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1

Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1 - Simulations of beneficial use  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ashamended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Mae Sexauer Gustin; Jody Ericksen; George C. Fernandez [University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States). Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study  

SciTech Connect

Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R. [Rutgers Centre, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

TSNo s02-staats173645-P Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TSNo s02-staats173645-P Title Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils. abstract Increased poultry production has contributed to excess nutrient (i.e., phosphorus (P)) problems in Atlantic Coastal Plain soils due to land application of poultry litter and manure

Sparks, Donald L.

4

Interactions between organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers modify phosphate sorption processes in an acid soil  

SciTech Connect

To determine how organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers interact to modify P sorption processes, three phosphate fertilizers were applied to lignite- and compost-amended acid soil and incubated for either 3 or 26 days. The fertilizers applied were potassium dihydrogen phosphate, triple superphosphate, and diammonium phosphate (DAP). After 3 days of incubation, sorption of all three P sources was decreased in the lignite-amended treatments, whereas P sorption was increased in the compost-amended treatments. Increased incubation time (26 days) resulted in significantly decreased P sorption when DAP was added to lignite-amended treatments. Addition of triple superphosphate increased P sorption in lignite- and compost-amended treatments and decreased solution pH compared with DAP application. In addition to the effect of P source, differences in P sorption between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were driven by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment and fertilizer addition also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. It is proposed that the combination of lignite and DAP may contribute to decreased P sorption in acid soils, with the positive effects likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

Sckefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Disposition of Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12/08/2008)

6

NEPA Determination: LM-08-12 Amendment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grazing Agreement Amendment, Acid Pond, Spook, WyomingCX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 09/12/2012Location(s): Spook, WYOffices(s): Legacy Management 

7

Midea: Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012-SE-1402) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012-SE-1402) Midea: Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012-SE-1402) November 26, 2012 DOE issued an Amended Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. finding that basic model HD-146F, a refrigerator-freezer, and basic model HS-390C, a freezer, do not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the products were noncompliant based on the company's own testing. Midea must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom Midea distributed the noncompliant products that the product does not meet Federal standards. In addition, Midea must provide to DOE documents and records showing the number of units Midea distributed

8

Characterization of Biochars Produced from Cornstovers for Soil Amendment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through cation exchange capacity assay, nitrogen adsorption-desorption surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopic imaging, infrared spectra and elemental analyses, we characterized biochar materials produced from cornstover under two different pyrolysis conditions, fast pyrolysis at 450 C and gasification at 700 C. Our experimental results showed that the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the fastpyrolytic char is about twice as high as that of the gasification char as well as that of a standard soil sample. The CEC values correlate well with the increase in the ratios of the oxygen atoms to the carbon atoms (O:C ratios) in the biochar materials. The higher O:C ratio was consistent with the presence of more hydroxyl, carboxylate, and carbonyl groups in the fast pyrolysis char. These results show how control of biomass pyrolysis conditions can improve biochar properties for soil amendment and carbon sequestration. Since the CEC of the fast-pyrolytic cornstover char can be about double that of a standard soil sample, this type of biochar products would be suitable for improvement of soil properties such as CEC, and at the same time, can serve as a carbon sequestration agent.

Lee, Dr. James W [Johns Hopkins University; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; Evans, Barbara [ORNL; Buchanan III, A C [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Paik, Sok W [ORNL; Brown, Dr. Robert C. [Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W. [University of Florida, Homestead, FL (United States). Center for Tropical Research & Education

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Reconciling Apparent Variability in Effects of Biochar Amendment on Soil Enzyme Activities by Assay Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying biochar to soils as an ameliorative substance and mechanism for C sequestration has received a great deal of interest in light of the sustained fertility observed in the Terra Preta soils of Brazil. The effects of synthetic biochars on biochemical processes needs to be better understood in order to determine if this is a reasonable practice in managed systems. The biochar studied was formed from the fast-pyrolysis of a switchgrass feedstock. Four soil enzymes were studied: ?-glucosidase, ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase. Both colorimetric and fluorescent assays were used for ?-glucosidase and ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Seven days after biochar was added to microcosms of a Palouse silt loam, the fluorescence-based assays indicated increased activities of the four enzymes, compared to non-amended soil. To clarify the mechanisms of the observed effects,in the absence of soil, purified enzymes or substrates were briefly exposed to biochar and then assayed. Except for ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase, the exposure of substrate to biochar reduced the apparent activity of the remaining three enzymes in vitro, suggesting that sorption reactions between the substrate and biochar either removed the substrate from the assays or impeded the enzyme binding. The activity of purified ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase increased significantly following biochar exposure, suggesting a chemical stimulation of enzyme functioning. We conclude that biochar added to soil acts as a substrate that can stimulate the soil microbial biomass and its activity. Our in vitro study suggests that biochar is not biochemically inert. Biochar amendments are likely to have effects that are currently difficult to predict, and that could impact overall soil function.

Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Smith, Jeffery L.; Bolton, Harvey

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

AMENDED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

x x 1 AMENDED CLASS 1 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ATTACHMENT SEPTEMBER 1, 2010 RAINIER BIOGAS LLC COMMUNITY ANAEROBIC MANURE DIGESTER 2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION Applicant's Name: Rainier Biogas LLC 20206 436 th St. Enumclaw, WA 98022 Project Title, Size, or Capacity: Anaerobic Digester to be located in Enumclaw, WA. Project Number/Case Number: 125029042 Location: The Rainier Biogas LLC site will be situated on property located at 43218 208 th Ave. SE, Enumclaw, WA 98022 Legal Description: Located on a tract of land identified as parcel ID 202006-9001 Project Description: This project is located in a rural area serving rural residents. It is a proposal to construct a farm based anaerobic digester for processing dairy manure

13

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

Menon, M.P.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation of Cu and Pb Bioavailability from Compost Amended Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Land application of biosolid or industrial compost raises concerns regarding heavy metal accumulation in soils, plants and free-ranging livestock. A strip-split plot design evaluated two… (more)

Cooper, Alicia M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and potentially cover a broader range of habitats.

Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mixtures of a Coal Combustion By-Product and Composted Yard Wastes for Use as Soil Substitutes and Amendments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, the physical and chemical properties of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) can be conducive to plant growth. As one means of increasing use rates, EPRI and several utilities have studied CCBP applications as a soil amendment and soil substitute when mixed with varying proportions of yard waste compost, sand, and soil. This report presents the results of green-house studies on the use of CCBP mixtures in growing shrubs, trees, and ground cover plants.

1996-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil. Technical terminal report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area at SRS, and disposal at WIPP, approximately 500 kg of surplus, non-pit plutonium. DOE finds that the analysis in the Interim Management of Nuclear Material EIS and the SRS Waste Management EIS are still representative of the impacts of disposal of these materials. Therefore, no adverse environmental impacts would result from disposal of these materials as TRU waste to WIPP and this action is clearly an allowable interim action in accordance with DOE regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

TSNo s02-peak104427-P Direct Determination of Phosphate Species in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TSNo s02-peak104427-P Title Direct Determination of Phosphate Species in Alum-Amended Poultry been fully addressed. We used XANES spectroscopy at the P k edge to directly determine the speciation

Sparks, Donald L.

23

Evaluation of Different Soil Carbon Determination Methods  

SciTech Connect

Determining soil carbon (C) with high precision is an essential requisite for the success of the terrestrial C sequestration program. The informed choice of management practices for different terrestrial ecosystems rests upon accurately measuring the potential for C sequestration. Numerous methods are available for assessing soil C. Chemical analysis of field-collected samples using a dry combustion method is regarded as the standard method. However, conventional sampling of soil and their subsequent chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, these methods are not sufficiently sensitive to identify small changes over time in response to alterations inmanagement practices or changes in land use. Presently, several different in situ analytic methods are being developed purportedly offering increased accuracy, precision and cost-effectiveness over traditional ex situ methods. We consider that, at this stage, a comparative discussion of different soil C determination methods will improve the understanding needed to develop a standard protocol.

Chatterjee, Dr Amitava [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr R [Ohio State University; Wielopolski, Dr L [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Ebinger, Dr Michael H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nitrogen availability and leaching from soil amended with municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beneficial use of municipal solid waste compost depends on identifying a management strategy that supports crop production and protects water quality. Effects of compost and N fertilizer management strategies on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching were evaluated in a 3-yr study on a Hubbard loamy sand soil. Two composts were each applied at either 90 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} from 1993 to 1995, or at 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} in one application in 1993. The compost and non-amended plots were side dressed annually with N fertilizer as urea at 0, 125, and 250 kg ha{sup {minus}1}. Biochemical properties of the compost as well as compost management strongly affected crop response and fate of N. Compost increased grain yield with no significant yield response to N fertilizer with the single compost application in Year 1 and the annual compost application in Year 3. Plant N uptake increased with N fertilizer rate, except in the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost treatments in Year 1. Over the 3-yr period, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching with the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost application was 1.8 times greater compared to that with the annual application. The estimated N mineralization ranged from 0 to 12% and 3 to 6% in the annual and single compost addition, respectively. Under the conditions of this study, annual compost application with reduced supplemental N fertilizer was the best management strategy to reach optimum crop yield while minimizing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching losses.

Mamo, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Halbach, T.R.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral nutrients imported in composted dairy manure (CDM) and municipal biosolid (CMB) amendments for highway-rights-of-way and urban landscapes can pose a threat to surface water quality. Treatments were developed to evaluate recommendations for amending roadside and urban soils with compost at large volumebased rates. Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) recommendations were evaluated in 2002 and 2003. Municipal recommendations were evaluated in 2004. Treatments were imposed on 4 by 1.5-m field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003, a 12.5% CMT treatment was substituted for the GUC, and two contrasting composts were compared. In 2002, soil test phosphorus (STP) concentrations (mg kg-1) were 291, 360, 410, and 1921 mg kg-1 in the 0 to 5-cm layer of a course textured CMT, fine textured CMT, GUC, and ECC treatments, respectively using CDM. In 2003, STP concentrations were 264, 439, 496,623, 1115, and 2203 mg kg-1, in the 0 to 5-cm layer after incorporation of CDM and CMB at the 12.5 and 25% volume-based rates, and topdressing the 5-cm CDM- or CMB-woodchip mix over bare soil, respectively. In 2004, contrasting CMB products, relatively low or high in total phosphorus (TP) were incorporated into the soil at 12.5 and 25% by volume, or imported in transplanted sod at the 25% by volume rate. The STP concentrations were 87, 147, 180, 301, 322, and 544 mg kg-1, respective to the previously defined treatments. Runoff water from 14, 10, and 8 natural rain events was used to characterize nutrient and sediment transport in 2002, 2003, and 2004, respectively. Concentration of TDP in runoff water was highly variable for roadside treatments across rain events. Mass losses of TDP were similar after CDM or CMB were incorporated into the soil at 12.5 and 25% by volume. Compost incorporation was the most effective method for limiting TP loss in runoff. Roadway and urban soils are expected to contribute greater TP losses as P concentration increases in soils.

Hansen, Nels Edward

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Utilizing Animal Waste Amendments to Impaired Rangeland Soils to Reduce Runoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composted biological wastes contain vital plant nutrients that assist in plant growth as well as contain organic matter that promotes good soil conditions; both aid in rangeland restoration. Most importantly, it has the potential to restore water availability through increased infiltration and reduced runoff. In this thesis, local sources of composted dairy manure are utilized for application onto the degraded Fort Hood Western Training Grounds in central Texas in hopes to restore the rangeland for continued military training. Small scale rainfall simulations are applied two and eight months post-application of seven different agronomic rates of composted waste treatment (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 y^3/acre) in order to determine changes in infiltration rates. July 2004 rainfall simulations, two months post application, indicate that composted wastes have not had sufficient time to incorporate into the soil matrix. Percent organic matter of the parent soil is the only significant variable of impact on maximum infiltration capacity. Composted waste treatments are concluded to have no effect on infiltration rates for any of the application rates in the summer rainfall simulations and are observed to exhibit very high variability in the amount of infiltration by a plot. January 2005 rainfall simulations, eight months post waste application, are observed to continue the trend of high variability across all treatment application rates. This variability is attributed to masking any potential effects from the treatment applications. Overall, this high natural variability disables the detection of potential effects of waste application treatments leading to the conclusion that composted waste applications do not affect infiltration on the Fort Hood Western Training Grounds. Runoff nutrient analysis observed nitrate-N to be well below Texas drinking water standards for all plots and phosphate to be above non-standardized values known to cause problematic algal growth. Natural rainfall events at intensities needed to generate runoff observed in this study are rare; therefore, nutrient pollution concern for local water bodies is low.

Thomas, Diana M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Growth and elemental accumulation of plants grown in acidic soil amended with coal fly ash-sewage sludge co-compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and heavy-metal accumulation of Brassica chinensis and Agropyron elongatum in 10 and 25% ash-sludge co-compost (ASC)-amended loamy acidic soil (pH 4.51) at two different application rates: 20% and 40% (v/v). Soil pH increased, whereas electrical conductivity decreased with the amendment of ASC to soil. Bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn contents of ASC-amended soil decreased, whereas Ni, Pb, and B contents increased. Concentrations of bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn in sludge compost (SC)-amended soils were 5.57, 20.8, and 8.19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. These concentrations were significantly lower than those in soil receiving an application rate of 20 or 25% ASC as 2.64, 8.48, and 5.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals and B contents of the composting mass significantly increased with an increase in ASC application rate from 20 to 40% (6.2 to 16.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 10% ASC- and 9.4 to 18.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 25% ASC-amended soil. However, when the ash content in co-compost increased from 10 to 25% during composting, bioavailable heavy-metal contents decreased. However, B contents increased with an increase in ash content. Addition of co-composts increased the dry-weight yield of the plants, and this increase was more obvious as the ash amendment rate in the co-composts and the ASC application rate increased. In case of B. chinensis, the biomass of 2.84 g/plant for 40% application of 25% ASC was significantly higher than SC (0.352 g/plant), which was 40% application of 10% ASC (0.434 g/plant) treatments. However, in A. elongatum, the differences between biomass of plants grown with 10% (1.34-1.94 g/ plant) and 25% ASC (2.12-2.21 g/plant) were not significantly different. ASC was favorable in increasing the growth of B. chinensis and A. elongatum. The optimal ash amendment to the sludge composting and ASC application rates were at 25 and 20%, respectively.

Wong, J.W.C.; Selvam, A. [Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

A STUDY OF THE FERTILITY AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF RICE SOIL WITH RESPECT TO THE APPLICATION OF BIOCHAR AND SELECTED AMENDMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was carried out to assess the effect of biochar on the carbon dynamics of wetland rice soils and on the growth and grain yield of rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). Pot experiments were conducted with amendments of chemical and organic origins in addition to woodderived biochar. Maximum soil carbon storage was observed with biochar compared to organic amendments such as composts and chemical fertilizer. Major soil carbon sequestration parameters like soil organic carbon (SOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were found to be greater with biochar. Aggregate formation was also significant under biochar trials. Considerable reduction in greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission, especially carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), was observed with biochar. Applications of biochar considerably influenced the growth profile and grain yield of the rice plants compared to other amendments. Hence, these results suggest that biochar of appropriate applied proportion can influence wetland rice soil carbon dynamics and has the potential to combat global warming without compromising productivity. The role of biochar as a green viable carbon negation option is supported by the study since the results showed a positive response towards soil and vegetation carbon Corresponding author:

Shanthi Prabhav; Renuka R; Sreekanth N. P; Babu Padmakumar; A. P Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area at SRS, and disposal at WIPP, approximately 500 kg of surplus, non-pit plutonium. DOE finds that the analysis in the Interim Management of Nuclear Material EIS and the SRS Waste Management EIS are still representative of the impacts of disposal of these materials. Therefore, no adverse environmental impacts would result from disposal of these materials as TRU waste to WIPP and this action is clearly an allowable interim action in accordance with DOE regulations for implementing NEPA. EIS-0283-S2-Amended_IAD-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

30

Characterization of Soil Amended with the By-Product of Corn Stover Fermentation  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is a potential biofuel; however, removing this stover from the land may increase the risk of erosion and reduce soil organic matter.

Johnson,J.M.F; Reicosky, D; Sharratt, M; Lindstrom,M; Voorhees, W; Carpenter-Boggs,L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioresources are generated in a variety of environments and each presents unique risks and benefits associated with land application. Bioresources from livestock, urban and bioenergy systems were selected and evaluated through field, greenhouse and laboratory studies of potential risk and benefits of recycling to agricultural and urban landscapes. The waste stream, including feedstock sources and treatment processes, affects composition and properties of bioresources and effects on biogeochemical cycles of amended soils. Variation of decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates among bioresources used to amend soil for turfgrass and forage reflected variation among contrasting feedstock sources and treatments prior to application. During turfgrass establishment, plant available nitrogen and nitrogen mineralized from a bioresource from livestock waste streams, (Geotube! residual solids, supplied N in excess of crop uptake potential and contributed to leaching loss of N. In contrast, N mineralization rates from bioresources generated during methane production from dairy manure (manure solids) were not sufficient to maximize crop production, necessitating N fertilizer application. In addition to variation of composition, bioresource effects on crop productivity and environmental quality vary among management practices and between forage and turfgrass cropping systems. Large application rates of bioresources increase soil nutrient concentration and potential crop productivity, but contribute to increased nutrient loss in drainage and surface runoff. Yet, incorporation or Alum treatment of bioresources will reduce runoff loss of dissolved P and protect water quality without sacrificing crop productivity. Alum treatment of bioresources prior to land application effectively reduced runoff loss of dissolved P to levels observed for control soil. For situations in which large, volume-based bioresource rates are top-dressed or incorporated, export of applied nutrients environmental impacts were compared between forage and turfgrass systems. Starting during the initial year of production, annual export of applied N and P in Tifway bermudagrass sod was greater than export through forage harvests of Tifton 85. Low forage yield limited N and P export from Tifton 85 during the year of establishment, but increased forage yield during the second year increased export of manure N and P to levels more comparable to sod. As variation between compost sources, turfgrass and forage production systems, and application methods indicated, effective management of bioresources is necessary to balance benefits and risk in cropping systems. Integrated assessment of bioresource composition and crop-specific management of application method and rate will enable sustainable bioresource cycling and crop productivity.

Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Amendment 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 PROJECT NAME & LOCATION DesignBuild Subcontract for the Research Support Facility Golden, CO The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth...

33

RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

Maxwell, S.

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Impacts of Historical Land Use on Soil Nitrogen Cycles in Falmouth, MA and the Threat of Chronic N Amendment Demonstrated at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amendment Demonstrated at the Harvard Forest LTER, Petersham, MA Brook Brouwer1 Advisor: Christopher Neill2, in Petersham, MA. At each site I measured: pH, C:N ratios, extractable inorganic nitrogen pools, net N Amendment Demonstrated at the Harvard Forest LTER, Petersham, MA" Brook Brouwer Introduction

Vallino, Joseph J.

35

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Compost Application Practices for Revegetating Disturbed Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Urban development alters the physical and chemical properties of soil which presents challenges for vegetation establishment. Compost, when applied as a soil amendment, can help… (more)

Dunifon, Shea Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Announcing Amended Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amended records are those methods with changes published after the official printing date of September 1st, 2011 Announcing Amended Methods Official Methods and Recommended Practices of the AOCS (Methods) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists

38

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

39

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil: Progress report, 1 June 1988--15 March 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first progress report that is submitted to the US Department of Energy on the research performed during the first year of the project which started on June 1, 1988. This project for coal fly ash research was approved to study the chemical composition of fly ashes collected from several coal-powered power plants located in Savannah River Plant (SRP) facilities and explore the possibility of utilizing the fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for vegetation. The schedule for the first year of the project includes the construction of a greenhouse, analysis of fly ash samples, preparation of compost, planting the seeds for and harvesting the fall-winter plants, analysis of the winter plant materials and potting the spring-summer plants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Menon, M.P.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proposed Technical Specification Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter provides the final revised Technical Specification (TS) pages for the subject proposed TS amendment. In Reference 1 Duke Energy requested an amendment to the Catawba Nuclear Station Facility Operating Licenses and Technical Specifications (TS). The proposed amendment revises various TS that are affected by the revised heatup, cooldown, critically, and inservice test pressure and temperature (P/T) limits for the reactor coolant system (RCS) of each unit. The proposed amendment also revised the TS requirements for the low temperature overpressure protection (LTOP) system for each unit. www. duke-energy. corn

D. M. Jamil; Duke Power

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Standard test method for radiochemical determination of uranium isotopes in soil by alpha spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of alpha-emitting uranium isotopes in soil. This test method describes one acceptable approach to the determination of uranium isotopes in soil. 1.2 The test method is designed to analyze 10 g of soil; however, the sample size may be varied to 50 g depending on the activity level. This test method may not be able to completely dissolve all forms of uranium in the soil matrix. Studies have indicated that the use of hydrofluoric acid to dissolve soil has resulted in lower values than results using total dissolution by fusion. 1.3 The lower limit of detection is dependent on count time, sample size, detector, background, and tracer yield. The chemical yield averaged 78 % in a single laboratory evaluation, and 66 % in an interlaboratory collaborative study. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ass...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

In situ determination of soil carbon pool by inelastic neutron scattering: Comparison with dry combustion  

SciTech Connect

There is a well-documented need for new in situ technologies for elemental analysis of soil, particularly for carbon (C), that overcome the limitations of the currently established chemical method by dry combustion (DC). In this work, we evaluated the concordance between the new INS (inelastic neutron scattering) technology and the DC method. The comparisons were carried out in the high C content (30-40%) organic soils of Willard, Ohio (4 sites), in natural forest in Willard, Ohio (1 site), and in a watershed pasture, with an {approx} 10{sup o} slope, in Coshocton, Ohio (5 sites). In addition to these stationary measurements, the organic soil and the pasture were continuously scanned with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system to obtain the transects mean C value. Both types of measurements, INS and DC, registered a decline in the surface density of C along transects in the watershed and in the organic soil. Similarly, both recorded a drop in C in the organic soil of about 0.16%. In the pastureland, declines in C levels of 0.08% and 0.10% were observed, respectively, by DC and INS. Combining the results from the three sites yielded a very satisfactory correlation between the INS- and DC-responses, with a regression coefficient, r{sup 2}, value of about 0.99. This suggests the possibility of establishing a universal regression line for various soil types. In addition, we demonstrated the ability of INS to measure the mean value over transect. In organic soil the mean value of an INS scan agreed, {approx} 0.5%, with the mean values of the DC analysis, whereas large discrepancy between these two was recorded in the pastureland. Overall, the various trends observed in C measurements by INS concurred with those determined by the DC method, so enhancing the confidence in the new INS technology.

Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Lal, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Formation and emission of methane in rice soils: Experimental determination and modeling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rice paddy soils have been identified as a major source of methane emissions contributing to the observed atmospheric increase in methane. This points to the need for a method of quantifying and predicting methane emissions for the widely varying conditions used in rice agriculture throughout the world. In the present work, a mathematical model for estimating the emission of methane from rice paddy soils is developed and refined. Kinetic parameters for methanogenesis in a Louisiana rice soil are determined from laboratory data on methane production from acetic acid substrate. Use of a stirred reactor allows simultaneous measurement of acetate consumption and methane production while minimizing mass transfer limitations. An existing model for rice plant growth is utilized to provide data on the availability of root exudates as a carbon source for the methanogens. The final methane model includes the kinetic parameters, plant data, and estimated transport parameters. With adjustments in these parameters, it provides an acceptable match to field data.

Law, V.J.; Bhattacharya, S.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Determination of Natural Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Swipe Samples Utilizing Yttrium/Beryllium Ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1. Objective: A method to determine whether beryllium (Be) components in surface swipe samples are from a natural source is needed. 2. Methods: Soil samples and surface swipes from area facilities were analyzed for marker elements to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be). To be useful, the natural marker element must be present at reasonably consistent levels across the site, must correlate with the Be concentration, and not have the potential to be present from non-natural sources. 3. Results: The research on marker elements used to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be) concentrations demonstrates a clear correlation between Be and yttrium (Y) in natural soils on the Nevada National Security Site. The Y/Be ratio is proposed as a method to characterize the source of Be in soil and surface swipe samples and to aid in recommendations for follow up actions. Swipe samples are analyzed using an ICP/MS method and compared with results from soil samples. Natural soil constituent levels and the Y/Be Ratio range is determined for the occupied and historical facilities and surrounding areas. Y/Be ratios within the statistical range established indicate the Be is from a natural source. Y/Be ratios lower than this range indicate the presence of another Be source, and may then be correlated to alloy, ceramic, or other operational sources by the ratios of copper, nickel, cobalt, uranium, and/or niobium. Example case studies of evaluations of buildings with historical operational beryllium usage, current ongoing technical processes, and heavy equipment used in large building demolitions are included demonstrating the value of the ratio approach. 4. Conclusions: This differentiation is valuable as there is no known correlation between natural beryllium in soil and beryllium disease.

None

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C . K W O N * Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory,...

47

Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

Ghezzehei, T.A.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Determining uranium speciation in contaminated soils by molecular spectroscopic methods: Examples from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s former uranium production facility located at Fernald, OH (18 mi NW of Cincinnati) is the host site for an Integrated Demonstration for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. A wide variety of source terms for uranium contamination have been identified reflecting the diversity of operations at the facility. Most of the uranium contamination is contained in the top {approximately}1/2 m of soil, but uranium has been found in perched waters indicating substantial migration. In support of the development of remediation technologies and risk assessment, we are conducting uranium speciation studies on untreated and treated soils using molecular spectroscopies. Untreated soils from five discrete sites have been analyzed. We have found that {approximately}80--90% of the uranium exists as hexavalent UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} species even though many source terms consisted of tetravalent uranium species such as UO{sub 2}. Much of the uranium exists as microcrystalline precipitates (secondary minerals). There is also clear evidence for variations in uranium species from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale. However, similarities in speciation at sites having different source terms suggest that soil and groundwater chemistry may be as important as source term in defining the uranium speciation in these soils. Characterization of treated soils has focused on materials from two sites that have undergone leaching using conventional extractants (e.g., carbonate, citrate) or novel chelators such as Tiron. Redox reagents have also been used to facilitate the leaching process. Three different classes of treated soils have been identified based on the speciation of uranium remaining in the soils. In general, the effective treatments decrease the total uranium while increasing the ratio of U(IV) to U(VI) species.

Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Plutonium Consolidation Amended ROD  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6450-01-P] 6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Record of Decision: Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Amended Record of Decision SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511 additional 3013-compliant packages 1 containing surplus non-pit weapons-usable plutonium metals and oxides to the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Approximately 2,300 containers will be transferred from the Hanford Site (Hanford) near

50

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Environmental assessment for amendments to 10 CFR Part 835  

SciTech Connect

This proposed amendment will modify the scope of 10 CFR 835 to explicitly exclude the transportation of radioactive material conducted in conformance with the Department of Transportation regulations, certain activities conducted on foreign soil, add standards for area posting and sealed radioactive source control, and add a removable surface radioactivity value for tritium.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Determination of the toxicity characteristic for metals in soil: A comparison of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and total metal determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made of the concentrations of metals extracted from soils using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a total determination method. This information is of interest in two ways. First, it is hoped that a relationship might be established between the amount of each metal determined after extraction by the TCLP and the amount determined using a total determination method. And second, data are also presented which indicate the general extractability of various metals in soil samples using the TCLP. This study looks specifically at inorganic elements (Sb, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Mg, Hg, Se, Ag, Sn, and Zn) in soils from a firing range. Results show that total determination methods for metals can not generally be used for heterogeneous samples, such as soil samples from a firing range. Some correlation between a total determination method and TCLP was observed when Ba and Cd were present in the samples at lower concentrations (less than 80 mg/kg for Ba and less than 25 mg/kg for Cd); however, additional data are necessary to verify this correlation.

Bass, D.A.; Taylor, J.D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Comparison of Laboratory and Field Methods for Determining the Quasi-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to atmospheric air. The soil sealing process decreases thesealing process begins, the hydraulic pressure drops below the airair is discharged from the soils; during the third stage, the hydraulic conductivity decreases to minimum values due to sealing

Faybishenko, Boris

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Sampling – Soil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

56

Continuous wave acoustic method for determination of moisture content in agricultural soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work deals with the problem of measuring moisture content in agricultural soil by means of an on-site, easy to use and real-time acoustic wave system. The method is based on the propagation of an acoustic continuous wave (CW) with frequencies below ... Keywords: Continuous wave, Irrigation monitoring and control, Soil moisture measurement, Sound propagation in soil, Speed of sound, Texture of soil, Transit time

R. K. Sharma; A. K. Gupta

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

CX-000896: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

896: Categorical Exclusion Determination 896: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000896: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Enhanced Soil Remediation "Track 2" CX(s) Applied: B3.8 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Evaluation of the long-term effectiveness of enhanced soil remediation with mixed amendments using geochemical parameters and numerical modeling under field conditions "Track 2" Under the proposed research we will investigate the ability of amendment mixtures including phosphates, organoclay, and cross-linked biopolymers to treat metals under field conditions. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000896.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000560: Categorical Exclusion Determination

58

Rule 10 CFR 835 and Amendments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Radiological Control Coordinating Committee Health and Safety HSS Logo Rule 10 CFR 835 and Amendments 4132011 amendment and complete text of 10 CFR 835 (Word) and...

59

Draft Mission Plan Amendment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has prepared this document to report plans for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, whose mission is to manage and dispose of the nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and of workers and the quality of the environment. The Congress established this program through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Specifically, the Congress directed us to isolate these wastes in geologic repositories constructed in suitable rock formations deep beneath the surface of the earth. In the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the Congress mandated that only one repository was to be developed at present and that only the Yucca Mountain candidate site in Nevada was to be characterized at this time. The Amendments Act also authorized the construction of a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. After a reassessment in 1989, the Secretary of Energy restructured the program, focusing the repository effort scientific evaluations of the Yucca Mountain candidate site, deciding to proceed with the development of an MRS facility, and strengthening the management of the program. 48 refs., 32 figs.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Determination of streamflow sequences for ungaged subbasins using soil and water assessment tool (SWAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Allocation of the highly variable water resources of a ics. river basin to competing water users is a major concern throughout the world, particularly in regions where demands exceed supplies. Water availability determining the unappropriated flow and availability models, such as Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP), require capabilities models could effectively be used for allocating the water to the users. Water for determining the water availability to water users at engaged as well as gaged locations. According to the present approach followed in water availability modeling, if a water right is in an engaged site, the water availability to that right is assumed to be the measured flow obtained from the downstream gaged site. The overall goal of this research was to evaluate hydrologic modeling capabilities for distributing naturalized streamflows from gaged locations to engaged water right locations. Naturalized streamflow represents the natural hydrology without the effects of upstream reservoirs and diversions. Naturalized streamflows are the historical gaged streamflow data adjusted to remove the impacts of reservoir construction, water use, and other human activities. The watershed selected for the study was the San Jacinto River Basin. The latitudes and longitudes of the stream gaging stations and the water right locations were obtained from TNRCC database. The subbasins were delineated for the control points and the water right locations. The subbasin raster layers were used as base maps for extracting the input data for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. The flows at each location were determined using SWAT model. The predictive ability of three methods', (1) Drainage area ratio method, (2) SWAT prediction, and (3) Regression approach, were compared. The Regression approach was found to be a better method over other methods. Hence, the regression relations were obtained between the predicted flows at the gaged locations and the predicted flows at the engaged water right locations. The streamflow sequences for the engaged water right locations were predicted using the regression relations for the period 1940-1980 from the naturalized flow values of the gaged locations.

Raju, Balasubramaniam

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Determining Soil Moisture from Geosynchronous Satellite Infrared Data: A Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the absence of a current capability for global routine daily soil moisture observation, an infrared technique using existing instrumentation is sought. Numerical modeling results are reported from a pilot study, the purpose of which was to ...

Peter J. Wetzel; David Atlas; Robert H. Woodward

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Field Application of a Rapid Spectrophotometric Method for Determination of Persulfate in Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils can be performed both in situ and ex situ using chemical oxidants such as sodium persulfate. Standard methods for quantifying persulfate require either centrifugation or prolonged settling times. An optimized soil extraction procedure was developed for persulfate involving simple water extraction using a modified disposable syringe. This allows considerable saving of time and removes the need for centrifugation. The extraction time was reduced to only 5 min compared to 15 min for the standard approach. A comparison of the two approaches demonstrated that each provides comparable results. Comparisons were made using high (93 g kg 21 soil) and low (9.3 g kg 21 soil) additions of sodium persulfate to a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, as well as sand spiked with diesel. Recoveries of 9561 % and 96610 % were observed with the higher application rate in the contaminated soil and spiked sand, respectively. Corresponding recoveries of 8665 % and 117619 % were measured for the lower application rate. Results were obtained in only 25 min and the method is well suited to batch analyses. In addition, it is suitable for application in a small field laboratory or even a mobile, vehicle-based system, as it requires minimal equipment and reagents.

Colin J. Cunningham; Vanessa Pitschi; Peter Anderson; D. A. Barry; Colin Patterson; Tanya A. Peshkur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Soil sterilization and organic carbon, but not microbial inoculants, change microbial communities in replanted peach orchards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bromide fumigation; above, compost spread down the row priorpeach trees i n February 2001. Compost and native soil werein two of the three compost-amended treatments. Composted

Drenovsky, Rebecca E.; Duncan, Roger A.; Scow, Kate M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal or ground-source heat pump (GHP) has been shown to be a very efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. GHPs exchange (reject or extract) heat with the earth by way of circulating water, rather than by use of circulating outdoor air, as with an air-source heat pump. The temperature of water entering a GHP is generally cooler than that of outdoor air when space cooling is required, and warmer than that of outdoor air when space heating is required. Consequently, the temperature lift across a GHP is less than the lift across an air-source heat pump. The lower temperature lift leads to greater efficiency, higher capacity at extreme outdoor air temperatures, and better indoor humidity control. These benefits are achieved, however, at the cost of installing a ground heat exchanger. In general, this cost is proportional to length of the heat exchanger, and for this reason there is an incentive to install the minimum possible length such that design criteria are met. The design of a ground heat exchanger for a GHP system requires, at a minimum, the operating characteristics of the heat pumps, estimates of annual and peak block loads for the building, and information about the properties of the heat exchanger: the size of the U-tubes, the grouting material, etc. The design also requires some knowledge of the thermal properties of the soil, namely thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and undisturbed soil temperature. In the case of a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) these properties generally vary with depth; therefore, in the design, effective or average thermal properties over the length of the borehole are usually sought. When the cost of doing so can be justified, these properties are measured in an in situ experiment: a test well is drilled to a depth on the same order as the expected depth of the heat pump heat exchangers; a U-tube heat exchanger is inserted and the borehole is grouted according to applicable state and local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short-term variations in heat input. Also, since the model is accurate even for short times, there is no n

Shonder, J.A.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

66

AMENDMENT OF SOUCITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., slroet, county, Stete and ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

67

Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amendment for New Reactors Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors The following document is a contract amendment to a standard contract between the United States of America,...

