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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Coulometric determination of americium in acetonitrile solution of phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure was developed for the coulometric determination of americium using the electrochemical couple Am(IV)-Am(III). An acetonitrile solution of 0.3-0.2 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was used as the electrolyte. Americium can be determined in the presence of large amounts of Cm, Pu, Ce, and other impurities; limit of detection approx. 10 ..mu..g.

Perevalov, S.A.; Kulyakov, Yu.M.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

1986-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Business Process driven solutions for innovative enterprise information systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Process driven solutions for innovative enterprise information systems F. Taglino, M. In particular, it will be argued about business process driven approach to information systems development and overcome current limits. Business process driven approach to IS development is here characterized by: (i

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Solution-processed coreshell nanowires for efficient photovoltaic cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution-processed core­shell nanowires for efficient photovoltaic cells Jinyao Tang1,3 , Ziyang are promising for photovoltaic appli- cations1­11 , but, so far, nanowire-based solar cells have had lower efficiencies than planar cells made from the same materials6­10,12,13 , even allowing for the generally lower

Yang, Peidong

11

TRUEX processing of plutonium analytical solutions at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRUEX (TRansUranic EXtraction) solvent extraction process was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Department of Energy. A TRUEX demonstration completed at ANL involved the processing of analytical and experimental waste generated there and at the New Brunswick Laboratory. A 20-stage centrifugal contactor was used to recover plutonium, americium, and uranium from the waste. Approximately 84 g of plutonium, 18 g of uranium, and 0.2 g of americium were recovered from about 118 liters of solution during four process runs. Alpha decontamination factors as high as 65,000 were attained, which was especially important because it allowed the disposal of the process raffinate as a low-level waste. The recovered plutonium and uranium were converted to oxide; the recovered americium solution was concentrated by evaporation to approximately 100 ml. The flowsheet and operational procedures were modified to overcome process difficulties. These difficulties included the presence of complexants in the feed, solvent degradation, plutonium precipitation, and inadequate decontamination factors during startup. This paper will discuss details of the experimental effort.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.; Wygmans, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

Oulman, Charles S. [Ames, IA; Chriswell, Colin D. [Slater, IA

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%. 5 figs.

Oulman, C.S.; Chriswell, C.D.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550?°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic ?-BiNbO{sub 4} crystals at 590?°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550?°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500?°C contained approximately 6.5?atm.?% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550?°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: s-inoue@jaist.ac.jp [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); School of Material Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Ariga, Tomoki [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Matsumoto, Shin [School of Material Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki [ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); School of Material Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Salmonella detection and critical control point determination during poultry processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SALMONELLA DETECTION AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT DETERMINATION DURING POULTRY PROCESSING A Thesis by SUZANNE D. Y O U N G Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of M A S T E R OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Poultry Science SALMONELLA DETECTION AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT DETERMINATION DURING POULTRY PROCESSING A Thesis by SUZANNE D. Y O U N G Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Young, Suzanne D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Kinetic method for the determination of iridium in copper and copper-nickel alloys and in industrial solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the kinetic determination of iridium in copper and copper-nickel alloys, in ores and ore processing products containing down to 10/sup -8/%, and in waste solutions down to 0.01 mg/liter. The procedure for the kinetic determination of iridium based on the oxidation of mercury(I) and cerium(IV) is described. The applications of the schemes presented allows one to widen significantly the range of products to be analyzed, to determine iridium at a concentration of 10/sup -8/% in the presence of copper and noble metals, and to shorten the time required for the analysis.

Danilova, F.I.; Fedotova, I.A.; Ustinova, N.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The studies have focused on rapid, efficient bond-fragmentation reactions initiated through photoinduced electron transfer. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of a number of donors have been examined, especially 1,2 diamines and related compounds. Two of the amines fragment with rate constants of 3 [times] 10[sup 8] to 2 [times] 10[sup 9] M[sup [minus]1]sec[sup [minus]1]. A series of amino-substituted pinacols and related compounds have also been examined; they undergo similar but slower fragmentation processes when converted to their cation radicals by photoinduced electron transfer. The studies with linked and polymeric electron donor- electron acceptor coupled molecules have also progressed. Several polymers containing diamine repeat units and anthraquinone or nitroaromatic acceptors have also been prepared that can be photoactivated by visible irradiation; they fragment efficiently in solution and photodegrade even in the solid state. The studies of singlet oxygen initiated fragmentation reactions of diamines, amino alcohols, and aminoketones have nearly been completed. Attention have been turned to fragmentable electron acceptors such as p- cyanobenzyl bromide; irradiation of electron donors such as methyl- or methoxy-naphthalenes can initiate efficient fragmentation of the electron deficient bromide.

Whitten, D.G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solution of relativistic quantum optics problems using clusters of graphical processing units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical solution of relativistic quantum optics problems requires high performance computing due to the rapid oscillations in a relativistic wavefunction. Clusters of graphical processing units are used to accelerate the computation of a time dependent relativistic wavefunction in an arbitrary external potential. The stationary states in a Coulomb potential and uniform magnetic field are determined analytically and numerically, so that they can used as initial conditions in fully time dependent calculations. Relativistic energy levels in extreme magnetic fields are recovered as a means of validation. The relativistic ionization rate is computed for an ion illuminated by a laser field near the usual barrier suppression threshold, and the ionizing wavefunction is displayed.

Gordon, D.F., E-mail: daviel.gordon@nrl.navy.mil; Hafizi, B.; Helle, M.H.

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Determination of the controlling process in coupled heat and mass transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of non-condensable gases on condensation is well known going back to Nusselt. The non-condensables tend to form a blanket around the cooled surface which can significantly slow condensation rates by introducing a controlling mass transfer resistance. The coupled heat and mass transfer process that results has a significant impact on the optimum design of compact condenser bundles. One of the questions that arises in analyzing such a coupled process is which of the two processes is controlling the overall transfer process? One way to quantify a solution to this problem is to take a thermodynamic perspective and to compute the entropy generation associated with each of the individual processes. Then, the process that contributes the largest entropy generation is viewed as the controlling process. The result of such a determination provides insight as to how to augment the overall transfer process. The approach taken in this study is to use available CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes to formulate and solve the condenser problem to gain insight into the coupled process. The resulting temperature, velocity and concentration data can then be analyzed to determine the entropy generation associated with each of the processes. Results are presented for a series of simplified geometries that define the magnitude of the effects contributed by each of the transfer processes.

Bell, B.; Kakavas, T.; Herold, K.E. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Center for Environmental Energy Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MODELING OF A NOVEL SOLUTION POTASH MINING PROCESS Sergio Almada, Harvey Haugen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by drilling followed by a number of steps to develop a solution mining cavern. Water is injected to dissolve a sump area within the salt at the base of the solution mining cavern. The sump allows insoluble materials settle within the cavern to avoid affecting the solution mining process and the dissolved salt can

22

Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Summary of Tests to Determine Effectiveness of Gelatin Strike on SS{ampersand}C Dissolver Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solutions from the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS&C) material are sufficiently different from previous solutions processed via the F-Canyon Purex process that the effectiveness of individual process steps needed to be ascertained. In this study, the effectiveness of gelatin strike was tested under a variety of conditions. Specifically, several concentrations of silica, fluoride, nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), and aluminium nitrate nonahydrate (ANN) were studied. The disengagement times of surrogate and plant SS&C dissolver solutions from plant solvent also were measured. The results of the tests indicate that gelatin strike does not coagulate the silica at the low concentration of silica ({tilde 30} ppm) expected in the SS&C dissolver solutions because the silicon is complexed with fluoride ions (e.g., SiF{sub 6}{sup -2}). The silicon fluoride complex is expected to remain with the aqueous phase during solvent extraction. The disengagement times of the dissolver solutions from the plant solvent were not affected by the presence of low concentrations of silica and no third phase formation was observed in the disengagement phase with the low silica concentrations. Tests of surrogate SS&C dissolver solutions with higher concentration of silica (less than 150 ppm) did show that gelatin strike followed by centrifugation resulted in good phase disengagement of the surrogate SS{ampersand}C dissolver solution from the plant dissolver solution. At the higher silica concentrations, there is not sufficient fluoride to complex with the silica, and the silica must be entrained by the gelatin and removed from the dissolver solution prior to solvent extraction.

Murray, A.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Karraker, D.G.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, Jr., Henry D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Hoyer, Kristin K. (Chicago, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Hoyer, Kristin K. (Chicago, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Uniqueness of Solutions to Single-Stage Isobaric Flash Processes Involving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of material stability, the Gibbs-Duhem equation, and the Cauchy interlace theorem. Results for the other solutions. Solution curves for the energy balance equation (for the QP case) and the vapor specification. The question of uniqueness arises because the set of model equations that describeseparation processes

Lucia, Angelo

29

Solution-processed infrared photovoltaic devices with >10% monochromatic internal quantum efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, solution-cast photovoltaics are of urgent interest to realize low-cost solar cells. Polymer, polymerSolution-processed infrared photovoltaic devices with >10% monochromatic internal quantum-fullerene, and polymer-nanocrystal photovoltaics absorb light only to wavelengths as long as 750 nm, with the exception

30

Development of low-temperature solution-processed colloidal quantum dot-based solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution-processed solar cells incorporating organic semiconductors and inorganic colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are potential alternatives to conventional solar cells fabricated via vacuum or high-temperature sintering ...

Chang, Liang-Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Metallocene/carbon hybrids prepared by a solution process for supercapacitor applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient and scalable solution-based processes are not generally available to integrate well-studied pseudocapacitive materials (i.e., metal oxides and conducting polymers) with other components such as porous carbon, ...

Mao, Xianwen

32

Numerical solutions for determining wave-induced pressure distributions around buried pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were moved as fsr as 1400 feet under the influence of Hurricane Flossy in 1956. The more then $200 million loss in pipeline facilities sustained off the Gulf Coast during 1964 and 1965 from two major hurricanes attests to the importance...NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS POR DETERMINING WAVE-INDUCED PRESSURE DISTRIBUTIONS AROUND BURIED PIPELINES A Thesis by NOOK WAI LAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Lai, Ngok-Wai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20?25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

Peterson, E.S.; Trudeau, J.; Cleary, B.; Hackett, M.; Greene, W.A.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Solvent extraction and recovery of the transuranic elements from waste solutions using the TRUEX process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-level liquid waste is produced during the processing of irradiated nuclear fuel by the PUREX process. In some cases the treatment of metallurgical scrap to recover the plutonium values also generates a nitric acid waste solution. Both waste solutions contain sufficient concentrations of transuranic elements (mostly /sup 241/Am) to require handling and disposal as a TRU waste. This paper describes a recently developed solvent extraction/recovery process called TRUEX (transuranium extraction) which is designed to reduce the TRU concentration in nitric waste solutions to <100 nCi/g of disposed form (1,2). (In the USA, non-TRU waste is defined as <100 nCi of TRU/g of disposed form.) The process utilizes PUREX process solvent (TBP in a normal paraffinic hydrocarbon or carbon tetrachloride) modified by a small concentration of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (abbrev. CMPO). The presence of CMPO enables the modified PUREX process solvent to extract trivalent actinides as well as tetra- and hexavalent actinides. A major feature of the TRUEX process is that is is applicable to waste solutions containing a wide range of nitric acid, salt, and fission product concentrations and at the same time is very compatible with existing liquid-liquid extraction technology as usually practiced in a fuel reprocessing plant. To date the process has been tested on two different types of synthetic waste solutions. The first solution is a typical high-level nitric acid waste and the second a typical waste solution generated in metallurgical scrap processing. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Schulz, W.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution.

Rogers, Robin (DeKalb, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bond, Andrew H. (Tallahassee, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution. 7 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanowire networks as window layers in thin film solar cells.window layer for fully solution-deposited thin filmITO) thin films by silver nanowire composite window layers

Chung, Choong-Heui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Surfactant based imbibition and induced solution gas drive process: investigation by nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drive mechanism. This imbibition and induced solution gas drive study employed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to monitor and characterize the progress of oil recovery inside the rock sample core. A specially designed core...SURFACTANT BASED IMBIBITION AND INDUCED SOLUTION GAS DRIVE PROCESS: INVESTIGATION BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE A Thesis by JAMES CALVIN COX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Cox, James Calvin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Process for recovering chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid/liquid process for the separation and recovery of chaotropic anions from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid support comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the chaotropic anions are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved salt (lyotrope). A solid/liquid phase admixture of separation particles containing bound chaotropic anions in such an aqueous solution is also contemplated, as is a chromatography apparatus containing that solid/liquid phase admixture. 19 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The vendor add processThe vendor add process Determining if a payment to a vendorDetermining if a payment to a vendor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vendor add processThe vendor add process Determining if a payment to a vendorDetermining if a payment to a vendor is reportable to the IRSis reportable to the IRS University of Utah Accounts Payable.Chan@admin.utah.edu · Maria Nielsen · Internal Auditor 581.4994 Maria.Nielsen@admin.utah.edu · Clint Rasmussen · Vendor Master

42

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 50, NO. 4, APRIL 2002 923 Adaptive Solution for Blind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 50, NO. 4, APRIL 2002 923 Adaptive Solution for Blind, and Mila Nikolova Abstract--A deterministic maximum likelihood (DML) ap- proach is presented for the blind of the recursive and adap- tive algorithm are presented. Index Terms--Adaptive algorithm, blind equalization, deter

Nikolova, Mila

43

Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

Dietz, Mark L. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX); Barrans, Jr., Richard E. (Downers Grove, IL); Rausch, David (Naperville, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Determining the Processes that Control Kelp Spore Abundance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999. Identification of kelp zoospores from in situ planktonTemporal and spatial scales of kelp demography: The role ofM.H. The secret life of kelps: Planktonic processes and

Dayton, Paul K.; Graham, Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Multipass optical device and process for gas and analyte determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A torus multipass optical device and method are described that provide for trace level determination of gases and gas-phase analytes. The torus device includes an optical cavity defined by at least one ring mirror. The mirror delivers optical power in at least a radial and axial direction and propagates light in a multipass optical path of a predefined path length.

Bernacki, Bruce E. (Kennewick, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Enhancing performing characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

Bazan, Guillermo C; Moses, Daniel; Peet, Jeffrey; Heeger, Alan J

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

Bazan, Guillermo C; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Moses, Daniel; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Peet, Jeffrey; Soci, Cesare

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

49

Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

Bazan, Guillermo C. (Santa Barbara, CA); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Moses, Daniel (Santa Barbara, CA); Peet, Jeffrey (Goleta, CA)

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Construction Wage Determination Process in the 1970's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

policy, manpower training programs, labor relations involvement, targeted tax incentives, etc., government may and, in fact, does intervene in this process at all times. We do not, however, know whether existing government intervention is optimally... industry is a highly complex one which does not always conform to the dictates of orthodox microeconomic theory. A post-World War II history of construe- tion wages reveals a highly expansionary period during the 1950's and 1960's, followed by a control...

Shulenburger, David E.; McLean, Robert; Rasch, Sara E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

56

Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for OLED SSL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interconnected network of silver nanowires has been used as transparent anode in OLED devices. This layer was deposited by spin-coating and slot-die coating from an aqueous nanowire suspension. The sheet resistance of the film was 10ohms/sq with a transmission (including the glass substrate) of higher than 85%. The first phase of the project focused on the implementation of this nanowire layer with a hole-injection-layer (HIL) which has been developed at Plextronics and has been shown to provide good stability and efficiency in conventional OLED devices. We modified the HIL solution such that it coated reasonably well with suitable surface morphology so that actual devices can be manufactured. During the second phase we investigated the hole-injection and stability of hole-onlydevices. We determined that the use of the nanowire network as anode does not introduce an additional degradation mechanism since the observed device characteristics did not differ from those made with ITO anode. We then proceeded to make actual OLED devices with this nanowire / HIL stack and achieved device characteristics similar state-of-the-art OLED devices with a single junction. In order to gain traction with potential OLED manufacturers, we decided to contract Novaled to prepare large-area demonstrators for us. For these devices, we used an allevaporated stack, i.e. we did use Novaledâ??s HIL material instead of Plextronicsâ??. We successfully fabricated demonstrators with an area of 25cm2 with a double or triple junction stack. Minor stack optimizations were necessary to achieve efficacies and lifetime equivalent with ITO devices made with the same devices stack. Due to the reduced microcavity effect, the color of the emitted light is significantly more stable with respect to the viewing angle compared to ITO devices. This fact in conjunction with the promise of lower production cost due to the elimination of the ITO sputtering process and the direct patterning of the anode layer are the obvious advantages of this technology. The project has shown that this nanowire technology is a viable option to achieve OLED devices with good lifetime and efficiency and we are currently working with manufacturers to utilize this technology in a production setting.

None

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

58

SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE SOLUTIONS USING LOCAL MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE union ABSTRACT This paper deals with new proposals for the design of passive solutions adapted use raw wood to warm the poorly designed houses. This leads to a large scale deforestation

Boyer, Edmond

59

Solution-processed high-performance colloidal quantum dot tandem photodetectors on flexible substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a high-performance colloidal quantum dot (CQD)-based near-infrared tandem photodetector fabricated on flexible substrates via solution-processed method. The tandem photodetector on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates exhibited low dark current and high detectivities over ?8.8?×?10{sup 11} Jones at near infrared range at ?0.5?V bias and over ?10{sup 13} Jones near 0 bias. The critical bend radii of ?8?mm and ?3?mm have been demonstrated for tensile and compressive bending, respectively. The performance of photodetectors remains stable under mechanical stress, making PbSe CQD material a promise candidate for flexible infrared sensing applications.

Jiang, Zhenyu; You, Guanjun; Wang, Li; Liu, Jie; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Hu, Wenjia [China Tianchen Engineering Corporation, Tianjin 300400 (China); Zhang, Yu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics and College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Studies of solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes and their materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hitherto unexplored approach is presented in which a small molecule is used as a host to polymer guests in solution-processed OLEDs. We find that the small molecule host results in much more efficient devices than the often-used alternative polymer host when used for the guests presented. It is likely that nano- and microstructural differences between the hosts contribute to the improvements, which highlights some interesting characteristics that can help to better understand the nature of these mixtures. A number of the guests used in this study were newly synthesized benzobisoxazole-based copolymers. New organic copolymers are presented that are based on the chemical structure of benzobisoxazoles, which have been shown in the past to have good electron transporting properties. The novel concept in this publication pertains to a change in the direction of polymerization, also known as the conjugation pathway, which we show increases the emission efficiency. This work highlights a unique and useful property of organic semiconducting materials in that they can be synthesized to create the desired characteristics. Earlier work is described that kick-started in our research group the use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs. Originally these devices were to be used in magnetoresistance studies, but the project took a different path when the devices were more efficient than expected. The efficient use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs is highlighted, which at the time was not often the case. Also, the important observation of the effect of solvent choice on the resultant film is emphasized, with discussion of the likely cause of these effects. Microcavity OLEDs are introduced in which the transparent anode ITO is replaced with semi-transparent thin silver, which creates an optical cavity within the devices. The goal was to expand a previous work that created an on-chip spectrometer covering wavelengths 493 to 639 nm. In this case, a spin-coated mixed emitting layer (EML) is used, consisting of a polymer and a small molecule that both emit in the near UV and blue. The resulting combined spectra gives a wide band that can be used to create narrow microcavity emission peaks of 373 to 469 nm, depending on the device thickness (i.e. the cavity’s optical length). In the process of this effort, the mixed EML presented interesting complexities that we attempt to explain via simulation and morphology study.

Hellerich, Emily [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Processing results of 1,800 gallons of mercury and radioactively contaminated mixed waste rinse solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mercury-contaminated rinse solution (INEL waste ID{number_sign} 123; File 8 waste) was successfully treated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This waste was generated during the decontamination of the Heat Transfer Reactor Experiment 3 (HTRE-3) reactor shield tank. Approximately 1,800 gal of waste was generated and was placed into 33 drums. Each drum contained precipitated sludge material ranging from 1--10 in. in depth, with the average depth of about 2.5 in. The pH of each drum varied from 3--11. The bulk liquid waste had a mercury level of 7.0 mg/l, which exceeded the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) limit of 0.2 mg/l. The average liquid bulk radioactivity was about 2.1 pCi/ml, while the average sludge contamination was about 13,800 pci/g. Treatment of the waste required separation of the liquid from the sludge, filtration, pH adjustment, and ion exchange. Because of difficulties in processing, three trials were required to reduce the mercury levels to below the RCRA limit. In the first trial, insufficient filtration of the waste allowed solid particulate produced during pH adjustment to enter into the ion exchange columns and ultimately the waste storage tank. In the second trial, the waste was filtered down to 0.1 {mu} to remove all solid mercury compounds. However, before filtration could take place, a solid mercury complex dissolved and mercury levels exceeded the RCRA limit after filtration. In the third trial, the waste was filtered through 0.3-A filters and then passed through the S-920 resin to remove the dissolved mercury. The resulting solution had mercury levels at 0.0186 mg/l and radioactivity of 0.282 pCi/ml. This solution was disposed of at the TAN warm waste pond, TAN782, TSF-10.

