilized by the switching control means to actuate the heating device at a time prior to a preset time for commencement of usage that corresponds to the difference between the preset usage commencement time and the time read out by the memory unit.

Lamkewitz, F.; Riedmaier, J.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

98

Major Modification Determination Process Utilized for Proposed Idaho National Laboratory Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past three years, several new projects with the potential for major modifications to existing facilities have been considered for implementation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These projects were designated to take place in existing nuclear facilities with existing documented safety analyses. 10 CFR 830.206 requires the contractor for a major modification to a Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to obtain Department of Energy (DOE) approval for the nuclear facility design criteria to be used for preparation of a preliminary documented safety analysis (PDSA), as well as creation and approval of the PDSA, before the contractor can procure materials or components or begin construction on the project. Given the significant effort and expense of preparation and approval of a PDSA, a major modification determination for new projects is warranted to determine if the rigorous requirements of a major modification are actually required. Furthermore, performing a major modification determination helps to ensure that important safety aspects of a project are appropriately considered prior to modification construction or equipment procurement. The projects considered for major modification status at the INL included: treatment and packaging of unirradiated, sodium-bonded highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and miscellaneous casting scrap in the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF); post irradiation examination of Advance Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) fuel in the MFC Analytical Laboratory (AL); the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) gas test loop (GTL); and the hydraulic shuttle irradiation system (HSIS) at ATR. The major modification determinations for three of the proposed projects resulted in a negative major modification. On the other hand, the major modification determination for the GTL project concluded that the project would require a major modification. This paper discusses the process, methods, and considerations used by the INL for the four major modification determinations. Three of the four major modification determinations discussed herein were completed using the guidance specified in the draft of DOE STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process. DOE-STD-1189 was released as a draft document in March 2007 and provides guidance for integrating safety considerations into the early design activities for constructing new facilities or making modifications to existing nuclear facilities. The fourth major modification determination was prepared prior to the existence of DOE STD-1189 and was evaluated solely by the definition of a major modification given in 10 CFR 830.206. For all four projects, consideration was given to: Facility hazard categorization change and material inventory Facility footprint change with the potential to adversely affect credited safety function New or changed processes resulting in a change to the safety basis The use of new technology or equipment not approved for use in the facility The need for new or revised safety basis controls Hazards not previously evaluated in the safety basis.

Michael A. Lehto, Ph.D.; Boyd D. Christensen

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Determination of Basic Structure-Property Relations for Processing and Modeling in Advanced Nuclear Fuel: Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to study structure-property relations in solid solutions of nitrides and oxides with surrogate elements to simulate the behavior of fuels of inert matrix fuels of interest to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), with emphasis in zirconium-based materials. Work with actual fuels will be carried out in parallel in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Three key aspects will be explored: microstructure characterization through measurement of global texture evolution and local crystallographic variations using Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD); determination of mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, quasi-static compression strength, and hardness, as functions of load and temperature, and, finally, development of structure-property relations to describe mechanical behavior of the fuels based on experimental data. Materials tested will be characterized to identify the mechanisms of deformation and fracture and their relationship to microstructure and its evolution. New aspects of this research are the inclusion of crystallographic information into the evaluation of fuel performance and the incorporation of statistical variations of microstructural variables into simplified models of mechanical behavior of fuels that account explicitly for these variations. The work is expected to provide insight into processing conditions leading to better fuel performance and structural reliability during manufacturing and service, as well as providing a simplified testing model for future fuel production.

Kirk Wheeler; Manuel Parra; Pedro Peralta

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An evaluation of membrane materials for the treatment of highly concentrated suspended salt solutions in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration processes for desalination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a study to enhance and improve a zero liquid discharge (ZLD) reverse osmosis process that uses seed crystals to promote crystallization of the dissolved salts in the residual brine while it is being treated by identifying those membrane materials that are most suitable for the process. In the study, a one plate SEPA Cell module by GE Osmonics was used to determine which membranes were most susceptible to fouling and/or membrane hydrolysis. A cellulose acetate (CA), polyamide (PA) low MWCO, and PA high MWCO membrane were tested under reverse osmosis conditions. The CA and thin film (TF) membranes were also tested for nanofiltration. The cell was operated under conditions that were determined to be optimum for each membrane by the manufacturer, GE Osmonics. A high pressure, low flow, positive displacement diaphragm pump circulated the saturated calcium sulfate solution with 2 % suspended solids through the cell while the reject and permeate were recycled back to the feed, thereby preserving a saturated solution to promote crystal growth and simulate the seeded reverse osmosis process. The temperature was maintained constant by adding an ice pack to the feed vessel when necessary. The transmembrane pressure differential was maintained constant by adjusting a back pressure valve on the concentrate outlet. The results illustrate that if potable drinking water is the intended use, then the nanofiltration cellulose acetate membrane should be used. If irrigation is the desired use, then the nanofiltration thin film membrane should be used. Overall, the reverse osmosis cellulose acetate membrane was observed to outperform all membranes when all performance parameters were normalized. However, this membrane was observed to be prone to degradation in a seeded slurry and therefore its lifetime should be analyzed further. The polyamide membrane initially had a high water transport coefficient, but fouling led to its rapid decline which was attributed to the membranes rough and protrusive surface. A lifetime test on the thin film and cellulose acetate revealed that when operated at their maximum pressure specified by GE Osmonics for a duration of 8 hours that no decrease in rejection occurred.

Hughes, Trenton Whiting

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Quantitative Determination of Chemical Processes by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) provides several orders of magnitude of NMR signal enhancement by converting the much larger electron spin polarization to nuclear spin polarization. Polarization occurs at low temperature (1.4K) and is followed by quickly dissolving the sample for room temperature NMR detection. DNP is generally applicable to almost any small molecules and can polarize various nuclei including 1H, 19F and 13C. The large signal from DNP enhancement reduces the limit of detection to micromolar or sub-micromolar concentration in a single scan. Since DNP enhancement often provides the only source for the observable signal, it enables tracking of the polarization flow. Therefore, DNP is ideal for studying chemical processes. Here, quantitative tools are developed to separate kinetics and spin relaxation, as well as to obtain structural information from these measurements. Techniques needed for analyzing DNP polarized sample are different from those used in conventional NMR because a large, yet non-renewable hyperpolarization is available. Using small flip angle pulse excitation, the hyperpolarization can still be divided into multiple scans. Based on this principle, a scheme is presented that allows reconstruction of indirect spectral dimensions similarly to conventional 2D NMR. Additionally, small flip angle pulses can be used to obtain a succession of scans separated in time. A model describing the combined effects of the evolution of a chemical process and of spin-lattice relaxation is shown. Applied to a Diels-Alder reaction, it permitted measuring kinetics along with the effects of auto- and cross-relaxation. DNP polarization of small molecules also shows significant promise for studying protein-ligand interaction. The binding of fluorinated ligands to the protease trypsin was studied through the observation of various NMR parameter changes, such as line width, signal intensity and chemical shift of the ligands. Intermolecular polarization transfer from hyperpolarized ligand to protein can further provide information about the binding pocket of the protein. As an alternative to direct observation of protein signal, a model is presented to describe a two-step intermolecular polarization transfer between competitively binding ligands mediated through the common binding pocket of the protein. The solutions of this model relate the evolution of signal intensities to the intermolecular cross relaxation rates, which depend on individual distances in the binding epitope. In summary, DNP provides incomparable sensitivity, speed and selectivity to NMR. Quantitative models such as those discussed here enable taking full advantage of these benefits for the study of chemical processes.

Zeng, Haifeng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Decontamination solution development studies  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement.

Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Application of lanthanide induced shifts for the determination of solution structures of metal ion-extractant complexes  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the induced shifts in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of extractants complexed to paramagnetic lanthanide ions has been performed. The complexes of a number of monofunctional and bifunctional extractants have been examined and assigned solution structures by minimizing the differences between the observed shifts and those calculated using a computer analysis in which the potential configurations of the complexes were generated. Complexes of monofunctional extractants were calculated to have coordination geometries quite similar to those observed in related compounds by crystallographic techniques. For the bifunctional extractants, differentiation between monodentate and bidentate coordination seems possible. 23 references, 2 figures, 7 tables.

Kalina, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O.sub.3 thin films and powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O.sub.3 precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650.degree. C. and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures.

Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} thin films and powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650 C and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures. 2 figs.

Boyle, T.J.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

Determining the locus of a processing zone in an oil shale retort by effluent off gas heating value  

SciTech Connect

A processing zone advances through a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort has an effluent gas passing therefrom. The effluent gas has a heating value which is dependent on the kerogen content of the oil shale then in contact with the processing zone. To determine the locus of the processing zone, the formation is assayed at selected locations in the retort for kerogen content before processing the selected locations, and effluent gas from the retort is monitored for its heating value.

Cha, C.Y.

1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measurement of pH in high ionic strength solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A practical method is described for measuring pH in solutions of high ionic strength (e.g., brines, process solutions). The pH is determined by integratively measuring the potential due to H{sup +} and the potential due to another cation or anion and relating the combined electrical potential to a calculated pH for high ionic strength solutions.

Knauss, K.G.; Wolery, T.J.; Jackson, K.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Aluminum Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process  

SciTech Connect

A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of aluminum, hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous aluminum oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Pye, S. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Hafnium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process  

SciTech Connect

A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of hafnyl chloride [HfOCl{sub 2}], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous hafnium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 70-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL; Simmerman, S. G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The monitoring and control of TRUEX processes. Volume 1, The use of sensitivity analysis to determine key process variables and their control bounds  

SciTech Connect

The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was used to design a flowsheet for the TRUEX solvent extraction process that would be used to determine its instrumentation and control requirements. Sensitivity analyses of the key process variables, namely, the aqueous and organic flow rates, feed compositions, and the number of contactor stages, were carried out to assess their impact on the operation of the TRUEX process. Results of these analyses provide a basis for the selection of an instrument and control system and the eventual implementation of a control algorithm. Volume Two of this report is an evaluation of the instruments available for measuring many of the physical parameters. Equations that model the dynamic behavior of the TRUEX process have been generated. These equations can be used to describe the transient or dynamic behavior of the process for a given flowsheet in accordance with the TRUEX model. Further work will be done with the dynamic model to determine how and how quickly the system responds to various perturbations. The use of perturbation analysis early in the design stage will lead to a robust flowsheet, namely, one that will meet all process goals and allow for wide control bounds. The process time delay, that is, the speed with which the system reaches a new steady state, is an important parameter in monitoring and controlling a process. In the future, instrument selection and point-of-variable measurement, now done using the steady-state results reported here, will be reviewed and modified as necessary based on this dynamic method of analysis.

Regalbuto, M.C.; Misra, B.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Theoretical and experimental determination of matrix diffusion and related solute transport properties of fractured tuffs from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical and experimental studies of the chemical and physical factors which affect molecular diffusion of dissolved substances from fractures into a tuffaceous rock matrix have been made on rocks from G-Tunnel and Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A variety of groundwater tracers, which may be useful in field tests at the NTS, have also been developed and tested. Although a number of physical/chemical processes may cause nonconvective transport of dissolved species from fractures into the tuff matrix, molecular diffusion seems to be the most important process. Molecular diffusion in these rocks is controlled by the composition of the groundwater through multicomponent effects and several rock properties. The porosities of the samples studied ranged from about 0.1 to 0.4. The constrictivity-tortuosity parameter ranged from 0.1 and 0.3 and effective matrix-diffusion coefficients were measured to be between 2 to 17. x 10{sup -7} c,{sup 2}/s for sodium halides and sodium pentafluorobenzoate. Total porosity was found to be the principle factor accounting for the variation in effective diffusion coefficients. The constrictivity-tortuosity factor was found to have a fair correlation (r = 0.75) with the median pore diameters measured by mercury intrusion. Measurements of bulk-rock electrical impedance changes with frequency indicate that the constrictivity factor has a maximum value of 0.8 to 1, but may be smaller. If the larger values are correct, then the diffusion paths in tuff are more tortuous than in granular media. Computation of the full diffusion-coefficient matrix for various tracers in J-13 well water from the NTS indicates coupling of the diffusion fluxes of all ionic species. These effects are being incorporated into a numerical model of multicomponent-matrix diffusion.

Walter, G.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

Li, Jian (Marietta, GA); Chai, Xin Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Junyoung (Marietta, GA)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

RAPID AUTOMATED RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYZER FOR DETERMINATION OF TARGETED RADIONUCLIDES IN NUCLEAR PROCESS STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some industrial process-scale plants require the monitoring of specific radionuclides as an indication of the composition of their feed streams or as indicators of plant performance. In this process environment, radiochemical measurements must be fast, accurate, and reliable. Manual sampling, sample preparation, and analysis of process fluids are highly precise and accurate, but tend to be expensive and slow. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have assembled and characterized a fully automated prototype Process Monitor instrument which was originally designed to rapidly measure Tc-99 in the effluent streams of the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, WA. The system is capable of a variety of tasks: extraction of a precise volume of sample, sample digestion / analyte redox adjustment, column-based chemical separations, flow-through radiochemical detection and data analysis / reporting. The system is compact, its components are fluidically inter-linked, and analytical results can be immediately calculated and electronically reported. It is capable of performing a complete analytical cycle in less than 15 minutes. The system is highly modular and can be adapted to a variety of sample types and analytical requirements. It exemplifies how automation could be integrated into reprocessing facilities to support international nuclear safeguards needs.

O'Hara, Matthew J.; Durst, Philip C.; Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg; Devol, Timothy A.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Determination of Thermal Contact Conductance of Metal Tabs for Battery Ultrasonic Welding Process  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental apparatus and data analysis algorithm were used to determine the thermal contact conductance between 0.2-mm-thick pure aluminum battery tabs as a function of contact pressure from 3.6 to 14.4 MPa. Specimens were sandwiched between one optically transparent and one infrared (IR) transparent glass windows, and heated up from one side by an intense short pulse of flash light. The temperature transient on the other side was measured by an IR camera. In order to determine the thermal contact conductance, two experiment configurations having different number of Al specimen layers were used. Numerical heat conduction simulations showed that the thermal contact conductance strongly depended on the ratio of the maximum temperature rise between the two configurations. Moreover, this ratio was not sensitive to the uncertainties of other thermal properties. Through the simulation results, a simple correlation between the gap conductance and the ratio was established. Therefore, once the ratio of the temperature rise between two configurations was experimentally measured, the thermal contact conductance could be readily determined from the correlation. The new method was fast and robust. Most importantly, the data analysis algorithm improved the measurement accuracy by considerably reducing the uncertainties associated with the thermophysical properties of materials and measurement system.