68

The jamming surface of granular matter determined from soil mechanics results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical soil mechanics results are used to propose the equation of the jamming transition surface in the (stress, specific volume) space. Taking axis-ymmetric conditions, labelling q the deviatoric stress and p' the mean pressure applied on the granular skeleton, and considering normal range of pressure (10 kPa-10MPa) the equation of the surface of jamming transition is v = vo-m ln(p'/p'o)+ md ln(1+q q/(M' M' p' p')); M' is related to the friction angle, m and md are two constants which depend on soil characteristics; p'o is a "unit" pressure.

P. Evesque

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Amended Silicated for Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly ash is sold as a by-product.

James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Determining effective soil formation thermal properties from field data using a parameter estimation technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one-dimensional thermal model is derived to describe the temperature field around a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) for a geothermal heat pump. The inlet and outlet pipe flows are modeled as one, and an effective heat capacity is added to model the heat storage in the fluid and pipes. Parameter estimation techniques are then used to estimate various parameters associated with the model, including the thermal conductivity of the soil and of the grout which fills the borehole and surrounds the u-tube. The model is validated using test data from an experimental rig containing sand with known thermal conductivity. The estimates of the sand thermal conductivity derived from the model are found to be in good agreement with independent measurements.

Shonder, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beck, J.V. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Atrazine in Contaminated Soils Using Dairy-Manure Biochar Xinde Cao,*, Lena Ma, Yuan Liang, Bin Gao, Florida 32611 bS Supporting Information ' INTRODUCTION Biochar is increasingly receiving attention, and crop residues have been used for biochar production.1 Biochar is produced as a soil amendment

Russo, Bernard

73

Development of a screened cathode gas flow proportional counter for in situ field determination of alpha contamination in soil  

SciTech Connect

This study resulted in the design, construction and testing of a gas flow proportional counter for in-situ determination of soil contamination. The uniqueness of this detector is the screened material used for the cathode. A Pu-239 source of 0.006 {micro}Ci was mounted to the outside of the cathode to simulate radioactive soil. The detector probe was placed into a laboratory mock-up and tested to determine operating voltage, efficiency and energy resolution. Two gas flow proportional counters were built and tested. The detectors are cylindrical, each with a radius of 1.905 cm, having an anode wire with a radius of 0.0038 cm. The length of the smaller detector`s anode was 2.54 cm, and the length of the larger detector`s anode was 7.64 cm. Therefore, the active volumes were 28.96 cm{sup 3} and 87.10 cm{sup 3}, respectively, for the small and large detector. An operating voltage of 1,975 volts was determined to be sufficient for both detectors. The average efficiency was 2.59 {+-} 0.12% and 76.71 {+-} 10.81% for the small volume and large volume detectors, respectively. The average energy resolution for the low-energy peak of the small detector was 4.24 {+-} 1.28% and for the large-energy peak was 1.37 {+-} 0.66%. The large detectors` energy resolution was 17.75 {+-} 3.74%. The smaller detector, with better energy resolution, exhibited a bi-modal spectrum, whereas the larger detector`s spectrum centered around a single broad peak.

Bush, S.P.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

INTERACTIONS AMONG PHOSPHATE AMENDMENTS, MICROBES AND URANIUM MOBILITY IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for long-term environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of four phosphate amendments and two microbial amendments on U availability. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of the untreated U-contaminated sediment showed that U was closely associated with Mn. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentration more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31% respectively. Uranium sorption in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of microbes. However, increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to reduction of phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract from U amended sediment was 437 {micro}g/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved sediment), the extractable U concentration was only 103 {micro}g/kg. When the autoclaved amended sediment was treated with autoclaved biological apatite, U concentration in the 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract was {approx}0 {micro}g/kg. Together these tests suggest that microbes may enhance U leaching and reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

Knox, A

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

PAGE OF PAGES PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 . REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO NO . 5 PROJECT NO. (II applicable) 213 6. ISSUED BY CODE 07/ 01 / 2010 05008 7. ADMINISTERED BY (llolherlhan lIem 6) 1 CODE 105008 NNSA/ Oakridge Site Office U.S. Department of Energy NNSA / Y-12 Site Office P.O . Box 2050 Building 9704-2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* streel. counly. Slale and ZIP Code) NNSA/Oakridge Site Office U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Y-12 Site Office P .O . Box 2050 Building 9704-2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (X) SA. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. -- ABC OCK & WILCOX TECHNI CAL ttn: WILLIE J. WILS ON o BOX 2 009 B A P SERVICES Y-12, LLC SB . DATED (SEE/TEM 11)

77

CX-005962: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-005962: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sacajawea Substation ? Ice Harbor Dam Fiber Project (Amended) CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05192011 Location(s):...

78

CX-002153: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

determination amends the original determination for this award as an additional biomass crop (energy cane; Saccharum officinarum) has been proposed for the project as an expansion...

79

DE-SOL-0005195/Amendment 000005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please refer to Solicitation DE-SOL-0005195 Amendment 000002, Attachment 2000002 A33. Q3. The Federal Equivalent GS rankings for the Executive Administrative Assistant I and...

80

Fernald Environmental Management Project Stipulated Amendment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stipulated Amendment to Consent Decree Entered December 2, 1988, and Settlement of Charges in Contempt State Ohio Agreement Type Consent Decree Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Determination of soil liquefaction characteristics by large-scale laboratory tests. [Sand  

SciTech Connect

The testing program described in this report was carried out to study the liquefaction behavior of a clean, uniform, medium sand. Horizontal beds of this sand, 42 inches by 90 inches by 4 inches were prepared by pluviation with a special sand spreader, saturated, and tested in a shaking table system designed for this program, which applied a horizontal cyclic shear stress to the specimens. Specimen size was selected to reduce boundary effects as much as possible. Values of pore pressures and shear strains developed during the tests are presented for sand specimens at relative densities of 54, 68, 82, and 90 percent, and the results interpreted to determine the values of the stress ratio causing liquefaction at the various relative densities.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2011 May 17, 2011 CX-006719: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casing Drilling Test CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.7, B5.12 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC April 29, 2011 CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Upper Falls, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 20, 2011 CX-006721: Categorical Exclusion Determination Permanent Borehole Array

83

EIS-0441: Amended Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amended Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0441: Amended Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mohave County Wind Farm...

84

Amended Notice of Intent for the Northern Pass Transmission Line...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amended Notice of Intent for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Published in the Federal Register Amended Notice of Intent for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project...

85

EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington DOE has decided to...

86

EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York DOE issued an amended Notice of...

87

EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Plan AmendmentFinal Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California EIS-0455: Plan AmendmentFinal Environmental Impact Statement for the...

88

EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision Surplus Plutonium Disposition: Waste Solidification Building The National Nuclear Security Administration (NSSA),...

89

EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decision (April 2002) EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program Amended Record of Decision: The U.S. Department of Energy's National...

90

EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program (April 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision A Supplement...

91

Amendment of Water Rights Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amendment of Water Rights Permit Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Amendment of Water Rights Permit Details Activities (0) Areas (0)...

92

FEMP SERVICES INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT WORK ORDER FOR SKAGGS AMENDMENT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORDER FOR SKAGGS AMENDMENT TRANSACTIONS Document details the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) interagency agreement work order for the Skaggs Amendment Transactions....

93

PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Hydro and Power...

94

Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

An investigation into the reactions of biochar in soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactions between biochar, soil, microbes and plant roots may occur within a short period of time after application to the soil. The extent, rates and implications of these interactions, however, are far from being understood. This review includes a description of the properties of biochars and suggests possible reactions that may occur after the addition of biochars to soil. These include dissolution-precipitation, adsorption-desorption, acid-base and redox reactions. Special attention is given to reactions occurring within pores, and to interactions with roots, microorganisms and soil fauna. The examination of biochars (from chicken litter, greenwaste and paper mill sludges) weathered for one and two years in an Australian Ferrosol provides evidence for some of the mechanisms described in this review and offers an insight to reactions at a molecular scale. These interactions are biochar- and site-specific. Therefore, suitable experimental trials combining biochar types and different pedoclimatic conditions are needed to determine the extent to which these reactions influence the potential of biochar as a soil amendment and C-sequestration tool.

Joseph, Stephen; Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Lin, Yun; Munroe, Paul R.; Chia, C. H.; Hook, James M.; Van Zweiten, Lucas; Kimber, S. W.; Cowie, Annette L.; Singh, B. P.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Foidl, Nicolas; Smernik, Ron; Amonette, James E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Directing ecological restoration: impact of organic amendments on above- and belowground ecosystem characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing interest among restoration ecologists exists in developing strategies that stimulate biotic interactions and promote self-regulation in restored systems. These approaches should target above- and belowground organisms because they interact to regulate ecosystem pattern and process. In the following dissertation, I compare the ability of organic amendments to alter above- and belowground biological community structure and function to promote prairie establishment on Castle Drive Landfill in Garland, Dallas County, Texas. Treatments included altering the location of organic amendments in the soil profile, either applied to surface or incorporated, and varying the amount applied. Plant community composition, grass population dynamics, soil nutrient conditions, and soil biological parameters were monitored for three growing seasons. Aboveground, the surface treatments were superior for the establishment of desired and undesired plant species. Plant density patterns can be attributed to the amelioration of physical conditions and the accidental burial of seed during incorporation. Grass population dynamics suggest that surface-amended plots supported establishment, but high-volume incorporated treatments were better for enhancing survival through seasonal and long-term drought. Belowground biological responses were affected by the plant community, and not by the amendment treatments. Soil microbial biomass and carbon mineralization potential were larger in those treatments with greater plant density. The structure of the nematode community suggests that decomposition in the surface-amended plots was directed through bacterial channels while decomposition in the incorporated plots was through fungal channels. It is likely that the higher rates of plant productivity in surface treatments stimulated root exudation, thereby favoring bacteria and the nematodes that feed on them. Treatment differences in decomposition pathway were attenuated after 17 months. The soil quality indicators, Cmic/Corg, qCO2, nematode family richness and nematode density, were not affected by the restoration treatments or plant density, but did increase over time. The results of this study suggest that restoration managers should direct their energies into establishing and promoting a high-quality plant community. This can be manipulated with amendments, but care is needed not to exceed thresholds within location treatments.

Biederman, Lori Ann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Yale, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2010 CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 10/18/2010 Location(s): Reno, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 18, 2010 CX-004290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenfield Community College - Geothermal Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/18/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

98

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Clarkstown, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Yale, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2010 CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6

99

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Energy Exploration Study CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 17, 2010 CX-003403: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.7 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): Twin Falls, Idaho Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 11, 2010 CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma

100

Amendment No.: 185. Renewed Facility Operating License  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brief description of amendment: The amendments revise the facility operating license to delete Section 2.G.1 of the Facility Operating License, which requires reporting of violations of the requirements in Section 2, items C(1), C(3) though (33), E, F, K, and L of the Facility Operating License. The proposed amendment would also delete Section 6.6 of the Technical Specifications (TSs) regarding reportable events. Section 6.6 of the TSs are redundant to requirements that have since been embodied in the regulations and, accordingly, may be deleted from the TS.

Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for former waste management units, legacy contamination source areas and distribution of contamination in soils, and environmental infrastructure (e.g., caps, monitoring systems, etc.) that is in place or planned in association with RAs. (3) Regulatory considerations and processes for management and disposition of waste soil upon generation, including regulatory drivers, best management practices (BMPs), waste determination protocols, waste acceptance criteria, and existing waste management procedures and BMPs for Y-12. This Soil Management Plan provides information to project planners to better coordinate their activities with other organizations and programs with a vested interest in soil disturbance activities at Y-12. The information allows project managers and maintenance personnel to evaluate and anticipate potential contaminant levels that may be present at a proposed soil disturbance site prior to commencement of activities and allows a more accurate assessment of potential waste management requirements.

None

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 12212005 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPUES TO AMI:NDMENTS Of 50uCITATlON5 o The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in...

103

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

ON OF CONTRACTORD ER NO. X DE-AC5 4-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) FACILITY CODE COD E 072820 00 015693703 11 . THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS o...

104

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Department o f Energy NNSAPantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 Amari110 TX 79120-0030 (xl r- 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF...

105

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. street. county. State and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

106

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. stroot. county. State and ZIP Codo) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

107

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. , county, sttJIe IJ1Id ZIP COde) (x) 9A, AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO, t-- OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES,...

108

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, COllllty, Stato and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r-- o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES,...

109

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroet, coooty, Stote JIId ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

110

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., slmot, county, Sloto and ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

111

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stme, county, Solo ond ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

112

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., strol1l, county, State and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r- o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES,...

113

Microsoft Word - CADROD amendment FINAL 091511  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION/RECORD OF DECISION CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION/RECORD OF DECISION AMENDMENT FOR ROCKY FLATS PLANT (USDOE) CENTRAL OPERABLE UNIT JEFFERSON AND BOULDER COUNTIES, COLORADO This page intentionally left blank Page 1 of 26 Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. 2 1.0 Introduction and Purpose ...................................................................................................... 3 1.1 Site Background .......................................................................................................... 3 1.2 Regulatory Status ........................................................................................................ 4 1.3 Need for CAD/ROD Amendment ............................................................................... 6

114

Biochars impact on soil moisture storage in an Ultisol and two Aridisols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biochar additions to soils can improve soil water storage capability, however, there is sparse information identifying feedstocks and pyrolysis conditions that maximize this improvement. Nine biochars were pyrolyzed from five feedstocks at two temperatures and their physical and chemical properties were characterized. Biochars were mixed at 2% wt w{sup -1} into a Norfolk loamy sand (Fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kandiudult), a Declo silt loam (Coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, mesic xeric Haplocalcid), or a Warden silt loam (Coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic xeric Haplocambid). Untreated soils served as controls. Soils were laboratory incubated in pots for 127 days and were leached about every 30 days with deionized water. Soil bulk densities were measured before each leaching event. For six days thereafter, pot holding capacities (PHC) for water were determined gravimetrically and were used as a surrogate for soil moisture contents. Water tension curves were also measured on the biochar treated and untreated Norfolk soil. Biochar surface area, surface tension, ash, C, and Si contents, in general, increased when produced under higher pyrolytic temperatures ({ge}500 C). Both switchgrass biochars caused the most significant water PHC improvements in the Norfolk, Declo and Warden soils compared to the controls. Norfolk soil water tension results at 5 and 60 kPa corroborated that biochar from switchgrass caused the most significant moisture storage improvements. Significant correlation occurred between the PHC for water with soil bulk densities. In general, biochar amendments enhanced the moisture storage capacity of Ultisols and Aridisols, but the effect varied with feedstock selection and pyrolysis temperature.

Novak, Jeffrey M.; Busscher, Warren J.; Watts, Don W.; Amonette, James E.; Ippolito, James I.; Lima, Isabel M.; Gaskin, Julia; Das, K. C.; Steiner, Christoph; Ahmedna, Mohamed; Rehrah, Djaafar; Schomberg, Harry

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Mass Transport within Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sampling – Soil - Energy Innovation Portal  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos.

117

Amendment to Metered Subsystem Agreement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center Units 3 and 4, into the Riverside MSS Agreement. Waiver of the Commission’s notice requirements pursuant to section 35.11 of the Commission's regulations (18 C.F.R. § 35.11) is granted, and the rate sheets as embodied in Amendment No. 2 to the Riverside MSS Agreement are accepted for filing effective September 28, 2010, as requested. Notice of this filing was issued on September 9, 2010, with protests, comments, or motions to intervene due on or before September 28, 2010. No protests, comments or motions to intervene were filed. Notices of intervention and unopposed timely filed motions to intervene are granted pursuant to the operation of Rule 214 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (18 C.F.R. § 385.214). Any unopposed or untimely filed motion to intervene is governed by the provisions of Rule 214. This acceptance for filing shall not be construed as constituting approval of the referenced filing or of any rate, charge, classification, or any rule, regulation or practice affecting such rate or service provided for in the filed documents; nor shall such acceptance be deemed as recognition of any claimed contractual right or obligation20101015-3015 FERC PDF (Unofficial) 10/15/2010 Docket No. ER10-2550-000-2associated therewith; and such acceptance is without prejudice to any findings or orders which have been or any which may hereafter be made by the Commission in any proceeding now pending or hereafter instituted by or against the California Independent

Washington D. C; Michael D. Dozier; Michael D. Dozier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_amendment_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2012 3, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Amendment Number 1 to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to amend its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions for up to approximately 35 days beyond what is specified in the existing Agreement. More specifically, this amendment would allow the existing Agreement's Initial Period

119

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9 9 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 1PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 25 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ . NO . 5 PROJECT NO. (If applicab/e) See Bl ock 1 6C 1 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 105007 NNSA / Pantex Site Office 05007 NNSA/Pantex Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Nt SA/ Pantex S it e Offi ce NNSA/Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 P . O . Box 30030 Amarillo TX 79 1 20-0030 Amarillo TX 79 1 20 - 0030 8 NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., streel, county, Siele end ZIP Code) 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. (xl - BABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES PANTEX, L L C Attn : GARY ALLEN 9B . DATED (SEE /TEM 11) P,0 . BOX 30020

120

EA-1339: Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) EA-1339: Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) Waste Disposition Activities at Paducah Site, Paducah, Kentucky The U.S. Department of Energy has completed an environmental assessment addendum (DOE/EA-1339-A), which is incorporated herein by reference, for proposed disposition of 17,600 m3 of waste from the Paducah Site in Paducah, Kentucky. It is anticipated that most of the waste would be transported for disposal at various locations in the United States. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The effect of young biochar on soil respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low temperature pyrolysis of organic material produces biochar, a charcoal like substance. Biochar is being promoted as a soil amendment to enhance soil quality, it is also seen as a mechanism of lomg-term sequestration of carbon. Our experiments tested the hypothesis that biochar is inert in soil. However, we measured an increase in CO2 production from soils after biochar amendment which increased with increasing rates of biochar. The ?13C signature of the CO2 evolved in the first several days of the incubation was the same as the ?13C signature of the biochar, confirming that biochar contributed to the CO2 flux. This effect diminished by day 6 of the incubation suggesting that most of the biochar C is slowly decomposing. Thus, aside from this short term mineralization increasing soil C with biochar may indeed be a long term C storage mechanism.