Thiesen, B.P.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Low-Temperature, Solution-Processed Molybdenum Oxide Hole-Collection Layer for Organic Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have utilized a commercially available metal-organic precursor to develop a new, low-temperature, solution-processed molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) hole-collection layer (HCL) for organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices that is compatible with high-throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates complete decomposition of the metal-organic precursor by 115 C in air. Acetonitrile solutions spin-cast in a N{sub 2} atmosphere and annealed in air yield continuous thin films of MoO{sub x}. Ultraviolet, inverse, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopies confirm the formation of MoO{sub x} and, along with Kelvin probe measurements, provide detailed information about the energetics of the MoO{sub x} thin films. Incorporation of these films into conventional architecture bulk heterojunction OPV devices with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester afford comparable power conversion efficiencies to those obtained with the industry-standard material for hole injection and collection: poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The MoO{sub x} HCL devices exhibit slightly reduced open circuit voltages and short circuit current densities with respect to the PEDOT:PSS HCL devices, likely due in part to charge recombination at Mo{sup 5+} gap states in the MoO{sub x} HCL, and demonstrate enhanced fill factors due to reduced series resistance in the MoO{sub x} HCL.

Hammond, S. R.; Meyer, J.; Widjonarko, N. E.; Ndione, P. F.; Sigdel, A. K.; Garcia, A.; Miedaner, A.; Lloyd, M. T.; Kahn, A.; Ginley, D. S.; Berry, J. J.; Olson, D. C.

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

63

On-line method of determining utilization factor in Hg-196 photochemical separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for determining the utilization factor [U] in a photochemical mercury enrichment process (.sup.196 Hg) by measuring relative .sup.196 Hg densities using absorption spectroscopy.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Moskowitz, Philip E. (Peabody, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Process Biochemistry 37 (2002) 10571065 Dynamics of yard trimmings composting as determined by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Biochemistry 37 (2002) 1057­1065 Dynamics of yard trimmings composting as determined of the composting process. In the present study, four different biochemical parameters (dehydrogenase activity, ATP of yard trimmings composting; and (2) to relate these parameters to changes in microbial numbers, physico

Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Determination of Henry's law constants of organics in dilute aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of Henry's law constants, H, or air/water partitioning coefficients are required to predict the behavior of organic compounds in the environment. In particular, when the compounds are relatively volatile and exhibit low solubility in water, air stripping may be a viable method for above-ground treatment. Henry's law constants of 15 volatile organic compounds in dilute aqueous solutions were measured by the procedure of equilibrium partitioning in a closed system. The method is based upon the measurement of the headspace concentration by gas chromatography. The compounds investigated included six halogenated hydrocarbons, four aromatic hydrocarbons, and five alkanes. The measurements were made at three temperatures between 25 and 45 C. The measured Henry's law constants compared well with the literature data of some liquids. The temperature dependence of Henry's law constant was also studied from the van't Hoff relation.

Hansen, K.C.; Zhou, Zhou; Yaws, C.L.; Aminabhavi, T.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Efficient solution-processed small molecule: Cadmium selenide quantum dot bulk heterojunction solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report bulk heterojunction solar cells based on blends of solution-processed small molecule [7,7?-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b?]dithiophene-2,6-diyl) bis(6-fluoro-4-(5?-hexyl-[2,2?-bithiophen]-5yl)benzo[c] [1,2,5] thiadiazole)] p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}: Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) (70:30, 60:40, 50:50, and 40:60) in the device configuration: Indium Tin Oxide /poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}: CdSe/Ca/Al. The optimized ratio of p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}:CdSe::60:40 leads to a short circuit current density (J{sub sc})?=?5.45?mA/cm{sup 2}, open circuit voltage (V{sub oc})?=?0.727?V, and fill factor (FF)?=?51%, and a power conversion efficiency?=?2.02% at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} under AM1.5G illumination. The J{sub sc} and FF are sensitive to the ratio of p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}:CdSe, which is a crucial factor for the device performance.

Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drvinaygupta@netscape.net [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, Organic and Hybrid Solar Cell Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India) [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, Organic and Hybrid Solar Cell Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Upreti, Tanvi; Chand, Suresh [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, Organic and Hybrid Solar Cell Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India)] [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, Organic and Hybrid Solar Cell Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Structural changes in block copolymer solution under shear flow as determined by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulation on microsegregated solutions of symmetrical diblock copolymers is reported. As the polymer concentration increases, the system undergoes phase transitions in the following order: body centered cubic (BCC) micelles, hexagonal (HEX) cylinders, gyroid (GYR) bicontinuous networks, and lamellae (L), which are the same morphologies that have been reported for block copolymer melts. Structural classification is based on the patterns of the anisotropic static structure factor and characteristic 3-dimensional images. The systems in the BCC micellar ($\\rho\\sigma^{3}=0.3$) and HEX cylindrical ($\\rho\\sigma^{3}=0.4$) phases were then subjected to a steady planar shear flow. In weak shear flow, the segregated domains in both systems tend to rearrange into sliding parallel close-packed layers with their normal in the direction of the shear gradient. At higher shear rates both systems adopt a perpendicular lamellar structure with the normal along the neutral direction. A further increase in the shear rate results in a decrease in lamellar spacing without any further structural transitions. Two critical shear rate values that correspond to the demarcation of different structural behaviors were found.

Igor Rychkov; Kenichi Yoshikawa

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Solution Processed Tungsten Oxide Interfacial Layer for Efficient Hole-Injection in Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/2014 Solution Processed Tungsten Oxide Interfacial Layer for Efficient Hole-Injection in Quantum Layer for Efficient Hole-Injection in Quantum Dot Light- Emitting Diodes Xuyong Yang, Evren Mutlugun-based devices, the organic interfacial buffer layers have inferior thermal stability. Efforts to replace PEDOT

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

70

Vacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-coated organic light-emitting diode is transferred from a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold by lamination, or blade coating [1,2] for organic light emitting diode (OLED) as well as solar cell. The top electrodeVacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting

Meng, Hsin-Fei

71

DETERMINATION OF THE UAV POSITION BY AUTOMATIC PROCESSING OF THERMAL IMAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF THE UAV POSITION BY AUTOMATIC PROCESSING OF THERMAL IMAGES Wilfried Hartmann.hartmann, sebastian.tilch, henri.eisenbeiss, konrad.schindler)@geod.baug.ethz.ch KEY WORDS: Thermal, UAV, Camera, Calibration, Bundle, Photogrammetry, GPS/INS ABSTRACT: If images acquired from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs

Schindler, Konrad

72

Guiding Cooperative Stakeholders to Compromise Solutions Using an Interactive Tradespace Exploration Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering projects frequently involve the cooperation of multiple stakeholders with varying objectives and preferences for the resulting system. Finding a mutually agreeable solution is of paramount importance in order ...

Fitzgerald, Matthew E.

73

Luminescence and electrical properties of solution-processed ZnO thin films by adding fluorides and annealing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} Systematic study of the fluorides doped solution-processed ZnO thin films via the luminescence and electrical behaviors. {yields} Defect-related visible emission bands are affected by annealing ambient and fluoride addition. {yields} Adding lithium fluoride followed by annealing in oxygen ambient leads to a controlled defect density with proper TFT performance. -- Abstract: To develop an efficient channel layer for thin film transistors (TFTs), understanding the defect-related luminescence and electrical property is crucial for solution-processed ZnO thin films. Film growth with the fluorides addition, especially using LiF, followed by the oxygen ambient post-annealing leads to decreased defect-related emission as well as enhanced switching property. The saturation mobility and current on/off ratio are 0.31 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 1.04 x 10{sup 3}. Consequently, we can visualize an optimized process condition and characterization method for solution-processed TFT based on the fluorine-doped ZnO film channel layer by considering the overall emission behavior.

Choi, Sungho, E-mail: shochoi@krict.re.kr [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)] [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung-Yoon [Chemical and Electronic Materials Division, LG Electronics, Hyangjeong-dong, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)] [Chemical and Electronic Materials Division, LG Electronics, Hyangjeong-dong, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ha-Kyun [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)] [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Determination of characteristic alterations of the mass transfer process of thermodynamically nonequilibrium hydrocarbon systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of research on hydrocarbon mixture sorption in porous medium showed that adsorbent activity with regard to separate components of a gas mixture changes in partial dependence on pressure. The alteration of vented gas content will take place not only in gas condensate fields, when this effect is conditioned by the losses of condensate in the stratum, but also in gas fields, by methods connected with desorption processes. At the same time, gas composition is the basis for different process calculations, such as separation, gas transport, gas filtration in porous medium, and others. Thus the determination of characteristic alterations of gas mixture composition in thermodynamically nonequilibrium hydrocarbon systems mass transfer process becomes important. The binary (methane + pentane) and tricomponent (methane + butane + pentane) systems composed of individual gases of high purity have been researched. Then with help of mathematical methods of experimental data processing the moment of the more characteristic changes of the mass transfer process was discovered. Processing of experimental data for tricomponent system by statistical differentiation allowed the discovery of a pressure below of which lightening of the vented gas was observed.

Ramazanova, E.E.; Nurmamedova, Z.A. [Azerbaijan State Oil Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan). Geotechnological Research Inst. of Oil, Gas, and Chemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Extraction and recovery of plutonium and americium from nitric acid waste solutions by the TRUEX process - continuing development studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done to date on the application of the TRUEX solvent extraction process for removing and separately recovering plutonium and americium from a nitric acid waste solution containing these elements, uranium, and a complement of inert metal ions. This simulated waste stream is typical of a raffinate from a tributyl phosphate (TBP)-based solvent extraction process for removing uranium and plutonium from dissolved plutonium-containing metallurgical scrap. The TRUEX process solvent in these experiments was a solution of TBP and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in carbon tetrachloride. A flowsheet was designed on the basis of measured batch distribution ratios to reduce the TRU content of the solidified raffinate to less than or equal to 10 nCi/g and was tested in a countercurrent experiment performed in a 14-stage Argonne-model centrifugal contractor. The process solvent was recycled without cleanup. An unexpectedly high evaporative loss of CCl/sub 4/ resulted in concentration of the active extractant, CMPO, to nearly 0.30M in the solvent. Results are consistent with this higher CMPO concentration. The raffinate contained only 2 nCi/g of TRU, but the higher CMPO concentration resulted in reduced effectiveness in the stripping of americium from the solvent. Conditions can be easily adjusted to give high yields and good separation of americium and plutonium. Experimental studies of the hydrolytic and gamma-radiolytic degradation of the TRUEX-CCl/sub 4/ showed that solvent degradation would be (1) minimal for a year of processing this typical feed, which contained no fission products, and (2) could be explained almost entirely by hydrolytic and radiolytic damage to TBP. Even for gross amounts of solvent damage, scrubbing with aqueous sodium carbonate solution restored the original americium extraction and stripping capability of the solvent. 43 refs., 5 figs., 36 tabs.

Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kalina, D.G.; Fischer, D.F.; Bane, R.W.; Burris, L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarisia, R.; Diamond, H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Precipitation of jarosite-type double salts from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation of jarosite compounds to remove Na, K, Fe, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} impurities from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process was studied. Simple heating of model solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}). Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} could be precipitated from those solutions at 95{degree}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simple heating of model solutions containing only Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} up to 95{degree}C for {le}12 hours produced low yields of jarosite compounds, and the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid the formation of undesirable Fe compounds. Precipitate yields could be increased dramatically in model solutions of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} containing excess Fe by using either CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, or ZnO to neutralize H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} released during hydrolysis of the Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and during the precipitation reactions. Results obtained from the studies with model solutions were applied to spent acids produced during laboratory countercurrent washing of coal which had been leached with a molten NaOH/KOH mixture. Results indicated that jarosite compounds can be precipitated effectively from spent acid solutions by heating for 6 hours at 80{degree}C while maintaining a pH of about 1.5 using CaCO{sub 3}.

Norton, G.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Process for preparing chemically modified micas for removal of cesium salts from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemically modified mica composite formed by heating a trioctahedral mica in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride having a concentration of at least 1 mole/liter at a temperature greater than 180 degrees Centigrade for at least 20 hours, thereby replacing exchangeable ions in the mica with sodium. Formation is accomplished at temperatures and pressures which are easily accessed by industrial equipment. The reagent employed is inexpensive and non-hazardous, and generates a precipitate which is readily separated from the modified mica.

Yates, Stephen Frederic (1539 S. Kennicott Dr., Arlington Heights, IL 60005); DeFilippi, Irene (208 E. Edgewood La., Palatine, IL 60067); Gaita, Romulus (6646 Davis Rd., Morton Grove, IL 60053); Clearfield, Abraham (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Lyudmila (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Anatoly (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843)

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Processing results of 1800 gallons of mercury and radioactively contaminated mixed waste rinse solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury-contaminated rinse solution was successfully treated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This waste was generated during the decontamination of the Heat Transfer Reactor Experiment 3 reactor shield tank. Approximately 6.8 m{sup 3} (1,800 pi) of waste was generated and placed into 33 drums. Each drum contained precipitated sludge material ranging from 2--5 cm in depth, with the average depth of about 6 cm. The pH of each drum varied from 3--11. The bulk liquid waste had a mercury level of 7.0 mg/l, which exceeded the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limit of 0.2 mg/l. The average liquid bulk radioactivity was about 2.1 pCi/mL while the average sludge contamination was about 13,800 pCi/g. Treatment of the waste required separation of the liquid from the sludge, filtration, pH adjustment, and ion exchange. The resulting solution after treatment had mercury levels at 0.0186 mg/l and radioactivity of 0.282 pCi/ml.

Thiesen, B.P.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Major Modification Determination Process Utilized for Proposed Idaho National Laboratory Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past three years, several new projects with the potential for major modifications to existing facilities have been considered for implementation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These projects were designated to take place in existing nuclear facilities with existing documented safety analyses. 10 CFR 830.206 requires the contractor for a major modification to a Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to obtain Department of Energy (DOE) approval for the nuclear facility design criteria to be used for preparation of a preliminary documented safety analysis (PDSA), as well as creation and approval of the PDSA, before the contractor can procure materials or components or begin construction on the project. Given the significant effort and expense of preparation and approval of a PDSA, a major modification determination for new projects is warranted to determine if the rigorous requirements of a major modification are actually required. Furthermore, performing a major modification determination helps to ensure that important safety aspects of a project are appropriately considered prior to modification construction or equipment procurement. The projects considered for major modification status at the INL included: treatment and packaging of unirradiated, sodium-bonded highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and miscellaneous casting scrap in the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF); post irradiation examination of Advance Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) fuel in the MFC Analytical Laboratory (AL); the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) gas test loop (GTL); and the hydraulic shuttle irradiation system (HSIS) at ATR. The major modification determinations for three of the proposed projects resulted in a negative major modification. On the other hand, the major modification determination for the GTL project concluded that the project would require a major modification. This paper discusses the process, methods, and considerations used by the INL for the four major modification determinations. Three of the four major modification determinations discussed herein were completed using the guidance specified in the draft of DOE STD-1189, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process.” DOE-STD-1189 was released as a draft document in March 2007 and provides guidance for integrating safety considerations into the early design activities for constructing new facilities or making modifications to existing nuclear facilities. The fourth major modification determination was prepared prior to the existence of DOE STD-1189 and was evaluated solely by the definition of a major modification given in 10 CFR 830.206. For all four projects, consideration was given to: • Facility hazard categorization change and material inventory • Facility footprint change with the potential to adversely affect credited safety function • New or changed processes resulting in a change to the safety basis • The use of new technology or equipment not approved for use in the facility • The need for new or revised safety basis controls • Hazards not previously evaluated in the safety basis.

Michael A. Lehto, Ph.D.; Boyd D. Christensen

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modeling and the Adaptive Solution of CVD Fiber-Coating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

guidance for improving the process. 1 Introduction Ceramic composites are designed for use in high permeate the matrix and react with the bers to weaken the composite. Coating the bers can protect them from, New York 12180, USA Abstract We develop a mathematical model for the coating of ceramic bers

Adjerid, Slimane

84

The Role of Advanced Process Control in Your Energy Management Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as cost savings are proven ? Custom application development and protocol emulation services are available Presentation title Service, Customization, Innovation Typical System Architecture DCS/PLC/OPC L1 Interface DCS Manual Entry ASCII files... Other computersPLC Process Lan RDBMS LIMS Other OPC Server Direct Interface SCADA Custom Application Systems ERP WEB Server RBV Corporate WAN EAMS Server & Historian Plant LAN LAB Presentation title Service, Customization...

Johnson, K.; Van Wyk, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility of organic matter oxidation as the main source of bicarbonate. Model results indicate that pH and Eh are relatively stable. The dissolution-precipitation trends of hematite, pyrite and calcite also coincide with those indicated by the conceptual model. A thorough sensitivity analysis has been performed for the most relevant microbial parameters as well as for initial and boundary POC and DOC concentrations. The results of such analysis indicate that computed concentrations of bicarbonate, sulfate and DOC are sensitive to most of the microbial parameters, including specific growth rates, half-saturation constants, proportionality coefficients and yield coefficients. Model results, however, are less sensitive to the yield coefficient of DOC to iron-reducer bacteria. The sensitivity analysis indicates that changes in fermentation microbial parameters affect the growth of the iron-reducer, thus confirming the interconnection of both microbial processes. Computed concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate are found to be sensitive to changes in the initial concentration of POC and the boundary concentration of DOC, but they lack sensitivity to the initial concentration of DOC and the boundary concentration of POC. The explanation for such result is related to the fact that POC has a low mobility due to its large molecular weight. DOC, however, can migrate downwards. Although a coupled hydro-bio-geochemical 1-D model can reproduce the observed ''unexpected'' increase of concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate at a depth of 70 m, further modeling work is required in order to obtain a similar conclusion under the more realistic two dimensional conditions of the fracture zone.

Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Oyenekan, Babatunde A. (Katy, TX)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Solute retention in column liquid chromatography. X. Determination of solute infinite-dilution activity coefficients in methanol, water, and their mixtures, by combined gas-liquid and liquid-liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raoult's-law activity coefficients of 3- to 7-carbon aliphatic aldehyde, ketone, ester, and alcohol solutes at infinite dilution in methanol, water, and mixtures of the two and in polydimethysiloxane, all at 293-308 K, have been determined for the first time by appropriate combination of GLC and LLC retention data. The latter data are reported in terms of mole factions, while the former are given in concentration units of molality. However, interpretation of the data is difficult because of the multiplicity of the retention mechanisms. Nevertheless, the combined GLC/LLC technique, which had been applied previously only to pure solvents, is said to offer a number of advantages over static techniques for the determination of solute infinite-dilution activity coefficients with volatile solvents, especially with mixtures of solvents.

Djerki, R.A.; Laub, R.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

INDEX - a solution to the high cost of processing transient workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1985 twelve midwestern utilities formed the Nuclear Employee Data System for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Region III (NEDS III) group. These utilities are Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Commonwealth Edison Company, Consumers Power Company, Detroit Edison Company, Illinois Power Company, Indiana and Michigan Electric Company, Iowa Electric Light and Power Company, Northern States Power Company, Toledo Edison Company, Union Electric Company, and Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. Early in 1986, Kansas Gas and Electric of NRC's Region IV joined the group and a cost-benefit study of a nuclear employee data system was initiated. The purpose of this system is to reduce the cost of processing workers requiring unescorted access to nuclear power plants. The involved utilities continued this project as the Integrated Nuclear Data Exchange (INDEX). In 1987 the following additional utilities joined INDEX: Houston Lighting and Power, Pacific Gas and Electric, Texas Utilities Electric Company, Arkansas Power and Light, Louisiana Power and Light, Systems Energy Resources Inc., and Southern California Edison. This paper summarizes the results of the study and discusses the current status of the program.