Chen, Jian [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Feasibility of using acoustic emission to determine in-process tool wear  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) was evaluated for its ability to predict and recognize failure of cutting tools during machining processes when the cutting tool rotates and the workpiece is stationary. AE output was evaluated with a simple algorithm. AE was able to detect drill failure when the transducer was mounted on the workpiece holding fixture. Drill failure was recognized as size was reduced to 0.0003 in. diameter. The ability to predict failure was reduced with drill size, drill material elasticity, and tool coating. AE output for the turning process on a lathe was compared to turning tool insert wear. The turning tool must have sufficient wear to produce a detectable change in AE output to predict insert failure.

Lazarus, L.J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Method and system for determining precursors of health abnormalities from processing medical records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Medical reports are converted to document vectors in computing apparatus and sampled by applying a maximum variation sampling function including a fitness function to the document vectors to reduce a number of medical records being processed and to increase the diversity of the medical records being processed. Linguistic phrases are extracted from the medical records and converted to s-grams. A Haar wavelet function is applied to the s-grams over the preselected time interval; and the coefficient results of the Haar wavelet function are examined for patterns representing the likelihood of health abnormalities. This confirms certain s-grams as precursors of the health abnormality and a parameter can be calculated in relation to the occurrence of such a health abnormality.

Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Beckerman, Barbara G

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Solution of Master Equations for the anharmonic oscillator interacting with a heat bath and for parametric down conversion process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve analytically master equations that describe a cavity filled with a kerr medium, taking into account the dissipation induced by the environment, and parametric down conversion processes. We use superoperator techniques.

L. M. Arvalo-Aguilar; R. Jurez-Amaro; J. M. Vargas-Martnez; O. Aguilar-Loreto; H. Moya-Cessa

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reduced cycle time and work in process in a medical device factory : the problem and a proposed solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many manufacturing firms have improved their operations by implementing a work-in-process (WIP) limiting control strategy. This project explores the application of this concept to limit WIP and reduce cycle time for the ...

Qian, Yi, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort by sound monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring for sound produced in the retort, preferably by monitoring for sound at at least two locations in a plane substantially normal to the direction of advancement of the processing zone. Monitoring can be effected by placing a sound transducer in a well extending through the formation adjacent the retort and/or in the fragmented mass such as in a well extending into the fragmented mass.

Elkington, W. Brice (Grand Junction, CO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Cerium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process  

SciTech Connect

A simple test tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous cerium oxide microspheres via the internal gelation process.1 Broth formulations of cerium ammonium nitrate [(NH4)2Ce(NO3)6], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous cerium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60 to 90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations to be able to equate the test-tube gelation times to actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broth formulations.

Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Chi, Anthony [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort by pressure monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring pressure in the retort. Monitoring can be effected by placing a pressure transducer in a well extending through the formation adjacent the retort and/or in the fragmented mass such as in a well extending into the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.; Burton, R.S. III

1978-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification efficiency is calculated based on entropy balances or based on exergy balances. In practice, however, exergy balances are less affected by measurement uncertainties, whereas entropy balances can not be recommended if measurement uncertainties are not corrected in a way that the energy balance of the storage process is in agreement with the first law of thermodynamics. A comparison of the stratification efficiencies obtained from experimental results of charging, standby, and discharging processes gives meaningful insights into the different mixing behaviors of a storage tank that is charged and discharged directly, and a tank-in-tank system whose outer tank is charged and the inner tank is discharged thereafter. The new method has a great potential for the comparison of the stratification efficiencies of thermal energy storages and storage components such as stratifying devices. (author)

Haller, Michel Y.; Streicher, Wolfgang [Institute of Thermal Engineering, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 25/B, 8010 Graz (Austria); Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon [Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Brovej, Building 118, DK-2800, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bales, Chris [Solar Energy Research Center SERC, Hoegskolan Dalarna, 781 88 Borlaenge (Sweden)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Determination of process conditions for the spray nozzle for the DWPF melter off-gas HEME  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF melter off-gas systems have High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME) upstream of the High Efficiency Particulates Air filters (HEPA) to remove fine mist and particulates from the off-gas. To have an acceptable filter life and an efficient HEME operation, air atomized water is sprayed into the melter off-gas and onto the HEME surface. The water spray keeps the HEME wet, which dissolves the soluble particulates and enhances the HEME efficiency. DWPF Technical requested SRL to determine the conditions for the DWPF nozzle which will give complete atomization of water so that the HEME will operate efficiently. Since the air pressure and flow rate to generate the desired spray are not known before hand, an experiment was performed in two stages. The first stage involved preliminary tests which mapped out a general operating region for producing the desired spray pattern. Afterward, all the gages and meters were changed to suitable ranges for the conditions which generated an acceptable spray. This report summarizes the results and the conclusions of the second stage experiment.

Lee, L.

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Procession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UEE 2008 Ziermann, Martin 2004 Macht und Architektur: ZweiP ROCESSION Martin Stadler EDITORS W ILLEKE W ENDRICHFull Citation: Stadler, Martin, 2008, Procession. In Jacco

Stadler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are processed to complex final shapes by investment casting. Iron-nickel-base superalloys are not customarily investment cast. Investment casting permits intricate internal cooling

132

DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

DISSELKAMP RS

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Information Technology Solutions - Energy  

texturing process is a cost effective alternative that uses nontoxic materials. Information Technology Solutions ... United States Department of Energys National

134

RPP-PLAN-47325 Revision 0 Radioactive Waste Determination Process Plan for Waste Management Area C Tank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This plan describes the radioactive waste determination process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will use for Hanford Site Waste Management Area C (WMA C) tank waste residuals subject to DOE authority under DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. Preparation of this plan is a required component of actions the DOE-Office of River Protection (ORP) must take to fulfill proposed Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-045-80. Waste Management Area C is comprised of various single-shell tanks, encased and direct-buried pipes, diversion boxes, pump pits, and unplanned release sites (sites contaminated as a result of spills of tank waste to the environment). Since operations began in the late 1940s, the tanks in WMA C have continuously stored waste managed as high-level waste (HLW) that was derived from defense-related nuclear research, development, and weapons production activities. Planning for the final closure of WMA C is underway. This radioactive waste determination process plan assumes that tank closure will follow retrieval of as much tank waste as technically and economically practical. It is also assumed for the purposes of this plan that after completion

Waste Residuals; J. R. Robertson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications with low voltage requirements which do not needvoltage and time in the context of application requirements.voltage of 5 V, and oxide thickness of 100 nm, mobility requirements

Bakhishev, Teymur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnetron sputtered indium-tin-oxide on plastic substrate,and A. K. -Y. Jen, Indium tin oxide-free semi-transparentelectrodes, usually indium tin oxide (ITO). Application of

Bakhishev, Teymur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Impact of Market Rules and Market Structure on the Price Determination Process in the England and Wales Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper argues that the market rules governing the operation of the England and Wales electricity market in combination with the structure of this market presents the two major generators---National Power and PowerGen---with opportunities to earn revenues substantially in excess of their costs of production for short periods of time. Generators competing to serve this market have two strategic weapons at their disposal: (1) the price bid for each generation set and (2) the capacity of each generation set made available to supply the market each half-hour period during the day. We argue that because of the rules governing the price determination process in this market, by the strategic use of capacity availability declarations, when conditions exogenous to the behavior of the two major generators favor it, these two generators are able to obtain prices for their output substantially in excess of their marginal costs of generation. The paper establishes these points in the following manner. First, we provide a description of the market structure and rules governing the operation of the England and Wales electricity market, emphasizing those aspects that are important to the success of the strategy we believe the two generators use to exercise market power. We then summarize the time series properties of the price of electricity emerging from this market structure and price-setting process. By analyzing four fiscal years of actual market prices, quantities and generator bids into the market, we provide various pieces of evidence in favor of the strategic use of the market rules by the two major participants. The paper closes with a discussion of the lessons that the England and Wales experience can provide for the design of competitive power markets in the US, particula...

Frank A. Wolak; Robert H. Patrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Determination of Optimal Process Flowrates and Reactor Design for Autothermal Hydrogen Production in a Heat-Integrated Ceramic Microchannel Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work aimed at designing a thermally efficient microreactor system coupling methanol steam reforming with methanol combustion for autothermal hydrogen production. A preliminary study was performed by analyzing three prototype reactor configurations to identify the optimal radial distribution pattern upon enhancing the reactor self-insulation. The annular heat integration pattern of Architecture C showed superior performance in providing efficient heat retention to the system with a 50 - 150 degrees C decrease in maximum external-surface temperature. Detailed work was performed using Architecture C configuration to optimize the catalyst placement in the microreactor network, and optimize reforming and combustion flows, using no third coolant line. The optimized combustion and reforming catalyst configuration prevented the hot-spot migration from the reactor midpoint and enabled stable reactor operation at all process flowrates studied. Best results were obtained at high reforming flowrates (1800 sccm) with an increase in combustion flowrate (300 sccm) with the net H2 yield of 53% and thermal efficiency of >80% from methanol with minimal insulation to the heatintegrated microchannel network. The use of the third bank of channels for recuperative heat exchange by four different reactor configurations was explored to further enhance the reactor performance; the maximum overall hydrogen yield was increased to 58% by preheating the reforming stream in the outer 16 heat retention channels. An initial 3-D COMSOL model of the 25-channeled heat-exchanger microreactor was developed to predict the reactor hotspot shape, location, optimum process flowrates and substrate thermal conductivity. This study indicated that low thermal conductivity materials (e.g. ceramics, glass) provides enhanced efficiencies than high conductivity materials (e.g. silicon, stainless steel), by maintaining substantial thermal gradients in the system through minimization of axial heat conduction. Final summary of the study included the determination of system energy density; a gravimetric energy density of 169.34 Wh/kg and a volumetric energy density of 506.02 Wh/l were achieved from brass architectures for 10 hrs operation, which is higher than the energy density of Li-Ion batteries (120 Wh/kg and 350 Wh/l). Overall, this research successfully established the optimal process flowrates and reactor design to enhance the potential of a thermally-efficient heat-exchanger microchannel network for autothermal hydrogen production in portable applications.

Damodharan, Shalini

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Accelerating Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions From vehicles on the road to the energy that powers them, Oak Ridge National Laboratory innovations are advancing American transportation. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is making an impact on everyday America by enhancing transportation choices and quality of life. Through strong collaborative partnerships with industry, ORNL research and development efforts are helping accelerate the deployment of a new generation of energy efficient vehicles powered by domestic, renewable, clean energy. EPA ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel rule ORNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory co-led a comprehensive research and test program to determine the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on emissions and emission control (catalyst) technology. In the course of this program, involving

140

Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)  

SciTech Connect

Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

Xiao, Teng

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

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141

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for concentrating fission-product-containing waste solutions from fuel element processing is described. The process comprises the addition of sugar to the solution, preferably after it is made alkaline; spraying the solution into a heated space whereby a dry powder is formed; heating the powder to at least 220 deg C in the presence of oxygen whereby the powder ignites, the sugar is converted to carbon, and the salts are decomposed by the carbon; melting the powder at between 800 and 900 deg C; and cooling the melt. (AEC) antidiuretic hormone from the blood by the liver. Data are summarized from the following: tracer studies on cardiovascular functions; the determination of serum protein-bound iodine; urinary estrogen excretion in patients with arvanced metastatic mammary carcinoma; the relationship between alheroclerosis aad lipoproteins; the physical chemistry of lipoproteins; and factors that modify the effects of densely ionizing radia

Allemann, R.T.; Johnson, B.M. Jr.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Regular Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The structure of a binary solid solution is shown schematically in Fig. 13. Three types of interatomic bonds

143

CX-001036: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001036: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solution Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) Solid State Lighting (Pennsylvania) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The objective of this project is to develop a solution processable transparent conducting hole injection (TCHI) electrode. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funding: DE-FOA-0000082. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001036.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002810: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002813: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001331

144

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other Gases for Coal-Gasification Processes", Chemicalof Liquid Effluents from Coal Gasification Plants", Economicand other Gases for Coal-Gasification Processes", Chemical

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A techno-economic model for determining the critical energy ratio of co-generation in process industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A techno-economic model incorporating various operating parameters namely, cogeneration technology, primary process, thermodynamic efficiency, capital investment and interest rate has been developed and analysed to arrive at the optimum energy index ...

V. N. Vedamurthy; C. P. Sarathy

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Final Closeout report for grant FG36-08GO18018, titled: Functional Multi-Layer Solution Processable Polymer Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original objectives were: (1) Develop a method to deposit multiple conjugated polymer film layers and avoid the problem of dissolution from mutually solubility; (2) Use this deposition method to develop multi-layer polymer based solar cells with layers that are function specific; (3) characterize these layers and devices; (4) develop electrical and optical models that describe and predict the properties of the multi-layers; and (5) Ultimate efficiency goals are {approx}6.75% with J{sub sc} = 12 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 0.75, and V{sub oc} = 0.75. The question of whether photovoltaic (PV) cells will ever be able to replace fossil fuels as the main provider of electrical power is not just a question of device efficiency; it is a question of how much power can be provided for what price. It has been well documented that PV devices at 10% power efficiency can provide for all of the world's power needs without covering too much of the earth's surface. Assuming desert like cloud coverage, an area equivalent to the land area of Texas would have to be covered. However, it has also been shown that using the current state-of-the-art silicon devices, the price-per-Watt will never be low enough to be economically feasible for large-scale development. Solution-processable PV devices based on polymers are a very attractive alternative to traditional Silicon PV because this technology is much lower in materials cost and in environmentally toxic waste production. Solution-based polymers can be rapidly deposited using printing technologies and are compatible with light-weight flexible substrates that can increase the range of available PV applications. In the past ten years, the efficiency of polymer based PV devices has increased from {approx}1% to over 10%. The highest efficiency organic solar cells are based upon a single layer than consists of a mixture of donor and acceptor moieties. This one layer has multiple optical and electrical functions, so the design of a single heterojunction layer is based upon the idea of balancing good and bad properties within a single film. This proposal addresses the idea that the use of multiple layers that have differing electrical and optical functions could lead to greater efficiency because fewer materials compromises must be made. This idea is not new, multiple functional layer have been successfully used in cross-linked OLED's and organic small molecule evaporated PV devices. The main reason that multiple layers of polymers are not commonly deposited is that most conjugated polymers are mutually soluble in the same solvents. The work outlined in the proposal was intended to develop a new deposition strategy that would allow multiple organic layers to be deposited from solution using spin coating. The deposition method that we proposed was successful, sometimes, but ultimately not reliable. Instead we focused on more reliable methods to implement doping along the interface between layers. This work has been very successful. We found that using PEDOT:PSS, the PSS would form a surface layer of {approx}2-3 nm thickness that would mix with and electrochemically react with P3HT upon heating. This mechanism is also a crosslinking reaction in that H{sub 2} is released and permanent new bonds are formed. Using the Plextronics Inc. replacement to PEDOT:PSS, for which there are no mobile dopants, we were able to show that a second and different mechanism can be used to p-type dope organic materials. We are currently working with Plextronics to develop a new product. Finally we produced n-type doping of a thin fullerene layer near the cathode also using a self-assembly method. Low work function metals will diffuse into the BHJ layer and dope the fullerene upon heating. This doping also affects the vertical segregation of BHJ materials in a predictable way. We accomplished all of the scientific goals that we set out in the proposal written in May 2007. Some of the methods we proposed were not fully successful, but we did come up with better methods to achieve the same goal. We did not achieve the efficiency g