Smith, Jeffery L.; Collins, Harold P.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Determining Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various consumer products and directs DOE to create or amend energy standards for major household appliances. Any new or amended standard must achieve the maximum improvement in...

123

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 of2 1 of2 AC PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE , 5. PROJECT NO (If applicab/e) A193 See Block 16C REQ. NO. NOPR 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than /tern 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC P.O. Box 2009 MS 8014 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8014 CODE FACILITY CODE 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC05-000R22800 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) August 31,2000 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS .. o The above numbered solicitation IS amended as set forth In Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers 0

124

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If app/icable) 331 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. slreet, county, State and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) o AK RIDGE TN 37830-6218 x 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC05-060R23100 108. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 12/21/2005 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO OF IIU .... O:' The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers -

125

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1. 1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) M058 See Block 16 C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road, Building 1410, TA-3 Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Los Alamos National Security, LLC 4200 West Jemez Road 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) Suite 400 Los Alamos, NM 87544 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC52-06NA25396 CODE FACILITY CODE 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) December 21, 2005 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS o The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt

126

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

CX-010119: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010119: Categorical Exclusion Determination Humate Injection CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting a humate injection study at the F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (FHWMF) as part of the Department of Energy EM-12 Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation "Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)". SRNL will perform a humate injection test in a monitoring well downgradient of the seepage basins at the FHWMF to evaluate the use of a humate amendment for the stabilization of dissolved uranium, strontium-90 and iodine-129 in an acidic groundwater plume.

128

CX-005736: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

36: Categorical Exclusion Determination 36: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005736: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: Otter Creek Biofuels CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 04/14/2011 Location(s): Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Otter Creek Biofuels would use Department of Energy funding to gather and compare on oilseed (sweet sorghum. sunflower, and soybeans) production and processing from two farms in Vermont. The two farms would grow and cultivate oilseed crops under different conditions (Le. with the use of different soil amendments, under different planting conditions, etc. ). The two farms would also look into different methods for handling and processing the oilseed crop. Approximately 140 acres of sunflowers and

129

The effects of chronic nitrogen fertilization on alpine tundra soil microbial communities: implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that changes in nitrogen (N) availability affect primary productivity in a variety of terrestrial systems, but less is known about the effects of the changing N cycle on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We used a variety of techniques to examine the effects of chronic N amendments on SOM chemistry and microbial community structure and function in an alpine tundra soil. We collected surface soil (0-5 cm) samples from five control and five long-term N-amended plots established and maintained at the Niwot Ridge Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Samples were bulked by treatment and all analyses were conducted on composite samples. The fungal community shifted in response to N amendments, with a decrease in the relative abundance of basidiomycetes. Bacterial community composition also shifted in the fertilized soil, with increases in the relative abundance of sequences related to the Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes, and decreases in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobia. We did not uncover any bacterial sequences that were closely related to known nitrifiers in either soil, but sequences related to archaeal nitrifiers were found in control soils. The ratio of fungi to bacteria did not change in the N-amended soils, but the ratio of archaea to bacteria dropped from 20% to less than 1% in the N-amended plots. Comparisons of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, two broad categories of soil carbon compounds, revealed no between treatment differences. However, G-lignins were found in higher relative abundance in the fertilized soils, while proteins were detected in lower relative abundance. Finally, the activities of two soil enzymes involved in N cycling changed in response to chronic N amendments. These results suggest that chronic N fertilization induces significant shifts in soil carbon dynamics that correspond to shifts in microbial community structure and function.

Nemergut, Diana R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Townsend, Alan R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Taylor, John [University of California, Berkeley; Sattin, Sarah R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Freeman, Kristen R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Fierer, Noah [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Neff, Jason [University of Colorado, Boulder; Bowman, William D [University of Colorado, Boulder; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Weintraub, Michael N [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Microsoft Word - Northern Pass Amended Application - FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRICITY ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY NORTHERN PASS TRANSMISSION LLC DOCKET NO. PP-371 AMENDED APPLICATION JULY 1, 2013 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. LIST OF EXHIBITS iii LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS iv INTRODUCTION 1 OVERVIEW OF AMENDMENTS TO APPLICATION 1 SECTION 1 - INFORMATION REGARDING THE APPLICANT 1.1 Legal Name of the Applicant 6 1.2 Legal Names of All Partners 6 1.3 Communications and Correspondence 7 1.4 Foreign Ownership and Affiliations 7 1.5 Existing Contracts with Foreign Entities for Purchase, Sale or Delivery of Electric Energy 7 1.6 Corporate Authority and Compliance with Laws 8 SECTION 2 - INFORMATION REGARDING TRANSMISSION LINES TO BE COVERED BY THE PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT 2.1 Project Overview 9 2.2 Technical Description 14 2.2.1. Number of Circuits 14 2.2.2. Operating Voltage and Frequency 14 2.2.3. Conductors 14 2.2.4. Additional Information Regarding Overhead

131

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CONTRACT ID CODE j PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2 AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (II applicable) 220 See Block 16C 6 ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7 ADMINISTERED BY (lfolherthan Item 6) CODE 105003 NNSA/Los Alamos Sile Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office u.s. Department of Energy u.s. Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos Los Alamos NM 87544 NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. street. county State and ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC A ttn: STEVE K. SHOOK 98 DATED (SEE ITEM 11) P.O. BOX 1663' MS P222 L OS ALAMOS Nt1 875450001 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO

132

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO . 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 0232 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 NNSA/Los Al amos Si t e Office U. S . Dep a rtme nt of Ene r gy Los Alamo s Sit e Off i ce 3747 We st Jemez Road Los Al a mos NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. , street, county, State and ZIP Code) L A OS ALAMOS NAT I ONAL SECURI TY, ttn : STEVE K. SHOOK P.O . BOX 1663 , M S P222 L OS ALAMOS NM 875450001 CODE 175252894 LLC FACILITY CODE 11 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (ff applicable) 7. ADMINISTERED BY (ff other than Item 6) CODE 1 05003 NNSA/ Los Alamos S i te Office U. S . Departme n t of Energy Los Alamos Site Off ice 3747 W est J e me z Ro a d Los Alamos NM 875 4 4 (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11)

133

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A, GRAETZ, AND K. R. REDDY2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A to produce CH4 or added to soil directly as an amendment.In this study, fresh and anaerobically digested digested plant biomass in soil. J. En- viron. Qual. 16:25-28. Anaerobic digestion of organic materials

Florida, University of

134

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the

135

EIS-0277: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amended Record of Decision Amended Record of Decision EIS-0277: Amended Record of Decision Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (January 2001) The Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to revise its approach to managing approximately 315 kg of plutonium fluoride residues (containing approximately 142 kg of plutonium) that currently are stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats Site). Amended Record of Decision for the Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, DOE/EIS-0277 (January 2001) 66 FR 4803 More Documents & Publications EIS-0220: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0220: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0220

136

Exchangeable sodium accumulation and replacement in Southeast Texas soils under turfgrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many municipal water supplies in Southeast Texas have a relatively high level of Na+ and low total dissolved solids. Most soils of this area are dominated by smectitic clays that respond to wetting by swelling, especially when wetted with high Na waters of low salinity. This study assessed the degree of Na accumulation in Southeast Texas soils under irrigated turfgrass, tested models predicting Na accumulation, and evaluated response of sodic soil to amendments. The Ap, E, and Bt horizons of 18 turf soils in 10 municipal water districts were studied. Irrigation water sodicity (SARiw) and salinity (ECiw) were strongly correlated with soil sodicity (SARE) and salinity (ECe). The SAR,W was found to be the best single variable to model soil Na accumulation but exchangeable Na also increased as a function of years of irrigation. The multiple regression equation: SARE =-5.16 + 0.53 SARiw + 4.04 In (yr) (R2 = 0.86) best predicted SARE to a depth of 30 cm. This study also compared gypsum, a common amendment for sodic soil reclamation, to langbeinite. A column leaching experiment using sodic water was conducted on a sodic, non-saline Boonville soil (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Ruptic Vertic Albaqualf) amended with gypsum and langbeinite at rates equivalent to exchangeable Na in soil depths of 15 and 30 cm. The soil water at depths of 7.5, 15 and 22.5 cm and the effluent from each column were collected at intervals of 12 h and analyzed for sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and soluble bases. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was calculated. At the end of the experiment, soil samples were removed from each column in four depth increments. Significantly less exchangeable Na and lower SAR of the soil waters were found in the lower sections of the soil columns, and Ksat was greater for the amended treatments than for the control.

Najjar, Namir Fouad

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, DOE decided to take the...

138

EA-0587: Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modification to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada EA-0587: Proposed...

139

PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, Amendment 1957...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 PP-22-1 British Columbia Electric Company,...

140

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02, Price-Anderson Amendment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Section 1.3 of the Operational...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 78, No. 160 - August 19, 2013 Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission LLC: Federal Register...

142

2002 Amendments to Deepwater Port Act of 1974  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This amendment has provided the natural gas industry the means to pursue the construction of offshore terminals for receiving liquefied natural gas ... approval must ...

143

EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Amended Record of Decision 5: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, UT The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its decision regarding the transportation method that DOE will use to relocate uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials (residual radioactive material) at the Moab milling site and vicinity properties in Utah. Amended Record of Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, UT (DOE/EIS-0355) (February 2008) 73 FR 11103 More Documents & Publications Meeting Minutes: February 20-21, 2007 Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report

144

DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative June 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued an amendment to the Funding Opportunity Announcement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. The amendment, which was issued on June 9, 2009, incorporates special provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOE anticipates making multiple awards under this FOA and may be able to provide up to $1.4 billion to be distributed among projects selected under both the previous closing date of January 20, 2009 and the new closing date of August 24, 2009. Of the total amount, approximately $800 million in DOE

145

DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative June 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued an amendment to the Funding Opportunity Announcement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. The amendment, which was issued on June 9, 2009, incorporates special provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOE anticipates making multiple awards under this FOA and may be able to provide up to $1.4 billion to be distributed among projects selected under both the previous closing date of January 20, 2009 and the new closing date of August 24, 2009. Of the total amount, approximately $800 million in DOE

146

Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 January 1, 2008 In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. (a) In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. "(a) Definitions.-In this section: "(1) Controlled substance.-The term `controlled substance' has the meaning given that term in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C.

147

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 213 See B':'ock 16C 10SC008480 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than lIem 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 p.e. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. street. county. State and ZIP Code) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r-- o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 99. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) o AK RIDGE TN 37830-6218 X 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC05-060R23100 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 12/21/2005 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO ' ... OF SOLICITATIONS The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers is extended. is not extended.

148

Preparing for the clean air act amendments  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state air quality control agencies are in the midst of developing regulations and programs to meet the ambitious goals of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. The CAAA--which call for stricter air quality standards, a greater number of pollutants and sources to be regulated, new operating permits, and more stringent enforcement of air quality violations--are expected to have a significant impact on virtually every facility in the country. An important deadline in the implementation of the CAAA is November 1993. That is when individual states must submit their proposed operating permit programs to the EPA, as mandated by Title 5 of the Amendments. The EPA then has one year after receiving a state program to accept or reject it. Once a state's program is accepted, all major sources of air pollution in that state have one year to apply for an operating air permit. Although the initial deadlines for business and industry are up to two years away, sufficient information is now available to take the first steps toward compliance with the new air quality regulations. Even while the details of the new rules are being hammered out, plant engineering can and should begin laying the groundwork for their own permit applications. Time and effort spent preparing now for the provisions of the CAAA will pay off in the long run.

Boomer, B.; Bensinger, D. (Midwest Research Inst., Kansas City, MO (United States) Midwest Research Inst., Cary, NC (United States))

1993-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for a double circuit upgrade along the existing Empire-EDS 11S-kV transmission line, Pinal County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION: Amendment No.2 A....

150

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

151

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

152

Landfill cover revegetation using organic amendments and cobble mulch in the arid southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cobble mulch and composted biosolids, greenwaste, and dairy manure were added to arid soil in an attempt to improve plant establishment and production, minimize erosion, increase evapotranspiration, and reduce leaching. Twenty-four plots (10 x 10 m) were established in a completely randomized block design (8 treatments, 3 plots per treatment). Treatments included (1) non-irrigated control, (2) irrigated control, (3) non-irrigated greenwaste compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (4) irrigated greenwaste compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (5) non-irrigated biosolids compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (6) irrigated biosolids compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (7) cobble-mulch, and (8) non-irrigated dairy manure compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot). Soil samples were collected from each plot for laboratory analyses to assess organic matter contents, macro-nutrient levels and trace metal contents, and nitrogen mineralization potential. All plots were seeded similarly with approximately equal portions of cool and warm season native grasses. The organic composts (greenwaste, biosolids, dairy manure) added to the soils substantially increased soil organic matter and plant nutrients including total nitrogen and phosphorus. However, the results of a laboratory study of the soils' nitrogen mineralization potential after the application of the various composts showed that the soil nitrogen-supplying capability decreased to non-amended soil levels by the start of the second growing season. Thus, from the standpoint of nitrogen fertilizer value, the benefits of the organic compost amendments appear to have been relatively short-lived. The addition of biosolids compost, however, did not produce significant changes in the soils' copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc concentrations and thus did not induce adverse environmental conditions due to excessive heavy metal concentrations. Supplemental irrigation water during the first and second growing seasons did not appear to increase plant biomass production in the irrigated control plots over that produced in the non-irrigated control plots. This surprising result was probably due to the cumulative effects of other factors that influenced the initial establishment and production of plants in the plots (e.g., plant species competition, seed germination delay times, differences in nutrient release and availability). Variation within individual plots, and among the three replicate plots associated with each treatment, rendered many of the recorded differences in vegetation establishment and production statistically insignificant. However, after two complete growing seasons the highest total plant foliar cover and the greatest biomass production and plant species diversity occurred in the cobble-mulched plots. These results suggest that cobble-mulch may be the desired amendment in re-vegetated arid landfill covers if the principal objectives are to quickly establish vegetation cover, stabilize the site from erosion, and increase water usage by plants, thereby reducing the potential for leaching and contaminant movement from the landfill's waste-bearing zone.

AGUILAR,RICHARD; DWYER,STEPHEN F.; REAVIS,BRUCE A.; NEWMAN,GRETCHEN CARR; LOFTIN,SAMUEL R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I '. I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

154

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M344 Page 2 of 19 1. Section B, Clause B-2, Contract Type and Value is amended as follows: a. Paragraph (b) is revised as follows to set forth the Estimated Cost for FY 2010 and to reflect the Total Estimated Cost, exclusive of Contractor's Fees: Contract Period Estimated Cost October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2010 $ 2,549,525,767 October 1, 2010 through $ To be negotiated annually September 30, 2012 TOTAL through FY10 $31,589,840,857 b. Paragraph (c) is revised as follows to set the Fixed Fee for FY 2010 and to reflect the total Fixed Fee under the contract: Contract Period Fixed Fee October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2010 $ 18,040,617 October 1, 2010 through $ To be negotiated annually

155

Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. (ENSR Consulting and Engineering, Houston, TX (US))

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed to improve crop yields. As this publication advises, growers should evaluate such products carefully and conduct field trials to determine their merit.