Stroupe, E.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processible Small-Molecule OLEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop key knowledge and make critical connections between technologies needed to enable low-cost manufacturing of OLED lighting products. In particular, the program was intended to demonstrate the feasibility of making high performance Small-Molecule OLEDs (SM-OLED) using a roll-to-roll (R2R) wet-coating technique by addressing the following technical risks (1) Whether the wet-coating technique can provide high performance OLEDs, (2) Whether SM-OLED can be made in a R2R manner, (3) What are the requirements for coating equipment, and (4) Whether R2R OLEDs can have the same performance as the lab controls. The program has been managed and executed according to the Program Management Plan (PMP) that was first developed at the beginning of the program and further revised accordingly as the program progressed. Significant progress and risk reductions have been accomplished by the end of the program. Specific achievements include: (1) Demonstrated that wet-coating can provide OLEDs with high LPW and long lifetime; (2) Demonstrated R2R OLEDs can be as efficient as batch controls (Figure 1) (3) Developed & validated basic designs for key equipment necessary for R2R SM-OLEDs; (4) Developed know-hows & specifications on materials & ink formulations critical to wetcoating; (5) Developed key R2R processes for each OLED layer (6) Identified key materials and components such as flexible barrier substrates necessary for R2R OLEDs.

Liu, Jie Jerry

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR AT-POWER SIGNIFICANCE DETERMINATION PROCESS (SDP) NOTEBOOKS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the assessment of inspection findings as part of the risk-informed inspection in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC's) Reactor Oversight Process (ROP), risk inspection notebooks, also called significance determination process (SDP) notebooks, have been developed for each of the operating plants in the United States. These notebooks serve as a tool for assessing risk significance of inspection findings along with providing an engineering understanding of the significance. Plant-specific notebooks are developed to capture plant-specific features, characteristics, and analyses that influence the risk profile of the plant. At the same time, the notebooks follow a consistent set of assumptions and guidelines to assure consistent treatment of inspection findings across the plants. To achieve these objectives, notebooks are designed to provide specific information that are unique both in the manner in which the information is provided and in the way the screening risk assessment is carried out using the information provided. The unique features of the SDP notebooks, the approaches used to present the information for assessment of inspection findings, the assumptions used in consistent modeling across different plants with due credit to plant-specific features and analyses form the technical basis of the SDP notebooks. In this document, the unique features and the technical basis for the notebooks are presented. The types of information that are included and the reasoning/basis for including that information are discussed. The rules and basis for developing the worksheets that are used by the inspectors in the assessment of inspection findings are presented. The approach to modeling plants' responses to different initiating events and specific assumptions/considerations used for each of the reactor types are also discussed.

AZARM,M.A.SMANTA,P.K.MARTINEZ-GURIDI,G.HIGGINS,J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oxidation-resistant, solution-processed plasmonic Ni nanochain-SiO{sub x} (x?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal oxidation at high temperatures has long been a challenge in cermet solar thermal absorbers, which impedes the development of atmospherically stable, high-temperature, high-performance concentrated solar power (CSP) systems. In this work, we demonstrate solution-processed Ni nanochain-SiO{sub x} (x?processed by low-cost solution-chemical methods for future generations of CSP systems.

Yu, Xiaobai; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng, E-mail: Jifeng.Liu@dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Qinglin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States); Li, Juchuan [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

Boboia, S. [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, M. [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ardelean, I. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

Acta Cryst. (1997). B53, 916-922 Multi-Solution Genetic Algorithm Approach to Surface Structure Determination Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

916 Acta Cryst. (1997). B53, 916-922 Multi-Solution Genetic Algorithm Approach to Surface Structure@merle.acns.nwu, edu (Received 5 May 1997; accepted 22 July 1997) Abstract We show that it is possible to use a multi (Collazo-Davila, Marks, Nishii & Tanishiro, 1997; Gilmore, Marks, Grozea, Collazo, Landree & Twesten, 1997

Marks, Laurence D.

95

Determination of Transport Properties From Flowing Fluid Temperature LoggingIn Unsaturated Fractured Rocks: Theory And Semi-Analytical Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has been recently proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this paper, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock, and develop a semianalytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. Based on the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this paper is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel paper [Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008], we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. We also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks.

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

One simple step in the identification of the cofactors signals, one giant leap for the solution structure determination of multiheme proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiheme proteins play major roles in various biological systems. Structural information on these systems in solution is crucial to understand their functional mechanisms. However, the presence of numerous proton-containing groups in the heme cofactors and the magnetic properties of the heme iron, in particular in the oxidised state, complicates significantly the assignment of the NMR signals. Consequently, the multiheme proteins superfamily is extremely under-represented in structural databases, which constitutes a severe bottleneck in the elucidation of their structural-functional relationships. In this work, we present a strategy that simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals in multiheme proteins and, concomitantly, their solution structure determination, using the triheme cytochrome PpcA from the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens as a model. Cost-effective isotopic labeling was used to double label ({sup 13}C/{sup 15}N) the protein in its polypeptide chain, with the correct folding and heme post-translational modifications. The combined analysis of {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC NMR spectra obtained for labeled and unlabeled samples of PpcA allowed a straight discrimination between the heme cofactors and the polypeptide chain signals and their confident assignment. The results presented here will be the foundations to assist solution structure determination of multiheme proteins, which are still very scarce in the literature.

Morgado, Leonor; Fernandes, Ana P. [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)] [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Londer, Yuri Y. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bruix, Marta [Departamento de Espectroscopia y Estructura Molecular, Instituto de Quimica-Fisica 'Rocasolano', CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de Espectroscopia y Estructura Molecular, Instituto de Quimica-Fisica 'Rocasolano', CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Salgueiro, Carlos A., E-mail: csalgueiro@dq.fct.unl.pt [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modulation of physical and photocatalytic properties of (Cr, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} nanorods using soft solution processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facile polymerized complex reactions together with a hydrothermal reaction were implemented to make single crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanorods for the first time. Chromium (Cr) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) co-doping was performed to tailor the physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction study illustrated that highly reactive facets of (101), (111), and (001) dominated rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods. A growth model, based on formation of complex species, was proposed to elucidate effectiveness of the soft solution processing in making TiO{sub 2} nanorods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and consideration of fundamentals of charge neutrality showed N{sub 2} doping could inhibit formation of Cr{sup 6+} and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}{sup 2+}). An investigation of the photocatalytic properties exhibited high efficiency of photodegradation of methylene blue in 15?min under pH?=?10, using a nanocomposite of (7% Cr, 0.0021% N) codoped and 3% Cr doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

Lu, Wen-Chung [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Hoang-Diem; Wu, Chun-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kao-Shuo, E-mail: kschang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Yoshimura, Masahiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research (PCGMR), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions. Progress report, April 16, 1992--December 1, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The studies have focused on rapid, efficient bond-fragmentation reactions initiated through photoinduced electron transfer. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of a number of donors have been examined, especially 1,2 diamines and related compounds. Two of the amines fragment with rate constants of 3 {times} 10{sup 8} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1}sec{sup {minus}1}. A series of amino-substituted pinacols and related compounds have also been examined; they undergo similar but slower fragmentation processes when converted to their cation radicals by photoinduced electron transfer. The studies with linked and polymeric electron donor- electron acceptor coupled molecules have also progressed. Several polymers containing diamine repeat units and anthraquinone or nitroaromatic acceptors have also been prepared that can be photoactivated by visible irradiation; they fragment efficiently in solution and photodegrade even in the solid state. The studies of singlet oxygen initiated fragmentation reactions of diamines, amino alcohols, and aminoketones have nearly been completed. Attention have been turned to fragmentable electron acceptors such as p- cyanobenzyl bromide; irradiation of electron donors such as methyl- or methoxy-naphthalenes can initiate efficient fragmentation of the electron deficient bromide.

Whitten, D.G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Determination of dispersivities and reactionkinetics of selected basalts of columbia river plateau using an inverse analytical solution technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the determination of transport parameters by modeling sodium transport in the Priest Rapids and Roza flow tops of the Wanapum formation, and Rocky Coulee and Umtanum flow tops of the Grande Ronde formation, within the Cold Creek Syncline of the Hanford Nuclear Waste...

Fahlquist, Lisa Armstrong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} thin films and powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650 C and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures. 2 figs.

Boyle, T.J.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

Li, Jian (Marietta, GA); Chai, Xin Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Junyoung (Marietta, GA)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

The method of general dimensional analysis applied to the determination of the parameters of the process of nitriding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the field of process characteristics for thermochemical treatments there is a contradiction between the great number of the parameters, that the experiment pointed out as determinants of the acquired results, and the small number of such kind of parameters that the Fick`s analytical laws can correlate. It can be ascertained that, a great deal of the complexity of diffusion processes is focused on the diffusion constant, as in the case of convection, where the coefficient of convection reflects the complexity of the process. The general dimensional analysis, created by the Romanian School of Experimental Physics as a development on a superior level of Rayleigh and Buckingham`s methods, can gather without exception, in analytical relations, all the parameters of the process of diffusion. The authors apply the method in the case of nitriding in nitrogen atmosphere with addition of ammonia.

Samoila, C.; Bot, D. [Transilvania-Univ. of Brasov (Romania)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Model independent determination of the light-cone wave functions for exclusive processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method to compute, by numerical simulations of lattice QCD, the light-cone wave functions which enter exclusive processes at large momentum transfer, such as electromagnetic elastic scatterings, or exclusive semi-leptonic decays as B -> pi (B -> rho) and radiative decays as B -> K* gamma. The method is based on first principles and does not require any model assumption.

Aglietti, U; Corbò, G; Franco, E; Martinelli, G; Silvestrini, L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Infrared and visible laser double resonance studies of vibrational energy transfer processes in polyatomic molecules. [Chromyl chloride solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the spectroscopy of chromyl chloride (CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} ) in dilute solutions has been initiated. A discussion is given of its spectra and emission bands. 17 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab. (DLC)

Bhatnagar, R. (Texas Southern Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Determination of total dietary fiber and resistant starch in processed corn and rice products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Colorimetry 113 I I Englyst's Modification for Determination of Resistant Starch 115 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Dietary fiber (DF) is defined as "polysaccharides and lignin of plant origin that are resistant to hydrolysis by the action of human alimentary... enzymes" (Trowell 1974). DF consists of: a) ~ater insoluble components, such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin; and b) water soluble components, such as pectin, gums and mucill ages. Other compounds, such as phytic acid, digestive enzyme...

Corujo Martinez, Juan Ignacio

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method and system for determining precursors of health abnormalities from processing medical records  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Medical reports are converted to document vectors in computing apparatus and sampled by applying a maximum variation sampling function including a fitness function to the document vectors to reduce a number of medical records being processed and to increase the diversity of the medical records being processed. Linguistic phrases are extracted from the medical records and converted to s-grams. A Haar wavelet function is applied to the s-grams over the preselected time interval; and the coefficient results of the Haar wavelet function are examined for patterns representing the likelihood of health abnormalities. This confirms certain s-grams as precursors of the health abnormality and a parameter can be calculated in relation to the occurrence of such a health abnormality.

Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Beckerman, Barbara G

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Mission-Critical Platform for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) SQL Server 2008 Mission-Critical Platform for OLTP Data Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mission-Critical Platform for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) SQL Server 2008 Mission Data Collector to troubleshoot and tune SQL Server 2008 instances. Help ensure compliance 2008 high- performance query processing engine for industry leading performance and scalability. Define

Bernstein, Phil

112

Combined Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of Processes Determining Cathode Performance in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are under intensive investigation since the 1980’s as these devices open the way for ecologically clean direct conversion of the chemical energy into electricity, avoiding the efficiency limitation by Carnot’s cycle for thermochemical conversion. However, the practical development of SOFC faces a number of unresolved fundamental problems, in particular concerning the kinetics of the electrode reactions, especially oxygen reduction reaction. We review recent experimental and theoretical achievements in the current understanding of the cathode performance by exploring and comparing mostly three materials: (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM), (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 (LSCF) and (Ba,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 (BSCF). Special attention is paid to a critical evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of BSCF, which shows the best cathode kinetics known so far for oxides. We demonstrate that it is the combined experimental and theoretical analysis of all major elementary steps of the oxygen reduction reaction which allows us to predict the rate determining steps for a given material under specific operational conditions and thus control and improve SOFC performance.

Kukla, Maija M.; Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Merkle, R.; Mastrikov, Yuri; Maier, J.

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

An evaluation of membrane materials for the treatment of highly concentrated suspended salt solutions in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration processes for desalination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN EVALUATION OF MEMBRANE MATERIALS FOR THE TREATMENT OF HIGHLY... CONCENTRATED SUSPENDED SALT SOLUTIONS IN REVERSE OSMOSIS AND NANOFILTRATION PROCESSES FOR DESALINATION A Thesis by TRENTON WHITING HUGHES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Hughes, Trenton Whiting

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer the potential for physical flexibility.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer.Controllingthecollectionandminimizingthetrappingofchargecarriersattheseboundariesiscrucialtoefficiency. Materials interface engineering for solution-processed photovoltaics Michael Graetzel1 , René A. J. Janssen2

116

Determination of the Dynamic Characteristics in the CO Transient Process in a PEM Fuel Cell Woo-kum Lee and J. W. Van Zee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the Dynamic Characteristics in the CO Transient Process in a PEM Fuel Cell Woo Road, Elkton, MD 21922-1488 Key words: PEM Fuel Cell, CO transient, Time constant Prepared publications #12;1 Determination of the Dynamic Characteristics in the CO Transient Process in a PEM Fuel Cell

Van Zee, John W.

117

Transverse transport of solutes between co-flowing pressure-driven streams for microfluidic studies of diffusion/reaction processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a situation commonly encountered in microfluidics: two streams of miscible liquids are brought at a junction to flow side by side within a microchannel, allowing solutes to diffuse from one stream to the other and possibly react. We focus on two model problems: (i) the transverse transport of a single solute from a stream into the adjacent one, (ii) the transport of the product of a diffusion-controlled chemical reaction between solutes originating from the two streams. Our description is made general through a non-dimensionalized formulation that incorporates both the parabolic Poiseuille velocity profile along the channel and thermal diffusion in the transverse direction. Numerical analysis over a wide range of the streamwise coordinate $x$ reveal different regimes. Close to the top and the bottom walls of the microchannel, the extent of the diffusive zone follows three distinct power law regimes as $x$ is increased, characterized respectively by the exponents 1/2, 1/3 and 1/2. Simple analytical arguments are proposed to account for these results.

Jean-Baptiste Salmon; Armand Ajdari

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Reduced cycle time and work in process in a medical device factory : the problem and a proposed solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many manufacturing firms have improved their operations by implementing a work-in-process (WIP) limiting control strategy. This project explores the application of this concept to limit WIP and reduce cycle time for the ...

Qian, Yi, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

122

Calcium niobate nanosheets as a novel electron transport material for solution-processed multi-junction polymer solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a common solvent. Nanoscale interpenetrating networks are formed as the donor and acceptor phase-junction polymer solar cells Lilian Chang,a Michael A. Holmes,b Mollie Waller,b Frank E. Osterlohb and Adam J-processed tandem polymer solar cells are demonstrated using stacked perovskite, (TBA,H) Ca2Nb3O10 (CNO

Osterloh, Frank

123

Solution Processed MoS2-PVA Composite for Sub-Bandgap Mode-Locking of a Wideband Tunable Ultrafast Er:Fiber Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with stable, picosecond pulses, tunable from 1535 nm to 1565 nm 2 Solution Processed MoS2-PVA Composite for Sub-Bandgap Mode-Locking of a Wideband Tunable Ultrafast Er:Fiber Laser Meng Zhang1, Richard C. T. Howe2, Robert I. Woodward1... ! to! relaxation! of! thermalized! electron! and!phonon! distribution! [3].! This! combination! of!properties!makes!MoS2!a!suitable!saturable!absorber!(SA)! for! ultrafast! mode+locked! pulsed! lasers,! with!the! potential! for! pulse! generation! at...

Zhang, Meng; Howe, Richard C. T.; Woodward, Robert I.; Kelleher, Edmund J. R.; Torrisi, Felice; Hu, Guohua; Popov, Sergei V.; Taylor, J. Roy; Hasan, Tawfique

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

CdS and CdS/CdSe sensitized ZnO nanorod array solar cells prepared by a solution ions exchange process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS and CdS/CdSe quantum dots are assembled on ZnO nanorods by ion exchange process. • The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO effectively extends the absorption spectrum. • The performance of ZnO/CdS/CdSe cell is improved by extending absorption spectrum. - Abstract: In this paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium sulfide/cadmium selenide (CdS/CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) are assembled onto ZnO nanorod arrays by a solution ion exchange process for QD-sensitized solar cell application. The morphology, composition and absorption properties of different photoanodes were characterized with scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum and Raman spectrum in detail. It is shown that conformal and uniform CdS and CdS/CdSe shells can grow on ZnO nanorod cores. Quantum dot sensitized solar cells based on ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS/CdSe nanocable arrays were assembled with gold counter electrode and polysulfide electrolyte solution. The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO can effectively extend the absorption spectrum up to 650 nm, which has a remarkable impact on the performance of a photovoltaic device by extending the absorption spectrum. Preliminary results show one fourth improvement in solar cell efficiency.

Chen, Ling; Gong, Haibo; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jun [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials in Universities of Shandong, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Yang, Shikuan [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6812 (United States); Cao, Bingqiang, E-mail: mse_caobq@ujn.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials in Universities of Shandong, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Conservation of Mass 25 on the flow rates? b) Determine the amounts of the solutes in each of the tanks as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the tanks as functions of time. (b) What happens to the concentrations of the solutes in each tank in the long run? Exercise 4.4. Imagine three tanks each containing three different substances in solution. The tanks are connected by equal sized pipes to form a closed loop; that is, tank-1 feeds tank-2 and is fed

Chicone, Carmen

126

DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

DISSELKAMP RS

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Dental Budget Process: Determination Schema Industry Sponsored, Industry Supported, University to University, Co-operative Group or Foundation Supported Clinical Trials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/5/2013 Dental Budget Process: Determination Schema Industry Sponsored, Industry Supported, University to University, Co-operative Group or Foundation Supported Clinical Trials DENTAL BUDGET PROCESS to have a Budget Workbook done by staff in the Office of Clinical & Translational Research (OCTR) before

Oliver, Douglas L.

128

Campaign 2 Level 2 Milestone Review 2009: Milestone # 3132 Determine Sustainable TATB Source and Processing Options, and Potential Binder Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A presentation was made to the Milestone review committee on September 18, 2009 that outlined the efforts making up the achievement of the Campaign 2, Level 2 Milestone No.3132. After the presentation and review of the collective work, the committee determined that the milestone was successfully completed. Highlights from this review are discussed here. A brief summary of the discussion points includes: (1) It was clear that this work represents a comprehensive collection of experimental, modeling, literature review, and analysis activities with a thorough attention to the details. The deliverables include 2 technical presentations and 5 written reports describing this work. (2) This is a joint LLNL/LANL milestone led by Campaign 2 with leveraging effort from other campaigns and activities at LLNL: (a) The contributing programs included Enhanced Surveillance Campaign (ESC) and Readiness Campaign. Key technical elements of this work were built on scientific advances from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. (b) Part of this work covers activities associated with the Enhanced Collaboration (EC) with the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE). (3) This Milestone work has supported a high-level Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) Joint DoD/DOE TATB Production Initiative. This is an example of the strong relevance of this Milestone research to current stockpile issues. A summary of the future direction in this research area includes: (1) The Ionic Liquid (IL) re-crystallization process has been demonstrated to improve the performance of recrystallized TATB molecule. However, lower thermal stability of the IL crystallized material (compared to conventional TATB) warrants further study to understand the source of this effect. (2) The compatibility issue needs to be addressed in upcoming work. One concern is how the new solvent and ionic liquid used in the formulation process might behave in the nuclear explosive assembly. Similarly, compatibility studies for the candidate binder must be performed. The future focus on R&D and additional scientific tools to address these areas is technically sound. (3) Currently there is no defined process for advancing this milestone's research and development successes into a production scale effort. The committee recognizes that other campaigns (Readiness Campaign, Enhanced Surveillance Campaign) will need to consider additional leverage resources for that scale-up effort. (4) We recommend that this effort continues to use modeling and experiment as complimentary paths to strengthen the scientific approach.