Adam J. Moule

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Electromarking solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

Bullock, Jonathan S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harper, William L. (Wartburg, TN); Peck, Charles G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, J.C.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Process design and costing of bioethanol technology: A tool for determining the status and direction of research and development  

SciTech Connect

Bioethanol is a fuel-grade ethanol made from trees, grasses, and waste materials. It represents a sustainable substitute for gasoline in today's passenger cars. Modeling and design of processes for making bioethanol are critical tools used in the US Department of Energy's bioethanol research and development program. The authors use such analysis to guide new directions for research and to help them understand the level at which and the time when bioethanol will achieve commercial success. This paper provides an update on their latest estimates for current and projected costs of bioethanol. These estimates are the result of very sophisticated modeling and costing efforts undertaken in the program over the past few years. Bioethanol could cost anywhere from $1.16 to $1.44 per gallon, depending on the technology and the availability of low cost feedstocks for conversion to ethanol. While this cost range opens the door to fuel blending opportunities, in which ethanol can be used, for example, to improve the octane rating of gasoline, it is not currently competitive with gasoline as a bulk fuel. Research strategies and goals described in this paper have been translated into cost savings for ethanol. Their analysis of these goals shows that the cost of ethanol could drop by 40 cents per gallon over the next ten years by taking advantage of exciting new tools in biotechnology that will improve yield and performance in the conversion process.

Wooley, R.; Ruth, M.; Glassner, D.; Sheehan, J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions to someone by E-mail Share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Facebook Tweet about State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Twitter Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Google Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Delicious Rank State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Digg Find More places to share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on AddThis.com... Strategic Energy Planning Energy Policies & Programs Financing Financing Overview Financing Program Market Segments Energy Data Management Energy Technologies

153

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by anDerived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing", Proceedings, 2ndWastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

Transuranic decontamination of nitric acid solutions by the TRUEX solvent extraction process: preliminary development studies. [Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work that has been performed to date at Argonne National Laboratory on the development of the TRUEX process, a solvent extraction process employing a bifunctional organophosphorous reagent in a PUREX process solvent (tributyl phosphate-normal paraffinic hydrocarbons). The purpose of this extraction process is to separate and concentrate transuranic (TRU) elements from nuclear waste. Assessments were made of the use of two TRUEX solvents: one incorporating the well-studied dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and a second incorporating an extractant with superior properties for a 1M HNO/sub 3/ acid feed, octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (O/sub phi/D(IB)CMPO). In this report, conceptual flowsheets for the removal of soluble TRUs from high-level nuclear wastes using these two TRUEX proces solvents are presented, and flowsheet features are discussed in detail. The conceptual flowsheet for TRU-element removal from a PUREX waste by the O/sub phi/D(IB)CMPO-TRUEX process solvent was tested in a bench-scale countercurrent experiment, and results of that experiment are presented and discussed. The conclusion of this study is that the TRUEX process is able to separate TRUs from high-level wastes so that the major portion of the solid waste (approx. 99%) can be classified as non-TRU. Areas where more experimentation is needed are listed at the end of the report. 45 references, 17 figures, 56 tables.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Leonard, R.A.; Steindler, M.J.; Horwitz, E.P.; Basile, L.J.; Diamond, H.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the original research program and of its continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large-scale testing sufficient to describe commercial-scale embankment behavior. The large-scale testing was accomplished by constructing five lysimeters, each 7.3{times}3.0{times}3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process (Schmalfield 1975). Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was placed in the lysimeter cells. This report discusses and summarizes results from scientific efforts conducted between October 1991 and September 1992 for Fiscal Year 1992.

Turner, J.P.; Reeves, T.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the claimed invention to combine chemical treatment with microfiltration process to treat groundwater, leachate from contaminated soil washing, surface and run-off waters contaminated with toxic metals, radionuclides and trace amounts of organics from variety of sources. The process can also be used to treat effluents from industrial processes such as discharges associated with smelting, mining and refining operations. Influent contaminants amenable to treatment are from a few mg/L to hundreds of mg/L. By selecting appropriate precipitation, ion exchange and adsorption agents and conditions, efficiencies greater than 99.9 percent can be achieved for removal of contaminants. The filtered water for discharge can be targeted with either an order of magnitude greater or lower than contaminant levels for drinking water.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, Chi Fun; Buckley, L.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

The use of post detonation analysis of stable isotope ratios to determine the type and production process of the explosive involved  

SciTech Connect

The detonation of a series of explosives was performed in a controlled manner to collect the resulting, solid residue or {open_quotes}soot.{close_quotes} This residue was examined to determine the ratios of the stable carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopes. The goal of the experiment was to determine if these ratios could be used to indicate, from the post detonation residues, the type and origin of the detonated explosive. The ratios of the stated stable isotopes in the undetonated explosive were also determined. Despite some reservations in the quality of the data resulting from contamination by nonexplosive components, certain trends can be discerned. (1) Carbon isotopes allow aromatic explosives to be distinguished from nonaromatic explosives. This trend seems to carry through the detonation so that the distinction might be made after the fact. (2) The amination process for TATB can be detected through the hydrogen and, to some extent, the nitrogen isotope ratios. Unfortunately, the data are not sufficiently good to determine if this differential carries through the detonation. (3) The relative magnitude and sign of the nitrogen isotope ratio seems to carry through the detonation: some exchange with atmospheric nitrogen is probable. Even though this set of experiments must also be viewed as preliminary, there is a definite indication that certain qualitative characteristics of explosives can be detected after the detonation. This {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} could have application to both intelligence and counter terrorism.

McGuire, R.R.; Velsko, C.A.; Lee, C.G.; Raber, E.

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

CX-003366: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003366: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Combustion Controls - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Vehicles...

164

CX-003365: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003365: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Combustion Controls - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Vehicles...

165

New Computational Methods Determination in Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engendered by two scien- tific advances: (1) new developments in an exper- imental technique known as Nuclear- ment of the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) between resonances, and (3) the use of computer modeling is that of constructing a highway map of the U.S. starting from a table which lists the distances between the major cities

166

Management Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMO: Request for proposal for Computer-Aided Facilities and Maintenance Management application software; professional services; development services for interfaces to Financial Management and Human Resources systems; configuration, test, train, maintenance and support services to implement and maintain a CAFM Solution for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Trial Courts, the Appellate Courts and the Judicial Council, known as The AOC Group. You are invited to review and respond to the attached Request for Proposal (RFP):

Rfp Number Isdcafm

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Automating DNA processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology is currently available to identify the genetic codes responsible for physical traits and genetic diseases in both plants and animals. Regardless of whether the final goal is medical diagnosis or breeder selection, extensive time and resources must be spent in laboratory research to determine the genetic structure of the relevant organisms. DNA processing is riddled with time intensive laboratory techniques that must be improved or replaced if genotyping large numbers of samples is to be accomplished. This thesis identifies and explains modules in DNA processing and how they can be improved by automation. modules associated with genome mapping are the focus of most of the discussion. A functional biochemistry background is provided so that researchers in automation can be efficiently assimilated to future biochen-fistry/automation projects. The needs of biochemistry researchers at Texas A&M University are specifically addressed. Herein, DNA processing has been defined as a series of discrete sub-processes or process modules in order to aid scheduling of future automation projects. Target process modules (sub-processes with a high probability of automation success) have been identified. In addition, possible automation solutions have been proposed for each target module along with a characterization of fundamental design parameters. Concluding this text is a discussion of procedures in genome mapping that have not been sufficiently automated. The initial focus of this thesis is on short term solutions. However, attention is given to more conceptual solutions accompanied by the biochemistry background necessary to begin developing them. Though systems are proposed to improve the efficiency of many processes, no implementation has been attempted. Design specifications are based on observation of current laboratory techniques and the variance that is typically allowed in relevant process parameters in TAMU laboratories.

Wienen, Michael Jan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

OPPORTUNITIES TO CONSTRAIN ASTROPHYSICAL REACTION RATES FOR THE s-PROCESS VIA DETERMINATION OF THE GROUND-STATE CROSS-SECTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Modern models of s-process nucleosynthesis in stars require stellar reaction rates of high precision. Most neutron-capture cross-sections in the s-process have been measured, and for an increasing number of reactions the required precision is achieved. This does not necessarily mean, however, that the stellar rates are constrained equally well, because only the capture of the ground state of a target is measured in the laboratory. Captures of excited states can contribute considerably to stellar rates that are already at typical s-process temperatures. We show that the ground-state contribution X to a stellar rate is the relevant measure to identify reactions that are or could be well constrained by experiments and apply it to (n,{gamma}) reactions in the s-process. We further show that the maximum possible reduction in uncertainty of a rate via determination of the ground-state cross-section is given directly by X. An error analysis of X is presented, and it is found that X is a robust measure with mostly small uncertainties. Several specific examples (neutron capture of {sup 79}Se, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 121}Sn, {sup 187}Os, and {sup 193}Pt) are discussed in detail. The ground-state contributions for a set of 412 neutron-capture reactions around the s-process path are presented in a table. This allows identification of reactions that may be better constrained by experiments and that cannot be constrained solely by measuring ground-state cross-sections (and thus require supplementary studies). General trends and implications are discussed.

Rauscher, T. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mohr, P. [Diakonie-Klinikum, D-74523 Schwaebisch Hall (Germany); Dillmann, I.; Plag, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Level Alignment in PCDTBT:PC70BM Solar Cells: Solution Processed NiOx for Improved Hole Collection and Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Solution-based NiO{sub x} outperforms PEDOT:PSS in device performance and stability when used as a hole-collection layer in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells formed with poly[N-9'-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) and PC70BM. The origin of the enhancement is clarified by studying the interfacial energy level alignment between PCDTBT or the 1:4 blended heterojunctions and PEDOT:PSS or NiO{sub x} using ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. The 1.6 eV electronic gap of PEDOT:PSS and energy level alignment with the BHJ result in poor hole selectivity of PEDOT:PSS and allows electron recombination at the PEDOT:PSS/BHJ interface. Conversely, the large band gap (3.7 eV) of NiO{sub x} and interfacial dipole (0.6 eV) with the organic active layer leads to a hole-selective interface. This interfacial dipole yields enhanced electron blocking properties by increasing the barrier to electron injection. The presence of such a strong dipole is predicted to further promote hole collection from the organic layer into the oxide, resulting in increased fill factor and short circuit current. An overall decrease in recombination is manifested in an increase in open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency of the device on NiO{sub x} versus PEDOT:PSS interlayers.

Ratcliff, E. L.; Meyer, J.; Steirer, K. X.; Armstrong, N. R.; Olson, D.; Kahn, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

CX-010141: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Categorical Exclusion Determination 41: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010141: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Process Solutions and Solids CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/06/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office K-area Materials Storage and H-Area Completion continue to request flowsheets for processing solids and liquids in H-Canyon and HB-Line facilities. Laboratory operations involved in flowsheet development include characterization, mixing, and neutralization of aqueous process and product solutions, heating of solids at elevated temperatures, and characterization and dissolution of solids in aqueous solutions. Heating, characterization, and dissolution studies will be performed in radhoods and gloveboxes located in C-wing and F-wing laboratories in 773-A. Characterization

173

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Orland Park, IL); Krumdick, Greg K. (Crete, IL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-001158: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Bloomington, Indiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001153: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Wilmington) Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Wilmington, Delaware Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Niskayuna) CX(s) Applied: B3.6

176

Gas tracer composition and method. [Process to determine whether any porous underground methane storage site is in fluid communication with a gas producing well  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for determining whether any porous underground gaseous methane storage sites is in fluid communication with a gas producing well, and if there is fluid communication, determining which site is in the fluid communication comprising injecting a different gaseous tracer mixture into each of the sites at some location in each of the site in an amount such that the presence of the tracer mixture will be detectable in the gaseous methane stored therein, each of the mixture having the properties of (1) not occurring in natural supplies of methane, (2) diffusing through any underground methane storage site in a manner very similar in rate to methane, and (3) being substantially insoluble in petroleum distillates, after a period of time sufficient for each of the tracer mixtures to diffuse through the underground site from its injection location to the well, withdrawing a sample gaseous product from the well, testing the sample gaseous product for the presence of each of the tracer mixtures.

Malcosky, N.D.; Koziar, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Summary report of the screening process to determine reasonable alternatives for long-term storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials (primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium) have become surplus to national defense needs both in the US and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety and health consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. As announced in the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Department of Energy is currently conducting an evaluation process for disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials determined surplus to National Security needs, and long-term storage of national security and programmatic inventories, and surplus weapons-usable fissile materials that are not able to go directly from interim storage to disposition. An extensive set of long-term storage and disposition options was compiled. Five broad long-term storage options were identified; thirty-seven options were considered for plutonium disposition; nine options were considered for HEU disposition; and eight options were identified for Uranium-233 disposition. Section 2 discusses the criteria used in the screening process. Section 3 describes the options considered, and Section 4 provides a detailed summary discussions of the screening results.