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

158

For IMO Use Only MR-00247-R00-R02 PART 2 – MARKET RULE AMENDMENT REFERENCE Date relevant Amendment Submission, Proposed or Recommended Rule Amendment posted for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provide your comments. Hydro One in general supports the Market Rule amendment as proposed but has one comment regarding Section 8.4.1: “8.4.1 A market participants whose facility is part of a manually armed SPS may reject a request to arm the SPS where the arming would endanger the safety of any person, damage equipment or violate any applicable law.” As currently stated in the above amendment proposal, it is not clear what is meant by the term “manually armed”, and why it is needed. The intent of this Market Rule amendment is to allow a market participant whose facility is part of an SPS to reject arming of the said SPS if that market participant deems this to be the appropriate action for the reasons stated in the amendment proposal. If the intent of the term “manually armed ” is to refer to situations where an intermediary is used by the IMO to physically arm the SPS, as opposed to situations where the IMO can arm the SPS without the use of intermediary, then the inclusion of the terms “manually armed ” is inappropriate. To do so would not meet the intent of the Market Rule amendment as originally proposed. A market participant whose

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance for Implementing 40 CFR 1506.9 and 1506.10 of the Council on Environmental Quality's Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act The purpose of the EPA Filing System Guidelines is to provide guidance to federal agencies on filing draft, final, and supplemental EISs. Information is provided on: (1) how to file an EIS; (2) the steps to follow when adopting an EIS, or when an EIS is withdrawn, delayed or reopened; (3) public review periods; (4) issuance of notices of availability in the Federal Register; and (5) retention of filed EISs. These updated guidelines

160

NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: February 12, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.: Possession and Use of Firearms 6C1-2.001 SUMMARY: The amendment provides that the University's armored car, the University Police, members of University Rifle Teams, the University's armored car vendor, and the staff

Roy, Subrata

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIS-0240: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40: Amended Record of Decision 40: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0240: Amended Record of Decision Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is amending the August 5, 1996, Record of Decision (the 1996 ROD) (61 FR 40619) for the Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Environmental Impact Statement (HEU EIS) (DOE/EIS-0240). The 1996 ROD included DOE's decision to implement a program to render a nominal 200 metric tons of surplus highly-enriched uranium (HEU) non-weapons-usable by blending it down to low-enriched uranium (LEU) and selling as much of the resulting LEU as possible (up to 85 percent) for use as reactor fuel. In 2007, NNSA prepared a Supplement Analysis (DOE/EIS-0240-SA1) to the HEU EIS but

162

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to execute one or more additional amendments to its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to further extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions. The current date for expiration of these provisions under the most recent amendment (Amendment Number 2) is July 31, 2012.

163

EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance for Implementing 40 CFR 1506.9 and 1506.10 of the Council on Environmental Quality's Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act The purpose of the EPA Filing System Guidelines is to provide guidance to federal agencies on filing draft, final, and supplemental EISs. Information is provided on: (1) how to file an EIS; (2) the steps to follow when adopting an EIS, or when an EIS is withdrawn, delayed or reopened; (3) public review periods; (4) issuance of notices of availability in the Federal Register; and (5) retention of filed EISs. These updated guidelines

164

Solar Decathlon 2013 Request for Proposals Amendment No. 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 1 Issue Date: October 10, 2011 This Amendment No. 1 to the Solar Decathlon 2013 Request for Proposals is issued to: 1) Provide an update to the anticipated Site...

165

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Road Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Los Alamos National Security, LLC 4200 West...

166

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Road Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county. state, ZIP Code 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Los Alamos National Security, LLC 4200 West...

167

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT /1. CONTRACT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. street. county, Stale and ZIP Code) ('J 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

168

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT \\1. CONTRACT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, county, State and ZIP Code) J1 SA. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

169

AMENDMENT OF SOLI CIT A TIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, Stato and ZIP Code) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

170

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT r' CONTRACT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* street. county. Stato and ZIP Code 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O....

171

IPAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amarillo TX 79120-0030 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., streot, county, S1ste end ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES...

172

EIS-0277: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77: Amended Record of Decision 77: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0277: Amended Record of Decision Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (January 2001) The Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to revise its approach to managing approximately 315 kg of plutonium fluoride residues (containing approximately 142 kg of plutonium) that currently are stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats Site). Amended Record of Decision for the Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, DOE/EIS-0277 (January 2001) 66 FR 4803 More Documents & Publications EIS-0277: Record of Decision EIS-0277: Final Environmental Impact Statement

173

EIS-0310: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: Amended Record of Decision 10: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0310: Amended Record of Decision Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its Record of Decision (ROD) (66 FR 7877, January 26, 2001) for its Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (Nuclear Infrastructure (NI) PEIS). DOE had decided to transport neptunium-237 (Np-237), after conversion to neptunium oxide (NpO2), from DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) to the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at the Oak Ridge

174

Southwest intertie project: Final environmental impact statement and proposed plan amendment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Intertie Project (SWIP) is a proposed 500kV electrical transmission line system between the Midpoint Substation near Shoshone, Idaho and a proposed substation in Dry Lake Valley, northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada (referred to as the Midpoint to Dry Lake segment), and between a proposed substation in the Ely, Nevada area and a proposed substation near Delta, Utah (referred to as the Ely to Delta segment). This SWIP Final Environmental Impact Statement/Proposed Plan Amendment (FEIS/PPA) assesses the environmental consequences of the federal approval for the project. Impacts of the proposed action would result from the access roads, tower sites, and staging areas required to construct the transmission lines and related facilities. Impacts are expected to soils, vegetation, wildlife, cultural resources, scenic resources, and land uses. Electric and magnetic field effects have also been studied for this project.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

Francis, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matthern, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality standards (same as maximum contaminant levels) by reducing water infiltration through strontium-90 contaminated perched water and interbeds. In addition, the remedy will prevent future drinking water wells from being drilled into the contaminated portion of the aquifer that is in and near the INTEC facility until such time as the water is restored to maximum contaminant levels or below.

L. S. Cahn

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. EFFECTIVE DATE 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 225 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* street. county. State and ZIP Code) OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 OAK RIDGE TN 37830-6218 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 4. REOUISITIONJPURCHASE REO. NO. 10SC009292 Item 07 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r- 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 1 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) CODE 100518 X 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC05-060R23100 CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 108. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 12/21/2005 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMEI DMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS

178

Microsoft Word - To_Amend_or_Not_8_20_10.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To Amend or Not Amend National Model Energy Codes and Standards To Amend or Not Amend National Model Energy Codes and Standards The purpose of this brief is to provide a discussion related to amending or not amending national model codes and standards when adopting them at the federal, state, or local level. It was considered necessary based on the significant amendment activity related to energy code adoption and the observation that in almost every case mistakes are made-some as significant as inadvertently excluding key building types from the code. In some cases, governing bodies will opt to amend with the goal of increasing energy savings; this is positive, and it is necessary to have states that are trendsetters with regard to efficiency. However, it is sometimes possible for amendment activities to yield the opposite result because of increased debate about the

179

doi:10.1155/2007/34601 Research Article Studies on the Effects of Certain Soil Properties on the Biodegradation of Oils Determined by the Manometric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biodegradability of certain biofuels was studied in the case of forest soils using the manometric respirometric technique, which was proved to be very suitable for untreated, fertilized as well as pH adjusted soils. Experiments carried out in infertile sandy forest soil gave a BOD/ThOD value of 45.1 % for a typical model substance, that is, sodium benzoate after a period of 30 days and mineral addition improved the BOD/ThOD value to a value of 76.2%. Rapeseed oil-based chain oil almost did not biodegrade at all in 30 days in nonprocessed soil, and when pH was adjusted to 8.0, the BOD/ThOD value increased slightly to a value of 7.4%. Mineral addition improved the BOD/ThOD value on average to 43.2 % after 30 days. The combined mineral addition and pH adjustment together increased the BOD/ThOD value to 75.8 % in 30 days. The observations were similar with a rapeseed oil-based lubricating oil: after 30 days, the BOD/ThOD value increased from 5.9 % to an average value of 51.9%, when the pH and mineral concentrations of the soil were optimized. The mineral addition and pH adjustment also improved the precision of the measurements significantly. Copyright © 2007 Juhani Kaakinen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 1.

Respirometric Method; Juhani Kaakinen; Pekka Vähäoja; Toivo Kuokkanen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Soil Environment Mediates Its Ecological Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Allelopathic functions of plant-released chemicals are often studied through growth bioassays assuming that these chemicals will directly impact plant growth. This overlooks the role of soil factors in mediating allelopathic activities of chemicals, particularly non-volatiles. Here we examined the allelopathic potential of 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ), a chemical reported to be exuded from the roots of Centaurea diffusa. Methodology/Principal Findings: Growth bioassays and HQ recovery experiments were performed in HQ-treated soils (non-sterile, sterile, organic matter-enriched and glucose-amended) and untreated control soil. Root growth of either Brassica campestris or Phalaris minor was not affected in HQ-treated non-sterile soil. Soil modifications (organic matter and glucose amendments) could not enhance the recovery of HQ in soil, which further supports the observation that HQ is not likely to be an allelopathic compound. Hydroxyquinoline-treated soil had lower values for the CO2 release compared to untreated non-sterile soil. Soil sterilization significantly influenced the organic matter content, PO 4-P and total organic nitrogen levels. Conclusion/Significance: Here, we concluded that evaluation of the effect of a chemical on plant growth is not enough in evaluating the ecological role of a chemical in plant-plant interactions. Interaction of the chemical with soil factors largely

Devika Bajpai; M. S. Rajeswari

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Abundance and Charge State of Implanted Solar Wind Transition Metals in Individual Apollo 16 and 17 Lunar Soil Plagioclase Grains Determined In Situ Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

We report (1) a new method for determining the relative abundances in situ of Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni in implanted solar wind in individual Apollo 16 and 17 lunar plagioclases via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and (2) the charge states of these metals. By virture of its mass alone, the Sun provides a representative composition of the solar system and can be used as a background against which to gauge excesses or deficiencies of specific components. One way of sampling the Sun is by measuring solar wind implanted ions in lunar soil grains. Such measurements are valuable because of their long exposure ages which compliment shorter time scale collections, such as those obtained by the Genesis spacecraft. Kitts et al. sought to determine the isotopic composition of solar Cr by analyzing the solar wind implanted into plagioclase grains from Apollo 16 lunar soils. The isotopic composition of the solar wind bearing fraction was anomalous and did not match any other known Cr isotopic signature. This could only be explained by either (1) an enrichment in the solar wind of heavy Cr due to spallation in the solar atmosphere or (2) that the Earth and the various parent bodies of the meteorites are distinct from the Sun and must have formed from slightly different mixes of presolar materials. To help resolve this issue, we have developed a wholly independent method for determining the relative abundances of transition metals in the solar wind implanted in individual lunar soil grains. This method is based on in situ abundance measurements by microbeam x-ray fluorescence in both the implantation zone and bulk grains using the synchrotron x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (GSECARS sector 13) at Argonne National Laboratory. Here, we report results for Apollo 16 and 17 plagioclase grains. Additionally, a micro-XANES technique was used to determine charge states of the implanted Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni.

Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M. (NIU); (UofC)

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

Reeve, Jennifer [Washington State University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne [Washington State University; Kang, S. [University of Oklahoma; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Reganold, John P. [Washington State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Amended Silicates for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amended Silicates for Mercury Control Amended Silicates for Mercury Control The project is designed to implement a comprehensive demonstration of the use of Amended Silicates for mercury control on a commercial-scale generating unit. Miami Fort Unit 6 burns eastern bituminous coal, has a nominal output of 175 MW, and a flue gas volumetric flow of 535,000 actual cubic feet per minute (acfm) at full load. The demonstration includes a baseline phase with no injection of mercury control sorbents, injection of carbon to develop a mercury-control technology baseline for sorbent performance comparison, and the injection of Amended Silicates at several rates. All sorbent will be injected upstream of the existing electro-static precipitators (ESPs) on the host unit, providing a nominal 1-second contact time before the gas flow enters an ESP. Mercury measurements will be made upstream of the sorbent injection and downstream of the first ESP to characterize the performance of the sorbent technologies. In addition, samples of coal and fly ash will be collected and analyzed to provide data for a mercury mass balance for the unit. The mercury measurements will be made with continuous emissions monitors as well as with Ontario-Hydro wet-chemistry sampling. Samples of fly ash plus sorbent from demonstration cases which include Amended Silicate sorbent injection will be collected from ESP hoppers for use in concrete testing to confirm the suitability of the material as a portland cement replacement.

184

AME:NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AME:NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT AME:NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE 1 OF 224 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. M202 3. EFFECTIVE DATE October 1, 2003 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.s. Department of Energy N.itional Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office Mail Stop 0184 P.O. Box 5400 AlbuauerQue, NM 87185-5400 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Sandia Corporation P. O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-ACO4-94AL85000 108. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) October 1, 1993 CODE II-ACIL~ CODE 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS

185

Global Soils Data, Sept. 5, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soils Data, Sept. 5 Soils Data, Sept. 5 The ORNL DAAC expanded its global data holdings to include the three additional data sets related to soil characteristics. "Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)" This data set consists of homogenized data for 1125 soil profiles, including soil classification, site data, soil horizon data, source of data, and methods used for determining analytical data. The profiles were derived from the World Inventory of Soil Emissions Potentials (WISE) project. The data set contains a selection of 665 profiles from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, 250 profiles from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and 210 profiles from the reference collection of the International Soil Reference and Information

186

Microsoft Word - PTPC_extension_amendment_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mark Miller Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PTL-5 Proposed Action: Amendment Number 2 to the Port Townsend Paper Corporation Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Port Townsend, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to amend the 2011 Firm Power Sales Agreement with Port Townsend Paper Corporation to exend the original duration through September 30, 2022. Findings: Amending the Agreement with Port Townsend Paper Corporation would involve extending service under an existing power sales contract to a facility (in Port Townsend, WA)

187

EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decision Decision EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511 additional 3013-compliant packages 1 containing surplus non-pit weapons-usable plutonium metals and oxides to the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE/EIS-0229, Amended Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact

188

EIS-0277: Amendment to Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amendment to Record of Decision Amendment to Record of Decision EIS-0277: Amendment to Record of Decision Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, EIS-0277 (September 1999) The Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to revise the approach to be used to dispose of approximately 3,360 kg of sand, slag and crucible plutonium residues (containing approximately 130 kg of plutonium) that is currently stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. In an earlier Record of Decision on Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (63 FR 66136, December 1, 1998), DOE decided that the sand, slag and crucible residues would be shipped to the Savannah River Site for processing and

189

IPAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

. CONTRACT 10 CODE . CONTRACT 10 CODE IPAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 1 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If appl/cab/e) 216 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05007 7. ADMINISTERED BY (ffother than Ilem 6) CODE \05007 NNSA/Pantex Site Office NNSA/Pantex Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Pantex Site Office NNSA/Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo TX 79120-0030 Amarillo TX 79120-0030 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., streot, county, S1ste end ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES PANTEX. L L C ttn: GARY ALLEN 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) .0. BOX 30020 AMARILLO TX 791200000

190

EA-1086: Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 6/98) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 6/98) 6: Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 6/98) EA-1086: Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 6/98) SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue as a final rulemaking an amended version of 10 CFR Part 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection." The amended version provides nuclear safety requirements that, if violated, provide DOE a basis for assessment of civil and criminal penalties under the Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 31, 1996 EA-1086: Finding of No Significant Impact Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 6/98) August 31, 1996 EA-1086: Final Environmental Assessment Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 6/98)

191

Samples of Soil from Arco, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a single drilling made at Arco, Idaho were submitted to determine the adsorptive capacity of soil at Arco, Idaho for radioactive elements.

Stewart, G. D.

1949-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

\\1. CONTRACT ID CODE OF PAGES-I PAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. EFFECTIVE DATE (M/DIY) 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. -f 5. PROJECT NO. (Ifapplicable)2. AMENDMENT

193

11. CONTRACT 10 CODE OF PAGESIPAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE (M/DIY) 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If

194

Urban waste compost: Effects on physical, chemical, and biochemical soil properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the additions of urban waste compost on the physical and chemical properties and enzymatic activities in a calcareous soil (Fluventic Xerochrept). Total Porosity (pores >50 pm measured on thin soil sections from undisturbed samples by image analysis) was greater in the plots treated with compost than the control plots due to a larger amount of elongated pores. In the amended plots total and humified organic C, Pb, Cu, and Zn showed a significant increase compared with nonamended plots. Enzymatic activities (L-asparaginase, arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and alkaline phosphomonoesterase) were significantly enhanced by the compost addition thus indicating no inhibiting influence of the heavy metals present. The increased levels of the arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and phosphomonoesterase activities were significantly correlated with total porosity: the first three with pores ranging from 50 to 1000 {mu}m, mainly with pores 50 to 200 {mu}m in size and phosphomonoesterase only with pores whose size was <500 {mu}m. L-asparaginase activity was not correlated with porosity. Only arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, and phosphodiesterase were negatively correlated with bulk density. 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Giusquiani, P.L.; Gigliotti, G.; Businelli, D. [Istituto di Chimica Agraria dell`Universita, Perugia (Italy)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

CX-007847: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47: Categorical Exclusion Determination 47: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007847: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Final Rule (DFR) and Accompanying Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Clothes Washers (RIN: 1904-AB90) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/23/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy In this Direct Final Rule, DOE proposes to adopt amended energy conservation standards for residential clothes washers. The amended standards represent the minimum allowable integrated modified energy factor (IMEF) and maximum allowable integrated water factor. One set of amended standards applies to all products listed in Table 1.1 of the NOPR and manufactured in, or imported into, the United States on or after January 1,

196

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I~' CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

I~' I~' CONTRACT ID CODE IPAGE OF PAGES DE-NR0000031 . 1 I 1 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 003 Same as Block 16G . N~ 6. ISSUED BV CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BV (If other than Item 6) Code I U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office P.O. Box 109 West Mifflin, PA 15122-0109 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. street, county, State and ZIP Code) (*...) 9.A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation 9.6. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 50 Beale Street San Francisco, CA 94105-1895 lOA MODIFICATION OF Contract/Order NO. *... DE-NROOOOO31 10.B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE N/A I FACILlTV CODE N/A Seotember 18, 2008 11. THIS ITEM ONLV APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS D The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers Dis

197

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SOlICITATION NO. 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 1 MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. DE-AC05-000R22800 lOB. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) A"auat 31 2000 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APpues TO AMENDMENTS OF...