Schwartz, A J

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Flow-Through High-Pressure Electrical Conductance Cell for Determining of Ion Association of Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions at High Temperature and Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flow-through high-pressure electrical conductance cell was designed and constructed to measure limiting molar conductances and ion association constants of dilute aqueous solutions with high precision at high temperatures and pressures. The basic concept of the cell employs the principle developed at the University of Delaware in 1995, but overall targets higher temperatures (to 600 C) and pressures (to 300 MPa). At present the cell has been tested by measuring aqueous NaCl and LiOH solutions (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}5} mol.kg{sup {minus}1}) to 405 C and 33 MPa with good results.

Bianchi, H.; Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A.; Wood, R.H.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells,” Nano Letters,diodes (OLEDs), dye- sensitized solar cells, as well as

Bakhishev, Teymur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function, and taking its asymptotics we prove KPZ universality for the polymer (free energy fluctuation exponent 1/3 and Tracy-Widom GUE limit law). (6) Under intermediate disorder scaling, we recover the Laplace transform of the solution of the KPZ equation with narrow wedge initial data. (7) We provide contour integral formulas for a wide array of polymer moments. (8) This results in a new ansatz for solving quantum many body systems such as the delta Bose gas.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advising is an ongoing process in which the student, in consultation with the department academic advisor, determines and creates the best-fit educational path toward graduation. This  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advisor, determines and creates the best-fit educational path toward graduation. This process enables and abilities. The advisor acts as an advocate for the student in the university system, serves as a resource setting. Each semester the advisor monitors the student's academic progress and provides information

Gelfond, Michael

133

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashbrook, A.W. , Process Metallurgy I , Solvent Extraction,and Applications to Process Metallurgy, Elsevier ScienceAshbrook, A.W. , Process Metallurgy 1, Solvent Extraction:

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs’ performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

Xiao, Teng

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production of citric acid by fermentation, recovery of theof Citric Acid from Aqueous Fermentation Solutions byof citric acid was 1.1.1 Lactic Acid Currently, fermentation

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

Plutonium recovery from carbonate wash solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodically higher than expected levels of plutonium are found in carbonate solutions used to wash second plutonium cycle solvent. The recent accumulation of plutonium in carbonate wash solutions has led to studies to determine the cause of that plutonium accumulation, to evaluate the quality of all canyon solvents, and to develop additional criteria needed to establish when solvent quality is acceptable. Solvent from three canyon solvent extraction cycles was used to evaluate technology required to measure tributyl phosphate (TBP) degradation products and was used to evaluate solvent quality criteria during the development of plutonium recovery processes. 1 fig.

Gray, J.H.; Reif, D.J.; Chostner, D.F.; Holcomb, H.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transforming Photovoltaic Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Determination of the melting threshold of TiO{sub 2} thin films processed by excimer laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing surfaces by laser needs an understanding of the mechanisms generated by irradiation. In this work, to gain understanding of the mechanisms occurring during irradiation of TiO{sub 2} thin films by means of KrF excimer laser, we have performed infrared time resolved reflectivity measurements. This experimental investigation revealed modifications of the heating/cooling cycle as a function of the fluence (F). These modifications start appearing for a fluence value of about {approx}0.25 J/cm{sup 2} which is associated with the melting threshold of the film. Additionally, we have solved numerically the heat equation of the system with specific boundary conditions. From these calculations, we have established the thermal history of the film during the 25 ns irradiation pulse. The data reveal that a part of the medium liquefies around a fluence of 0.23 J/cm{sup 2} in good agreement with the experimental data.

Van Overschelde, O. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface, Universite de Mons, 23, Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Delsate, T. [Service de Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite de Mons, 6 Avenue du champ de Mars, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, R. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface, Universite de Mons, 23, Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, 1 Avenue Copernic, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

XAFS determination of the chemical form of lead in smelter-contaminated soils and mine tailings: Importance of adsorption processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors investigated smelter-contaminated soils from Evin-Malmaison, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, and mine tailings from Leadville, Colorado, U.S.A. Bulk Pb concentrations range from 460 to 1900 ppm in the topsoils at Evin-Malmaison site and from 6000 to 10,000 ppm in the tailings samples from the Leadville site. These concentrations necessarily raise human health and environmental concerns, but bioavailability and chemical lability of Pb in these materials vary dramatically and show little correlation with bulk concentrations. This study provides detailed information on the speciation of Pb in these materials. Emphasis is on the identification and characterization of poorly crystalline and/or fine-grained species, such as sorption complexes and poorly crystalline (co)precipitates, which are likely to control Pb bioavailability and mobility in these natural systems. In the Evin-Malmaison samples, direct spectroscopic evidence for Pb sorbed to humic acids was found, as well as to both manganese and iron (oxyhydr)oxides. In the Leadville samples, variations in Pb speciation with pH are consistent with predictions based on simplified model system studies of adsorption processes; specifically, the carbonate-buffered tailings with near-neutral pH contain up to 50% of total Pb as adsorption complexes on iron (oxyhydr)oxides, whereas Pb speciation in sulfide-rich low pH samples is dominated by Pb-bearing jarosites with no evidence for adsorbed Pb in these latter samples.

Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Ildefonse, P.; Calas, G. [Univ. de Paris 6 et 7 (France). Lab. de Mineralogie-Cristallographie; Ostergren, J.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences; Brown, G.E. Jr. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences]|[Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Carnoules mine. Generation of As-rich acid mine drainage, natural attenuation processes and solutions for passive in-situ remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and solutions for passive in-situ remediation F.ELBAZ-POULICHET, UMR Hydrosciences, CNRS-University Montpellier-Zn mine (Department of Gard, France) has produced 1.5 Mt of solid waste containing pyrite and associated oxidation they generate acid (pH3) water containing up to 350mg/l of arsenic, 750 to 2700mg/L of iron

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

144

Misfit layered Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} as a high figure of merit p-type transparent conducting oxide film through solution processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films synthesized through solution processing are shown to be high-performing, p-type transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). The synthesis method is a cost-effective and scalable process that consists of sol-gel chemistry, spin coating, and heat treatments. The process parameters can be varied to produce TCO thin films with sheet resistance as low as 5.7?k?/sq (????57 m? cm) or with average visible range transparency as high as 67%. The most conductive Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} TCO thin film has near infrared region optical transmission as high as 85%. The figure of merit (FOM) for the top-performing Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin film (151 M?{sup ?1}) is higher than FOM values reported in the literature for all other solution processed, p-type TCO thin films and higher than most others prepared by physical vapor deposition and chemical vapor deposition. Transparent conductivity in misfit layered oxides presents new opportunities for TCO compositions.

Aksit, M.; Kolli, S. K.; Slauch, I. M.; Robinson, R. D., E-mail: rdr82@cornell.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by anDerived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing", Proceedings, 2ndWastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19,20). In the coking step, coal is heated III the absencethe "coking" process in In the second step the which coal isCoal Liquefaction Wastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters from Petroleum Refining Sour Waters from Coking

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fissile solution measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for determining the content of a fissile material within a solution by detecting delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material after it is temporarily irradiated by a neutron source. The apparatus comprises a container holding the solution and having a portion defining a neutron source cavity centrally disposed within the container. The neutron source cavity temporarily receives the neutron source. The container has portions defining a plurality of neutron detector ports that form an annular pattern and surround the neutron source cavity. A plurality of neutron detectors count delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material. Each neutron detector is located in a separate one of the neutron detector ports.

Crane, T.W.; Collinsworth, P.R.

1984-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Level Alignment in PCDTBT:PC70BM Solar Cells: Solution Processed NiOx for Improved Hole Collection and Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-based NiO{sub x} outperforms PEDOT:PSS in device performance and stability when used as a hole-collection layer in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells formed with poly[N-9'-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) and PC70BM. The origin of the enhancement is clarified by studying the interfacial energy level alignment between PCDTBT or the 1:4 blended heterojunctions and PEDOT:PSS or NiO{sub x} using ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. The 1.6 eV electronic gap of PEDOT:PSS and energy level alignment with the BHJ result in poor hole selectivity of PEDOT:PSS and allows electron recombination at the PEDOT:PSS/BHJ interface. Conversely, the large band gap (3.7 eV) of NiO{sub x} and interfacial dipole (0.6 eV) with the organic active layer leads to a hole-selective interface. This interfacial dipole yields enhanced electron blocking properties by increasing the barrier to electron injection. The presence of such a strong dipole is predicted to further promote hole collection from the organic layer into the oxide, resulting in increased fill factor and short circuit current. An overall decrease in recombination is manifested in an increase in open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency of the device on NiO{sub x} versus PEDOT:PSS interlayers.

Ratcliff, E. L.; Meyer, J.; Steirer, K. X.; Armstrong, N. R.; Olson, D.; Kahn, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CX-002964: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002964: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.11, A9 Date: 07092010...

153

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Extraction of antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate. I. Tributyl phosphate-antimony(III)-nitric acid system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data have been reported concerning the extraction of trivalent antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate (TBP). A possible mechanism for the extraction of antimony(III) has been determined and the (pre)concentration constant for the process has been calculated. The effect of temperature on trivalent antimony extraction has also been evaluated. The enthalpy value and standard isobar potential and entropy for this process have been determined.

Lakaev, V.S.; Smelov, V.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Efficient indium-tin-oxide free inverted organic solar cells based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide cathode and low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide electron extraction layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) free inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) cathode, low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide (ZnO) electron extraction layer, and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl):[6, 6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester blend were realized in this work. The resulted IOSC with ZnO annealed at 150?°C shows the superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.01%, if decreasing the ZnO annealing temperature to 100?°C, the obtained IOSC also shows a PCE of 2.76%, and no light soaking issue is observed. It is found that this ZnO film not only acts as an effective buffer layer but also slightly improves the optical transmittance of AZO substrates. Further, despite the relatively inferior air-stability, these un-encapsulated AZO/ZnO IOSCs show comparable PCEs to the referenced ITO/ZnO IOSCs, which demonstrates that the AZO cathode is a potential alternative to ITO in IOSCs. Meanwhile, this simple ZnO process is compatible with large area deposition and plastic substrates, and is promising to be widely used in IOSCs and other relative fields.

Chen, Dazheng; Zhang, Chunfu, E-mail: cfzhang@xidian.edu.cn; Wang, Zhizhe; Zhang, Jincheng; Tang, Shi; Wei, Wei; Sun, Li; Hao, Yue, E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn [State Key Discipline Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Technology, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, No. 2 South Taibai Road, Xi'an 710071 (China)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

156

Enhanced safeguards via solution monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution monitoring is defined as the essentially continuous monitoring of solution level, density, and temperature in all tanks in the process that contain, or could contain, safeguards-significant quantities of nuclear material. This report describes some of the enhancements that solution monitoring could make to international safeguards. The focus is on the quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring, but qualitatively, solution monitoring can be viewed as a form of surveillance. Quantitatively, solution monitoring can in some cases improve diversion detection probability. For example, the authors show that under certain assumptions, solution monitoring can be used to reduce the standard deviation of the annual material balance, {sigma}{sub MB}, from approximately 17 kg to approximately 4 kg. Such reduction in {sigma}{sub MB} will not always be possible, as they discuss. However, in all cases, solution monitoring would provide assurance that the measurement error models are adequate so that one has confidence in his estimate of {sigma}{sub MB}. Some of the results in this report were generated using data that were simulated with prototype solution monitoring software that they are developing. An accompanying document describes that software.

Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic device having a first electrode layer, a high resistivity transparent film disposed on the first electrode, a second electrode layer, and an inorganic photoactive layer disposed between the first and second electrode layers, wherein the inorganic photoactive layer is disposed in at least partial electrical contact with the high resistivity transparent film, and in at least partial electrical contact with the second electrode. The photoactive layer has a first inorganic material and a second inorganic material different from the first inorganic material, wherein the first and second inorganic materials exhibit a type II band offset energy profile, and wherein the photoactive layer has a first population of nanostructures of a first inorganic material and a second population of nanostructures of a second inorganic material.

Alivisatos, A. Paul; Gur, Ilan; Milliron, Delia

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Engineering report (conceptual design) PFP solution stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Report (Conceptual Design) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

Witt, J.B.

1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Vibrational Spectra of Water Solutions of Azoles from QM/MM Calculations: Effects of Solvation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and solution conditions can successfully indicate the role of the solvent in determining the structural

Guidoni, Leonardo

160

CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development Date: 04022010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CX-011555: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011555: Categorical Exclusion Determination Managing Zirconium Chemistry and Phase Compatibility in Combined Process Separations for Minor Actinide...

162

CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination Streamlining Solar Standards & Processes: The Southern California Rooftop Solar Challenge CX(s)...

163

FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Lee Slater

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Commercial Lighting Solutions, Webtool Peer Review Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the beta version of the CLS webtool, which contains retail box lighting solutions. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed about which feedback should be addressed for the release of version 1.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in New York City in May 2009. Due to the volume of data (~500 comments) the methodology for addressing the peer review comments was central to the success of the ultimate goal of improving the tool. The comments were first imported into a master spreadsheet, and then grouped and organized in several layers. Solutions to each comment were then rated by importance and feasibility to determine the practicality of resolving the concerns of the commenter in the short-term or long-term. The rating system was used as an analytical tool, but the results were viewed thoughtfully to ensure that they were not the sole the factor in determining which comments were recommended for near-term resolution. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 1.0 as well as appendices containing the short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 1.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Jones, Carol C.; Meyer, Tracy A.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Purification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for the removal of hydrogen sulphide from gases or liquid hydrocarbons, comprises contacting the gas or liquid hydrocarbon with an aqueous alkaline solution, preferably having a pH value of 8 to 10, comprising (A) an anthraquinone disulphonic acid or a water-soluble sulphonamide thereof (B) a compound of a metal which can exist in at least two valency states and (C) a sequestering agent.

Marshall, A.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

THE DAYLIGHTING SOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980, pp.l4-20 THE DAYLIGHTING SOLUTION Stephen SelkowitzEEB-W·-80-19 W-74 THE DAYLIGHTING SOLUTION Stephen Selkowitz

Selkowitz, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

An operational method and device for the determination of an output signal in a selected spatial section of an information processing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current strategies in system science with a focus on neuroscience do differ in their methodological approach when exploring and trying to analyze a system in order to detect supposed underlying principle processes in its inherent actions, which one might would call rules or laws. The here suggested procedure and measuring device, performs a mapping of characteristic parameters of the regional output signal, of the supposed structural properties, onto a selected regional part of the information processing system, in which the output signal and its characteristics occur. Explicitly it is pointed out here: Here are not considered input signals, which for instance might have an influence upon (few) nuclear kernels of the atom, electrons, protons, spins of these atomic structures or substructures, or phonons, or which in general represent the physical basis for example of NMR-Physics (NMR = nuclear magnetic resonance) or solid state physics. Examples for the type of input signals considered here are visual, olfactory, tactile or auditory input signals or simply a verbal instruction.

Oliver Zafiris

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

IID Energy- PV Solutions Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''IID accepted applications for the 2013 PV Solutions Program from Jan. 2, 2013 – Jan. 31, 2013. Winners were determined via lottery. The program is now closed for the remainder of 2013, but...

169

CX-004808: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination Flowsheet Evaluation for the Neutralization of High Aluminum ? Low Uranium Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Solution CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11292010...

170

CX-001153: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Wilmington) Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): Wilmington, DelawareOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

171

Financing Solutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solution Center Financing Solutions Financing Solutions Transitioning to a clean energy economy requires innovative financing solutions that enable state, local, and tribal...

172

DETERMINATION OF AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISPOSITION OF 2-BUTOXYETHANOL AND ITS METABOLITES IN MICE AND RATS TO IMPROVE PBPK MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is the most widely used glycol ether solvent. BE's major metabolite, butoxyacetic acid (BAA), causes hemolysis with significant species differences in sensitivity. Several PBPK models have been developed over the past two decades to describe the disposition of BE and BAA in male rats and humans to refine health risk assessments. More recent efforts by Lee et al. (1998) to describe the kinetics of BE and BAA in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) chronic inhalation studies required the use of several assumptions to extrapolate model parameters from earlier PBPK models developed for young male rats to include female F344 and both sexes of B6C3F1 mice and the effects of aging. To replace these assumptions, studies were conducted to determine the impact of age, gender and species on the metabolism of BE, and the tissue partitioning, renal acid transport and plasma protein binding of BAA. In the current study, the Lee et al. PBPK model was updated and expanded to include the further metabolism of BAA and the salivary excretion of BE and BAA which may contribute to the forestomach irritation observed in mice in the NTP study. The revised model predicted that peak blood concentrations of BAA achieved following 6-hr inhalation exposures are greatest in young adult female rats at concentrations up to 300 ppm. This is not the case predicted for old (>18 months) animals, where peak blood concentrations of BAA in male and female mice were similar to or greater than female rats. The revised model serves as a quantitative tool for integrating an extensive pharmacokinetic and mechanistic database into a format that can readily be used to compare internal dosimetry across dose, route of exposure and species.

Corley, Rick A.; Grant, Donna M.; Farris, Elizabeth; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Thrall, K D.; Poet, Torka S.

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

University of Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine Best Solutions for Diesel Emission Reductions University of Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine Best...

174

EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of processing the plutonium solutions to metal form using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities at the Savannah River Site.

175

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

Characterising Vainshtein Solutions in Massive Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study static, spherically symmetric solutions in a recently proposed ghost-free model of non-linear massive gravity. We focus on a branch of solutions where the helicity-0 mode can be strongly coupled within certain radial regions, giving rise to the Vainshtein effect. We truncate the analysis to scales below the gravitational Compton wavelength, and consider the weak field limit for the gravitational potentials, while keeping all non-linearities of the helicity-0 mode. We determine analytically the number and properties of local solutions which exist asymptotically on large scales, and of local (inner) solutions which exist on small scales. We find two kinds of asymptotic solutions, one of which is asymptotically flat, while the other one is not, and also two types of inner solutions, one of which displays the Vainshtein mechanism, while the other exhibits a self-shielding behaviour of the gravitational field. We analyse in detail in which cases the solutions match in an intermediate region. The asymptotically flat solutions connect only to inner configurations displaying the Vainshtein mechanism, while the non asymptotically flat solutions can connect with both kinds of inner solutions. We show furthermore that there are some regions in the parameter space where global solutions do not exist, and characterise precisely in which regions of the phase space the Vainshtein mechanism takes place.

Fulvio Sbisa'; Gustavo Niz; Kazuya Koyama; Gianmassimo Tasinato

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

CX-002948: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-002948: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions - Kansas State University CX(s) Applied: B3.11, A9, B5.1 Date: 07...

178

Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

SATO, P.K.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

CX-002530: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Processing (MSP) Project seeks to deploy equipment to remove the cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and select actinides from the high level waste salt solutions using existing...

180

Equilibria in aqueous iodine solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the determination of pH and. 1odide concentration. This instrument, reads pH to 0. 001 pH units and millivolts to F 1 mv. An Orion Specific Ion Electrode, Iodide Model 94-53, was used in the iodide determination. A Corning Triple Purpose pH glass elect- rode... with such electrodes fully confirms this statement. The optimum concentration of Solution I was found to be between 5 x 10 and 10 H iodide. Error in ZIIF Although short-term reproducibility to within 0. 001 26 pH unit can in principle be achieved. with the glass...

Burger, Joanne Denise

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In this project, the Raleigh Housing Authority worked with Building America team, the Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative, to determine the most cost-effective...

182

Pervaporation process and assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

186

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

187

alkyl carbonate solution: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. 13 Solution-processed single walled carbon nanotube electrodes for organic thin-film transistors Physics Websites Summary: t Airbrushed single walled carbon nanotube...

188

Robust Waste-to-Value Solution Using Advanced Monitoring and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Monitoring and Controls Introduction Waste-to-value is a promising and comprehensive wastewater processing solution being pursued by GE that recovers valuable energy and purified...

189

CX-009553: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009553: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mild Biomass Liquefaction Process for Economic Production of Stabilized Refiner-Ready Bio-Oils...

190

CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination Use of Inedible Energy Crops for Production of Advanced Biofuels with the Mcgyan Process CX(s) Applied:...

191

CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

378: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Solar Cell Fabrication Alkaline Texturing Process Improvement CX(s) Applied:...

192

CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining...