NONE

1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

Mitchell, John W. (Charlottesville, VA)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dissolution of Sludge Constituents in Glycolate-containing 2H Evaporator Rad Feed Solution Dissolution of Sludge Constituents in Glycolate-containing 2H Evaporator Rad Feed Solution Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Glycolic acid is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. The DWPF recycle stream, in addition to containing sludge, also will contain glycolate. This testing seeks to determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (or the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H Evaporator feed solution (Tank 43H). The testing also seeks to determine the interaction of the glycolate-containing evaporator feed solutions with 2H evaporator

180

NEW DETERMINATION OF THE {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O REACTION RATE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN AGB STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of the {alpha}-spectroscopic factor (S{sub {alpha}}) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the 6.356 MeV 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O through the {sup 13}C({sup 11}B, {sup 7}Li){sup 17}O transfer reaction and we determine the {alpha}-width of this state. This is believed to have a strong effect on the rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction, the main neutron source for slow neutron captures (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Based on the new width we derive the astrophysical S-factor and the stellar rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction. At a temperature of 100 MK, our rate is roughly two times larger than that by Caughlan and Fowler and two times smaller than that recommended by the NACRE compilation. We use the new rate and different rates available in the literature as input in simulations of AGB stars to study their influence on the abundances of selected s-process elements and isotopic ratios. There are no changes in the final results using the different rates for the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction when the {sup 13}C burns completely in radiative conditions. When the {sup 13}C burns in convective conditions, as in stars of initial mass lower than {approx}2 M{sub Sun} and in post-AGB stars, some changes are to be expected, e.g., of up to 25% for Pb in our models. These variations will have to be carefully analyzed when more accurate stellar mixing models and more precise observational constraints are available.

Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Y. J.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Bai, X. X.; Chen, Y. S.; Fan, Q. W.; Jin, S. J.; Li, E. T.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Shu, N. C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(1), Beijing 102413 (China); Lugaro, M.; Buntain, J. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Victoria (Australia); Pang, D. Y. [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Karakas, A. I. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Weston Creek ACT 2611 (Australia); Shi, J. R., E-mail: wpliu@ciae.ac.cn, E-mail: guobing@ciae.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); and others

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Treatment of plutonium-bearing solutions: A brief survey of the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

With the abrupt shutdown of some DOE facilities, a significant volume of in-process material was left in place and still requires treatment for interim storage. Because the systems containing these process streams have deteriorated since shutdown, a portable system for treating the solutions may be useful. A brief survey was made of the DOE complex on the need for a portable treatment system to treat plutonium-bearing solutions. A survey was completed to determine (1) the compositions and volumes of solutions and heels present, (2) the methods that have been used to treat these solutions and heels in the past, and (3) the potential problems that exist in removing and treating these solutions. Based on the surveys and on the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1, design criteria for a portable treatment system were generated.

Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic device having a first electrode layer, a high resistivity transparent film disposed on the first electrode, a second electrode layer, and an inorganic photoactive layer disposed between the first and second electrode layers, wherein the inorganic photoactive layer is disposed in at least partial electrical contact with the high resistivity transparent film, and in at least partial electrical contact with the second electrode. The photoactive layer has a first inorganic material and a second inorganic material different from the first inorganic material, wherein the first and second inorganic materials exhibit a type II band offset energy profile, and wherein the photoactive layer has a first population of nanostructures of a first inorganic material and a second population of nanostructures of a second inorganic material.

Alivisatos, A. Paul; Gur, Ilan; Milliron, Delia

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Solution Processed Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Synthesis and Structural and Functional Characterization of Thin Films and...

184

Solubilization of coal by chemical process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves exposing coal to an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, or ozone. It is preferable to maximize the surface area of the coal to accelerate oxidation; therefore, coal is broken and crushed into small pieces. The coal is then placed in an oxidizing solution for a sufficient period of time to render it susceptible to solubilization. Exposure to oxidizing agent at 30/sup 0/C for about two days gives good results, although these parameters are not critical. After oxidation, the treated coal is placed in a base solution. Since the original studies were aimed at determining if certain microorganisms could solubilize coal after oxidation pretreatment, the base solutions used for study were organic buffer solutions ordinarily used in biological studies. Although most tests were done with such bases, it was found that a simple sodium hydroxide solution was also very effective, and therefore, it is believed that the critical factor is pH and not the identity of the base; thus, any base would be suitable for use in this solubilization process. The coal can be washed prior to exposure to the base to remove oxidizing agent that might tend to lower the pH of the solubilizing solution. Shaking the coal and base solution can enhance the solubilization process, although it isn't necessary. After two days exposure under ambient conditions, coal is significantly solubilized and can be separated from the solute by centrifugation and filtration.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Poly(3-decylthiophene) Radical Anions and Cations in Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly(3-decylthiophene) Radical Anions and Cations in Solution: Single and Poly(3-decylthiophene) Radical Anions and Cations in Solution: Single and Multiple Polarons and Their Delocalization Lengths in Conjugated Polymers N. Takeda and J. R. Miller J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 14715-14723 (2012). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Optical absorption spectra of anions and cations of poly(3-decylthiophene) (P3DT) in solution were identified as single polarons. Pulse radiolysis of P3DT in THF determined the spatial extent of one negative polaron to be similar to 11.5 thiophene units by observing transient absorption of P3DT(-dot) radical ions, which are prinicpally free ions, at 850 nm with epsilon = (7.25 ± 0.47) x 104 M-1 cm-1 and bleaching of the neutral absorption band at 450 nm. P3DT(-dot) was formed in a combination of diffusive reactions and fast "step" processes. Similarly, a positive

187

CX-002964: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002964: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.11, A9 Date: 07092010 Location(s):...

188

CX-002952: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002952: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions - University of Tennessee CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 0709...

189

CX-003170: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003170: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07262010...

190

CX-003573: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003573: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategic Biomass Solutions
CX(s) Applied: A9
Date: 08252010
Location(s):...

191

CX-002530: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

530: Categorical Exclusion Determination 530: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002530: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Salt Processing (MSP) Mixing Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/24/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The Modular Salt Processing (MSP) Project seeks to deploy equipment to remove the cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and select actinides from the high level waste salt solutions using existing waste tanks for shielding. This process will be tested in Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) using non-radioactive simulants. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002530.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005770: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006642: Categorical Exclusion Determination

192

Commercial Lighting Solutions, Webtool Peer Review Report  

SciTech Connect

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energys Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the beta version of the CLS webtool, which contains retail box lighting solutions. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed about which feedback should be addressed for the release of version 1.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in New York City in May 2009. Due to the volume of data (~500 comments) the methodology for addressing the peer review comments was central to the success of the ultimate goal of improving the tool. The comments were first imported into a master spreadsheet, and then grouped and organized in several layers. Solutions to each comment were then rated by importance and feasibility to determine the practicality of resolving the concerns of the commenter in the short-term or long-term. The rating system was used as an analytical tool, but the results were viewed thoughtfully to ensure that they were not the sole the factor in determining which comments were recommended for near-term resolution. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 1.0 as well as appendices containing the short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 1.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Jones, Carol C.; Meyer, Tracy A.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-001153: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Wilmington) Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Wilmington, Delaware Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Niskayuna) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001169: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic Carbonate Membrane Reactor CX(s) Applied: B3.6

194

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-001158: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Bloomington, Indiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001153: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Wilmington) Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Wilmington, Delaware Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Niskayuna) CX(s) Applied: B3.6

195

FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Lee Slater

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2012 March 7, 2012 CX-008379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Archer Communications Building CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 03/07/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region January 24, 2012 CX-008675: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC - Cryogenic Carbon Capture (Phase 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.9 Date: 01/24/2012 Location(s): Utah, Wyoming Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy January 12, 2012 CX-007755: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine and Proposed Actions at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 01/12/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Legacy Management December 15, 2011 CX-007515: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bucknam Temporary Tap, Natrona County, Wyoming

197

Swaging Problems and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Some swaging problems, potential causes, and possible solutions...causes Solutions Difficult feeding Work material too hard Anneal or stress relieve to remove effects of cold

198

Big Data Solutions Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Big Data Solutions Reference Glossary (14 pages) Very brief descriptions and links are listed here to provide starting ...

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Solutioning and Aging Behaviours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Aluminum Alloys: Fabrication, Characterization and Applications: Solutioning and Aging Behaviours Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and...

200

Solutioning and Aging Behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum Alloys: Development, Characterization and Applications: Solutioning and Aging Behaviors Sponsored by: TMS Light Metals Division, TMS: Aluminum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

URANIUM EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium values from acidic aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium by contacting the solution with an organic solution comprised of a substantially water-immiscible organlc diluent and an organic phosphate to extract the uranlum values into the organic phase. Carbon tetrachloride and a petroleum hydrocarbon fraction, such as kerosene, are sultable diluents to be used in combination with organlc phosphates such as dibutyl butylphosphonate, trlbutyl phosphine oxide, and tributyl phosphate.

Baldwin, W.H.; Higgins, C.E.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dissolution of Sludge Constituents in Glycolate-Containing 2H Evaporator Rad Feed Solution Dissolution of Sludge Constituents in Glycolate-Containing 2H Evaporator Rad Feed Solution Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Glycolic acid is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. The DWPF recycle stream in addition to containing sludge will also contain glycolate. This testing seeks to determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (or the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H Evaporator feed solution (Tank 43H). B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects

203

Pervaporation process and assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

CX-006834: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006834: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biomass Pre-Extraction, Hydrolysis and Conversion Process Improvements for an Integrated...

205

GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

Pierce, R.

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spherical nitroguanidine process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing spherical high bulk density nitroguanidine by dissing low bulk density nitroguanidine in N-methyl pyrrolidone at elevated temperatures and then cooling the solution to lower temperatures as a liquid characterized as a nonsolvent for the nitroguanidine is provided. The process is enhanced by inclusion in the solution of from about 1 ppm up to about 250 ppm of a metal salt such as nickel nitrate, zinc nitrate or chromium nitrate, preferably from about 20 to about 50 ppm.

Sanchez, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Roemer, Edward L. (Los Alamos, NM); Stretz, Lawrence A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE SALT SOLUTIONS IN MILLION GALLON TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

Leishear, R.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Alkali Treatment of Acidic Solution from Hanford K Basin Sludge Dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Nitric acid solutions will be created from the dissolution of Hanford K Basin sludge. These acidic dissolver solutions must be made alkaline by treatment with NaOH solution before they are disposed to ~ the Tank Waste Remediation System on the Hanford Site. During the alkali treatments, sodium diuranate, hydroxides of iron and aluminum, and radioelements (uranium, plutonium, and americium) will precipitate from the dissolver solution. Laboratory tests, discussed here, were pefiormed to provide information on these precipitates and their precipitation behavior that is important in designing the engineering flowsheet for the treatment process. Specifically, experiments were conducted to determine the optimum precipitation conditions; the completeness of uranium, plutonium, and americium precipitation; the rate of sedimentation; and the physico-chemical characteristics of the solids formed by alkali treatment of simulated acidic dissolver solutions. These experiments also determined the redistribution of uranium, plutonium, and americium flom the sodium di~ate and iron and al&inurn hydroxide precipitates upon contact with carbonate- and EDTA-bearing simulated waste solutions. Note: EDTA is the tetrasodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

AA Bessonov; AB Yusov; AM Fedoseev; AV Gelis; AY Garnov; CH Delegard; GM Plavnik; LN Astafurova; MS Grigoriev; NA Budantseva; NN Krot; SI Nikitenko; TP Puraeva; VP Perminov; VP Shilov

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

210

Innovative Financing Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AGENCY'S ENERGY STAR PROGRAM INNOVATIVE FINANCING SOLUTIONS: FINDING MONEY FOR YOUR ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROJECTS Are you having trouble getting energy efficiency projects...

211

Information Technology Solutions  

Information Technology Solutions Advantages LLNL and University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) have used nickel-chelating nanolipoprotein particles (Ni-NLPs) as a ...

212

METHOD FOR RECOVERING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM SOLUTION USING A BISMUTH HYDROXIDE CARRIER PRECIPITATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carrier precipitation processes for separating plutonium values from aqueous solutions are described. In accordance with the invention a bismuth hydroxide precipitate is formed in the plutonium-containing solution, thereby carrying plutonium values from the solution.

Faris, B.F.

1961-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

CX-007967: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67: Categorical Exclusion Determination 67: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007967: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Electrochemical Fluorination in Molten Fluoride Salts CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office This EEC covers activities related to development of an electrochemical fluorination process to separate selected metals (non-RCRA) from depleted uranium. The goal of the process is to convert depleted uranium metal (U) to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) that can be easily separated from solution while other metallic constituents remain as metals or are converted to non-volatile fluoride salts. The electrochemical fluorination process will be conducted in molten fluoride eutectic salts at temperatures

214

CX-008363: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008363: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Sorbent/Ion Exchangers for Radiochemical and Metal Separations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/09/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office This Research and Demonstration (R&D) activity involves the preparation, characterization and testing of inorganic-based materials for the sorption/ion exchange of radioactive and non-radioactive sorbates from waste and process solutions. New sorbent materials are prepared or received from collaborators and vendors and characterized as needed for chemical and physical properties. Research will also include Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests utilizing similar sorbate solutions described above, and an

215

CX-008618: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008618: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Sorbent/Ion Exchangers for Radiochemical and Metal Separations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/26/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office This research and development activity involves the preparation, characterization and testing of inorganic-based materials for the sorption/ion exchange of radioactive and non-radioactive sorbates from waste and process solutions. New sorbent materials are prepared or received from collaborators and vendors and characterized as needed for chemical and physical properties. Research will also include Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests utilizing similar sorbate solutions described above, and an

216

CX-010490: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Characterization of Process Solutions and Solids CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/21/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

217

Temperature determination using pyrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study  

SciTech Connect

Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R. [Rutgers Centre, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

CX-002333: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Regional Demonstration - Technology Solutions for Wind Integration - Phase I CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05112010 Location(s): Austin, Texas...

220

CX-009690: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Support Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 12142012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CX-000496: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Silver Chloride Solution Injection Wells CX(s) Applied: B6.2 Date: 06152009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina...

222

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Silver Chloride Solution Injection Wells CX(s) Applied: B6.2 Date: 06152009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina...

223

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory August 13, 2010 CX-003365: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Combustion Controls - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Vehicles...

224

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 CX-003365: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Combustion Controls - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Vehicles CX(s) Applied: A9, A11...

225

Anaerobic pyrite oxidation rates determined via direct volume-loss measurements: a Vertical Scanning Interferometric approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determina- tion of dissolution/precipitation kinetic rates. A VSI assessment of pyrite dissolution rates et al., 2008) with applications to oxic ARD processes. Presented here are rate data for the inorganic experiments the bulk chemical changes in the solution composition (e.g. Fe2+ /Fe3+ ) were used to determine

Benning, Liane G.