198

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: May 27, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: May 27, 2009 REGULATION TITLE: REGULATION NO, while time alone is not sufficient to justify an emergency regulation, it is important to the fiscal in the Appropriations Act. The University must proceed with the regulation authorizing tuition increases on an emergency

Roy, Subrata

199

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: June 10, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: June 10, 2010 REGULATION TITLE: REGULATION NO is not sufficient to justify an emergency regulation, it is important to the fiscal welfare of the University with the regulation authorizing tuition and fee increases on an emergency basis. REASONS FOR CONCLUDING

Roy, Subrata

200

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: June 2, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: June 2, 2008 REGULATION TITLE: REGULATION NO is not sufficient to justify an emergency regulation, it is important to the fiscal welfare of the University. The University must proceed with the regulation authorizing tuition increases on an emergency basis. REASONS

Roy, Subrata

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: June 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: June 7, 2011 REGULATION TITLE: REGULATION NO an emergency regulation, it is important to the fiscal welfare of the University and the State of Florida tuition and fee increases on an emergency basis. REASONS FOR CONCLUDING THAT THE PROCEDURE USED IS FAIR

Roy, Subrata

202

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2, 2011 May 2, 2011 CX-007145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade Amendment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/02/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region April 28, 2011 CX-007144: Categorical Exclusion Determination Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade Amendment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region April 28, 2011 CX-007132: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casa Grande-Empire Double Circuit Upgrade Amendment CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

203

Determining cost and treatment effective soil and plant combinations in bioretention cells for storm water management in the Piedmont Region of Georgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Six bioretention cells at the Rockdale Career Academy in Conyers, GA were studied in order to determine which set of cells, the control (40% topsoil,… (more)

Tanner, Hillary Smith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

DEVELOPMENT OF PROCESS CONTROL EQUATIONS TO SUPPORT DETOXIFICATION OF COPPER USING NATURAL HUMATE AMENDMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Recent scientific research and changes in regulatory policies have led to reductions in the allowable discharges of several contaminant metals, including copper, into surface water. Low target concentrations and variable outfall conditions challenge the efficacy of traditional treatment technologies such as ion exchange. In reviewing various treatment options, scientists and engineers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) developed a treatment strategy focusing on toxicity reduction (rather than the removal of the copper) and demonstrated that the method is viable and promising for mitigating copper toxicity. The resulting outfall chemistry protects the ecosystem in the receiving stream in a manner that is equal to, or better than, technologies that remove copper to the emerging regulatory levels. Further, the proposed toxicity reduction strategy results in collateral beneficial changes in outfall water chemistry such that the outfall more closely matches the chemistry of natural streams for key parameters such as the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The detoxification process is based on the EPA BLM. Specifically, modeling indicates that copper toxicity can be mitigated by modest additions of natural organic carbon and that the amount of amendment needed can be determined based on pH and stream flow. The organic carbon amendments proposed for the treatment/detoxification process are extracts of natural materials that are produced for use in organic agriculture. These extracts are known by several common names such as potassium humate, soluble humic acid, and a variety of brand trademarks. When used to reduce ecosystem toxicity in surface water, these amendments bind copper and compete with the biological receptor sites, resulting in a reduction of impacts to key food chain organisms such as the Daphnia ('water flea'). Design and implementation of the process is straightforward. The core equipment consists of storage tank(s), pH sensor(s), outfall flow monitor(s), variable speed pump(s), and a programmable logic controller (PLC). The PLC collects information on pH and outfall flow, and modulates the pump flow rate to meter the correct amount of amendment into the outfall. A mathematical relationship, or control equation, is programmed into the PLC and serves as the basis of the operation. A summary of the development of, and key documentation for, the process control equation is provided.

Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Halverson, N.; Nichols, R.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alaska-Specific Amendments to the IECC 2009 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska-Specific Amendments to the IECC 2009 Alaska-Specific Amendments to the IECC 2009 This document is a list of Alaska-specific amendments to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, adopted by the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) on March 9, 2011. It is meant to be read in conjunction with the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 which may be purchased at local bookstores or online. These amendments comprise both the residential and commercial Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES) for AHFC-funded residential mortgage loans and energy rebates, and energy retrofits of public buildings. These amendments supplant the BEES amendments to the 2006 IECC for residential projects as adopted on June 17, 2009, and include the amendments previously made to the 2009 IECC known as

206

EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental 7: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement DOE issued an amended Notice of Intent and is conducting additional public scoping on its Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0447) for the Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc., transmission system project (Champlain Hudson Project). An amended application was filed with DOE on February 28, 2012, for a Presidential permit for the Champlain Hudson Project. The amended application for Champlain Hudson Project reflects changes made as a result of negotiations with State of New York agencies and other stakeholders as part of the project review under Article VII of the New York Public Service Law. EIS-0447-AmendedNOI-2012.pdf

207

An Improved Method for Estimating Global Evapotranspiration Based on Satellite Determination of Surface Net Radiation, Vegetation Index, Temperature, and Soil Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and accurate method to estimate regional or global latent heat of evapotranspiration (ET) from remote sensing data is essential. The authors proposed a method in an earlier study that utilized satellite-determined surface net radiation (...

Kaicun Wang; Shunlin Liang

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

210

Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problems associated with shrink-swell soils are well known geotechnical problems that have been studied and researched by many geotechnical researchers for many decades. Potentially shrink-swell soils can be found almost anywhere in the world especially in the semi-arid regions of the tropical and temperate climate. Foundation slabs on grade on shrink-swell soils are one of the most efficient and inexpensive solutions for this kind of problematic soil. It is commonly used in residential foundations or any light weight structure on shrink-swell soils. Many design methods have been established for this specific problem such as Building Research Advisory Board (BRAB), Wire Reinforcement Institute (WRI), Post- Tensioning Institute (PTI), and Australian Standards (AS 2870) design methods. This research investigates most of these methods, and then, proposes a moisture diffusion soil volume change model, a soil-weather interaction model, and a soil-structure interaction model. The proposed moisture diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it, and explains a large scale laboratory test that verifies the proposed moisture diffusion soil volume change model. The proposed soil-weather interaction model uses the FAO 56-PM method to simulate a weightless cover performance for six cities in the US that suffer significantly from shallow foundation problems on shrink-swell soils due to seasonal weather variations. These simulations provide more accurate weather site-specific parameters such as the range of surface suction variations. The proposed weather-site specific parameters will be input parameters to the soil structure models. The proposed soil-structure interaction model uses Mitchell (1979) equations for moisture diffusion under covered soil to develop a new closed form solution for the soil mound shape under the foundation slab. Then, it presents a parametric study by carrying out several 2D finite elements plane strain simulations for plates resting on a semiinfinite elastic continuum and resting on different soil mounds. The parametric study outcomes are then presented in design charts that end with a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils. Finally, based on the developed weather-soil-structure interaction models, this research details two procedures of a proposed new design method for foundation slabs on grade on shrink-swell soils: a suction based design procedure and a water content based design procedure.

Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

DRAFT MAINSTEM AMENDMENTS COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Hanford Reach fall chinook), this plan7 provides an emphasis on protecting and restoring mainstem spawning7 steelhead in the mainstem. This includes, among other things, protecting the8 Hanford Reach fall" while the Council works with the region to determine the most biologically effective level of spillway

212

2 -Draft Mainstem Plan amendments Introduction.....................................................................................................................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Hanford Reach fall chinook), this plan7 provides an emphasis on protecting and restoring mainstem spawning7 steelhead in the mainstem. This includes, among other things, protecting the8 Hanford Reach fall" while the Council works with the region to determine the most biologically effective level of spillway

213

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam  

SciTech Connect

A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Full Text of Amended National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Code (Fully Amended) United States Code (Fully Amended) Title 42. The Public Health and Welfare Chapter 91. National Energy Conservation Policy Subchapter III. Federal Energy Initiative Part B. Federal Energy Management Section 8251. Findings The Congress finds that-- (1) the Federal Government is the largest single energy consumer in the Nation; (2) the cost of meeting the Federal Government's energy requirement is substantial; (3) there are significant opportunities in the Federal Government to conserve and make more efficient use of energy through improved operations and maintenance, the use of new energy efficient technologies, and the application and achievement of energy efficient design and construction; (4) Federal energy conservation measures can be financed at little or no cost to the Federal Government by using

215

FAC 2005-32 amends the FAR as specified below  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 amends the FAR as specified below: 2 amends the FAR as specified below: Item I--American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act)--Buy American Requirements for Construction Material (Interim) (FAR Case 2009-008) This interim rule implements the Buy American provision. section 1605. of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. It prohibits the use of funds appropriated for the Recovery Act for any project for the construction. alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work unless all of the iron, steel, and manufactured goods used in the project are produced in the United States. However, section 1605 requires that the Buy American requirement be applied in a manner consistent with U.S. obligations under international agreements. Moreover, because Congress intended that least developed countries be excepted

216

Full Text of Amended National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Code (Fully Amended) United States Code (Fully Amended) Title 42. The Public Health and Welfare Chapter 91. National Energy Conservation Policy Subchapter III. Federal Energy Initiative Part B. Federal Energy Management Section 8251. Findings The Congress finds that-- (1) the Federal Government is the largest single energy consumer in the Nation; (2) the cost of meeting the Federal Government's energy requirement is substantial; (3) there are significant opportunities in the Federal Government to conserve and make more efficient use of energy through improved operations and maintenance, the use of new energy efficient technologies, and the application and achievement of energy efficient design and construction; (4) Federal energy conservation measures can be financed at little or no cost to the Federal Government by using

217

EIS-0459-AmendedNOIwithErrata-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A formatting error in the Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Hawai'i A formatting error in the Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Hawai'i Clean Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, as published in the Federal Register, resulted in listing the names of two renewable technologies, Biomass and Geothermal, on the same line under the Utility- Scale Renewables category. See page 47829 below. The two technologies are separate and distinct and will be evaluated separately in the PEIS. 47828 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 155 / Friday, August 10, 2012 / Notices Flows would peak in October and November, and then decrease through the dry season. During dry periods and low water levels, connections between the lakes would disappear and bottom sediments would oxidize, preventing accumulation of organic material along

218

Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

661 Federal Register 661 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 121 / Friday, June 22, 2012 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact Statement for a Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for the Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Rockport, IN, and CO 2 Pipeline; Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings; and Issue a Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement AGENCY: Loan Programs Office, DOE. ACTION: Amended notice of intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to expand the scope of an environmental impact statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0429) to analyze the environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Indiana Gasification, LLC, (IG) for the

219

Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

Similarity measures for spectral discrimination of salt-affected soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper illustrates a pilot study designed to examine the spectral response of soils due to salt variations. The aim of the study includes determining whether salt-affected soils can be discriminated based on their spectral characteristics, by establishing ...

J. Farifteh; F. van der Meer; E. J. M. Carranza

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mesoscale Monitoring of Soil Moisture across a Statewide Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture is an important component in many hydrologic and land–atmosphere interactions. Understanding the spatial and temporal nature of soil moisture on the mesoscale is vital to determine the influence that land surface processes have on ...

Bradley G. Illston; Jeffrey B. Basara; Christopher A. Fiebrich; Kenneth C. Crawford; Eric Hunt; Daniel K. Fisher; Ronald Elliott; Karen Humes

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

L AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

L L _ AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 25 7 See Block 16C 6 . 1SSUED BY CODE 0500 8 NNSA/ Oa kridge Site Office u.s. De pa rtment of Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 S it e Offic e P. O. Box 2 05 0 Bu ilding 97 0 4- 2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8 . NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county. state and ZIP Code) ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL B A t t n: W ILLIE J. W I LSON PO BOX 2009 SERVICES Y- 12 , LLC ,1 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 1 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) coDE lo5008 NNSA/ Oakridg e Site Office u. s . Department o f Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 Site Of fi ce P. O. Bo x 2050 Building 9704 -2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (x) 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO.

223

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

224

CX-010031: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010031: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of Soil Vapor Extraction Units CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01172013 Location(s):...

225

CX-010034: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of Soil Vapor Extraction Units CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01152013 Location(s):...

226

CX-007808: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-007808: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mesa Substation Soil Remediation Assessment CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12122011 Location(s):...

227

Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AMENDED SILICATES. LLC, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AMENDED SILICATES. LLC, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND AMENDED SILICATES. LLC, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26- 04NT41988; W(A)-04-00'1, CH-1172 The Petitioner, Amended Silicates, was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Large Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program. The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to conduct a demonstration of the use of Amended SilicatesT for the removal of mercury from the flue gas of an operating power plant in North Bend, Ohio. Activated carbon and Amended Silicate sorbents will be injected into the plant flue gas stream during the testing period. Measurements of mercury content of flue gas will be made to characterize the mercury removal efficiency of the sorbent materials. Amended Silicates is a joint

229

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT BWXT Pantex, LLC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BWXT Pantex, LLC BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 . - ~ . ~ - - Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) CONTRACT ID CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) DE-AC04-00AL66620 I I IOB. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) PAGE I OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI06 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

230

Yard-waste compost evaluation for soil amendment utilization| Elemental, thermal, and infrared analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research generates analytical criteria for the utilization of Northern California yard-waste composts, regardless of the sample’s feedstock, treatment facility, or final form. Several… (more)

Flock, Rebecca J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Products Blends as Soil Substitutes/Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data from greenhouse and field experiments evaluating the utilization of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) as (i) components of potting mixes to grow ornamentals in a greenhouse, (ii) components of topsoil to grow sod in a greenhouse on plastic, and (iii) components of topsoil to produce sod in the field. The experimental mixes included bottom and fly-ash mixed with biosolids. Two greenhouse experiments involving Evolvus and Pansy test plants and a greenhouse experiment to grow sod ...

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Phosphorus depletion from rhizosphere solution by maize grown in compost-amended soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buhler, D.D. 2004. Tillage and compost affect yield of corn,response to tillage and compost. Agron. J. 100:1039-1046.such as manure and compost, are an economical alternative to

Bortolon, Leandro; Kovar, John L.; Gianello, Clesio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Adsorption and desorption of atrazine on a melamine-based soil amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adsorption kinetics and adsorption-desorption of atrazine on organoclay composites prepared with the surfactant 6-piperazin-1-yl-N,N'-bis-(1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-butyl)-(1,3,5)triazine-2,4-diamine and Houston Black clay were studied using the indirect batch equilibration procedure. The organoclay composites sorbed significantly more atrazine than the Houston Black clay. Adsorption equilibrium was reached after 72 h for the organoclay composites. Atrazine adsorption isotherms were described by linear partitioning. The Koc values ranged from 605 to 5271 L kg-1 for the organoclay composites compared to a value of 41 L kg-1 for the Houston Black clay. The organoclay composite containing 20% surfactant on a total weight basis provided the most efficient adsorption of atrazine, although organoclay composites containing much lower amounts of surfactant also adsorbed significant amounts of atrazine. An average of 11% of sorbed atrazine was released during desorption. Characterization of desorption products showed only atrazine molecules being released from the organoclay composites.

Neitsch, Susan Lynn

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

UNCORRECTED 2 Fate of 4-nonylphenol in a biosolids amended soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.25-cm o.d., 0.95-cm i.d. with 2.3-mm holes) closed at each end with glass wool and nylon cable ties); this suggests anaerobic condition with a past history of oxygen availability (31, 33). The ratio of UQn

Brown, Sally

235

Use of pyrolysis char as an amendment in soils of the Southeastern United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pyrolysis is an energy production process involving the thermal decomposition of biomass in the absence of oxygen. Char, a byproduct of the pyrolysis process, has… (more)

Speir, Robert Adam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Residual Nutrient Removal by a Winter Cover Crop From Broiler Litter Amended Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Poultry production throughout Southern Kentucky is becoming a major agricultural enterprise. Rapid spread of the industry has led to many agricultural advances as well as… (more)

Johnson, Jennifer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Product Blends as Soil Substitutes / Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a field assessment of the use of blends of coal combustion by-products with biosolids in horticultural applications such as potting mixes for ornamentals and turf production.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Accumulation and replacement of exchangeable sodium in soils of Southeast Texas under turfgrass and its effect on soil infiltration rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many municipal water supplies in Southeast Texas have a relatively high level of Ne and low total dissolved solids. Smectitic clays which respond to wetting by swelling, especially when wetted with high Na waters of low salinity are the major clays in soils of this area. This study assessed the degree of Na accumulation on cation exchange sites as affected by gypsum treatments in soils that support turfgrass (bermudagrass) and the response of soil infiltration rate to different rates of gypsum amendment by using rainfall simulation. A field experiment was conducted on a sodic, non-saline Boonville soil (fine, montmorillonitic, thennic Ruptic Vertic Albaqualf) amended with gypsum at rates equivalent to 5 0%, I 00% and 200% of the exchangeable Na in the soil to a depth of 15 cm. Application of gypsum resulted in similar infiltration rates (IR) which were lower than the untreated plots suggesting a significant difference between treated and untreated soils 9 wk after application. However, at 36 wk after application, treated and untreated soils had similar IR with no statistical difference between treatments. Soils of the study area varied somewhat in textural class, but generally had more than 20 % clay within the 0-IO cm depth. Clay content in the 0-10 cm depth was not correlated with IR at the 20-min measurement. These results suggest the channels developed by roots may enable water to enter the soil in spite of clay content and degree of sodic character. The gypsum treatments statistically affected the levels of extractable Ca and Na in some plots and some depths. Treated plots had higher extractable Ca than untreated plots for the 01 0 cm depth for all sites, but treatment rates did not show a significant difference for each site in the same depth. Levels of extractable Na were statistically lower for treated plots than untreated ones for the 0-I 0 cm depth at all sites. For all sites gypsum application did not have significant effects on levels of extractable Mg and K at all depths and times. Even though the pH of the soils tended to decrease with application of gypsum, untreated soils also showed a decrease in pH over the course of the study and pH was not statistically significant.