193

CX-008294: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008294: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

194

CX-008293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

93: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008293: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

195

CX-008295: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008295: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

196

CX-008292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

197

CX-011544: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-based Sorbents CX(s)...

198

CX-003037: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-003037: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mercury Removal from Clean Coal Processing Air Stream CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07132010 Location(s): Butte,...

199

CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 0910...

200

CX-010910: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010910: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane-Absorption Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09252013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CX-003876: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-003876: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 0910...

202

CX-004394: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-004394: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 1105...

203

CX-010911: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010911: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane-Absorption Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09252013...

204

CX-005684: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005684: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction and Operation of a Cask Processing Enclosure (CPE) at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste...

205

Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

Beller, Laurence S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

Beller, L.S.

1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Solution deposition assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

HEPA filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hepa filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Murphy, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Reducing the consumption of anthraquinone disulfonate in stretford solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for treating a hydrogen sulfide-containing hydrogenated claus process tail gas to convert the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in which said gas is contacted with an aqueous alkaline solution containing a water-soluble metal vanadate, a water-soluble anthraquinone disulfonate, and a watersoluble, inorganic fluoride, borate, or phosphate complexing agent to yield an effluent gas to reduced sulfur content. The solution is thereafter regenerated by contact with an oxygencontaining gas, elemental sulfur is recovered from the solution, and the regenerated solution is recycled to the gas-contacting step. The complexing agent contained in the solution reduces the chemical consumption of the anthraquinone disulfonate.

Fenton, D.M.; Vaell, R.P.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mixed oxide solid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, R.L.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nuclear fuel processing solution consisting of tri-n-butyl phosphate and dodecane, with a complex of uranium, plutonium, or zirconium and with a solvent degradation product such as di-n-butyl phosphate therein, is contacted with an aqueous solution of a salt formed from hydrazine and either a dicarboxylic acid or a hydroxycarboxylic acid, thereby removing the aforesaid complex from the processing solution.

Tallent, O.K.; Crouse, D.J.; Mailen, J.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Computing Approximate Solutions of the Protein Structure Determination Problem using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dovier@dimi.uniud.it 3 Dept. of Computer Science, New Mexico State University epontell conformation of protein structures, in particular in the context of energy landscape studies [25, 16, 2, 22, 1 be effectively em- ployed to solve energy minimization problems, and thus, can be used to com- pute putative

Dal Palù, Alessandro

220

Computing Approximate Solutions of the Protein Structure Determination Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dovier@dimi.uniud.it 3 Dept. of Computer Science, New Mexico State University epontell of Computer Science at New Mexico State University, where he also serves as the Di- rector of the Knowledge in the context of energy landscape studies (24; 17; 2; 22; 1). Commonly, Monte Carlo simulations, based

Dal Palù, Alessandro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis,Technologies Available Site16.27W

222

Commercial Lighting Solutions Webtool Peer Review Report, Office Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the CLS webtool for offices. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed for the release of version 2.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in Las Vegas in May 2010. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 2.0 as well as appendices containing the comments and short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 2.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Beeson, Tracy A.; Jones, Carol C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Strategic Biomass Solutions (SBS) was formed by the Mississippi Technology Alliance in June 2009. The purpose of the SBS is to provide assistance to existing and potential companies, investors...

225

Solution to Quiz 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 5, 2013 ... over the next four years: Cash Flow at End of Year Amount of Cash Flow. 1. 1 Million. 2 ... project is 8%. Calculate X . Solution: By definition, the ...

jeffb_000

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Extraction of antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate. II. Tributyl phosphate-antimony(V)-nitric acid system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extraction of pentavalent antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate has been investigated. A possible mechanism for the extraction of antimony(V) has been determined and the (pre)concentration constant for the process has been calculated. The composition of the extracted antimony(V) complex has been deduced. A negative effect of temperature on the distribution coefficient for antimony(V) has also been demonstrated.

Lakaev, V.S.; Smelov, V.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solutions of Penrose's Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computational use of Killing potentials which satisfy Penrose's equation is discussed. Penrose's equation is presented as a conformal Killing-Yano equation and the class of possible solutions is analyzed. It is shown that solutions exist in spacetimes of Petrov type O, D or N. In the particular case of the Kerr background, it is shown that there can be no Killing potential for the axial Killing vector.

E. N. Glass; Jonathan Kress

1998-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gas treating process and composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a sour gaseous stream. The process consists of: (a) contacting the sour gaseous stream in a contacting zone with an aqueous reaction solution, at a temperature not greater than about 160{sup 0}C, the reaction solution comprising an effective amount of vanadium V-containing ions to oxidize H/sub 2/S to elemental sulfur and being substantially free of anthraquinone disulfonate, and producing a sweet gas stream and an aqueous solution having a pH of 8-11 and containing sulfur and vanadium IV-containing ions, the reaction solution further comprising an amount of phosphate ions sufficient to provide a molar ratio of phosphate ions to vanadium IV-containing ions produced in solution of at least 0.1; (b) removing sulfur from the aqueous solution, producing an aqueous solution having reduced sulfur content; (c) regenerating aqueous solution having reduced sulfur content in a regenerating zone and producing regenerated reactant in the solution; and (d) returning regenerated solution from step (c) to the contacting zone for use as aqueous reaction solution therein.

Byers, D.L.

1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

CX-001152: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Niskayuna)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): Niskayuna, New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

230

Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

Currier, R.P. [comp.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Process for purifying molybdenum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for purifying molybdenum containing arsenic and phosphorus. The process comprising: adding to an acidic slurry of molybdenum trioxide, a source of magnesium ions in a solid form, with the amount of magnesium and the magnesium ion concentration in the subsequently formed ammonium molybdate solution being sufficient to subsequently form insoluble compounds containing greater than about 80% by weight of the arsenic and greater than about 80% by weight of the phosphorus, and ammonia in an amount sufficient to subsequently dissolve the molybdenum and subsequently form the insoluble compounds, with the source of magnesium ions being added prior to the addition of the ammonia; digesting the resulting ammoniated slurry at a temperature sufficient to dissolve the molybdenum and form an ammonium molybdate solution while the pH is maintained at from bout 9 to about 10 to form a solid containing the insoluble compounds; and separating the solid from the ammonium molybdate solution.

Cheresnowsky, J.

1989-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

Gerung, Henry (Albuquerque, NM); Boyle, Timothy J. (Kensington, MD); Bunge, Scott D. (Cuyahoga Falls, OH)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Actinide recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

Muscatello, Anthony C. (Arvada, CO); Navratil, James D. (Arvada, CO); Saba, Mark T. (Arvada, CO)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power ­ to meet its target of achieving 15% of energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. CefasOffshore Renewable Energy Solutions #12;Cefas: meeting complex requirements The Centre and maximise resource input on field and lab-based studies ­ saving you time and money.Recognised expertise

235

Neutrino mass matrix solutions and neutrinoless double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a determination of the neutrino mass matrix which holds for values of the neutrinoless double beta decay effective mass m_{ee} larger than the neutrino mass differences. We find eight possible solutions and discuss for each one the corresponding neutrino mass eigenvalues and zero texture. A minimal structure of the perturbations to add to these zero textures to recover the full mass matrix is also determined. Implications for neutrino hot dark matter are discussed for each solution.

Thomas Hambye

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution...

239

Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

The Keystone Center

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

A fractional dispersion model for overland solute transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a process-oriented, physically-based model is developed for overland solute transport. Two scenarios, one consisting of downslope and the other...

Deng, Zhi-Qiang; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Singh, Vijay P.; de Lima, Jo??o L. M. P.

2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Standard guide for determining synergism between wear and corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide covers and provides a means for computing the increased wear loss rate attributed to synergism or interaction that may occur in a system when both wear and corrosion processes coexist. The guide applies to systems in liquid solutions or slurries and does not include processes in a gas/solid system. 1.2 This guide applies to metallic materials and can be used in a generic sense with a number of wear/corrosion tests. It is not restricted to use with approved ASTM test methods. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Constraining the Kehagias-Sfetsos solution in the Horava-Lifshitz gravity with extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat vacuum solution of the Horava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity that is the analog of the general relativistic Schwarzschild black hole. In the weak-field and slow-motion approximation, we work out the correction to the third Kepler law of a test particle induced by such a solution and compare it to the phenomenologically determined orbital period of the transiting extrasolar planet HD209458b Osiris to preliminarily obtain an order-of-magnitude lower bound on the KS dimensionless parameter \\omega_0 >= 1.4\\times 10^-18. As suggestions for further analyses, the entire data set of HD209458b should be re-processed by explicitly modeling KS gravity as well, and one or more dedicated solve-for parameter(s) should be estimated.

Lorenzo Iorio; Matteo Luca Ruggiero

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

CX-006211: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Henniges Automotive - Process Air Compressor Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07182011 Location(s):...

244

CX-004251: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CX-004251: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization by 2013 CX(s) Applied: A9,...

245

CX-007855: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-007855: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Diablo Regional Distributed Solar Energy Generation Expedited Permit Process CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01272012...

246

CX-010824: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

247

CX-010821: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

248

CX-010823: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

249

CX-010822: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

250

Solution to Quiz 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 11, 2014 ... At that time, she deposits 2,500 that she did not spend on her vacation. On May 30, 2013, Vanessa's account has a value of 26,000. Determine ...

jeffb_000

2014-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - assets management process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 5 Asset management solutions To support your agency's mission Summary: standardization of asset management business processes, the solution gives multiple levels of...

252

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Bearwall Energy Efficient Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CATEE Conference November 20, 2014 ENERGY EFFICIENT SOLUTIONS ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Brief History of Bearwall… Who We Are: ? Manuel Sovero ? Luis Osorio Energy Conservation... Experience: ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Energy Programs… ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Bearwall Methodology… Introduction...

Sovero,M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cyanide Solution | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments SignCyanide Solution

255

Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions with Sustainable Energy By Mark DiesendorfSolutions with Sustainable Energy. Sydney, NSW: University

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ultratrace determination of curium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a method for detection of curium at near single atom levels is being undertaken as a part of the Advanced Concepts Project at Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. Ultratrace determination of curium, with the ability to quantify the fraction that is curium-242, provides a signature method of detecting clandestine reprocessing of recently irradiated uranium targets. Curium initially present in any of a variety of materials such as air filters, solid or liquid process waste, soil, flora, or fauna can be recovered via current chemical separations processing techniques. Using the ultratrace method being developed, such recovered curium will be quantified with thousand-fold higher sensitivity than the best currently available method which is alpha counting. This high sensitivity arises because, on average, a given trivalent curium (Cm{sup 3+}) ion can emit a very large number of fluorescence photons before alpha decay occurs.

Beitz, J.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reducing the consumption of anthraquinone disulfonate in Stretford solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for treating a hydrogen sulfide-containing hydrogenated Claus process tail gas to convert the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in which said gas is contacted with an aqueous alkaline solution containing a water-soluble metal vanadate, a water-soluble anthraquinone disulfonate, and a water soluble phenolic complexing agent or a water-soluble carboxylic complexing agent, to yield an effluent gas of reduced sulfur content. The solution is thereafter regenerated by contact with an oxygen-containing gas, elemental sulfur is recovered from the solution, and the regenerated solution is recycled to the gascontacting step. The complexing agent contained in the solution reduces the chemical consumption of the anthraquinone disulfonate.

Fenton, D.M.; Vaell, R.P.

1980-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

High-efficiency solution processable polymer photovoltaic cells by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Polymer solar cells have shown potential to harness solar energy in a cost-effective way. Significant as a promising cost-effective alternative to silicon-based solar cells1­3 . Some of the important advantages, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA 2 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Functional Polymer Architectures for Solution Processed Organic Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through formation of the tetrazole from 4-bromobenzonitrile13 5-(4-Bromophenyl)tetrazole, 7 2-(4-tert- Butylphenyl)-5-(

Poulsen, Daniel Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Design and process solutions for decreasing vendor defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why do some new initiatives fail while others succeed? This thesis attempts to answer this complex question by investigating the failure of a defect tracking initiative at Amazon and examining how a reintroduction of the ...

Joyce, Michael (Michael Sagar)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solution-Processed Solar Cells using Colloidal Quantum Dots ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

physical understanding, and performance-oriented engineering of colloidal quantum dot solar cells and light sensors. Bio: Ted Sargent received the B.Sc.Eng. (Engineering...

264

Solution-processed photovoltaics with advanced characterization and analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the 37th IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference (D. B. Mitzi, Prog. Photovoltaics 2011, 20, 6. [23] S. Bag,R. Noufi, IEEE J. Photovoltaics 2012, T. Todorov, J. Tang,

Duan, Hsin-Sheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Small Molecule Solution-Processed Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Laboratory of Polymer and Composite Technology, Lausanne A large source of interest in organic photovoltaics to lateral structures with sizes of about 300 nm. The UV-Vis absorbance spectra of a SQ:PCBM blend film:PCBM blends with varying composition and indicate an eutectic system. This might provide a strategy to obtain

Candea, George

266

Technology Reports Solution Concentration Prediction for Pharmaceutical Crystallization Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Robust Chemometrics and ATR FTIR Spectroscopy Timokleia Togkalidou, Hsien-Hsin Tung,*, Yongkui Sun systems in the presence of impurities and over a wide range of temperature. To our best knowledge in pharmaceutical industry such as crystal size distribution (CSD) and crystal shape of the product pharmaceuticals

Braatz, Richard D.

267

Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the work described in this report is on single electron transfer reactions of excited states which culminate in the formation of stable or metastable even electron species. For the most part the studies have involved even electron organic substrates which are thus converted photochemically to odd electron species and then at some stage reconvert to even electron products. These reactions generally fall into two rather different categories. In one set of studies we have examined reactions in which the metastable reagents generated by single electron transfer quenching of an excited state undergo novel fragmentation reactions, chiefly involving C-C bond cleavage. These reactions often culminate in novel and potentially useful chemical reactions and frequently have the potential for leading to new chemical products otherwise unaffordable by conventional reaction paths. In a rather different investigation we have also studied reactions in which single electron transfer quenching of an excited state is followed by subsequent reactions which lead reversibly to metastable two electron products which, often stable in themselves, can nonetheless be reacted with each other or with other reagents to regenerate the starting materials with release of energy. 66 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Whitten, D.G.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solution Processed Silver Sulfide Thin Films for Filament Memory Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TGA) with Mixed Conductivity (EIS) o Understanding effect ofModified Circuit Simulated EIS data of the brick-layer modelimpedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoparticle Synthesis 4.1.1:

Yin, Shong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatio-temporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions, and adopted into two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. First target is a steady solution to Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bi-stable systems in which localized solutions coexist, and a model for span-wisely localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to an isolated branch known as "isolas" are found with a continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. Second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for stream-wisely localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

Toshiki Teramura; Sadayoshi Toh

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaporation of Enriched Uranium Solutions Containing Organophosphates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site has enriched uranium (EU) solution which has been stored for almost 10 years since being purified in the second uranium cycle of the H area solvent extraction process. The preliminary SRTC data, in conjunction with information in the literature, is promising. However, very few experiments have been run, and none of the results have been confirmed with repeat tests. As a result, it is believed that insufficient data exists at this time to warrant Separations making any process or program changes based on the information contained in this report. When this data is confirmed in future testing, recommendations will be presented.

Pierce, R.A.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Preparation of diallyl phthalate prepolymer solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is claimed for preparing prepolymers of a diallyl phthalate at room temperature. The process is characterized by the fact that the solution of a diallyl phthalate alone or a diallyl phthalate and another copolymerizable monomer, in a liquid ketone at ambient temperature, is heated in the presence of a free radical-forming catalyst, preferably hydrogen peroxide, as well as in the presence of a small amount of a strong acid until at least 60% and advantageously at least 90% of the monomer initially present has been converted to the prepolymer.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

aqueous buffered solutions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

different temperatures and determined the characteristic parameters for each adsorption isotherm. The adsorption process has been found endothermic in nature and thermodynamic...

274

JOINING ADVANCED MATERIALS BY PLASTIC FLOW PROVIDES SOLUTION FOR OXYGEN SENSOR APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOINING ADVANCED MATERIALS BY PLASTIC FLOW PROVIDES SOLUTION FOR OXYGEN SENSOR APPLICATIONS's unique plastic deformation process. · Abilitytodeploymultipleoxygen sensors (due to their lower cost

Kemner, Ken

275

Nucleic acid isolation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

Longmire, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Annette K. (La Jolla, CA); Hildebrand, Carl E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Gender determination of avian embryo  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Processing Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

278

Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear...

279

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Process Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and...

280

Corporate Energy Management Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. May 21-24, 2013 Corporate Energy Management Process 2 ?Brief introduction to BASF ? BASF Corporate Energy Management ? Management Support ? Goals ? Continuous Improvement ? Best Practices ? Recognition ?Summary ESL-IE-13-05-25 Proceedings...-value products ? Intelligent, sustainable system solutions ? 2012 Sales: ?72.1 Billion ? Employees: 110,000 Company overview BASF ? The Chemical Company ESL-IE-13-05-25 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA...

Geiger, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Actinide recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing as a Tool for Process Improvement Evaluation. ”A. (2005). “Determination of Process Durations on VirtualR.G. (1987). “Cost Modeling: a Process-Modeling Approach”.

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

Vobach, A.R.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

Vobach, A.R.

1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

FY-2010 Process Monitoring Technology Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY 2010, work under the Spectroscopy-Based Process Monitoring task included ordering and receiving four fluid flow meters and four flow visible-near infrared spectrometer cells to be instrumented within the centrifugal contactor system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Initial demonstrations of real-time spectroscopic measurements on cold-stream simulants were conducted using plutonium (Pu)/uranium (U) (PUREX) solvent extraction process conditions. The specific test case examined the extraction of neodymium nitrate (Nd(NO3)3) from an aqueous nitric acid (HNO3) feed into a tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/ n-dodecane solvent. Demonstration testing of this system included diverting a sample from the aqueous feed meanwhile monitoring the process in every phase using the on-line spectroscopic process monitoring system. The purpose of this demonstration was to test whether spectroscopic monitoring is capable of determining the mass balance of metal nitrate species involved in a cross-current solvent extraction scheme while also diverting a sample from the system. The diversion scenario involved diverting a portion of the feed from a counter-current extraction system while a continuous extraction experiment was underway. A successful test would demonstrate the ability of the process monitoring system to detect and quantify the diversion of material from the system during a real-time continuous solvent extraction experiment. The system was designed to mimic a PUREX-type extraction process with a bank of four centrifugal contactors. The aqueous feed contained Nd(NO3)3 in HNO3, and the organic phase was composed of TBP/n-dodecane. The amount of sample observed to be diverted by on-line spectroscopic process monitoring was measured to be 3 mmol (3 x 10-3 mol) Nd3+. This value was in excellent agreement with the 2.9 mmol Nd3+ value based on the known mass of sample taken (i.e., diverted) directly from the system feed solution.

Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Hines, Wes; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; henkell, J.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Jordan, Elizabeth A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peterson, James M.; Verdugo, Dawn E.; Christensen, Ronald N.; Peper, Shane M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

287

IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems. It consists of adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8 to 9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids. The solution is oxidized to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes. The aldehydes are removed as they are generated and converted to peracids.

Chum, H.L.; Palasz, P.D.; Ratcliff, M.A.

1984-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

AdS_6 solutions of type II supergravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very few AdS_6 x M_4 supersymmetric solutions are known: one in massive IIA, and two IIB solutions dual to it. The IIA solution is known to be unique; in this paper, we use the pure spinor approach to give a classification for IIB supergravity. We reduce the problem to two PDEs on a two-dimensional space Sigma. M_4 is then a fibration of S^2 over Sigma; the metric and fluxes are completely determined in terms of the solution to the PDEs. The results seem likely to accommodate near-horizon limits of (p,q)-fivebrane webs studied in the literature as a source of CFT_5's. We also show that there are no AdS_6 solutions in eleven-dimensional supergravity.

Fabio Apruzzi; Marco Fazzi; Achilleas Passias; Dario Rosa; Alessandro Tomasiello

2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

291

AdS_6 solutions of type II supergravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very few AdS_6 x M_4 supersymmetric solutions are known: one in massive IIA, and two IIB solutions dual to it. The IIA solution is known to be unique; in this paper, we use the pure spinor approach to give a classification for IIB supergravity. We reduce the problem to two PDEs on a two-dimensional space Sigma. M_4 is then a fibration of S^2 over Sigma; the metric and fluxes are completely determined in terms of the solution to the PDEs. The results seem likely to accommodate near-horizon limits of (p,q)-fivebrane webs studied in the literature as a source of CFT_5's. We also show that there are no AdS_6 solutions in eleven-dimensional supergravity.