226

CX-004449: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

449: Categorical Exclusion Determination 449: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing to Provide Data on Precipitation Control in the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/15/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WPT) project is completing solubility models for nitrate salts to evaluate control of the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Process (CNP) in order to avoid precipitation of solids in the evaporator concentrate. In order to do this, bench scale tests to determine salt solubility in nitric acid solutions at expected feed and final evaporated concentrations will be done. This work will provide the necessary data to verify predicted salt solubilities and basic

227

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-009108: Categorical Exclusion Determination Precipitation of Mixed Actinide Solid Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 27, 2012 CX-009107: Categorical Exclusion Determination Xylene Measurement for Saltstone Antifoams CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 27, 2012 CX-008998: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-scale Physics-based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-informed Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): Golden Field Office" August 27, 2012 CX-009006: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials

228

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

229

Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

Beller, L.S.

1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

Beller, Laurence S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

Beller, L.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermodynamics of ATP in Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of ATP in Solution. Summary: ... Computations of the thermodynamics of biomolecules in solution are rare in the literature. ...

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process is for the selective separation of Sr-82 and Sr-85 from a proton-irradiated Mo target. It includes dissolving the Mo in H2O2 to form a solution which is then passed through a cationic resin, whereby Mo, Nb, Tc, Se, V, As, Ge, Zr, Rb ions remain in the solution, while Rb, Zn, Be, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, Sr, Y, Zr ions are adsorbed. The resin is contacted with an acid solution to remove the adsorbed ions, forming a second solution. The second solution is evaporated and the residue dissolved in a dilute acid to form a third solution. After adjusting the acid molarity, the third solution is passed through a second cationic resin; this resin is contacted first with a dilute sulfuric acid solution and then with a dilute acid solution to remove the adsorbed Sr ions. Zr, Rb, and Y radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : HVAC Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Solution Back to Tool Screenshot for HVAC Solution. Screenshot for HVAC Solution. Screenshot for HVAC Solution...

236

FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

Processing Determinatives of Microstructure Development in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit Direct Precipitation of Sr-doped LaP3O9 Thin Film Electrolytes for...

240

Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flowing cell containing flowing bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flowing cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flowing cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

Almon, A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hepa filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Murphy, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

HEPA filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

HEPA filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

CX-002948: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002948: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions - Kansas State University CX(s) Applied: B3.11, A9, B5.1...

246

CX-002486: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002486: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Renewable Energy Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B4.6, A1,...

247

CX-002483: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002483: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Renewable Energy Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B4.6, A1,...

248

Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

SciTech Connect

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant is patented. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel processing solution consisting of tri-n-butyl phosphate and dodecane, with a complex of uranium, plutonium, or zirconium and with a solvent degradation product such as di-n-butyl phosphate therein, is contacted with an aqueous solution of a salt formed from hydrazine and either a dicarboxylic acid or a hydroxycarboxylic acid, thereby removing the aforesaid complex from the processing solution.

Tallent, O.K.; Crouse, D.J.; Mailen, J.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

251

Commercial Lighting Solutions Webtool Peer Review Report, Office Solutions  

SciTech Connect

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energys Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the CLS webtool for offices. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed for the release of version 2.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in Las Vegas in May 2010. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 2.0 as well as appendices containing the comments and short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 2.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Beeson, Tracy A.; Jones, Carol C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

1961-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

255

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 28, 2010 April 28, 2010 CX-002550: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bubbler Upgrade Support - Defense Waste Processing Facility Dry Frit Addition CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010 CX-002547: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bubbler Upgrade Support - Defense Waste Processing Facility Water Separation from Decon Frit Solution CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 27, 2010 CX-002236: Categorical Exclusion Determination C-Farm Electrical, Lighting, and Walkway Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.13, B2.1, B1.3 Date: 04/27/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington

256

CX-004251: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4251: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4251: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004251: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization by 2013 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 10/14/2010 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Department of Energy and cost share funds would be used to design, construct, and operate the "Boardman Project". The Boardman Project consists of the design, construction and operation of two standalone processing units. One unit would convert biomass to a fermentable sugar solution (chemical fractionation) and the other would convert carboxylic esters to ethanol (hydrogenolysis). The Boardman Project, together with ZeaChem's Core Facility, would constitute an integrated cellulosic ethanol

257

Oil recovery process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system is claimed for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P.A.; Rhudy, J.S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

McClaine, L.A.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solidification Structures of Solid Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 16 Binary phase diagrams. L, L 1 , and L 2 are liquid solutions. α and β are solid solutions. (a) Complete

262

Thermal Insulation Performance in the Process Industries: Facts and Fallacies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficient use of thermal insulation materials and systems for design of cryogenic and elevated temperature process applications depends upon a reliable knowledge of their properties. Properties determined under idealized laboratory conditions are inadequate based on quantified field performance results. The various general and specific materials and environment factors which influence actual thermal performance will be outlined and discussed. Examples are given to illustrate the significant effects that such factors can have on energy conservation in the industrial arena. Various solutions are suggested.

Tye, R. P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth  

SciTech Connect

A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Processing of Anode Cover Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Cryolite Ratio of Aluminum Electrolytes Development and Application of a Multivariate Process Parameters Intelligence Control Technology ...

265

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

Yeager, J.H.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Solution Combustion Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Innovative Processing and Synthesis of Ceramics, Glasses and Composites.

267

CATALYZED OXIDATION OF URANIUM IN CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given wherein carbonate solutions are employed to leach uranium from ores and the like containing lower valent uranium species by utilizing catalytic amounts of copper in the presence of ammonia therein and simultaneously supplying an oxidizing agent thereto. The catalysis accelerates rate of dissolution and increases recovery of uranium from the ore. (AEC)

Clifford, W.E.

1962-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Integrated Solutions in Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paths best traveled Choose from a portfolio of comprehensive, interlinked, intuitive and accessible chemistry resources Paths best traveled Choose from a comprehensive portfolio of interlinked, intuitive and accessible resources www.info.sciencedirect.com/solutions www.elsevier.com/chemistrysolutions ELSEVIERS

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sustainable energy supply. The UK is uniquely placed to harness its natural resources ­ wind, wave and tidalOffshore Renewable Energy Solutions #12;Cefas: meeting complex requirements The Centre science centre, Cefas provides a bridge between government and industry. We have unprecedented links

270

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Categorical Exclusion Determination 22: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mulberry Grove Geo-Thermal Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Mulberry Grove, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 28, 2010 CX-002547: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bubbler Upgrade Support - Defense Waste Processing Facility Water Separation from Decon Frit Solution CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010 CX-002175: Categorical Exclusion Determination U tu Utu Gwaitu Paiute Tribe Energy and Conservation Strategy and Implementation Plan CX(s) Applied: B2.5, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

271

CX-009000: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009000: Categorical Exclusion Determination "High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/20/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to MEMC Electronic Materials, Inc. MEMC would conduct research and development activities for a two phase project to develop a new process method for growing large bulk gallium nitrate (GaN) crystals at low cost with improved functional properties." CX-009000.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3,

272

CX-001388: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88: Categorical Exclusion Determination 88: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001388: Categorical Exclusion Determination City of Wasilla Wastewater Treatment Facility Governor's Highway Safety Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/25/2010 Location(s): Wasilla, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funds.The geothermal system will be used in conjunction with the existing facility's primary heating system to alleviate process piping from freezing and reduce overall operating costs. Great Northern Engineering (GNE) has determined that a 5 ton geothermal system may be possible in order to remain under the $50,000 price cap established by the customer; recommendations have been presented as a solution for preventing pipe freeze-up and improve the performance of

273

Proposed Multi-step DOE NIETC Designation Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE Technical Conference - Mike Heyeck - AEP VP, Transmission 1 Proposed Multi-Step DOE NIETC Designation Process Proposed Multi-Step DOE NIETC Designation Process 1) DOE designates NIETCs that exhibit significant congestion and reliability problems in studies or per request and delegates to FERC siting process for action according to statute. 2) RTOs, ISOs or individual TOs determine the optimal solution to alleviate the problems identified above. 3) DOE designates NIETCs if transmission solutions are found that are not designated NIETCs per step 1. 4) State and local agencies fully engage with transmission developers on siting requirements including environmental impact studies. DOE delegates its lead agency role to FERC for federal lands and areas not covered by state and local siting requirements.

274

Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions A functionalized polymer for binding a dissolved molecule in an aqueous solution is presented. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions A functionalized polymer for binding a dissolved molecule in an aqueous solution is presented. The polymer has a backbone polymer to which one or more functional groups are covalently linked. The backbone polymer can be such polymers as polyethylenimine, polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, and polypropylamine. These polymers are generally water-soluble, but can be insoluble when cross-linked. The functional group can be for example diol

275

CX-000377: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000377: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas used for...

276

CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

172: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination RTI International - Novel Non-Aqueous Carbon Dioxide-Solvents and Capture Process CX(s)...

277

CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thai Process for Heavy Oil CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11192010 Location(s): Laramie,...

278

CX-005826: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bench-scale experiments to determine chemical processes that could occur in deep wells under carbon dioxide injection conditions, and determine their impact on seal...

279

CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Solar Cell Fabrication Alkaline Texturing Process Improvement CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08122010...

280

CX-010647: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010647: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 06262013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CX-010902: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010902: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 06262013...

282

CX-000460: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000460: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal Integration of Carbon Dioxide Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants...

283

CX-010384: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010384: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Biofuels Process Development Unit for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory CX(s) Applied: A7;...

284

CX-003564: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003564: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Building Insulation by Carbon Dioxide Foaming Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08242010 Location(s):...

285

CX-000446: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000446: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coupled Hydro-Chemo-Thermo-Mechanical Phenomena for Pore Scale Processes to Macro Scale...

286

Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the cosine correction term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or knot-point spline definition, that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

Trent, Bruce C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Interim Action Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interim Action Determination Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national

288

Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

The Keystone Center

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Post Travel Summary Document Number: ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-004, Contractor Travel Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 11_0221 Initial Release ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 3 of 3

290

REDUCTION IN Pu RECOVERY PROCESSES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing plutonium from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state in a carrier precipitation process for separating plutonium and nuclear fission products. In accordance with the invention oxalate ions are incorporated in the hexavalent plutoniumcontaining solution prior to a step of precipitating lanthanum fluoride in the solution.

Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A process is described for the recovery of uranium and thorium from monazite sand, which is frequently processed by treating it with a hot sodium hydroxide solution whereby a precipitate forms consisting mainly of oxides or hydroxides of the rare earths, thorium and uranium. The precipitate is dissolved in mineral acid, and the acid solution is then neutralized to a pH value of between 5.2 and 6.2 whereby both the uranium and thorium precipitate as the hydroxides, while substantially all the rare earth metal values present remain in the solution. The uranium and thoriunn can then be separated by dissolving the precipitate in a solution containing a mixture of alkali carbonate and alkali bicarbonate: and contacting the carbonate solution with a strong-base anion exchange resin whereby the uranium values are adsorbed on the resin while the thorium remains in solution.

Calkins, G.D.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Process for degrading hypochlorite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved means and method for the degradation of hypochlorite in alkali waste solutions. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a more effective and less costly method for the degradation of hypochlorite. The foregoing objects and others are accomplished in accordance with the present invention, generally speaking, by providing a process to degrade hypochlorite into chloride and oxygen which includes contacting an aqueous hypochlorite basic solution with a catalyst comprising about 1--10 w/w % cobalt oxide and about 1--15 w/w % molybdenum oxide on a suitable substrate. In another embodiment a similar process for degrading lithium hypochlorite is provided in which waste solution concentration is lowered in order to minimize carbonate precipitation. 6 tabs.

Huxtable, W.P.; Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

Currier, R.P. [comp.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Image processing and reconstruction  

SciTech Connect

This talk will examine some mathematical methods for image processing and the solution of underdetermined, linear inverse problems. The talk will have a tutorial flavor, mostly accessible to undergraduates, while still presenting research results. The primary approach is the use of optimization problems. We will find that relaxing the usual assumption of convexity will give us much better results.

Chartrand, Rick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

The scorecard solution to the author-paper identification challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes team mb74's solution to Track 1 of KDD Cup 2013. The challenge is to determine whether an author has written a given paper in the Microsoft Academic Search database. The key part of our solution is the feature generation which is ... Keywords: FICO model builder, average precision, feature generation, logistic regression, scorecard, supervised machine learning

Xing Zhao

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Boundary layer solutions for natural convection in porous media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An approximate solution is developed for natural convection in porous media resulting from localized heat sources. The method is applicable for moderate levels of convection. Results of the method compare well with those of other calculational methods and with experimental data. The solution for a spherical source can be used as an indirect method for the determination of permeability in some cases.

Hardee, H.C.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd Place Yoqneam, Israel Zip 20692 Sector Solar Product Israel-based manufacturer of non-contact substrate processing, handling, and testing equipments for Flat Panel Display (FPD), semiconductor, and solar industries. References CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd is a company located in Yoqneam, Israel . References ↑ "CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoreFlow_Scientific_Solutions_Ltd&oldid=343913" Categories:

298

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

SCAVENGER AND PROCESS OF SCAVENGING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carrier precipitation processes are given for the separation and recovery of plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions containing plutonium and fission products. Bismuth phosphate is precipitated in the acidic solution while plutonlum is maintained in the hexavalent oxidation state. Preformed, uncalcined, granular titanium dioxide is then added to the solution and the fission product-carrying bismuth phosphate and titanium dioxide are separated from the resulting mixture. Fluosilicic acid, which dissolves any remaining titanium dioxide particles, is then added to the purified plutonium-containing solution.

Olson, C.M.

1960-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 WBT Course Development Process 110512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Course Development Process Document Number: ISDP- 018 Rev. 110512 Document Owner:...

302

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 WBT Programming Process 110426 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Programming Process Document Number: ITTP-016 Rev. 110426 Document Owner: Doug Bond...

303

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 ILT Course Development Process 110512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Development Process Document Number: ISDP-016 Rev. 110512 Document Owner:...

304

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 NetworkTechnical Support Process 110406 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: NetworkTechnical Support Process Document Number: ITTP-014 Rev. 110406 Document...

305

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Training Production Process Overview 110620 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Training Production Process Document Number: ISDP-002 Rev. 110620 Document Owner:...

306

PURIFICATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with the separation of uranium from molybdenum compounds, and in particular with their separation from ether solutions containing the molybdenum in the form of acids, such as silicomolybdic and phosphomolybdic acids. After the nitric acid leach of pitchblende, the molybdenum values present in the ore are found in the leach solution in the form of complex acids. The uranium bearing solution may be purified of this molybdenum content by comtacting it with activated charcoal. The purification is improved when the acidity of the solution is low ad agitation is also beneficial. The molybdenum may subsequently be recovered from the charcosl ad the charcoal reused.

Wibbles, H.L.; Miller, E.I.