Aydemir, Salih

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

White paper : the fourth amendment : implications for radiological and nuclear detection.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need to improve the radiation detection architecture has given rise to increased concern over the potential of equipment or procedures to violate the Fourth Amendment. Protecting the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is a foremost value of every government agency. However, protecting U.S. residents and assets from potentially catastrophic threats is also a crucial role of government. In the absence of clear precedent, the fear of potentially violating rights could lead to the rejection of effective and reasonable means that could reduce risks, possibly savings lives and assets. The goal of this document is not to apply case law to determine what the precedent may be if it exists, but rather provide a detailed outline that defines searches and seizures, identifies what precedent exists and what precedent doesn't exist, and explore what the existing (and non-existing) precedent means for the use of radiation detection used inside the nation's borders.

Levey, Brandon Seth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Efficacy of compost amendments and extracts in the control of foliar disease in organic tomato production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of compost amendments and extracts on tomato foliar disease severity and yield were assessed in greenhouse and field experiments. Aerated and nonaerated compost tea… (more)

Murray, William Kraft.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

TX 79120 extended. 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I ( 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must...

242

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A2 A2 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A2 Existing Regulations A2: Clarifying or administrative contract actions Contract interpretations, amendments, and modifications that are clarifying or administrative in nature. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 1, 2012 CX-009195: Categorical Exclusion Determination Amendment Number 2 to the Port Townsend Paper Corporation Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 10/01/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 14, 2012 CX-009201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 09/14/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 23, 2012 CX-008892: Categorical Exclusion Determination

244

An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An analysis of SO sub 2 emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC's of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

Sparks, Donald L.

247

EIS-0463: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS 63: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0463: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement Department of Energy - Presidential Permit Application for Northern Pass Transmission, New Hampshire DOE announces its intent to modify the scope of the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0463) and conduct additional public scoping meetings. EIS-0463-AmendedNOI-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands

248

Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application from British Columbia Transmission Corporation to amend Presidential Permit to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border: Federal Register Notice Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice, Volume 72, No. 78 More Documents & Publications EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro

249

Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application from British Columbia Transmission Corporation to amend Presidential Permit to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border: Federal Register Notice Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice, Volume 72, No. 78 More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia

250

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT ( I. ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

( ( I. ID CODE / DE-ACO4-OOAL6662O ' 10s. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Babcock & W ~ ~ C O X Technical Services Pantex, LLC 800 Main Street Lynchburg, VA 24505 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE

251

EIS-0463: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS 3: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0463: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement Department of Energy - Presidential Permit Application for Northern Pass Transmission, New Hampshire DOE announces its intent to modify the scope of the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0463) and conduct additional public scoping meetings. EIS-0463-AmendedNOI-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands

252

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

253

CX-007014: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14: Categorical Exclusion Determination 14: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007014: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Permeable Active Amendment Concrete (PAAC) for Contaminant Remediation and Erosion Control CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/09/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, National Energy Technology Laboratory The objective of this project is to develop a permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) consisting of apatite, limestone, organoclays, zeolite, sand, and cement. The amendments will be incorporated in a concrete matrix by replacing a portion of the crushed stone or sand in traditional pervious concrete. PAAC has the potential to produce a barrier that combines high structural integrity with the ability to stabilize a variety of contaminants.

254

CX-005095: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005095: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Permeable Active Amendment Concrete (PAAC) for Contaminant Remediation and Erosion Control CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/05/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office The objective of this project is to develop a permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) consisting of apatite, limestone, organoclays, zeolite, sand, and cement. The amendments will be incorporated in a concrete matrix by replacing a portion of the crushed stone or sand in traditional pervious concrete. PAAC has the potential to produce a barrier that combines high structural integrity with the ability to stabilize a variety of contaminants. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

255

CX-007848: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48: Categorical Exclusion Determination 48: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007848: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Final Rule (DFR) and Accompanying Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/09/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy In this Direct Final Rule, DOE proposes amended energy conservation standards for residential dishwashers. The proposed amended standards are the maximum allowable estimated annual energy use (EAEU) and the maximum allowable water consumption. These proposed standards, if adopted, would apply to all products listed in Table 1.1 of the NOPR and manufactured in, or imported into, the United Stales on or after January 1,2013.

256

SOIL HEALTH AND SOIL QUALITY: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil health is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living system, by recognizing that it contains biological elements that are key to ecosystem function within land-use boundaries (Doran and Zeiss, 2000; Karlen et al., 2001). These functions are able to sustain biological productivity of soil, maintain the quality of surrounding air and water environments, as well as promote plant, animal, and human health (Doran et al., 1996). The concept of soil quality emerged in the literature in the early 1990s (Doran and Safely, 1997; Wienhold et al., 2004), and the first official application of the term was approved by the Soil Science Society of America Ad Hoc Committee on Soil Quality (S-581) and discussed by Karlen et al., (1997). Soil quality was been defined as ‘‘the capacity of a reference soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation.’ ’ Subsequently the two terms are used interchangeably (Karlen et al., 2001) although it is important to distinguish that, soil quality is related to soil function (Karlen et al., 2003; Letey et al, 2003), whereas soil

James Kinyangi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

258

Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers' objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers' test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

Dwyer, Brian P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Impact of biochar application on nitrogen nutrition of rice, greenhouse-gas emissions and soil organic carbon dynamics in two paddy soils of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field microcosm experiments and 15N labeling techniques were used to investigate the first-year effects of biochar addition on rice N nutrition and GHG emissions in an Inceptisol and an Ultisol. Biochar N bioavailability and effect of biochar on fertilizer nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were studied by 15N-enriched wheat biochar (7.8803 atom% 15N) and fertilizer urea (5 atom% 15N) (Experiment I). Corn biochar and corn stalks were applied at 12 Mg ha-1 to study their effects on GHG emissions (Experiment II). Biochar had no significant impact on rice production and less than 2% of the biochar N was available to plants in the first season. Biochar addition increased soil C and N contents and decreased urea NUE.. Seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions with biochar were similar to the controls, but significantly lower than the local practice of straw amendment. Soil emissions of N2O with biochar amendment were similar to the control in the acidic Ultisol, but significantly higher in the slightly alkaline Inceptisol. Carbon-balance calculations found no major losses of biochar-C. Low bio-availability of biochar N did not make a significant impact on rice production or N nutrition during the first year.. Replacement of straw amendments with biochar could decrease CH4 emissions and increase SOC stocks.

Xie, Zubin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jianguo; Tu, Cong; Amonette, James E.; Cadisch, Georg; Yong, Jean W.; Hu, Shuijin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Proposed amendment to presidential permit PP-63 and associated modifications to 500 kV international transmission line, Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada. [Forbes Substation  

SciTech Connect

This Addendum to the Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada (DOE/EA-587) addresses Northern States Power Company's (NSP) proposed expansion of the Forbes Substation. The applicant has requested that the expansion take place on the west side of the substation, within the existing property line, instead of on the north side as originally proposed. All of the proposed construction would take place on property already owned by NSP. DOE has reviewed the environmental impacts associated with this minor modification and has determined that the conclusions reached in the environmental assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact prepared in connection with NSP's original amendment request remain valid.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory.

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Price-Anderson Amendment Act 2: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EHEnforcement) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. During 1999, EH-Enforcement began an initiative to conduct formal reviews of contractor programs for identifying, reporting, tracking and closing PAAA noncompliances. Four main objectives were associated with this initiative: into existing EH-Enforcement guidance. Encourage the establishment of effective programs for noncompliance identification

263

Summary Description Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-58 Federal Acquisition Regulation Amendments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Description Description Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-58 Federal Acquisition Regulation Amendments Published in the Federal Register April 18, 2012 Page 23364 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- I. Biobased Procurements FAR Case 2010-004 II. Representation Regarding Export of Sensitive Technology to Iran FAR Case 2010-018 III. Justification and Approval of Sole-Source 8(a) Contracts FAR Case 2009-038 IV. Technical Amendments ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Item I--Biobased Procurements (FAR Case 2010-004) This final rule amends the FAR to implement changes that require contractors to report the biobased products purchased under service and construction contracts. The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act (7 U.S.C.

264

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminate or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. The objective was to selectively extract uranium using a soil washing/extraction process without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating a secondary waste form that would be difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. One of the soils is from near the Plant 1 storage pad and the other soil was taken from near a waste incinerator used to burn low-level contaminated trash. The third soil was a surface soil from an area formally used as a landfarm for the treatment of spent oils at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The sediment sample was material sampled from a storm sewer sediment trap at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Uranium concentrations in the Fernald soils ranged from 450 to 550 {mu}g U/g of soil while the samples from the Y-12 Plant ranged from 150 to 200 {mu}g U/g of soil.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Elless, M.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CX-007077: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-007077: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) Unit 2 Equipment from the 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area (SSTA) Dynamic Underground...

266

EA-0587: Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and 87: Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modification to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada EA-0587: Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modification to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of Northern States Power Company's proposal to expand the Forbes Substation in Minnesota. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 14, 1992 EA-0587: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modification to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba,

267

DOE Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings in Moab, Utah DOE Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings in Moab, Utah February 29, 2008 - 11:43am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced an amendment to its 2005 Record of Decision (ROD) for the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to allow for the use of truck or rail in transporting residual radioactive materials from the Moab site in Utah. These materials will be relocated to a new disposal site 30 miles north at Crescent Junction, Utah. "The Department is committed to ensuring the protection of human health and the environment in the Moab area and in the communities served by the Colorado River," Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Jim

268

Final Rulemaking, 10 CFR Part 1021, with Amendments Shown In Tracked Changes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document presents the final rule as issued September 27, 2011, amendments shown with changes tracked (additions in blue, deletions in red). Categorical exclusions are listed in Appendices A...

269

EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility April 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. AIKEN, S.C. - EM issued an amended Record of Decision (ROD) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Spent Nuclear Fuel Environmental Impact Statement to expand the operations of the H-Canyon Facility at SRS to support a major nuclear non-proliferation goal and save taxpayer dollars. DOE recently signed a contract allowing Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

270

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments2_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mark Miller Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to execute one or more additional amendments to its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to further extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions. The current date for expiration of these provisions under the most recent amendment (Amendment Number 4) is September 30, 2012. The current proposal involves executing one or more additional

271

EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility April 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. AIKEN, S.C. - EM issued an amended Record of Decision (ROD) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Spent Nuclear Fuel Environmental Impact Statement to expand the operations of the H-Canyon Facility at SRS to support a major nuclear non-proliferation goal and save taxpayer dollars. DOE recently signed a contract allowing Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

272

EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amended Record of Decision Amended Record of Decision EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives The Department of Energy (DOE), pursuant to 10 CFR 1021.315, is amending its Record of Decision: Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives issued on October 17, 2001 (66 FR 52752). At that time the Department decided to implement the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) technology, one of the alternative technologies evaluated in DOE/EIS- 0082-S2 (Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPA SEIS), June 2001) for separation of the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of Savannah River Site (SRS) salt wastes. DOE has initiated design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), which will house the CSSX technology. Now,

273

EIS-0026: Amendment to a Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amendment to a Record of Decision Amendment to a Record of Decision EIS-0026: Amendment to a Record of Decision Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to revise its approach for managing approximately 0.97 metric tons (MT) of plutonium-bearing materials (containing about 0.18 MT of surplus plutonium) that are currently located at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). The Department has decided to repackage and transport these materials for direct disposal as transuranic waste (TRUW) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico instead of shipping them to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for storage pending possible disposition. DOE/EIS-0026, Amendment to a Record of Decision for the Waste Isolation

274

Microsoft Word - CX-Amended-Sac-Sub-IceHarbor-Fiber.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Amended) (Amended) Chad Hamel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Sacajawea Substation - Ice Harbor Dam Fiber Project (Amended) Budget Information: Work Order 00195734, Task 3 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.7 Adding fiber optic cable to transmission structures or burying fiber optic cable in existing transmission line rights-of-way. Location: Walla Walla County, Washington Township 9 North, Range 31 East, Sections 24, 25 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: An environmental clearance memorandum was prepared for the project on June 1, 2007. The original document has been amended in order to more fully describe the proposed work and changes to the original project description:

275

EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Amended Notice of Intent Second Amended Notice of Intent EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to modify the scope of the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD Supplemental EIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2) and to conduct additional public scoping. DOE issued its Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare the SPD Supplemental EIS on March 28, 2007, and issued an Amended NOI on July 19, 2010. DOE now intends to further revise the scope of the SPD Supplemental EIS primarily to add additional alternatives for the disassembly of pits (a nuclear weapons component) and the conversion of plutonium metal originating from pits to feed material for the Mixed Oxide

276

EIS-0350-S1: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

350-S1: Amended Record of Decision 350-S1: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0350-S1: Amended Record of Decision Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM For more information: Mr. George J. Rael Assistant Manager Environmental Operations NEPA Compliance Officer U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road, Los Alamos, NM 87544 Telephone: 505-606-0397 Electronic mail: NEPALASO@doeal.gov The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this Amended Record of Decision (AROD) for the Nuclear Facility portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in

277

EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Amended Notice of Intent Second Amended Notice of Intent EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to modify the scope of the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD Supplemental EIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2) and to conduct additional public scoping. DOE issued its Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare the SPD Supplemental EIS on March 28, 2007, and issued an Amended NOI on July 19, 2010. DOE now intends to further revise the scope of the SPD Supplemental EIS primarily to add additional alternatives for the disassembly of pits (a nuclear weapons component) and the conversion of plutonium metal originating from pits to feed material for the Mixed Oxide

278

Nuclear Safety Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 FR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 FR 1810), Federal Register (Fed Reg), 1/10/2001 Nuclear Safety Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 FR 1810), Federal Register (Fed Reg), 1/10/2001 SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) adopts, with minor changes, the interim final rule published on October 10, 2000, to amend the DOE Nuclear Safety Management regulations. EFFECTIVE DATE: This final rule is effective on February 9, 2001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Black, Director, Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy, 270CC, Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874; telephone: 301-903-3465; email: Richard.Black@eh.doe.gov SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Introduction and Summary On October 10, 2000, the Department of Energy (DOE) published an

279

Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 78, No. 160 LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 78, No. 160 - August 19, 2013 Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 78, No. 160 - August 19, 2013 Northern Pass Transmission LLC (Northern Pass) has submitted an amended application for a Presidential permit to construct, operate, maintain, and connect an electric transmission line across the United States border with Canada. PP-371 Amended Northern Pass Transmission FRN More Documents & Publications EIS-0431: Extension of Public Comment Period Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement for the Northern Pass Project: Federal Register Notice VOlume

280

EIS-0350-S1: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amended Record of Decision Amended Record of Decision EIS-0350-S1: Amended Record of Decision Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM For more information: Mr. George J. Rael Assistant Manager Environmental Operations NEPA Compliance Officer U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road, Los Alamos, NM 87544 Telephone: 505-606-0397 Electronic mail: NEPALASO@doeal.gov The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this Amended Record of Decision (AROD) for the Nuclear Facility portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATION OF CONTRACT 1 I . CONTR...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By ssparate letter or telegran which Includes a r a f m to the solicitation m d amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO BE...

282

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

not I. CONTRA'T ID CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) extended. PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI53 9A. AMENDMENT OF...

283

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is not I. CONTRA'T ID CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) extended. PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI53 9A. AMENDMENT OF...

284

EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Kern County, CA DOE is publishing this Amended Notice of Intent (ANOI) to inform the public of changes in the scope of an ongoing EIS. This ANOI provides information about changes to the project's design, HECA's ownership, and DOE's plans for completing the NEPA process that occurred after publication of the original NOI in the Federal Register on April 6, 2010 (75 FR 17397-401).

285

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended).xls SLIP Energy WY Gross Gen from Hydro LP Dolores Gen. Total SLIP Gross Gen Avg. Plant Use SLIP Net Gen @ Plant...