Fabio Apruzzi; Marco Fazzi; Achilleas Passias; Dario Rosa; Alessandro Tomasiello

2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Ly, Jennifer (San Jose, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

Nerad, Bruce A. (Longmont, CO); Krantz, William B. (Boulder, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NSTAR (Electric)- Business Solutions Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Business Solutions Program offers NSTAR's non-residential customers incentives for a variety of energy efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Prescriptive rebates are available for...

295

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences. A method by which fluorescence in situ hybridization can be made strand specific is described. Cell cultures are grown in a medium containing a halogenated nucleotide. The analog is partially incorporated in one DNA strand of each chromatid. This substitution takes place in opposite strands of the two sister chromatids. After staining with the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33258, cells are exposed to long-wavelength ultraviolet light which results in numerous strand nicks. These nicks enable the substituted strand to be denatured and solubilized by heat, treatment with high or low pH aqueous solutions, or by immersing the strands in 2.times.SSC (0.3M NaCl+0.03M sodium citrate), to name three procedures. It is unnecessary to enzymatically digest the strands using Exo III or another exonuclease in order to excise and solubilize nucleotides starting at the sites of the nicks. The denaturing/solubilizing process removes most of the substituted strand while leaving the prereplication strand largely intact. Hybridization of a single-stranded probe of a tandem repeat arranged in a head-to-tail orientation will result in hybridization only to the chromatid with the complementary strand present.

Goodwin, Edwin H. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Process Modeling for Process Improvement A Process Conformance Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Modeling for Process Improvement - A Process Conformance Approach Sigurd Thunem September processes. In order to improve these processes, knowledge about them is necessary. To support process improve- ment the organization should collect process data, transform process data into knowledge

299

The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

Bruce J. Mincher

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel surface, efforts are needed to compare the polished surfaces to corroded and mill-scale surfaces, which are more likely to occur in application. Additionally, due to the change in liquid waste levels within the tanks, salt deposits are highly likely to be present along the tank wall. When the level of the tank decreases, a salt deposit will form as the solution evaporates. The effects of this pre-existing salt, or supernate deposit, are unknown at this time on the corrosion effect and thus require investigation. Additionally, in the presence of radiation, moist air undergoes radiolysis, forming a corrosive nitric acid condensate. This condensate could accelerate the corrosion process in the vapor space. To investigate this process, an experimental apparatus simulating the effects of radiation was designed and constructed to provide gamma irradiation while coupons are exposed to a simulate tank solution. Additionally, ammonia vapors will also be introduced to further represent the tank environment.

Hoffman, E.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Photolytic Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

302

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript The Better Buildings Residential...

304

Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general...

305

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential...

306

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Demonstration webinar slides...

307

Method for gettering organic, inorganic and elemental iodine in aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the removal of iodine from aqueous solutions, particularly the trapping of radioactive iodine to mitigate damage resulting from accidents or spills associated with nuclear reactors, by exposing the solution to well dispersed silver carbonate which reacts with the iodine and iodides, thereby gettering iodine and iodine compounds from solution. The iodine is not only removed from solution but also from the contiguous vapor.

Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Shockley, William E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

High frequency titration of amines in nonaqueous solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results for the aliphatkc amines and nitrogen hetero- cyclic compounds tested and fair results for some ef the aromatic compounds. An attempt to determine the individual amounts of two bases with one titration was unsuccessful. TABLE OF C05TE5TS I5... may be extended to include the titration of amines in nonaqueous solutions. The quantitative determination of amines in non- aqueous solutions is a field in which only a relatively small amount of work has been done, the major portion of which has...

Witmer, William Byron

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrocarbon Processing`s petrochemical processes `97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on numerous petrochemical processes, describing the application, the process, yields, economics, commercial plants, references, and licensor. Petrochemicals which are synthesized include: alkylbenzene, methylamines, ammonia, benzene, bisphenol-A, BTX aromatics, butadiene, butanediol, butyraldehyde, caprolactam, cumene, dimethyl terephthalate, ethanolamines, ethylbenzene, ethylene, ethylene glycols, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, maleic anhydride, methanol, olefins, paraxylene, phenol, phthalic anhydride, polycaproamide, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, PVC, styrene, terephthalic acid, urea, vinyl chloride, and xylene isomers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Perturbation theory for a stochastic process with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process may be used to generate a noise signal with a finite correlation time. If a one-dimensional stochastic process is driven by such a noise source, it may be analysed by solving a Fokker-Planck equation in two dimensions. In the case of motion in the vicinity of an attractive fixed point, it is shown how the solution of this equation can be developed as a power series. The coefficients are determined exactly by using algebraic properties of a system of annihilation and creation operators.

Michael Wilkinson

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Northern Paths to Aboriginal Self-Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are at the forefront of solutions to accommodate the divide between these communities. Aboriginal peoples seek-determination. Since 1380, the Inuit of Greenland have been under Danish rule, and formally Greenland was a colony. The Sami Parliament, however, only has advisory powers to the Norwegian Storting (legislature) and does

Northern British Columbia, University of

312

Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

Ahmad Ghodsi

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

For discussion only Phase Two Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For discussion only 1 Phase Two Process 1 Revised per Advisory Committee 10/20/11Advisory Reviews Input on Select Opportunities and Charges AE to Begin Solution Development Process Organizes Work, Identifies Business Process Owners and Affected Constituent, and Refines Data Analysis #12;For discussion

Sheridan, Jennifer

314

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

315

Unique Hardware and Software Data Acquisition and Processing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hardware and Software Data Acquisition and Processing Solutions in a Small Engine Test Cell for Enhanced Kinetic Engine Modeling Accuracy Unique Hardware and Software Data...

316

Process for decomposing lignin in biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mild inexpensive process for treating lignocellulosic biomass involves oxidative delignification of wood using an aqueous solution prepared by dissolving a catalytic amount of manganese (III) acetate into water and adding hydrogen peroxide. Within 4 days and without agitation, the solution was used to convert poplar wood sections into a fine powder-like delignified, cellulose rich materials that included individual wood cells.

Rector, Kirk Davin; Lucas, Marcel; Wagner, Gregory Lawrence; Kimball, David Bryan; Hanson, Susan Kloek

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mistake #3: Digitally controlled analog processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-digital solution and puts your machine in the junk heap. LESSON LEARNED: Design the processor and its programming- out the intervention of the accountants. LESSON LEARNED: Make sure there's enough processing power that the resources will be suffi- cient to solve it. LESSON LEARNED: Don't mess with hybrid solutions if a digital

Maher, Robert C.

318

Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford… (more)

Adamski, Mark Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

324

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on “Nuclear Responsibility” on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Negative Energy Solutions and Symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the negative energy solutions of the Dirac equation, which become relevant at very high energies and study several symmetries which follow therefrom. The consequences are briefly examined.

Burra G. Sidharth

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09252013...

328

CX-006664: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Process Improvement Old Pipe Yard Clean Up CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.23 Date: 11162009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming...

329

CX-003070: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-003070: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU)Syngas (Synthetic Gas) Generator Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.27, B1.31, B3.6...

330

CX-008259: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Slipstream Testing of a Membrane Carbon Dioxide Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03282012...

331

CX-012025: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Slipstream Testing of a Membrane Carbon Dioxide Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A1, A9,...

332

CX-012024: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Slipstream Testing of a Membrane Carbon Dioxide Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A1, A9,...

333

Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical processes in situ, involves the transport, displacement, distribution and mixing of one or more reactive agents. Biological and chemical reactions all require diffusive transport of solutes to reaction sites at the molecular scale and accordingly, the success of processes at the meter-scale and larger is dictated by the success of phenomena that occur at the micron-scale. However, current understanding of scaling effects on the mixing and delivery of nutrients in biogeochemically dynamic porous media systems is limited, despite the limitations this imposes on the efficiency and effectiveness of the remediation challenges at hand. Objectives. We therefore proposed to experimentally characterize and computationally describe the growth, evolution, and distribution of microbial activity and mineral formation as well as changes in transport processes in porous media that receive two or more reactive amendments. The model system chosen for this project was based on a method for immobilizing 90Sr, which involves stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis with ensuing mineral precipitation (CaCO3), and co-precipitation of Sr. Studies at different laboratory scales were used to visualize and quantitatively describe the spatial relationships between amendment transport and consumption that stimulate the production of biomass and mineral phases that subsequently modify the permeability and heterogeneity of porous media. Biomass growth, activity, and mass deposition in mixing zones was investigated using two-dimensional micro-model flow cells as well as flow cells that could be analyzed using synchrotron-based x-ray tomography. Larger-scale flow-cell experiments were conducted where the spatial distribution of media properties, flow, segregation of biological activity and impact on ancillary constituents (i.e., Sr) was determined. Model simulations accompanied the experimental efforts. Benefits and Outcomes of the Project. The research contributed towards defining the key physical, chemical, and biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE priority contaminants (e.g., 60Co, 90Sr, U) in the subsurface. The work conducted and reported herein, will in the future (i) contribute to controlling the juxtaposition of microbial activity, contaminants and amendments, (ii) promote new strategies for delivering amendments, and (iii) allow new approaches for modifying permeability and flow in porous media. We feel that the work has already translated directly to improving the efficiency of amendment based remediation strategies. Products. The results of the project have been published in a number of peer reviewed journal articles. The abstracts and citations to those articles, given in section 2.0 below, make up the bulk of this final report.

Gerlach, Robin [Montana State University

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Classical solutions from quantum regime for barotropic FRW model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantization of gravity coupled to barotropic perfect fluid as matter field and cosmological constant is made and the wave function can be determined for any $\\kappa$ in the FRW minisuperspace model. The meaning of the existence of the classical solution is discussed in the WKB semiclassical approximation

J. Socorro

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Elasticity solutions for plane anisotropic functionally graded beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elasticity solutions for plane anisotropic functionally graded beams H.J. Ding a , D.J. Huang a This paper considers the plane stress problem of generally anisotropic beams with elastic compliance of anisotropic functionally graded plane beams, with the integral constants completely determined from boundary

Wang, Ji

336

A Robust Solution Searching Scheme in Genetic Shigeyoshi Tsutsui1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aerospace control system, nuclear power control system, where a kind of robustness against the perturbation of the environmental features are important. In nature, the phenotypic feature of an organism is determined from develop a genetic search scheme which can produce robust solutions. The proposed approach uses the effect

Tsutsui, Shigeyoshi

337

Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp/sub 2/MX/sub 2/. Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U ..-->.. L ..pi..-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs.

Brennan, J.G.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Microfluidic System for Solution Array Based Bioassays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate new enabling technology for multiplex biodetection systems that are flexible, miniaturizable, highly automated, low cost, and high performance. It builds on prior successes at LLNL with particle-based solution arrays, such as those used in the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) successfully field deployed to multiple locations nationwide. We report the development of a multiplex solution array immunoassay based upon engineered metallic nanorod particles. Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} particles are fabricated by sequential electrodeposition of dissimilar metals within porous alumina templates, yielding optically encoded striping patterns that can be read using standard laboratory microscope optics and PC-based image processing software. The addition of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings and target-specific antibodies allows each encoded class of nanorod particles to be directed against a different antigen target. A prototype assay panel directed against bacterial, viral, and soluble protein targets demonstrates simultaneous detection at sensitivities comparable to state of the art immunoassays, with minimal cross-reactivity. Studies have been performed to characterize the colloidal properties (zeta potential) of the suspended nanorod particles as a function of pH, the ionic strength of the suspending solution, and surface functionalization state. Additional studies have produced means for the non-contact manipulation of the particles, including the insertion of magnetic nickel stripes within the encoding pattern, and control via externally applied electromagnetic fields. Using the results of these studies, the novel Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} based assay was implemented in a prototype automated system with the sample processing functions and optical readout performed on a microfluidic card. The unique physical properties of the nanorod particles enable the development of integrated microfluidic systems for biodefense, protein expression studies, and other applications.

Dougherty, G M; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Rose, K A

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CuIn(Se,S) 2 solar cell with a PCE of 11.1% under dark andpower conversion efficiency (PCE) of around 20% among thinAchievement of such high PCE can be largely ascribed to the

Chung, Choong-Heui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources, the potential of solar energy is the mostuse of solar cells as an energy source [2]. Therefore, thinspread use of solar cells as a renewable energy source [2].

Chung, Choong-Heui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SciTech Connect: A Solution for Solution-Produced [beta]-FeSe...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A Solution for Solution-Produced beta-FeSe: Elucidating and Overcoming Factors that Prevent Superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Solution for...

342

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutions at Constant Chemical Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, that range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, that influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a Grand-Canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work we propose the C$\\mu$MD method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the C$\\mu$MD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystall...

Perego, Claudio; Parrinello, Michele

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Waste immobilization process development at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processes to immobilize various wasteforms, including waste salt solution, transuranic waste, and low-level incinerator ash, are being developed. Wasteform characteristics, process and equipment details, and results from field/pilot tests and mathematical modeling studies are discussed.

Charlesworth, D L

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

QUANTIFYING THE CONVERGENCE TIME OF DISTRIBUTED DESIGN PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTIFYING THE CONVERGENCE TIME OF DISTRIBUTED DESIGN PROCESSES Erich Devendorf Research Engineer design processes. In distributed design, large systems are decomposed into smaller, coupled design individual objectives. The number of iterations required to reach equilibrium solutions in distributed design

Lewis, Kemper E.

345

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5) Enhanced Stabilization Technologies; (6) Spent Nuclear Fuel; and (7) Challenging Materials. This report provides updates on 35 technology development tasks conducted during calendar year 2008 in the Roadmap and MYPP program areas.

Bush, S.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t ? [0,1). We prove several results ...

Borodin, Alexei

348

Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

van Swol, F. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical Engineering)

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M; (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound; (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete; and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

350

Two-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative transfer equation has been derived with full mathematical rigor [13,14]. In the case the wave nature of the process and is not just about energy transport. Hence the governing equation cannotTwo-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution Albert C. Fannjiang* Department

Fannjiang, Albert

351

Optimization For Grade Transitions In Polyethylene Solution Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization For Grade Transitions In Polyethylene Solution Polymerization Jun Shi1, Intan Hamdan2 Engineering Carnegie Mellon University 2The Dow Chemical Company #12;Dynamic Optimization Models Grade Transition for LLDPE · Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR) (represents two actual processes) · Assume

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

352

Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Interested Parties - Energy Solutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Energy Solutions EnergySolutions.pdf More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - NRG Energy Interested Parties - Myriant Interested Parties - 1603 Program Discussion...

354

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the Energy Efficiency of US Commercial Buildings Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the...

355

ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf More Documents...

356

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012, Clean...

357

Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every Consumer Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every Consumer Highlights of Ford's near, mid, and...

358

TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

SAMS TL; MENDOZA RE

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETREIVAL AND PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

SAMS TL

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gravitational duality and rotating solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study how gravitational duality acts on rotating solutions, using the Kerr-NUT black hole as an example. After properly reconsidering how to take into account both electric (i.e. masslike) and magnetic (i.e. NUT-like) sources in the equations of general relativity, we propose a set of definitions for the dual Lorentz charges. We then show that the Kerr-NUT solution has nontrivial such charges. Further, we clarify in which respect Kerr's source can be seen as a mass M with a dipole of NUT charges.

Argurio, Riccardo; Dehouck, Francois [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

anionic surfactant solution: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from zinc nanoclasters size of several nanometers to ZnO fractal aggregates (FA) size up to hundreds of nanometers. Determinants of this process are the average power and an...

362

aqueous surfactant solutions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ZnO nanostructures formation from zinc nanoclasters size of several nanometers to ZnO fractal aggregates (FA) size up to hundreds of nanometers. Determinants of this process are...

363

aqueous surfactant solution: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ZnO nanostructures formation from zinc nanoclasters size of several nanometers to ZnO fractal aggregates (FA) size up to hundreds of nanometers. Determinants of this process are...

364

Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our contribution to the larger project (ANL) was the phylogenetic analysis of evolved communities capable of reducing metals including uranium.

Marsh, Terence L.

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear FuelAaron SilbersteinNuclearIndustry

366

TA-53 UNREVIEWED SAFETY ISSUE SCREENING AND DETERMINATION PROCESS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySynthetic fuelT Plant3 UNREVIEWED

367

Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 16, 2012 ... Calculate the accumulated value of this annuity at the end of 5 years .... The Net Present Value of this project at 10% interest is 280,026.06 .

368

Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10000= yields 2133.18 (Using BA 35 Solar keystrokes are AC/ON (to clear registers) ... In this question, first layer gives a value of 1/i (=PV of level perpetuity of 1 ...

CJordan

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Criticality safety of an annular tank for fissile solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments performed to determine the criticality safety of annular tanks for storing fissile solutions are described. Six annular tanks were built in four nesting sizes to obtain experimental criticality data which could be used to validate computer codes employed in the design of such a safe storage system for an industrial plant. Each tank had an annular solution region thickness of 38 mm. The height of this region was 2.13 m, held 0.3 m off the floor by a stainless steel skirting. Walls were 6.4 mm-thick type 304L stainless steel. The uranyl nitrate solution contained 357 g U/l and had a density of 1.5 kg/m/sup 3/. The uranium was enriched to 93.2% /sup 235/U with other isotopes: 5.4% /sup 238/U, 1.0% /sup 234/U, and 0.4% /sup 236/U. The solution contained 0.5 molar nitric acid and a total impurity content of less than 1500 ppM. Important neutron absorbers, boron and cadmium, averaged 10 ppM and 30 ppM, respectively. Boron-loaded concrete and boron-loaded plaster were selected for the neutron moderator/absorber interior to the annular tank. Three configurations of tanks and reflector were taken to criticality and are reported. The critical uranium solution height in all tanks containing solution as a function of boron content in earthen interior material, tank array configuration, and other variables. (LCL)

Rothe, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Effective Darcy-scale contact angles in porous media imbibing solutions of various surface tensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective Darcy-scale contact angles in porous media imbibing solutions of various surface tensions was to develop and test a methodology to determine whether these surface tension effects predictably alter of 25° for the NaNO3 solution solely on the basis of surface tension contrast. The results of this study

Selker, John

372

THE EXACT RIEMANN SOLUTIONS TO SHALLOW WATER EE HAN AND GERALD WARNECKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EXACT RIEMANN SOLUTIONS TO SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS EE HAN AND GERALD WARNECKE Abstract. We determine completely the exact Riemann solutions for the shallow water equations with a bottom step on the subcritical and supercritical Froude number of the Riemann initial data as well as the jump of the bottom step

373

Decontamination by cleaning with fluorocarbon surfactant solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the nuclear industry, facilities and their components inevitably become contaminated with radioactive materials. This report documents the application of a novel particle-removal process developed by Entropic Systems, Inc. (ESI), to decontaminate critical instruments and parts that are contaminated with small radioactive particles that adhere to equipment surfaces. The tests were performed as a cooperative effort between ESI and the Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ESI developed a new, environmentally compatible process to remove small particles from solid surfaces that is more effective than spraying or sonicating with CFC-113. This process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as working media; the liquids have zero ozone-depleting potential, are nontoxic and nonflammnable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. In the ESI process, parts to be cleaned are first sprayed or sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid to effect particle removal. The parts are then rinsed with the perfluorinated liquid to remove the fluorocarbon surfactant applied in the first step, and the residual rinse liquid is then evaporated from the parts into an air or nitrogen stream from which it is recovered. Nuclear contamination is inherently a surface phenomenon. The presence of radioactive particles is responsible for all ``smearable`` contamination and, if the radioactive particles are small enough, for some of the fixed contamination. Because radioactivity does not influence the physical chemistry of particle adhesion, the ESI process should be just as effective in removing radioactive particles as it is in removing nonradioactive particles.

Kaiser, R. [Entropic Systems, Inc., Winchester, MA (United States); Benson, C.E.; Meyers, E.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vaughen, V.C.A. [Chemical Engineering and Safety Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Quantitative determinations of tryptophane in cottonseed meats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their determinations on the blue color developed by tryptophane and the phosphomolybdio-phosphotungstic acid phenol reagent of Folin and . )enis . Their results are low in comparison with the results of other workers. Looney contends that it was the unfamiliarity... method. Another frequently used colorimetric method is based on the reaction of tryptophane and p-dimethylaminobensaldehyde in 20 per cent hydrochloric acid solution, in which a blue color results. This was first o'bserved by Rhode19, but Hersfeld20...