1958-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

HEU age determination  

SciTech Connect

A new technique has been developed to determine the age of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in solids. Uranium age is defined as the time since the uranium-containing material was last subjected to a process capable of separating uranium from its radioactive-decay daughters. [Most chemical processing, uranium enrichment, volatilization processes, and phase transformations (especially relevant for uranium hexafluoride) can result in separation of the uranium parent material from the decay-product daughters.] Determination of the uranium age, as defined here, may be relevant in verifying arms-control agreements involving uranium-containing nuclear weapons. The HEU age is determined from the ratios of relevant uranium daughter isotopes and their parents, viz {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U. Uranium isotopes are quantitatively measured by their characteristic gamma rays and their daughters by alpha spectroscopy. In some of the samples, where HEU is enriched more than 99%, the only mode of HEU age determination is by the measurement of {sup 231}Pa since there is negligible quantity of {sup 230}Th due to very low atom concentrations of {sup 234}U in the samples. In this report the methodology and the data for determining the age of two HEU samples are presented.

Moorthy, A.R.; Kato, W.Y.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DEVELOPMENT Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEVELOPMENT Solutions DEVELOPMENT Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name DEVELOPMENT Solutions Place Reading, England, United Kingdom Zip RG4 8UJ Sector Efficiency Product DEVELOPMENT Solutions (DS) supports investors to realise projects with sustainable applications, including in the areas of environment, energy efficiency, water resource management and other applications for sustainable development. References DEVELOPMENT Solutions[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. DEVELOPMENT Solutions is a company located in Reading, England, United Kingdom . References ↑ "DEVELOPMENT Solutions" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DEVELOPMENT_Solutions&oldid=344207

309

Silver Recovery from Silver-Rich Photographic Processing Solutions ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Microstructural and Mechanical Length Scales on Fatigue Crack ... Components and Mechanical Properties of an Acicular Ferrite Pipeline Steel.

310

The Challenge of Scale for Solution Processable Hybrid Organic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Cell-impedance Spectroscopy at the Biological-inorganic Interface, Shewanella Oneidensis - Gold, for Microbial Fuel Cell Applications Encapsulating...

311

Solution Processing of Polymer Nanotube Thermal Interface Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ideal TIMs should exhibit high thermal conductivity and maintain mechanical ... bulk polymers exhibit phonon scattering and are poor conductors of thermal...

312

Solution-based Processing for Ceramic Materials: Solar and Optical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have paid particular attention to layered basic zinc acetate (LBZA) in which ... use in DSSCs having relatively high light-to-electricity conversion efficiencies.

313

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Industrial Process Surveillance System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-001102: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Clemson University Wind Turbine Testing Facility CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): North Charleston, South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 2, 2010 CX-001037: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-Cost Illumination Grade Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2, 2010 CX-001036: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solution Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) Solid State Lighting (Pennsylvania) CX(s) Applied: B3.6

317

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 13, 2013 August 13, 2013 CX-010800: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 9, 2013 CX-010746: Categorical Exclusion Determination Better Buildings- Commercial Energy Efficiency Solutions, Pre-Packaged Commercial PACE: The BEERE Menu CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 5, 2013 CX-010811: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Louisiana Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)/Sequestration Research and Development (R&D) Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

318

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-001130: Categorical Exclusion Determination Explosives Stabilization Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office March 2, 2010 CX-001037: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-Cost Illumination Grade Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2, 2010 CX-001036: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solution Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) Solid State Lighting (Pennsylvania) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

319

Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions with Sustainable Energy By Mark DiesendorfSolutions with Sustainable Energy. Sydney, NSW: University

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions. ... Reuther, JJ; 1991. Fine Water Sprays for Fire Protection: A Halon Replacement Option.. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC Permission to Publish KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned (hereinafter referred to

322

Discontinuous bifurcations of periodic solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of bifurcations of periodic solutions in discontinuous systems. It is explained how jumps in the fundamental solution matrix lead to jumps of the Floquet multipliers of periodic solutions. A Floquet multiplier of ... Keywords: Bifurcation, Discontinuous, Dry friction, Stick-slip

R. I. Leine; D. H. Van Campen

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

CX-002336: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Regional Demonstration - Technology Solutions for Wind Integration - Phase II CX(s) Applied: B1.19, B4.6, B5.1 Date: 05112010 Location(s):...

324

CX-002614: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Research and Education of Carbon Dioxide Separation from Coal Combustion Flue Gases with Regenerable Magnesium Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 0212...

325

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2010 CX-000973: Categorical Exclusion Determination Environmental Solutions, Inc. Wood Pellet Mill Expansion CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s):...

326

CX-000973: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-000973: Categorical Exclusion Determination Environmental Solutions, Inc. Wood Pellet Mill Expansion CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s):...

327

CX-008675: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC - Cryogenic Carbon Capture (Phase 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.9 Date: 01242012 Location(s): Utah,...

328

Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Governments and Schools: Governments and Schools: Looking for Energy Solutions Turn to an ENERGY STAR ® Service and Product Provider Partner ENERGY STAR Service and Product Providers (SPPs) have the experience and access to the tools needed to implement energy- efficient strategies that are right for you. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidelines for Energy Management, a proven strategy developed from ENERGY STAR partner successes, your organization can gain control of energy expenses and demonstrate environmental leadership. SPPs can help you assess your energy performance and recommend low-cost upgrades, cost-effective investments, and longer-term strategies that make the most sense for you. ENERGY STAR SPPs make it easy for you to care for your constituents, your facilities, and your finances.

329

PROCESS OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for recovering plutonium values from aqueous solutions. It comprises forming a uranous hydroxide precipitate in such a plutonium bearing solution, at a pH of at least 5. The plutonium values are precipitated with and carried by the uranium hydroxide. The carrier precipitate is then redissolved in acid solution and the pH is adjusted to about 2.5, causing precipitation of the uranous hydroxide but leaving the still soluble plutonium values in solution.

Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Summary of criticality data obtained at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories on fixed and soluble poisons in U + Pu nitrate solutions  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the effects of neutron poisons on U +Pu systems is necessary to better establish criticality safety programs. These data are needed in setting of criticality safety specifications for storage, processing and shipping of fissile material where it is desired to handle larger quantities with safety and efficiency. These data are needed also for validating calculational techniques and cross sections sets. U + Pu solutions containing 30% Pu in the total U + Pu were used in these experiments to determine the effect of neutron poisons. Criticality of heterogeneous systems of UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ rods in a lattice were studied when the U + Pu solutions with various amounts of Gd and + B were added to the system. Criticality of homogeneous systems of the U + Pu nitrate were determined with varying amounts of Gd and Gd + B added to the solution. Measurements were made to determine also the effect of boron-glass raschig rings on the criticality of the U + Pu nitrate solution systems.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy and Processing Alternative Rawmaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

March 14, 2012 ... Decrease of Heat Consumption at Nepheline Processing to Alumina and By-Products: Vladimir Kazakov1; Vadim Lipin2; 1St. Petersburg State Technologic University of Vegetable Polymers; 2Saint Petersburg ... aluminate liquor and evaporation of a soda solution are united in one technological process.

332

Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Robust signatures of solar neutrino oscillation solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the goal of identifying signatures that select specific neutrino oscillation parameters, we test the robustness of global oscillation solutions that fit all the available solar and reactor experimental data. We use three global analysis strategies previously applied by different authors and also determine the sensitivity of the oscillation solutions to the critical nuclear fusion cross section, S_{17}(0), for the production of 8B. The favored solutions are LMA, LOW, and VAC in order of g.o.f. The neutral current to charged current ratio for SNO is predicted to be 3.5 +- 0.6 (1 sigma), which is separated from the no-oscillation value of 1.0 by much more than the expected experimental error. The predicted range of the day-night difference in charged current rates is (8.2 +- 5.2)% and is strongly correlated with the day-night effect for neutrino-electron scattering. A measurement by SNO of either a NC to CC ratio > 3.3 or a day-night difference > 10%, would favor a small region of the currently allowed LMA neutrino parameter space. The global oscillation solutions predict a 7Be neutrino-electron scattering rate in BOREXINO and KamLAND in the range 0.66 +- 0.04 of the BP00 standard solar model rate, a prediction which can be used to test both the solar model and the neutrino oscillation theory. Only the LOW solution predicts a large day-night effect(reactor experiment, the LMA solution predicts 0.44 of the standard model rate; we evaluate 1 sigma and 3 sigma uncertainties and the first and second moments of the energy spectrum.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

Suntech Energy Solutions Formerly EI Solutions | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Formerly EI Solutions) Place Pasadena, California Zip 91103 Sector Solar Product A California-based solar power systems integrator and installer. References Suntech Energy...

335

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process Deviation Document Number: P-010 Rev 11-0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-013 Process Deviation Form, P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action, F-014 Process Deviation Log, ADMP-001 Procurement Process P-010 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0822 Process assigned to new owner. Process and flowchart modified to require completion of all items on F-013. 09_0122 Process and flowchart modified to reflect process modifications.

336

Interaction of manganese(II) with the surface of calcite in dilute solutions and seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of Mn/sup 2 +/ with the surface of calcite in aqueous solutions is complex. In dilute solutions the Mn/sup 2 +/ is rapidly adsorbed, MnCO/sub 3/ nucleates on the calcite surface and then grows by a first order reaction with respect to the initial Mn/sup 2 +/ concentration. At higher ionic strengths, in NaCl solutions, the rate of these processes is slower, but the same general pattern persists. In solutions containing Mg/sup 2 +/, at the concentration of seawater and in seawater, the nucleation phase of the uptake process does not appear to occur. The long term uptake rate of Mn/sup 2 +/ on the surface of calcite in seawater is first order with respect to the disolved Mn/sup 2 +/ concentration. The rate constant is over 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that found in dilute Mg/sup 2 +/-free solutions. A probable explanation for the slower growith rate in seawater is that MnCO/sub 3/ is not nucleated on the calcite surface due to the presence of high Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations. These, through site competition, prevent enough Mn/sup 2 +/ from being adsorbed to reach a critical concentration for MnCO/sub 3/ nucleation. This behavior is similar to that found for orthophosphate with calcite surfaces in dilute solutions and seawater. Measurements of the solubility of rhodochrosite in seawater gave results from an undersaturation approach to equilibrium in excellent agreement with those found in previous studies in dilute solutions. When equilibrium was approached from supersaturation, approximately 50 times more calcium was precipitated than Mn/sup 2 +/. The measured solubility was over twice that determined from undersaturation. It is possible that a Mn-calcite containing 25 to 30 mole percent MnCO/sub 3/ formed on the rhodochrosite from the supersaturated solutions. Consequently, it is doubtful that rhodochrosite controls the concentration of Mn/sup 2 +/ in calcium carbonate rich marine environments.

Franklin, M. L.; Morse, J. W.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Processing Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances the processing knowledge and managerial skills by providing a forum of technical information and networking opportunities. Processing Division Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents

340

EIS Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process The EIS Process The two Conversion Facility EISs have been prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Council on Environmental Quality NEPA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Process R&D Overview 100G Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance...

342

Solar Choice Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choice Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Choice Solutions Inc. Place Calabasas, California Zip 91302 Sector Solar Product Solar Choice Solutions Inc. is an...

343

EXTRACTION OF HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS WITH ETHYL SULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting Pu>s6/sup > /om an aqueous ammonium nitrate-containing nitric acid solution with ethyl sulfide.

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Information Solutions: Database Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database Applications Database Applications Argonne DOE-BES Central User Facility: A-Z People Query Data Warehouse Edits Registration | Registration Processing Security Admin Beamline Component Database System to manage beamline components. Beamline Downtime Report - UES Floor coordinator's downtime entry and reporting system. Beamline Directory | Beamline Entry Administration Links to the beamline websites and to detailed information about the equipment, techniques and contact information of a beamline. Beamline Usage and Scheduling System Long term schedule query and edit. Beamline schedule query and edit. Watchman and PSS data. Budget Proposal System Allows user to submit budget proposals via the web. Beamline Statistics Menu Query, entry and reporting of beamline statistics for ALD use only.

345

Global and Regional Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robyn Rock Robyn Rock Robyn Rock Manager, BNL Proposal Center rrock@bnl.gov, (631)-344-5468 Photo of Robyn Rock Responsibilities Robyn is responsible for establishing a new Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Proposal Center to support the Laboratory's development of high-quality, competitive proposals to sponsor organizations; for providing oversight for BNL proposal process, organizational performance and optimization in proposal execution; supporting the Laboratory's growth initiative through collaborations with BNL's research organizations and with external funding organizations and partners. She is also responsible for providing leadership in advising BNL's research organizations on funding opportunity requirements. Experience Robyn's strengths include 15 years of experience in Government

346

Actinide recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Sunflower Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Sunflower Solutions Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44106 Product Cleveland-based tracking systems maker for PV modules targeted at installations in the developing world....

348

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Enspiria Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information systems and technology consultants, with services in smart grid planning and systems integration. References Enspiria Solutions1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

350

Extracting alcohols from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon and surfactants are contacted with a solution of alcohol and water to extract the alcohol into the hydrocarbon-surfactant mixture.

Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Biofuel Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuel Solutions Place Colorado Product Defunct bioethanol plant developer, which had been developing one plant in Fairmont, Minnesota and...

352

HEU age determination  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to determine the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Age which is defined as the time since the HEU was produced in an enrichment process. The HEU age is determined from the ratios of relevant uranium parents and their daughters viz {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U. Uranium isotopes are quantitatively measured by their characteristic gammas and their daughters by alpha spectroscopy. In some of the samples where HEU is enriched more than 99%, the only mode of HEU age determination is by the measurement of {sup 231}Pa since there is negligible quantity of {sup 230}Th due to very low atom concentrations of {sup 234}U in the sample. In this paper we have presented data and methodology of finding the age of two HEU samples.

Moorthy, A.R.; Kato, W.Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

Vobach, A.R.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

Vobach, Arnold R. (6006 Allentown Dr., Spring, TX 77379)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

Vobach, Arnold R. (6006 Allentown Dr., Spring, TX 77389)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

Vobach, A.R.

1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study of PV module encapsulation materials, processing, and testing shows that overall module reliability is determined by all component materials and processing factors.

Pern, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydrocarbon Processing`s refining processes `96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on the following refining processes: alkylation, benzene reduction, benzene saturation, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, coking, crude distillation, deasphalting, deep catalytic cracking, electrical desalting, ethers, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogenation, hydrotreating, isomerization, resid catalytic cracking, treating, and visbreaking. The application, products, a description of the process, yield, economics, installation, and licensor are given for each entry.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

Ahmad Ghodsi

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

Oil recovery process and system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P. A.; Rhudy, J. S.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

PLUTONIUM-CUPFERRON COMPLEX AND METHOD OF REMOVING PLUTONIUM FROM SOLUTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for separating plutonium from fission products present in solutions of neutronirradiated uranium. The process consists in treating such acidic solutions with cupferron so that the cupferron reacts with the plutonium present to form an insoluble complex. This plutonium cupferride precipitates and may then be separated from the solution.