Holland, Bryant Richard

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ozone decomposition in water solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hewes, III; B. S. , Texas ASH University Directed by Dr. R. R. Davison The rate of the decomposition of ozone in water solutions at various pH's and temperatures were ob- tained by an iodometrical method. The orders of the reactions and the reaction...

Hewes, Cecil Grayson

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable Rural Energy in the Baram River Basin, Sarawak with a large-scale hydropower plan for the river basin. Keywords: South East Asia, Malaysia, Rural Energy In this study we explore the potential for rural renewable energy supply through a focus on villages

Kammen, Daniel M.

377

Energy solutions?Director Eric Isaacs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne's Director Eric Isaacs talks about the laboratory's efforts for creating new, clean energy solutions.

Eric ISaacs

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Energy solutions—Director Eric Isaacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne's Director Eric Isaacs talks about the laboratory's efforts for creating new, clean energy solutions.

Eric ISaacs

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Project Work Plan: Sequestration of Strontium-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of an Apatite Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to develop an infiltration strategy that defines the precipitation rate of an apatite-forming solution and Sr-90 sequestration processes under variably saturated (low water content) conditions. We will develop this understanding through small-scale column studies, intermediate-scale two-dimensional (2-D) experiments, and numerical modeling to quantify individual and coupled processes associated with apatite formation and Sr-90 transport during and after infiltration of the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution. Development of capabilities to simulate these coupled biogeochemical processes during both injection and infiltration will be used to determine the most cost-effective means to emplace an in situ apatite barrier with a longevity of 300 years to permanently sequester Sr-90 until it decays. Biogeochemical processes that will be investigated are citrate biodegradation and apatite precipitation rates at varying water contents as a function of water content. Coupled processes that will be investigated include the influence of apatite precipitation (which occupies pore space) on the hydraulic and transport properties of the porous media during infiltration.

Szecsody, Jim E.

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effective Collaboration and Consistency Management in Business Process Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective Collaboration and Consistency Management in Business Process Modeling Co-Chairs: Moises they are lost. Business Process Modeling (BPM) is a promising approach to enable agility in business process of experts. Business analysts gather requirements and create high-level process models. Solution architects

Czarnecki, Krzysztof

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Extracting alcohols from aqueous solutions. [USDOE patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The objective is to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols in aqueous solutions into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. This is done by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5-18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is then mixed with one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers to extract the alcohol into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

1981-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

382

Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

REST-Style Architecture and the Development of Mobile Health Care Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describes the motivations and technical solutions chosen to build a REST API that can be easily integrated, RHIO, Lab Results, CCD, HL7, REST API, Web Services, JAX-RS, Security, Software Development Process. 1REST-Style Architecture and the Development of Mobile Health Care Solutions François Andry1 Daren

Andry, François

384

Hydropyrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fissile solution dynamics: Student research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

Hetrick, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

Reategui, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radiation-induced accumulation of carboxylic acids in solution of tributyl phosphate in dodecane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of the molecular composition and concentrations of carboxylic acids formed upon irradiation of the system 30% TBP in dodecane-3 M HNO{sub 3}. Based on these data, a model solution of carboxylic acids in dodecane has been formulated and compared with the irradiated solution in the interfacial tension on the organic phase-alkaline solution interface. Coefficients of carboxylic acid distribution between TBP in dodecane and aqueous solutions of HNO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3} have been determined.

Bykov, G.L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Process for electrochemically gasifying coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is claimed for electrochemically gasifying coal by establishing a flowing stream of coal particulate slurry, electrolyte and electrode members through a transverse magnetic field that has sufficient strength to polarize the electrode members, thereby causing them to operate in combination with the electrolyte to electrochemically reduce the coal particulate in the slurry. Such electrochemical reduction of the coal produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide at opposite ends of the polarized electrode members. Gas collection means are operated in conjunction with the process to collect the evolved gases as they rise from the slurry and electrolyte solution. 7 figs.

Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.

1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

Heyd, R. [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, University of Orleans and CNRS, rue de la Férollerie 1B, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)] [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, University of Orleans and CNRS, rue de la Férollerie 1B, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Rampino, A. [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, University of Orleans and CNRS, rue de la Férollerie 1B, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France) [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, University of Orleans and CNRS, rue de la Férollerie 1B, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Laboratory of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Trieste, Via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Bellich, B.; Elisei, E. [Laboratory of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Trieste, Via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy)] [Laboratory of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Trieste, Via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Cesàro, A. [Laboratory of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Trieste, Via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy) [Laboratory of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Trieste, Via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Saboungi, M.-L. [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, University of Orleans and CNRS, rue de la Férollerie 1B, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France) [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, University of Orleans and CNRS, rue de la Férollerie 1B, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux, et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), Sorbonne Univ-UPMC, Univ Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, IRD UMR 206, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and amercium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N.N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU`s to gather with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU`s and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Process for separation and preconcentration of radium from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preconcentrating and separating radium from a contaminated solution containing at least water and radium includes the steps of adding a quantity of a water-soluble macrocyclic polyether to the contaminated solution to form a combined solution. An acid is added to the combined solution to form an acidic combined solution having an [H{sup +}] concentration of about 0.5M. The acidic combined solution is contacted with a sulfonic acid-based strong acid cation exchange medium or a organophilic sulfonic acid medium having a plurality of binding sites thereon to bind the radium thereto and to form a radium-depleted solution. The radium-depleted solution is separated from the strong acid cation exchange medium or organophilic sulfonic acid medium. The radium remaining bound to the exchange medium or organophilic reagent is then stripped from the exchange medium or organophilic medium and the activity of the radium is measured. 24 figs.

Dietz, M.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Bartsch, R.A.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment.

Rudisill, T.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hoffmann-Infeld Black Hole Solutions in Lovelock Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five-dimensional black holes are studied in Lovelock gravity coupled to Hoffmann-Infeld non-linear electrodynamics. It is shown that some of these solutions present a double peak behavior of the temperature as a function of the horizon radius. This feature implies that the evaporation process, though drastic for a period, leads to an eternal black hole remnant. Moreover, the form of the caloric curve corresponds to the existence of a plateau in the evaporation rate, which implies that black holes of intermediate scales turn out to be unstable. The geometrical aspects, such as the absence of conical singularity, the structure of horizons, etc. are also discussed. In particular, solutions that are asymptotically AdS arise for special choices of the parameters, corresponding to charged solutions of five-dimensional Chern-Simons gravity.

Matias Aiello; Rafael Ferraro; Gaston Giribet

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

Separation and concentration of lower alcohols from dilute aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing, from a dilute aqueous solution of a lower (C.sub.1 -C.sub.5) alcohol, a concentrated liquid solution of the alcohol in an aromatic organic solvent is disclosed. Most of the water is removed from the dilute aqueous solution of alcohol by chilling sufficiently to form ice crystals. Simultaneously, the remaining liquid is extracted at substantially the same low temperature with a liquid organic solvent that is substantially immiscible in aqueous liquids and has an affinity for the alcohol at that temperature, causing the alcohol to transfer to the organic phase. After separating the organic liquid from the ice crystals, the organic liquid can be distilled to enrich the concentration of alcohol therein. Ethanol so separated from water and concentrated in an organic solvent such as toluene is useful as an anti-knock additive for gasoline.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA); Eakin, David E. (Kennewick, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Exact Solution of a Field Theory Model of Frontal Photopolymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) provides a versatile method for the rapid fabrication of solid polymer network materials by exposing photosensitive molecules to light. Dimensional control of structures created by this process is crucial in applications ranging from microfluidics and coatings to dentistry, and the availability of a predictive mathematical model of FPP is needed to achieve this control. Previous work has relied on numerical solutions of the governing kinetic equations in validating the model against experiments because of the intractability of the governing nonlinear equations. The present paper provides exact solutions to these equations in the general case in which the optical attenuation decreases (photobleaching) or increases (photodarkening) with photopolymerization. These exact solutions are of mathematical and physical interest because they support traveling waves of polymerization that propagate logarithmically or linearly in time, depending on the evolution of optical attenuation of the photopolymerized material.

James A. Warren; Joao T. Cabral; Jack F. Douglas

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

Das, Rhiju

403

Adsorption analysis of ammonia in an aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis is carried out to determine the effects of the diffusional resistance on the rate of the adsorption of ammonia in an aqueous solution. A performance prediction model is developed to calculate the local rate of heat and mass transfer, including physical and thermodynamic property calculations of the mixture. An algorithm is developed for calculating the interfacial conditions. The local heat- and mass-transfer calculation is then incorporated into the performance prediction method for adsorption for a given geometry.

Arman, B.; Panchal, C.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A reverse osmosis treatment process for produced water: optimization, process control, and renewable energy application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources (wind and solar) are analyzed as potential power sources for the process, and an overview of reverse osmosis membrane fouling is presented. A computer model of the process was created using a dynamic simulator, Aspen Dynamics, to determine energy...

Mareth, Brett

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

Aerosols generated by spills of viscous solutions and slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop methods for estimating source terms from these accidents. Experiments were run by spilling viscous solutions and slurries to determine the mass and particle-size distribution of the material made airborne. In all cases, 1 L of solution was spilled from a height of 3 m. Aqueous solutions of sucrose (0 to 56%) gave a range of viscosities from 1.3 to 46 cp. The percent of spill mass made airborne from the spills of these solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0.0001. The mass of particles made airborne decreased as solution viscosity increased. Slurry loading ranged from 25 to 51% total solids. The maximum source airborne (0.0046 wt %) occurred with the slurry that had the lightest loading of soluble solids. The viscosity of the carrying solution also had an impact on the source term from spilling slurries. The effect of surface tension on the source term was examined in two experiments. Surface tension was halved in these spills by adding a surfactant. The maximum weight percent airborne from these spills was 0.0045, compared to 0.003 for spills with twice the surface tension. The aerodynamic mass medium diameters for the aerosols produced by spills of the viscous solutions, slurries, and low surface tension liquids ranged from 0.6 to 8.4 ..mu..m, and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.8 to 28.0.

Ballinger, M Y; Hodgson, W H

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Production via a Novel Low Pressure, Magnetically Stabilized, Non-Volatile Iron Oxide Looping Process Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy...

407

Exact solution for quantum dynamics of a periodically-driven two-level-system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a family of exact analytic solutions for non-linear quantum dynamics of a two-level system (TLS) subject to a periodic-in-time external field. In constructing the exactly solvable models, we use a "reverse engineering" approach where the form of external perturbation is chosen to preserve an integrability constraint, which yields a single non-linear differential equation for the ac-field. A solution to this equation is expressed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions with three independent parameters that allows one to choose the frequency, average value, and amplitude of the time-dependent field at will. This form of the ac-drive is especially relevant to the problem of dynamics of TLS charge defects that cause dielectric losses in superconducting qubits. We apply our exact results to analyze non-linear dielectric response of such TLSs and show that the position of the resonance peak in the spectrum of the relevant correlation function is determined by the quantum-mechanical phase accumulated by the TLS wave-function over a time evolution cycle. It is shown that in the non-linear regime, this resonance frequency may be shifted strongly from the value predicted by the canonical TLS model. We also analyze the "spin" survival probability in the regime of strong external drive and recover a coherent destruction of tunneling phenomenon within our family of exact solutions, which manifests itself as a strong suppression of "spin-flip" processes and suggests that such non-linear dynamics in LC-resonators may lead to lower losses.

Anirban Gangopadhyay; Maxim Dzero; Victor Galitski

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lithium-aluminum-carbonate-hydroxide hydrate coatings on aluminum alloys: Composition, structure, and processing bath chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new corrosion resistant coating, being designed for possible replacement of chromate conversion coatings on aluminum alloys, was investigated for composition, structure, and solubility using a variety of techniques. The stoichiometry of the material, prepared by immersion of 1100 Al alloy into a lithium carbonate-lithium hydroxide solution, was approximately Li{sub 2}Al{sub 4}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 12}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O. Processing time was shown to be dependent upon the bath pH, and consistent coating formation required supersaturation of the coating bath with aluminum. The exact crystal structure of this hydrotalcite material, hexagonal or monoclinic, was not determined. It was shown that both the bulk material and coatings with the same nominal composition and crystal structure could be formed by precipitation from an aluminum supersatured solution of lithium carbonate. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

Drewien, C.A.; Eatough, M.O.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Buchheit, R.G. [Materials and Process Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Parameter estimation of quantum processes using convex optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A convex optimization based method is proposed for quantum process tomography, in the case of known channel model structure, but unknown channel parameters. The main idea is to select an affine parametrization of the Choi matrix as a set of optimization variables, and formulate a semidefinite programming problem with a least squares objective function. Possible convex relations between the optimization variables are also taken into account to improve the estimation. Simulation case studies show, that the proposed method can significantly increase the accuracy of the parameter estimation, if the channel model structure is known. Beside the convex part, the determination of the channel parameters from the optimization variables is a nonconvex step in general. In the case of Pauli channels however, the method reduces to a purely convex optimization problem, allowing to obtain a globally optimal solution.

Gábor Balló; Katalin M. Hangos

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Polymer Field-Theory Simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first CUDA graphics-processing-unit (GPU) implementation of the polymer field-theoretic simulation framework for determining fully fluctuating expectation values of equilibrium properties for periodic and select aperiodic polymer systems. Our implementation is suitable both for self-consistent field theory (mean-field) solutions of the field equations, and for fully fluctuating simulations using the complex Langevin approach. Running on NVIDIA Tesla T20 series GPUs, we find double-precision speedups of up to 30x compared to single-core serial calculations on a recent reference CPU, while single-precision calculations proceed up to 60x faster than those on the single CPU core. Due to intensive communications overhead, an MPI implementation running on 64 CPU cores remains two times slower than a single GPU.

Kris T. Delaney; Glenn H. Fredrickson

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

Bradley, W.H. [General Motors, Warren, MI (United States). Service Technology Group

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

413

Oligomerization process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Etherification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Singlet exciton fission in solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics 135, 214508 (2011). 25. Sheraw, C. D., Jackson, T. N., Eaton, D. L. & Anthony, J. E. Functionalized Pentacene Active Layer Organic Thin-Film Transistors. Advanced Materials 15, 2009–2011 (2003). 26. Giri, G. et al. Tuning charge transport... in solution-sheared organic semiconductors using lattice strain. Nature 480, 504–8 (2011). 27. Gundlach, D. J. et al. Contact-induced crystallinity for high-performance soluble acene-based transistors and circuits. Nature Materials 7, 216–21 (2008). 28...

Walker, Brian J.; Musser, Andrew J.; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H.

2013-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy SecondWellsWinsRules HelpSolutions Require

417

Soy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland, Illinois:5717551°Farms LtdLLC JumpSouthwoodSoy Solutions

418

2015 Midwest Energy Solutions | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2015 Midwest Energy Solutions 2015 Midwest Energy Solutions January 28, 2015 9:00AM EST to January 30, 2015 5:00PM EST Chicago, Illinois Learn more....

419

Correction-solution partielle des Feuilles 1 8 Exercice 1.1 : Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIA3 Correction-solution partielle des Feuilles 1 à 8 Exercice 1.1 : Solutions : Df = R+ Dg = Rn 5

Mas, André

420

The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I{sub 2} solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I{sub 2} leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I{sub 2}, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass.

Gates, D.D.; Chao, K.K.; Cameron, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The solution combustion synthesis of nanophosphors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanophosphors are defined as nano-sized (1-100mn), insulating, inorganic materials that emit light under particle or electromagnetic excitation. Their unique luminescence properties provide an excellent potential for applications in radiation detection and imaging. Herein, solution combustion synthesis (SCS) is presented as a method to prepare nanophosphor powders, while X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), and other techniques were used to characterize their structural and optical properties. The goal of this work is to synthesize bright, high-quality powders of nanophosphors, consolidate them into bulk materials and study their structural and optical properties using XRD, TEM, PL, and PLE. SCS is of interest because it is a robust, inexpensive, and facile technique, which yields a significant amount of a wide variety of oxide materials, in a short amount of time. Several practical nanophosphors were synthesized and investigated in this work, including simple oxides such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, complex oxides such as Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn, and Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce. Results demonstrate that altering the processing parameters such as water content of the precursor solution, ignition temperature, fuel type and amount, and post-synthesis annealing can significantly improve light output, and that it is possible to optimize the luminescence output of oxyorthosilicates by reducing the amount of silica in the precursor mixture.

Tornga, Stephanie C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The inverse problems of wing panel manufacture processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that inverse problems of steady-state creep bending of plates in both the geometrically linear and nonlinear formulations can be represented in a variational formulation. Steady-state values of the obtained functionals corresponding to the solutions of the problems of inelastic deformation and springback are determined by applying a finite element procedure to the functionals. Optimal laws of creep deformation are formulated using the criterion of minimizing damage in the functionals of the inverse problems. The formulated problems are reduced to the problems solved by the finite element method using MSC.Marc software. Currently, forming of light metals poses tremendous challenges due to their low ductility at room temperature and their unusual deformation characteristics at hot-cold work: strong asymmetry between tensile and compressive behavior, and a very pronounced anisotropy. We used the constitutive models of steady-state creep of initially transverse isotropy structural materials the kind of the stress state has influence. The paper gives basics of the developed computer-aided system of design, modeling, and electronic simulation targeting the processes of manufacture of wing integral panels. The modeling results can be used to calculate the die tooling, determine the panel processibility, and control panel rejection in the course of forming.

Oleinikov, A. I., E-mail: a.i.oleinikov@mail.ru [Komsomolsk-on-Amur State Technical University, Lenina prospect 27, Komsomolsk-on-Amur, 681013, Russian Federation, and Institute of Machinery and Metallurgy Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Metallurgov Street 1, Komsomolsk-on-Am (Russian Federation); Bormotin, K. S., E-mail: cvmi@knastu.ru [Komsomolsk-on-Amur State Technical University, Lenina prospect 27, Komsomolsk-on-Amur, 681013, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Entropy evolution law in a laser process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the first time, we obtain the entropy variation law in a laser process after finding the Kraus operator of the master equation describing the laser process with the use of the entangled state representation. The behavior of entropy is determined by the competition of the gain and damping in the laser process. The photon number evolution formula is also obtained.

Jun-hua Chen; Hong-yi Fan

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Determination of CMPO using HPLC -UV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) is an extractant proposed for selective separation of radionuclide metals from used nuclear fuel solutions using solvent extraction. Radiolysis reactions can degrade CMPO and reduce separation performance and hence methods for measuring concentration of CMPO and identifying degradation products are needed. A novel high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method employing ultraviolet detection (UV) was developed to detect and quantitate CMPO in dodecane. Some radiolysis products in gamma and alpha irradiated CMPO solutions were identified using HPLC/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Validation data indicated that the HPLC-UV method for CMPO determination provided good linearity, sensitivity, procedure accuracy and system precision. CMPO-nitric acid complexes were also identified, that account for the apparent loss of CMPO in acidic environment, independent of irradiation.

Gracy Elias; Gary S. Groenewold; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

429

Internship -Fall 2011 Search Solutions Digital Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship - Fall 2011 Search Solutions Digital Media SSdigitalmedia.com About us: Search Solutions Search Solutions Digital Media 1500 N. Stephenson HWY Royal Oak, MI 48067 Amanda are a full service digital advertising agency. We build custom web packages to meet our clients' exact needs

Cinabro, David

430

Process for preparing energetic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA; , Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Swansiger, Rosalind W. (Livermore, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Techniques for determining physical zones of influence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques for analyzing flow of a quantity in a given domain are provided. In one aspect, a method for modeling regions in a domain affected by a flow of a quantity is provided which includes the following steps. A physical representation of the domain is provided. A grid that contains a plurality of grid-points in the domain is created. Sources are identified in the domain. Given a vector field that defines a direction of flow of the quantity within the domain, a boundary value problem is defined for each of one or more of the sources identified in the domain. Each of the boundary value problems is solved numerically to obtain a solution for the boundary value problems at each of the grid-points. The boundary problem solutions are post-processed to model the regions affected by the flow of the quantity on the physical representation of the domain.

Hamann, Hendrik F; Lopez-Marrero, Vanessa

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Moving from software to solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like other industries, oil and gas companies are looking to computer-aided technologies to contribute to their bottom line. The question is, what can and should software vendors offer the oil and gas industry for them to achieve this goal? In order to answer this, the paper looks at the enablers of change that today's geoscience software vendors can exploit to meet these challenges, as well as at the future role of software vendors. The era of computer-aided exploration tools has somewhat changed. The oil and gas industry's concerns for cost-effectiveness demand a more holistic approach--geoscience software and services that optimize the reservoir's full life cycle. Recent advances in computing technologies and geoscience justify the oil and gas industry's expectations that software vendors deliver next-generation reservoir management solutions.

Weiss, E.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Process for desulfurizing petroleum feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for upgrading an oil feedstock includes reacting the oil feedstock with a quantity of an alkali metal, wherein the reaction produces solid materials and liquid materials. The solid materials are separated from the liquid materials. The solid materials may be washed and heat treated by heating the materials to a temperature above 400.degree. C. The heat treating occurs in an atmosphere that has low oxygen and water content. Once heat treated, the solid materials are added to a solution comprising a polar solvent, where sulfide, hydrogen sulfide or polysulfide anions dissolve. The solution comprising polar solvent is then added to an electrolytic cell, which during operation, produces alkali metal and sulfur.

Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

Recovery process for electroless plating baths  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

Anderson, Roger W. (Farragut, TN); Neff, Wayne A. (Knoxville, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Recovery process for electroless plating baths  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Refractive indexes of aqueous LiBr solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the refractive indexes of water-lithium bromide solutions were measured in the temperature range from 5.0 to 80.0 {degrees}C and in the range of salt concentrations from 0.00 (deionized water) to 58.90 mass %. An electrolyte solution of LlBr in water was chosen for study because of its wide use as an absorption chiller fluid. The concentration of LlBr aqueous solution was determined by argentimetric titration using tetrabromofluoresceln (Eosin) as an adsorption indicator and was checked at a few discrete concentrations (10.06, 20.30, and 58.90 mass % LlBr) against the values obtained by gravimetric analysis. The deviation between values obtained using these two techniques was found to be less than 0.27 mass %. The refractive indexes are shown to represent a reliable and convenient way of measuring the concentration of salt (or water) in LlBr solutions with accuracies of {plus minus}0.3 mass % salt.

Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R. (Energy Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV– Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV–Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will ex examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the UV-Visible spectroscopy studies. The use of TRLFS to examine Cm and U will provide data to evaluate lifetime, peak location, and peak ratios (mainly for U). The bases for the spectroscopic techniques have been investigated, providing fundamental evidence for the application’s utility.

Czerwinski, Kenneth

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

In-line measurement of plutonium and americium in mixed solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solution assay instrument (SAI) has been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and installed in the plutonium purification and americium recovery process area in the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. The instrument is designed for accurate, timely, and simultaneous nondestructive analysis of plutonium and americium in process solutions that have a wide range of concentrations and Am/Pu ratios. For a 25-mL sample, the assay precision is < 1%, both for plutonium and for americium having concentrations >5 g/L within a 2000-s count time.

Li, T.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Extended Fokker Planck model: properties and solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the current paper Fokker Planck model of random walks has been extended to non conservative cases characterized by explicit dependence of diffusion and energy on time. A given generalization allows describing of such non equilibrium processes as Levy flights in a classical differential form without use of fractal PDE. Besides it takes into account mixing properties that are obligatory for a certain class of chaotic systems such as Kolmogorov K system. It was shown that an abnormal transport is a consequence of the equilibrium distortion and not stationary diffusion. The particular case of fixed boundaries was considered. According to the received solutions it was shown that a system structure can resist a weak disturbance in the vicinity of the discrete regimes, defined by a system scale and its nonlinear properties. These regimes correspond to the exponential increase of quasi regular structure fluctuations. Only fast disruption of regime is possible for other states of the system. It leads to an immediate transition to the chaos.

Sergey Kamenshchikov

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Gender determination in populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt at the eutectic composition (58 mol% LiCl, 42 mol% KCl), which is used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. The same process being used for EBRII fuel is currently being studied for widespread international implementation. The methods will focus on first-principles and first- principles derived interatomic potential based simulations, primarily using molecular dynamics. Results will be validated against existing literature and parallel ongoing experimental efforts. The simulation results will be of value for interpreting experimental results, validating analytical models, and for optimizing waste separation by potentially developing new salt configurations and operating conditions.

Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Controlling microstructure of nanocrystalline thermoelectrics through powder processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bismuth Telluride and its solid solutions are currently front running thermoelectric materials because of their high figure of merit. When processed via mechanical alloying to obtain nanocrystalline structures, their ...

Humphry-Baker, Samuel A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Technology Transfer of Computational Intelligence for Manufacturing Process Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer of Computational Intelligence for Manufacturing Process Control Alice E. Smith applications is a large and uncertain step. This paper focuses on the technology transfer issues and solutions

Smith, Alice E.

448

Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vital SCADA and Process Control Networks (PCNs). These systems are now under risk of attack from a variety of threats. One commonly suggested security solution is to isolate the...

449

Optimal segmentation and packaging process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for improving packaging efficiency uses three dimensional, computer simulated models with various optimization algorithms to determine the optimal segmentation process and packaging configurations based on constraints including container limitations. The present invention is applied to a process for decontaminating, decommissioning (D&D), and remediating a nuclear facility involving the segmentation and packaging of contaminated items in waste containers in order to minimize the number of cuts, maximize packaging density, and reduce worker radiation exposure. A three-dimensional, computer simulated, facility model of the contaminated items are created. The contaminated items are differentiated. The optimal location, orientation and sequence of the segmentation and packaging of the contaminated items is determined using the simulated model, the algorithms, and various constraints including container limitations. The cut locations and orientations are transposed to the simulated model. The contaminated items are actually segmented and packaged. The segmentation and packaging may be simulated beforehand. In addition, the contaminated items may be cataloged and recorded.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meservey, Richard H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Landon, Mark D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Differential Wiener process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Processes Will Penny Stochastic Differential Equations Wiener process Sample Paths OU Process Stochastic Chain Rule Change of variables Time-varying functions Multivariate SDE Expectations Wiener Process OU Process Neural Population Fitzhugh Nagumo Gaussian approximation FN Population Fokker

Penny, Will

451

Determinants of Meme Popularity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online social media have greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what are the fundamental mechanisms driving dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior and analytically show, using techniques from mathematical population genetics, that competition between memes for the limited resource of user attention leads to a type of self-organized criticality, with heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity: a few memes "go viral" but the majority become only moderately popular. The time-dependent solutions of the model are shown to fit empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, and to predict novel scaling features of the data. The presented framework, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

Gleeson, James P; Baños, Raquel A; Moreno, Yamir

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Mineralogical characterization of steel industry hazardous waste and refractory sulfide ores for zinc and gold recovery processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steel industry generates dust as a waste product from high temperature electric arc furnaces (EAF), which is a major step in processing scrap metal into steel. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified EAF dust as KO61 hazardous waste, due to its lead, cadmium, and chromium content. The dust also contains valuable zinc, averaging 19%. Detailed mineralogical characterization show the zinc is present as crystals of franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite solid solutions in calcium-iron-silicate glass spheres and as zincite mostly as very small individual spheres. Much of the chromium is present in an insoluble form in solid solution in the iron spinels. This microscopic research is a valuable tool in determining treatment processes for the 600,000 tons of dust generated annually in the US. Refractory gold ores, pyrite and arsenopyrite, have been studied to determine additional, cost-effective methods of processing. One technique under investigation involves roasting sulfide mineral particles to hematite to create porosity through which a leach can permeate to recover the gold. Portlandite, Ca(OH)[sub 2], is added to the roast for retention of hazardous sulfur and arsenic. Modern microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, such electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and electron microprobe, have been applied, as well as reflected light and dark field microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to determine the mineralogy of the sulfur, arsenic, and iron phases, and the extent of porosity, permeability, and oxidation state of the ore particles at various roasting temperatures. It is concluded that mineralogical techniques can be effectively applied to the solution of environmental problems.

Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Geology Geophysics Dept.)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Toxicity of the cryoprotectants glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, methanol, sucrose, trehalose and hypersaline solutions to the embryos and nauplii of some penaeid shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Osmolalities of solutions (fig. 1) were determined using a Wescor vapour pressure osmometer. An Orion Research model 231 pH/mV/temperature meter was used to determine pH of solutions (fig. 2). Filtered and pooled water samples (3 replicates) from petri...

Robertson, Stephen Michael

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Determination of americium and curium by isotope dilution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a method for the determination of americium and curium in solutions of spent fuels from water cooled and moderated reactors that is based on isotope dilution with Am 241 and Cm 244 combined with extraction chromatography of americium and curium and alpha spectroscopy of the labels.

Yablochkin, A.V.; Krapivin, M.I.; Fedotov, S.N.; Yudina, V.G.; Yakobson, A.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

3D Hydrogels Substrate Rationale Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization Swelling, Mechanical Evaluation Matrix Production qPCR, Histology (Day 7, 21) Poly(Ethylene glycol Orthopedics for her help in processing histology samples. FECs Viability/Cytotoxicity Matrix Production Day7Day21 Cell Pellet 5'000'000 cell/mL Polymer solution · PEGDM · PBS · Photoinitiator Mold 10 min UV

Dalang, Robert C.

456

Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

Datta, Rathin (Chicago, IL); Randhava, Sarabjit S. (Evanston, IL); Tsai, Shih-Perng (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Mathematical models of hydraulic fracture · Scaling and special solutions for 1-2D models · Numerical modeling for 2-3D problems

Peirce, Anthony

458

Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

459

X-ray Studies of Regenerated Cellulose Fibers Wet Spun from Cotton Linter Pulp in NaOH/Thiourea Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerated cellulose fibers were fabricated by dissolution of cotton linter pulp in NaOH (9.5 wt%) and thiourea (4.5 wt%) aqueous solution followed by wet-spinning and multi-roller drawing. The multi-roller drawing process involved three stages: coagulation (I), coagulation (II) and post-treatment (III). The crystalline structure and morphology of regenerated cellulose fiber was investigated by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Results indicated that only the cellulose II crystal structure was found in regenerated cellulose fibers, proving that the cellulose crystals were completely transformed from cellulose I to II structure during spinning from NaOH/thiourea aqueous solution. The crystallinity, orientation and crystal size at each stage were determined from the WAXD analysis. Drawing of cellulose fibers in the coagulation (II) bath (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O) was found to generate higher orientation and crystallinity than drawing in the post-treatment (III). Although the post-treatment process also increased crystal orientation, it led to a decrease in crystallinity with notable reduction in the anisotropic fraction. Compared with commercial rayon fibers fabricated by the viscose process, the regenerated cellulose fibers exhibited higher crystallinity but lower crystal orientation. SAXS results revealed a clear scattering maximum along the meridian direction in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the formation of lamellar structure during spinning.

Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Fang, D.; Ruan, D.; Zhang, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determined the total equilibrium metal solubility ([Fe2+ ]T and [Mg2+ ]T) in 20­90 wt % sulfuric acidSolubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper solutions over the temperature range 200­300 K. We have measured solubilities using samples of MgSO4, FeSO4Á

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination solution processable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New knotted solutions of Maxwell's equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note we have further developed the study of topologically non-trivial solutions of vacuum electrodynamics. We have discovered a novel method of generating such solutions by applying conformal transformations with complex parameters on known solutions expressed in terms of Bateman's variables. This has enabled us to get a wide class of solutions from the basic configuration like constant electromagnetic fields and plane-waves. We have introduced a covariant formulation of the Bateman's construction and discussed the conserved charges associated with the conformal group as well as a set of four types of conserved helicities. We have also given a formulation in terms of quaternions. This led to a simple map between the electromagnetic knotted and linked solutions into flat connections of $SU(2)$ gauge theory. We have computed the corresponding CS charge in a class of solutions and it takes integer values.

Hoyos, Carlos; Sonnenschein, Jacob

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Markov Process of Muscle Motors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a Markov random process describing a muscle molecular motor behavior. Every motor is either bound up with a thin filament or unbound. In the bound state the motor creates a force proportional to its displacement from the neutral position. In both states the motor spend an exponential time depending on the state. The thin filament moves at its velocity proportional to average of all displacements of all motors. We assume that the time which a motor stays at the bound state does not depend on its displacement. Then one can find an exact solution of a non-linear equation appearing in the limit of infinite number of the motors.

Yu. Kondratiev; E. Pechersky; S. Pirogov

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

ISOPAR L RELEASE RATES FROM SALTSTONE USING SIMULATED SALT SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour, the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed, and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the maximum concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS to assure 25% of the lower flammable limit is not exceeded has been determined to be about 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released versus time can be treated as a percentage of initial amount present; there was no statistically significant dependence of the release rate on the initial concentration. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release rate is larger than at lower temperatures. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few hours or days had a significant effect on the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released. Short scoping tests at 95 C with solvent containing all components (Isopar{reg_sign} L, suppressor trioctylamine (TOA), and modifier Cs-7SB) except the BOBCalixC6 extractant released less Isopar{reg_sign} L than the tests run with Isopar{reg_sign} L/TOA. Based on these scoping tests, the Isopar{reg_sign} L releases reported herein are conservative. Isopar{reg_sign} L release was studied for a two-month period and average cumulative release rates were determined from three sets of tests each at 95 and 75 C and at ambient conditions. The overall average releases at were estimated for each temperature. For the 95 and 75 C data, at a 5% significance level, the hypothesis that the three test sets at each temperature had the same average percent release can be rejected, suggesting that there was a statistically significant difference among the three averages seen in the three experimental tests conducted. An upper confidence limit on the mean percent release required incorporation of variation from two sources: test-to-test variation as well as the variation within a test. An analysis of variance that relies on a random effects model was used to estimate the two variance components. The test-to-test variance and the within test (or residual) variance were both calculated. There is no indication of a statistically significant linear correlation between the percent Isopar{reg_sign} L release and the Isopar{reg_sign} L initial concentration. From the analysis of variance, upper confidence limits at confidences of 80-95% were calculated for the data at 95 and 75 C. The mean Isopar{reg_sign} L percent releases were 67.33% and 13.17% at 95 and 75 C, respectively.

Zamecnik, J; Michael Bronikowski, M; Alex Cozzi, A; Russell Eibling, R; Charles Nash, C

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Robinson-Trautman solution with scalar hair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit Robinson-Trautman solution with minimally coupled free scalar field is derived and analyzed. It is shown that this solution contains curvature singularity which is initially naked but later the horizon envelopes it. We use quasilocal horizon definition and prove its existence in later retarded times using sub- and supersolution method combined with growth estimates. We show that the solution is generally of algebraic type II but reduces to type D in spherical symmetry.

T. Tahamtan; O. Svitek

2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Robinson-Trautman solution with scalar hair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit Robinson-Trautman solution with minimally coupled free scalar field is derived and analyzed. It is shown that this solution contains curvature singularity which is initially naked but later the horizon envelopes it. We use quasilocal horizon definition and prove its existence in later retarded times using sub- and supersolution method combined with growth estimates. We show that the solution is generally of algebraic type II but reduces to type D in spherical symmetry.

Tahamtan, T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Solutions to a Reduced PoissonNernstPlanck System and Determination of Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

linearized. Others are assumed to be reactive, meaning that their concentrations vanish when in contact to the underlying re- duced PNP system, and calculate the reaction rate for the reactive species. We give a rigorous dependence of the reaction rates of the reactive species on the magnitude of its far field concentration

Li, Bo

467

A graphical method for determining electrical conductivity of ionic solutions by direct current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ce AND D. C, HEASURENENTS IH PHASE I FOR VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF Pb(N03)2 AT 30 C Normality R K AC K DC k (ohms) (ob%1 ow ) (os% N& ) (0% ) 1, 0000 0. 5000 0. 2000 0. 1000 23t 5 31, 8 52. 4 86. 7 0. 0752 0. 0541 0. 0305 0. 0167 0. 0757 0... ~ ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 32 7. R ~ vs Current Data for Varions Oonoentratione of Ph(803)2 sell Solntione at 30 C Phase I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 33 8. Graphical Data for Varioas Conoentrations of Pb(803)2 at 0 30 c PhaN I...

Simpson, Harold Navayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

ECE 174 Homework # 5 Solutions FALL 2011 1. The MLE, xMLE, is determined as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A A = 1 2 1 + 1 2 2 , which is invertible (as we already knew since A has full column rank). Continuing = m i=1 t2 i m i=1 t2 i = . (c) Var {(m)} = 2 (AT A)-1 = 2 m i=1 t2 i 0 as m . 1 In advanced case the loss function is (x) = 1 2 (y - h(x))2 . Also the gradient of (x) is just the derivative of (x

Wang, Deli

469

Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: G4S Government Solutions, Inc. - Wackenhut Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDearTechnical InformationAugustsummer electricAviation

470

AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy Feedstocks—From Field to Fuel AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation Glenn Farris, Marketing Manager Biomass, AGCO Corporation

471

Engineered Solutions: Order (2010-CE-2112)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued an Order after entering into a Compromise Agreement with Engineered Solutions, Inc. to resolve a case involving the failure to certify dehumidifier basic model SD109.

472

Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Engineered Solutions, Inc. failed to certify a dehumidifier as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

473

Black Hole Solutions in $R^2$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find static spherically symmetric solutions of scale invariant $R^2$ gravity. The latter has been shown to be equivalent to General Relativity with a positive cosmological constant and a scalar mode. Therefore, one expects that solutions of the $R^2$ theory will be identical to that of Einstein theory. Indeed, we find that the solutions of $R^2$ gravity are in one-to-one correspondence with solutions of General Relativity in the case of non-vanishing Ricci scalar. However, scalar-flat $R=0$ solutions are global minima of the $R^2$ action and they cannot in general be mapped to solutions of the Einstein theory. As we will discuss, the $R=0$ solutions arise in Einstein gravity as solutions in the tensionless, strong coupling limit $M_P\\rightarrow 0$. As a further result, there is no corresponding Birkhoff theorem and the Schwarzschild black hole is by no means unique in this framework. In fact, $R^2$ gravity has a rich structure of vacuum static spherically symmetric solutions partially uncovered here. We al...

Kehagias, Alex; Lust, Dieter; Riotto, Antonio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Optimization Online - Solution Analysis for the Pseudomonotone ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 18, 2014 ... Solution Analysis for the Pseudomonotone Second-order Cone Linear Complementarity Problem. Yang Wei Hong(whyang ***at*** ...

Yang Wei Hong

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

475

NFWF Environmental Solutions for Communities Grant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wells Fargo and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) are accepting applications for approximately $2.5 million in Environmental Solutions for Communities grants.

476

El Paso Electric Company- Residential Solutions Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program funding has been expended in Texas for 2012. New funding will be available January 1, 2013. '''

477

Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust of Oregon offers a variety of incentives and services through their Home Energy Solutions program. All equipment eligible for incentives needs to meet the efficiency requirements...

478

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations HIAR-ORP-2011-10-26 This Independent Activity...

479

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

480

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offers the Energy Right Solutions Program for commercial and industrial facilities. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen...

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481

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

482

Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluation Meeting ace066yilmaz2013o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty...

483

Time-dependent analytic solutions of quasi-steady shocks with cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present time-dependent analytical solutions of quasi-steady shocks with cooling, where quasi-steady shocks are objects composed of truncated steady-state models of shocks at any intermediate time. I compare these solutions to simulations with a hydrodynamical code and finally discuss quasi-steady shocks as approximations to time-dependent shocks. Large departure of both the adiabatic and steady-state approximations from the quasi-steady solution emphasise the importance of the cooling history in determining the trajectory of a shock.

P. Lesaffre

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

484

New framework for studying spherically symmetric static solutions in f(R) gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a new covariant formalism to treat spherically symmetric spacetimes in metric f(R) theories of gravity. Using this formalism we derive the general equations for a static and spherically symmetric metric in a general f(R) gravity. These equations are used to determine the conditions for which the Schwarzschild metric is the only vacuum solution with vanishing Ricci scalar. We also show that our general framework provides a clear way of showing that the Schwarzschild solution is not a unique static spherically symmetric solution, providing some insight into how the current form of Birkhoff's theorem breaks down for these theories.

Nzioki, Anne Marie; Goswami, Rituparno [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Carloni, Sante [Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Dunsby, Peter K. S. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

486

Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today's rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation is for instance reflected in the term 'zero emission systems'. The concept of zero emissions can be app