Potratz, H.A.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

IID Energy - PV Solutions Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PV Solutions Rebate Program PV Solutions Rebate Program IID Energy - PV Solutions Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate PBI Incentive max: 550,000 for the 5-year period (110,000/year) Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 2013 program is closed Provider Imperial Irrigation District '''''IID accepted applications for the 2013 PV Solutions Program from Jan. 2, 2013 - Jan. 31, 2013. Winners were determined via lottery. The program is now closed for the remainder of 2013, but another funding round is expected in 2014. ''''' Through the PV Solutions Rebate Program, Imperial Irrigation District (IID) provides rebates to its residential and commercial customers who install

364

Attractor solutions in Lorentz violating scalar-vector-tensor theory  

SciTech Connect

We investigate properties of attractors for the scalar field in the Lorentz violating scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravity. In this framework, both the effective coupling and potential functions determine the stabilities of the fixed points. In the model, we consider the constants of the slope of the effective coupling and potential functions which lead to the quadratic effective coupling vector with the (inverse) power-law potential. For the case of a purely scalar field, there are only two stable attractor solutions in the inflationary scenario. In the presence of a barotropic fluid, the fluid dominated solution is absent. We find two scaling solutions: the kinetic scaling solution and the scalar field scaling solutions. We show the stable attractors in regions of ({gamma},{xi}) parameter space and in a phase plane plot for different qualitative evolutions. From the standard nucleosynthesis, we derive the constraints for the value of the coupling parameter.

Arianto [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, THEPI Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Udayana University, Jl. Kampus Bukit Jimbaran Kuta-Bali 80361 (Indonesia); Zen, Freddy P.; Triyanta; Gunara, Bobby E. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, THEPI Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fundamental solutions for isotropic size-dependent couple stress elasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental solutions for two- and three-dimensional linear isotropic size-dependent couple stress elasticity are derived, based upon the decomposition of displacement fields into dilatational and solenoidal components. While several fundamental solutions have appeared previously in the literature, the present version is for the newly developed fully determinate couple stress theory. Within this theory, the couple stress tensor is skewsymmetrical and thus possesses vectorial character. The present derivation provides solutions for infinite domains of elastic materials under the influence of unit concentrated forces and couples. Unlike all previous work, unique solutions for displacements, rotations, force-stresses and couple-stresses are established, along with the corresponding force-tractions and couple-tractions. These fundamental solutions are central in analysis methods based on Green's functions for infinite domains and are required as kernels in the corresponding boundary integral formulations for size-dependent couple stress elastic materials.

Ali R. Hadjesfandiari; Gary F. Dargush

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Exact Solutions in Massive Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive gravity is a good theoretical laboratory to study modifications of General Relativity. The theory offers a concrete set-up to study models of dark energy, since it admits cosmological self-accelerating solutions in the vacuum, in which the size of the acceleration depends on the graviton mass. Moreover, non-linear gravitational self-interactions, in the proximity of a matter source, manage to mimic the predictions of linearised General Relativity, hence agreeing with solar-system precision measurements. In this article, we review our work in the subject, classifying, on one hand, static solutions, and on the other hand, self-accelerating backgrounds. For what respects static solutions we exhibit black hole configurations, together with other solutions that recover General Relativity near a source via the Vainshtein mechanism. For the self-accelerating solutions we describe a wide class of cosmological backgrounds, including an analysis of their stability.

Gianmassimo Tasinato; Kazuya Koyama; Gustavo Niz

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Parabolic Equations and Markov Processes Over p-adic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct and study a fundamental solution of Cauchy's problem for p-adic parabolic equations of a certain the type. The fundamental solution is the transition density of a p-adic Markov process.

W. A. Zuniga-Galindo

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

371

Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112) Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112) Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112) September 8, 2010 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Engineered Solutions, Inc. failed to certify a dehumidifier as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112) More Documents & Publications Basement Systems: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2110)

372

GE Lighting Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-4901) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GE Lighting Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-4901) GE Lighting Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-4901) GE Lighting Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-4901) March 5, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that General Electric Lighting Solutions manufactured and distributed noncompliant traffic signal modules in the U.S. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties distribute in the U.S. products that do not meet applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. GE Lighting Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-4901) More Documents & Publications Act One: NPCP (2013-CE-49001) Excellence Opto: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-49002)

373

Separation of iodine from mercury containing scrubbing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodines can be recovered from a nitric acid scrub solution containing mercuric nitrate by passing a current through the scrub solution to react the iodine with the mercuric nitrate to form mercuric iodate which precipitates out. The mercuric iodate can then be reacted to recover the radioiodine for further processing into a form suitable for long-term storage and to recover the mercury for recycling.

Burger, Leland L. (Richland, WA); Scheele, Randall D. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course/Analysis Initiation Process Document Number: ISDP- 010 Rev 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDP-010, Course Analysis Initiation Process, ISDP-015, WBT/ILT/Ex Design Process ISDP-010 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0512 Modified verbiage for clarification and updated referenced documents.

375

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course Evaluation and Close-out Process Document Number: ISDP-014 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Vickie Pleau Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-011, ISD History File Acceptance, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 5 I. Purpose To effectively plan and control the process for evaluating and finalizing EOTA ILT, EX and WBT training products, assuring

376

Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Ly, Jennifer (San Jose, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

Nerad, Bruce A. (Longmont, CO); Krantz, William B. (Boulder, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems comprising: adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8-9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids; oxidizing the solution to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes; removing said aldehydes as they are generated; and converting said aldehydes to peracids.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Ratcliff, Matthew A. (Lakewood, CO); Palasz, Peter D. (Lakewood, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems. It consists of adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8 to 9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids. The solution is oxidized to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes. The aldehydes are removed as they are generated and converted to peracids.

Chum, H.L.; Palasz, P.D.; Ratcliff, M.A.

1984-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between the two liquid phases, separation will result. This is the principle upon which separation by liquid-liquid extraction is based, and there are a number of important applications of this concept in industrial processes. This paper will review the basic concepts and applications as well as present future directions for the liquid-liquid extraction process.

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Globular Cluster Distance Determinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present status of the distance scale to Galactic globular clusters is reviewed. Six distance determination techniques which are deemed to be most reliable are discussed in depth. These different techniques are used to calibrate the absolute magnitude of the RR Lyrae stars. The various calibrations fall into three groups. Main sequence fitting using Hipparcos parallaxes, theoretical HB models and the RR Lyrae in the LMC all favor a bright calibration, implying a `long' globular cluster distance scale. White dwarf fitting and the astrometric distances yield a somewhat fainter RR Lyrae calibration, while the statistical parallax solution yields faint RR Lyrae stars implying a `short' distance scale to globular clusters. Various secondary distance indicators discussed all favor the long distance scale. The `long' and `short' distance scales differ by (0.31+/-0.16) mag. Averaging together all of the different distance determinations yields Mv(RR) = (0.23+/-0.04)([Fe/H] + 1.6) + (0.56+/-0.12) mag.

Brian Chaboyer

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

K2 Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name K2 Energy Solutions (formerly Peak Energy Solutions) Place Henderson, Nevada Zip 89074 Product Nevada-based designer and fabricator of Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP) batteries for such applications as EVs, power tools and larger-scale storage. Coordinates 38.83461°, -82.140509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.83461,"lon":-82.140509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solutions Require Solutions Require New Thinking America's demand for power threatens to overburden an already congested electric system. The U.S. Department of Energy is addressing these energy challenges with innovative solutions to energy generation. Its Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration (RDSI) Program is helping to alleviate congestion, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve reliability by investigating answers such as * Microgrid technologies * Distributed generation * Two-way communication systems * Demand response programs Reducing Peak Demand The RDSI program aims to reduce peak load on distribution feeders 20% by 2015. To help achieve this goal, RDSI is sponsoring demonstration projects nationwide. From California to New York, these projects are

384

FISSION PRODUCT REMOVAL FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The decontamination of organic solvents from fission products and in particular the treatment of solvents that were used for the extraction of uranium and/or plutonium from aqueous acid solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium are treated. The process broadly comprises heating manganese carbonate in air to a temperature of between 300 and 500 deg C whereby manganese dioxide is formed; mixing the manganese dioxide with the fission product-containing organic solvent to be treated whereby the fission products are precipitated on the manganese dioxide; and separating the fission product-containing manganese dioxide from the solvent.

Moore, R.H.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

FY-2010 Process Monitoring Technology Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2010, work under the Spectroscopy-Based Process Monitoring task included ordering and receiving four fluid flow meters and four flow visible-near infrared spectrometer cells to be instrumented within the centrifugal contactor system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Initial demonstrations of real-time spectroscopic measurements on cold-stream simulants were conducted using plutonium (Pu)/uranium (U) (PUREX) solvent extraction process conditions. The specific test case examined the extraction of neodymium nitrate (Nd(NO3)3) from an aqueous nitric acid (HNO3) feed into a tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/ n-dodecane solvent. Demonstration testing of this system included diverting a sample from the aqueous feed meanwhile monitoring the process in every phase using the on-line spectroscopic process monitoring system. The purpose of this demonstration was to test whether spectroscopic monitoring is capable of determining the mass balance of metal nitrate species involved in a cross-current solvent extraction scheme while also diverting a sample from the system. The diversion scenario involved diverting a portion of the feed from a counter-current extraction system while a continuous extraction experiment was underway. A successful test would demonstrate the ability of the process monitoring system to detect and quantify the diversion of material from the system during a real-time continuous solvent extraction experiment. The system was designed to mimic a PUREX-type extraction process with a bank of four centrifugal contactors. The aqueous feed contained Nd(NO3)3 in HNO3, and the organic phase was composed of TBP/n-dodecane. The amount of sample observed to be diverted by on-line spectroscopic process monitoring was measured to be 3 mmol (3 x 10-3 mol) Nd3+. This value was in excellent agreement with the 2.9 mmol Nd3+ value based on the known mass of sample taken (i.e., diverted) directly from the system feed solution.

Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Hines, Wes; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; henkell, J.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Jordan, Elizabeth A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peterson, James M.; Verdugo, Dawn E.; Christensen, Ronald N.; Peper, Shane M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Method for gettering organic, inorganic and elemental iodine in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of iodine from aqueous solutions, particularly the trapping of radioactive iodine to mitigate damage resulting from accidents or spills associated with nuclear reactors, by exposing the solution to well dispersed silver carbonate which reacts with the iodine and iodides, thereby gettering iodine and iodine compounds from solution. The iodine is not only removed from solution but also from the contiguous vapor.

Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Shockley, William E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

CX-010646: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010646: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06...

388

CX-010648: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010648: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06...

389

CX-010903: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010903: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06...

390

CX-010901: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06...

391

CX-010761: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Gasoline from Wood using Carbona Gasification and Topsoe TIGAS Processes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 07...

392

CX-005748: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-005748: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Reactor Technology for Hydro processing Bio-oils to Produce Gasoline, Diesel and Jet Fuel CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

393

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

394

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process Document Number: ISDP-015 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006A WBT Script Template, ISDF- 007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 6

396

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Development Process Document Number: ISDP-017 Revision 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ITTP-016 WBT Programming ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0223 Made changes to accurately reflect TPP. 11_0414 Added Derivative Classifier to step 12.0 ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 3 of 8

397

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Website Development-Maintenance Process Document Number: ITTP-015 Rev. 11_0419 Document Owner: Benjamin Aragon Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: ITT Referenced Document(s): ITTF-016 Website Development/Maintenance Log, ISDP-002 Training Production Process ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0419 Deleted decision point 2.1 and 2.2, incorporated Notifying Requester into step 2.0, modified verbiage for clarification. ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 3 of 6

398

Robust signatures of solar neutrino oscillation solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the goal of identifying signatures that select specific neutrino oscillation parameters, we test the robustness of global oscillation solutions that fit all the available solar and reactor experimental data. We use three global analysis strategies previously applied by different authors and also determine the sensitivity of the oscillation solutions to the critical nuclear fusion cross section, S_{17}(0), for the production of 8B. The neutral current to charged current ratio for SNO is predicted to be 3.5 +- 0.6 (1 sigma) for the favored LMA, LOW, and VAC solutions, which is separated from the no-oscillation value of 1.0 by much more than the expected experimental error. The predicted range of the day-night difference in charged current rates is between 0% and 21% (3 sigma) and is to be strongly correlated with the day-night effect for neutrino-electron scattering. A measurement by SNO of either a NC to CC ratio > 3.3 or a day-night difference > 10%, would favor a small region of the currently allowed LM...

Bahcall, J N; Pea-Garay, C; Bahcall, John N.; Pea-Garay, Carlos

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

CX-008491: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process CX(s)...

400

CX-008490: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process CX(s)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CX-008492: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process CX(s)...

402

CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Streamlining Solar Standards & Processes: The Southern California Rooftop Solar Challenge CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01272012 Location(s):...

403

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Systems...

404

CX-008993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-008993: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08222012...

405

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory August 12, 2010 CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Solar Cell Fabrication Alkaline Texturing Process Improvement CX(s) Applied:...

406

CX-009859: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009859: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost-Effective Treatment of Flowback and Produced Water via an Integrated Precipitative Supercritical Process CX(s) Applied: A9,...

407

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Thermal Integration of Carbon Dioxide Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12072009...

408

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

409

CX-010822: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

410

CX-010824: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

411

CX-009746: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Upstream Ultrasonic Processing for Small Producers: Preventative Maintenance for Paraffin Management CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 12172012...

412

IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Sol Solution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solution Solution Jump to: navigation, search Name Sol Solution Place Los Gatos, California Zip 95030 Sector Solar Product Rainbow Concentrator, Current matching multijunction Solar Cell Year founded 2008 Website http://www.Sol-Solution.net Coordinates 37.216351719361°, -121.9694852829° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.216351719361,"lon":-121.9694852829,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Natural Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Solutions Natural Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Solutions Name Natural Solutions Address 3715 Briarwood Dr. Place Cedar Falls, Iowa Zip 50613 Sector Solar Product solar and wind systems Phone number 319-277-7842 Website http://www.naturalsolutions-sk Coordinates 42.5048475°, -92.434048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5048475,"lon":-92.434048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Heinsight Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heinsight Solutions Heinsight Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Heinsight Solutions Name Heinsight Solutions Address 217 Pine Street Place Fort Collins, Colorado Zip 80524 Sector Efficiency Product Skylight and solar water heating installation Website http://www.heinsightsolutions. Coordinates 40.5891279°, -105.0765009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5891279,"lon":-105.0765009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

Soy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milford, Iowa Zip 51351 Product Manufacturer and distributor of 100 percent Soy-Based Biodiesel References Soy Solutions1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

417

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on Nuclear Responsibility on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE ZIRFLEX PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

tive dissolution of zirconium or Zircaloy fuel cladding. The process involves the dissolution of the cladding material in solutions of ammonium fluoride alone or in mixture with amonium nitrate. Mixtures of amonium fluoride and amonium nitrate are preferred since they result in very little evolution of hydrogen during the is that these solutions attack austenitic stainless steels only slowly, in sharp contrast to the media (e.g., hydrofluoric acid or hydrofluoric-nitric acid mixtures) generng 6 M NH/sub 4/F, the rate of pentration of Zircaloy-2 is nearly 100 mils/hr, while that of typical austentic stainless steels is only about 0.5 mil/month. (auth)

Swanson, J.L.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Production of cerium oxide microsheres by an internal gelation sol-gel process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experiments performed for this research were completed to produce solid cerium oxide microspheres by an internal gelation sol-gel process. The motivation for this work was to develop a process that would enable the fabrication of a storage or transmutation form for the plutonium and transuranics (TRU) from the Uranium Extraction Plus (UREX ) used fuel reprocessing process. This process is being investigated by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Advanced Fuel Cycles Initiative (AFCI) through the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The internal gelation production of cerium oxide involves the combination of hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), urea, and cerium nitrate solutions at ~100oC. Microspheres were produced by injection of a broth solution into a flowing stream of hot silicone oil. The captured microspheres were aged, washed, and then underwent Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and XRay Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The process variables examined in this study include the concentrations of HMTA, urea and cerium nitrate, the process temperature, the postgelation aging time, and the product washing conditions. Over a series of 70 experiments, it was determined that a broth solution containing a mixture of 1.45 M cerium nitrate and 1.65 M HMTA and urea (1:1 ratio) solutions produced the best cerium oxide microspheres. The spheres were aged for 30 to 60 minutes and then washed in hexane to remove the silicone oil and a subsequent series of ammonium hydroxide washes to remove unreacted product and to fully gel the microspheres. Through DSC analysis it was determined that excess wash or unreacted product may be removed by an exothermic reaction at approximately 200oC. The XRD analysis of unheated spheres showed the presence of cerium oxide with additional cerium-bearing organics. Following heating, the microspheres were completely converted to cerium oxide.

Wegener, Jeffrey J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanowire networks embedded in indium tin oxide nanoparticleoxide (i-ZnO) and indium tin oxide (ITO) by radio frequencyNetworks Embedded in Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle Matrices

Chung, Choong-Heui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

SciTech Connect

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Kalina, Dale G. (Naperville, IL); Kaplan, Louis (Lombard, IL); Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process Document Number: ISDP-005 Rev 11_0718 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: PM2 Referenced Document(s): ISDF-XXX Vision User Guide (currently being developed ) ISDP-005 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0410 Initial Release 10_0630 Process modified to match steps within the TPP 11_0718 Minor editorial changes; changed step 8.0 from Task-to-Training Matrix to "Analysis"-to-Training Matrix.

423

aluminum processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refining of Potroom Metal Using the Hydro Ram Crucible Fluxing Process [pp. .... Approachgeneration of Aluminum Wrought Alloy Scrap of Old Cars [pp.

424

materials processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Stainless Steel Elaborated by the Duplex Procedure (Electric Furnace- VOD Installation) [pp. ... Materials Processing on a Solar Furnace Satellite [pp.

425

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 14, 2012 December 14, 2012 CX-009689: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Disconnection of Utilities CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office December 14, 2012 CX-009672: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Relocation of Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.22 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office December 14, 2012 CX-009671: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Demolition and Disposal of Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office December 14, 2012

426

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

427

The CMSF Process: The Spray Forming of Clean Metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a solution to this problem that led to the CMSF process. .... This work was performed under funding from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects...

428

A class of moving boundary problems arising in drying processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: drying processes, heat and mass transfer, moving boundary value problems, multiphase flows in porous media, quasilinear parabolic systems, wellposedness of solutions

M. Ilic

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Process Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Although melt loss had become the major cost factor in ingot production, it was the soaring cost of energy during the 1973 energy crisis that triggered the search for more-efficient remelt processes. This effort also sought to develop process that were less labor intensive and more...

430

Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K. [Entropic Systems, Inc., Winchester, MA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C) solution of sodium carbonate (pH 11-12). The sample was placed in a vertical 18 in. long aluminum cylindrical cell with an ID of 1.5 in.. The top half of the cell was thermally insulated while the bottom half was cooled. Hot alkaline solution was injected at 20 ml/min for 3-4 hours at the top of the cell and liquid produced at the bottom of the cell. After each experiment, the cell contents were removed and analyzed to determine if sand consolidation occurred. Both aggregates of sand grains and sectioned and polished epoxy-mounted sand grains were examined and analyzed using an electron microprobe to determine any change in shape, size, or composition of the sand pack and precipitation and growth of secondary phases. To better understand the process, experiments were subsequently conducted using samples of pure quartz, pure feldspar, and a 50:50 (by weight) mixture of quartz and feldspar. In each case, both varied 20-40 mesh and 50-250 mesh grain size samples were used. For the 20-40 mesh cases, zeolites and a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate were deposited on grain surfaces but were insufficient to cause overall sand consolidation. However, when a finer, poorly sorted (50-250 mesh) 50:50 mixture of feldspar and quartz was used, sand consolidation was obtained in 2.5 hours. At the top, hotter part of the cell, equant and acicular zeolite crystals (sodium aluminum silicates) weakly bound the sand grains. At the bottom and cooler part of the cell, the sand grains were strongly bound by a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate. Results to-date indicate that both zeolite and silica may be cementing agents, the grain-bonding strength depending on the grain surface area. This investigation is part of an ongoing research. The temperature, injection rate, and pH of the alkaline solution, treating time and "soaking period" are considered important process parameters that need to be further investigated.

Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

METAL RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for the separation of plutonium from the niobium oxide which is frequently used as a carrier precipitate to separate the plutonium from solutions of dissolved fuel elements. The niobium oxide, plutonium bearing precipitate is treated with hydrogen fluoride converting the niobium to the volatile pentafluoride, while the plutonium is changed into the substantially non- volatile plutonium tetrafluoride. After the niobium has been removed, the plutonium tetrafluoride is reacted with elemental fluorine, converting it to a higher plutonium fluoride and this may in turn be volitilized away from any residual impurities.

Werner, L.B.; Hill, O.F.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Process for producing hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A process for producing hydrogen by an electrolysis of water with an aqueous solution of an alkali hydroxide is provided. It is to use an electrolytic cell prepared by bonding a gas and liquid permeable anode on one surface of a cation-exchange membrane of a fluorinated polymer and a gas and liquid permeable cathode on the other surface of the membrane. An economical metal can be used as the substance for the electrolytic cell. Hydrogen can be produced at a low voltage in stable for a long time.

Oda, Y.; Morimoto, T.; Suzuki, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Analysis of hypochlorite process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal gases  

SciTech Connect

Sodium hypochlorite reacts readily with hydrogen sulfide to convert the sulfide ion into free sulfur in a neutral or acid solution and to the sulfate ion in an alkaline solution. Sodium hypochlorite can be generated on site by processing geothermal brine in electrolytic cells. An investigation to determine if this reaction could be economically used to remove hydrogen sulfide from geothermal noncondensible gases is reported. Two processes, the LO-CAT Process and the Stretford Process, were selected for comparison with the hypochlorite process. Three geothermal reservoirs were considered for evaluation: Niland KGRA, Baca KGRA, and The Geysers KGRA. Because of the wide variation in the amount of hydrogen sulfide present at The Geysers, two different gas analyses were considered for treatment. Plants were designed to process the effluent noncondensible gases from a 10 MW/sub e/ geothermal power plant. The effluent gas from each plant was to contain a maximum hydrogen sulfide concentration of 35 ppb. Capital costs were estimated for each of the processes at each of the four sites selected. Operating costs were also calculated for each of the processes at each of the sites. The results of these studies are shown.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Gender determination of avian embryo  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Powerit Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powerit Solutions Powerit Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Powerit Solutions Address 568 First Ave South Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Sector Efficiency Product Allows business customers to control their energy usage online Website http://www.poweritsolutions.co Coordinates 47.5977906°, -122.3341632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5977906,"lon":-122.3341632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

DOE Cites Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations DOE Cites Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations December 22, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) that it will fine the company $192,500 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today cites a number of deficiencies that led to a series of low-level plutonium uptakes by workers at a WTS mobile facility (MOVER) stationed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, Calif. The violations reflected WTS' limited understanding of the design and operational limitations of the MOVER facility, a portable waste processing facility designed to be

438

Casting Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   General characteristics of casting processes...casting processes Characteristic Casting process Green sand Resin-bonded sand Plaster Lost foam Investment Permanent mold Die Part Material (casting) All All Zn to Cu Al to cast iron All Zn to cast iron Zn to Cu Porosity and voids (a) C-E D-E D-E C-E E B-C A-C Shape (b) All All All All All Not T3, 5,...

439

Hara Environmental and Energy Management Solution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hara Environmental and Energy Management Solution Hara Environmental and Energy Management Solution Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hara Environmental and Energy Management Solution Agency/Company /Organization: Hara Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., Develop Goals, "Perpare a Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Implement the Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

440

Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes Thomas J.94720 USA Abstract Lithium-magnesium solid solution alloysHeating mixtures of lithium nitride and magnesium provides a

Richardson, Thomas J.; Chen, Guoying

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Duplicate tag number Send email to am;Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Personal property Send email to am

Li, Mo

442

Solar Project Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Project Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Project Solutions Place California Sector Solar Product US-based JV to build solar-power plants in California....

443

Solar amp Electric Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar amp Electric Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar & Electric Solutions Place Santa Cruz, California Zip 95062 Sector Solar Product Small solar installation firm...

444

Green Heat Solutions Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Solutions Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Heat Solutions Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenheating Region Scotland LinkedIn...

445

AG Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AG Solutions Inc. Place Gladstone, Michigan Product 10Mgpy biodiesel producer in Gladstone, Michigan. References AG Solutions Inc.1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

446

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Place North Carolina Zip 27709-3981 Product String representation "Manufactures ad...

447

AFV Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Place Mesa, Arizona Zip 85210 Product AFV Solutions is a manufacturer of electric-hybrid buses and energy conversion systems for cars. References AFV Solutions Inc1...

448

Energy Options Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Options & Solutions Place Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip 48103 Product Michigan-based alternative energy consultant. References Energy Options & Solutions1 LinkedIn...

449

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FT Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name FT Solutions LLC Place South Jordan, Utah Zip 84095 Product JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to focus...

450

Quantum Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions Place Rancho Cordova, California Zip 95742 Product California-based energy management company that was formed in 1974. References Quantum Energy Solutions1...

451

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012,...

452

Solar India Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar India Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar India Solutions Place Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 530016 Sector Efficiency Product Andhra-based energy...

453

Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89103 Product Waste-to-energy bioremediation developer. References Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc1...

454

Battery Wireless Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Battery Wireless Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Battery & Wireless Solutions...

455

Smarter Grid Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smarter Grid Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Smarter Grid Solutions Place United Kingdom Product String representation "The SGS technol ... the technology." is too long....

456

Energy Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

. References "Energy Solutions International" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnergySolutionsInternational&oldid344882" Categories: Clean Energy...

457

PNE Renewable Solutions JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Solutions JV Jump to: navigation, search Name PNE & Renewable Solutions JV Place Delaware Sector Wind energy Product Delaware-based limited liability company and JV...

458

Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating Through the Headwinds of Change Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating Through the...

459

Wind Park Solutions Arcadia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arcadia Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Park Solutions Arcadia Place Big Sandy, Montana Sector Wind energy Product JV between Wind Park Solutions America and Arcadia...

460

PROCESS FOR THE PURIFICATION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proccss is described for reclaiming uranium values from aqueous solutions containing U, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Cr comprising treating the solution with NH/sub 3/ to precipitate the: U, Fc, and Cr and leaving Cu and Ni in solution as ammonia complex ions. The precipitate is chlorinated with CCl/sub 4/ at an elevated temperature to convert the U, Tc, and Cr into their chlorides. The more volatile FeCl/sub 3/ and CrCl/sub 3/ are separated from the UCl/sub 4/. The process is used when U is treated in a calutron, and composite solutions are produccd which contain dissolved products of stainless steel.

Rosenfeld, S.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-012 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-014 Course Announcement, ISDF-010, After Action Report, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-009, Design/Development Review Checklist, ITTF-014 Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ISDP-011, Exercise Course Implementation Process, ITTP-015 Website Development/Maintenance Process, ISDF-015, ILT/EX Course Support Checklist

462

Process Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...flash-welding applications include: Chain links Transmission bands Automotive flywheel ring gears Strips that are joined for continuous processing lines Wire and bar drawing operations for continuous stamping press

463

Process Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update uses real world examples to discuss applications of electrotechnology in industrial process heating and to highlight some of the emerging technologies in this field. These emerging technologies, when implemented in a plant, will provide significant energy savings as well as increase productivity. The report presents three case studies of successful implementation of two different electric process-heating technologies in three different industries. The case studies show that in some ...

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

464

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Research of IPE Solution Applied to EPR Nuclear Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power company is currently in the process of constructing the advanced 3rd generation of EPR Nuclear Power Plant, and its corresponding information system is an overall integrated information management system based on the new concept design. ... Keywords: digital nuclear power plant, IPE solutions, comprehensive application

Daqiao Wang; Fangneng Hu; Yi Luo; Yi Ma

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Robust solutions for combinatorial auctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bids submitted in auctions are usually treated as enforceable commitments in most bidding and auction theory literature. In reality bidders often withdraw winning bids before the transaction when it is in their best interests to do so. Given a bid withdrawal ... Keywords: bid withdrawal, combinatorial auctions, constraint programming, robustness, weighted Super Solutions

Alan Holland; Barry O'Sullivan

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

RWE Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RWE Solutions RWE Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name RWE Solutions Place Neu-Isenburg, Germany Zip 63263 Sector Solar Product Germany-based, subsidiary of RWE AG plans, builds and manages energy infrastructure for utilities (power, gas, water, steam, heat and cooling). RWE Solutions through its subsidiaries is invovled in the solar sector Coordinates 50.05652°, 8.695144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.05652,"lon":8.695144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Filardo, Giuseppe (Palermo, IT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 f