286

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration and soil organic carbon (SOC) accretion was evaluated using the respiratory quotient (qCO2) and the ratio of the SMB to SOC (SMBC:SOC ratio). Newly leveled, 1-, 3-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 23-year-old reclaimed mixed overburden as well as an unmined soil were sampled bimonthly to measure SMIBC and other parameters. Three methods [chloroform fumigation incubation (FI), chloroform fumigation extraction (FE), and substrate-induced respiration (SIR)] were used to measure SMB and compared as estimators of SMB in reclaimed mine soils. Basal respiration (CO2 evolved from untreated soil), metabolic quotient (i.e. specific respiratory activity; qCO2; C02 produced per unit mass of SMB), and the SMBC:SOC ratio (the abundance of SMB relative to SOC) were used to determine trends in microbial biomass dynamics relative to SOC accumulation. A nearly linear increase in SMB was observed over the chronosequence of mine soils (r--O.98 to 0.99) for each of the three biomass methods. Mean values of SMB from 12 sample dates ranged from 41 pg SMIBC g-1 at the 0-year site to 291 ptg SMBC g-' at the 23-year site. The unmined reference soil averaged 84 jig SMBC g-1 through the period of the study. The qCO2 declined from 0.24 to 0. 12 Mg C02-C Mg SMBC d-' during the first year and tended to stabilize near 0.06 to 0.09 as reclaimed sites matured. The ratios of SMBC:SOC increased linearly with age of site through 23 years (r--O. 97). A substantial amount of seasonal variation in SMB was observed during the two-year study. Older sites (15-and 23-years) showed significant fluctuations of SMB that correlated well with the growing season of Coastal bermudagrass. Microbial biomass peaked during mid to late summer and declined to a minimum during the cold, wet winter months. Younger sites were less affected by seasonal influences, and changes at these sites appeared more related to changes in soil moisture.

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Texas Bentonites as Amendments of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Poultry Feed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aflatoxins are toxic organic compounds produced by fungi in grains. Moderately contaminated grains that cannot be used as food are often directed to animal feed. Economically-feasible detoxification measures for contaminated feeds are needed. The objectives of this research were to identify effective bentonites as aflatoxin adsorbents and to evaluate the performance of the clays as aflatoxin amendments in feed for broiler chickens. Five bentonite samples from Gonzales, Texas, USA were collected and analyzed against the published selection criteria for aflatoxin adsorbents: aflatoxin adsorption capacity, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic carbon, particle size distribution, and mineralogical and structural compositions. Two bentonites were identified as potentially good aflatoxin adsorbents based on the analyses. These two bentonites were selected for an in vivo poultry experiment where chickens were fed with aflatoxin-contaminated corn (1400 ppb) to test the detoxification efficacy of the clays. Detailed mineralogy analyses were conducted on these two samples (4TX and 1TX) after size fractionation. Clay 4TX and 1TX contained 87 percent and 65 percent clay, respectively. Smectite was the dominant mineral phase in both clay fractions. Quartz and feldspars were also present in both samples. These minerals are unlikely to cause harmful effects on the chickens. The presence of pyrite and heavy metals in 1TX raised concerns about its use in animal feed. The clays were introduced into feed by mixing the dry bentonite powder with the feed for twelve minutes in a mechanical mixer. The body weight was increased by 21 percent with clay 4TX and 14 percent with clay 1TX in the aflatoxin diet. The concentration of total aflatoxins in liver was reduced by 36 percent with the addition of clays. Liver visual appearance was also improved from pale red to a more reddish color resembling the healthy red liver. All chickens fed clean feed had significantly higher body weights than those fed with highly contaminated feed, suggesting that the clays did not completely eliminate aflatoxin toxicity. The published aflatoxin binder selection criteria were useful for screening bentonites as aflatoxin amendments. The selected bentonites based on the criteria could effectively sequester aflatoxins in vivo. Yet direct mixing of bentonite as dry powder to highly contaminated poultry feed could not eliminate the toxicity of aflatoxins.

Barrientos Velazquez, Ana Luisa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

CX-004261: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004261: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - National Environmental Policy Act Template Amendment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/20/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) determination is for an amendment to the NEPA determination for California's Energy Commission (CEC). The original categorical exclusion dated 3/18/2010 was signed by David Boron and did not address the energy saving projects under this determination, which are outside of the scope of the Template. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004261.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-004298: Categorical Exclusion Determination

289

Microbial Community Succession During Lactate Amendment of Chromium Contaminated Groundwater Reveals a Predominance of Pelosinus spp.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial community structure and metabolism in contaminated ecosystems are potentially controlled not only by the different populations within the community, but a myriad of dynamic physicochemical parameters as well. The goal of the current work was to determine the impact of organic acid enrichment, in this case lactate, on the succession of the native microbial community from a contaminated groundwater aquifer. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors were inoculated with Hanford 100-H groundwater and incubated for 95 days to obtain a stable, enriched community. The microbial community experienced a shift in the population dynamics over time to eventually form a community with far less diversity than the original. The final community was dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp. with small amounts of other bacteria and archaea including methanogens. The resultant diversity was far decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from three phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from one phylum). Isolation efforts were successful in attaining new species of Pelosinus and known members of Methanosarcina barkerii along with several sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing consortia members. The continuous-flow reactors allowed for testing physiochemical factors with microbial community dynamics on a smaller, replicable, scale while also facilitating the isolation of several previously uncultured community members. These lab-scale simulations will presumably allow for a deeper understanding of the community metabolism with specific carbon amendments that can inform future in situ efforts.

Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Moberly, James G [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Faybishenko, Boris A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

I CONTRACT ID CODE Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) PO Box 30020 Amarillo, T X 79120 PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI74 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

292

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT ID PAGE I OF 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ ' / ' ID PAGE I OF 2 PAGES - . Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I ( DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & W ~ ~ C O X Technical Services Pantex, LLC 800 Main Street Lynchburg, VA 24505 2 . AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI50 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

293

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I CONTRACT ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTRACT ID CODE CONTRACT ID CODE Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) PO Box 30020 Amarillo, T X 79120 PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI74 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

294

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT ID PAGE I OF 2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

/ ' / ' ID PAGE I OF 2 PAGES - . Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I ( DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & W ~ ~ C O X Technical Services Pantex, LLC 800 Main Street Lynchburg, VA 24505 2 . AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI50 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

295

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

296

Skill and Global Trend Analysis of Soil Moisture from Reanalyses and Microwave Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ soil moisture measurements from 2007 to 2010 for 196 stations from five networks across the world (United States, France, Spain, China, and Australia) are used to determine the reliability of three soil moisture products: (i) a revised ...

C. Albergel; W. Dorigo; R. H. Reichle; G. Balsamo; P. de Rosnay; J. Muñoz-Sabater; L. Isaksen; R. de Jeu; W. Wagner

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in tropical soils of Mali, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low soil fertility is one of the major biophysical constraints affecting African agriculture. Phosphorus and nitrogen are the two most common limiting nutrients. Before fertility amendment recommendations are made a soil's natural nutrient availability should be assessed. In 1998, soil samples were collected at Cinzana, Mali, West Africa for the purpose of documenting the seasonal dynamics of soil nitrogen and phosphorus in two soils after nine years under five crop management systems. The cropping systems are: continuous grain (sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) or millet (Pennisetum glaucum)), continuous grain with stalk residue returned to the field every second year, grain in rotation with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), grain in rotation with a sesbania (Sesbania rostrata) green manure crop, and grain in rotation with a dolichos (Dolichos lablab) green manure crop. Nitrogen availability graphs showed an inorganic nitrogen flush early in the rainy season in both soils. Extractable N concentration in a loamy sand soil peaked around 10-15 mg N kg?¹ soil or 15-22 kg N in the upper 10 cm of soil ha?¹. The inorganic N concentration declined four weeks after the onset of the rainy season. Extractable N concentration in the clay soil reached a maximum of 22-34 mg N kg?¹ soil or 33-51 kg N in the upper 10 cm of soil ha?¹. In the clay soil the high N concentrations associated with the early season flush lasted eight weeks after the onset of the rain. Further improvement of cereal grain yield may not be possible by rotation with sesbania and dolichos green manure or cowpea without additional nutrient input. Nitrogen and P return through rotation crops and crop residue is low. Phosphorous Bray-1 measurements fluctuated by 1.43 mg P kg?¹ in the clay soil in 1998. Soil P availability in the clay soil was not influenced by the crop management systems. Bray-1 P measurements in loamy sand soil five months after Tilemsi phosphate rock application were surprisingly significantly lower than before application. Findings from this study can be used to make future crop management recommendations in the Cinzana, Mali, region.

Blanton-Knewtson, Sharon Joy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Threats to Drinking Water Security . a.The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Investigating the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on inputs to coal-fired power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) on inputs to coal-fired power plants. The 1990 CAAA established a system… (more)

Lange, Ian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depending on local availability. An automated version of the soil textural classification triangle shownNeill, J. (1994). Reclaiming disturbed land for forestry. Forestry Commission Bulletin 110. HMSO, London

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships ISSN 0032-079X Plant Soil DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1353-x Seedling growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree species: implications for afforestation

Neher, Deborah A.

302

GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process -FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process 01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During NEPA Process 40 CFR 1501.4(e)(2) "No Significant Impact" 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping 43 CFR 1610.3-1(d) Developing Guidance to Field Manager 43 CFR 1610.3-2(e) To the Governor 43 CFR 1610.7-2(b) Public Notice Triggers None specified A Plan amendment is a modification of one or more parts (e.g., decisions about geothermal leasing) of an existing Land Use Plan (LUP). A LUP can be

303

Modeling soil quality thresholds to ecosystem recovery at Fort Benning, GA, USA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. Artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training at military installations can produce soil disturbance and potentially create barren, degraded soils. Ecosystem reclamation is an important component of natural resource management at military installations. Four factors were important to the development of thresholds to recovery of aboveground biomass on degraded soils: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds for ecosystem recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning were generally below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils were apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization. Calculations with the model indicated that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determine the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

APPENDIX K: SOILS INFORMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

limitations affecting various uses. Soil scientists observed the steepness, length, and shape of the slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of crops and native plants;...

305

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EHEnforcement) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. During 1999, EH-Enforcement began an initiative to conduct formal reviews of contractor programs for identifying, reporting, tracking and closing PAAA noncompliances. Four main objectives were associated with this initiative: Encourage the establishment of effective programs for noncompliance identification and reporting across the complex;

306

Comments and Amended Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Amended Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of and Amended Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Comments and Amended Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Order No. 202-05-03: Pursuant to the public comment procedure set forth in the Special Environmental Analysis ("SEA") issued by the Department of Energy ("DOE") in the above-captioned proceeding on November 22, 2006, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby submits these Comments. The DCPSC renews its request for an extension of Order No. 202-05-3, at least until certain transmission upgrades currently being constructed by the Potomac Electric Power Company ("PEPCO")2

307

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT ( I- CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

( ( I- CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES I . . Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 51 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. 6 . ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Su~pport Department P.O. Box 5400 CODE FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning -

308

Microsoft Word - Westside-Sub-CX-Amended-5-2010.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 25, 2010 May 25, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum (Amended) Amit Sinha Project Manager - TEP-CSB-2 Proposed Action: Westside Substation Additions (Amended) Budget Information: Work Order 00251471 and Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6: Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed area... Location: Westside Substation, 3.5 miles southwest of Idaho Falls, Bonneville County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: An environmental clearance memorandum was completed for the project on May 5, 2008. The original document is amended in order to more

309

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT ( I- CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

( ( I- CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES I . . Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 51 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. 6 . ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Su~pport Department P.O. Box 5400 CODE FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning -

310

EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental 9: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Hawai'i Clean Energy In 2010, DOE announced its intent to prepare a PEIS for the Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program (HIREP): Wind (DOE/EIS-0459) (HIREP: Wind PEIS). In response to public scoping comments on the HIREP: Wind PEIS, as well as regulatory and policy developments since the scoping meetings, DOE proposes to broaden the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy activities and technologies to be analyzed in the PEIS and, accordingly, has renamed it the Hawai'i Clean Energy PEIS. DOE's proposal will involve the development of guidance to use in future funding decisions and other

311

EIS-0429: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental 9: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact Statement; Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings; and Issue a Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0429: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact Statement; Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings; and Issue a Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement Department of Energy Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for the Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Rockport, IN, and CO2 Pipeline DOE announces its intent to expand the scope of an EIS to analyze the environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Indiana Gasification, LLC, for the construction and startup of both a proposed coal-to-substitute natural gas gasification facility in

312

Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC LLC Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission LLC Northern Pass Transmission LLC (Northern Pass) has submitted an amended application for a Presidential permit to construct, operate, maintain, and connect an electric transmission line across the United States border with Canada. Amended Application of Northern Pass Transmission LLC for Presidential Permit Exhibit 1 - Opinion of Counsel Exhibit 2 - General Area Map of Proposed Route Exhibit 3 - Diagrams of Cross-Section of Underground Cables Exhibit 4 - Drawings of Typical Structure Configurations Exhibit 5 - Chart of Proposed Structure Heights Exhibit 6 - Drawing of Typical Converter Terminal Exhibit 7 - General Area Map of North Section Exhibit 8 - General Area Map of Central Section

313

Analysis of Senate Amendment 2028, the Climate Stewardship Act of 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Senate Amendment 2028, the Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 of Senate Amendment 2028, the Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 Energy Information Administration May 2004 Introduction In June 2003, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released an analysis 1 of the Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 (S.139) as introduced by Senators McCain and Lieberman in January 2003. S.139 would establish a cap on emissions of greenhouse gases 2 from covered sources that would be implemented in two phases beginning in 2010 and 2016 respectively. More recently, in October 2003, Senators McCain and Lieberman proposed an amended version of the bill, SA.2028, that included the first phase of emissions reductions beginning in 2010 but removed references to a second phase of reductions beginning in 2016. On May 11, 2004, Senator Landrieu asked EIA to evaluate SA.2028. This paper responds to that

314

EIS-0429: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental 9: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact Statement; Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings; and Issue a Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0429: Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare the Environmental Impact Statement; Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings; and Issue a Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement Department of Energy Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for the Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Rockport, IN, and CO2 Pipeline DOE announces its intent to expand the scope of an EIS to analyze the environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Indiana Gasification, LLC, for the construction and startup of both a proposed coal-to-substitute natural gas gasification facility in

315

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

l PAGE 1 OF 3PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 180 See Block 16 C 6.1SSUEDBY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Los Alamos National Security, LLC 4200 West Jemez Road 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) Suite 400 10A. MODIFICATION OF Los Alamos, NM 87544 CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC52-06NA25396 CODE FACILITY CODE 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) December 21, 2005 -~ - - 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS

316

EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

55: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for 55: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California Summary The BLM's purpose and need for the GSEP is to respond to Genesis Solar, LLC's application under Title V of FLPMA (43 U.S.C. 1761) for a ROW grant to construct, operate, maintain and decommission a solar thermal facility on public lands in compliance with FLPMA, BLM ROW regulations, and other applicable Federal laws. The BLM will decide whether to approve, approve with modification, or deny issuance of a ROW grant to Genesis Solar, LLC for the proposed GSEP. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

317

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery through Fluid Viscosity Modifications: Experiments and numerical simulations  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Heterogeneity is often encountered in subsurface contamination characterization and remediation. Low-permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong the remediation operations. Laboratory experiments and numerical studies have been conducted to develop the Mobility-Controlled Flood (MCF) technology for subsurface remediation and to demonstrate the capability of this technology in enhancing the remedial amendments delivery to the lower permeability zones in heterogeneous systems. Xanthan gum, a bio-polymer, was used to modify the viscosity of the amendment-containing remedial solutions. Sodium mono-phosphate and surfactant were the remedial amendment used in this work. The enhanced delivery of the amendments was demonstrated in two-dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments, packed with heterogeneous systems. The impact of polymer concentration, fluid injection rate, and permeability contract in the heterogeneous systems has been studied. The Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear thinning effects. Shear rates of polymer solutions were computed from pore-water velocities using a relationship proposed in the literature. Viscosity data were subsequently obtained from empirical viscosity-shear rate relationships derived from laboratory data. The experimental and simulation results clearly show that the MCF technology is capable of enhancing the delivery of remedial amendments to subsurface lower permeability zones. The enhanced delivery significantly improved the NAPL removal from these zones and the sweeping efficiency on a heterogeneous system was remarkably increased when a polymer fluid was applied. MCF technology is also able to stabilize the fluid displacing front when there is a density difference between the fluids. The modified STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimental observed fluid displacing behavior. The simulator may be used to predict the subsurface remediation performance when a shear thinning fluid is used to remediate a heterogeneous system.

Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Potential net soil N mineralization and decomposition of glycine-13C in forest soils along an elevation gradient  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to better understand patterns of soil nitrogen (N) availability and soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in forest soils across an elevation gradient (235-1670 m) in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Laboratory studies were used to determine the potential rate of net soil N mineralization and in situ studies of {sup 13}C-labelled glycine were used to infer differences in decomposition rates. Nitrogen stocks, surface soil (0-5 cm) N concentrations, and the pool of potentially mineralizable surface soil N tended to increase from low to high elevations. Rates of potential net soil N mineralization were not significantly correlated with elevation. Increasing soil N availability with elevation is primarily due to greater soil N stocks and lower substrate C-to-N ratios, rather than differences in potential net soil N mineralization rates. The loss rate of {sup 13}C from labelled soils (0-20 cm) was inversely related to study site elevation (r = -0.85; P < 0.05) and directly related to mean annual temperature (+0.86; P<0.05). The results indicated different patterns of potential net soil N mineralization and {sup 13}C loss along the elevation gradient. The different patterns can be explained within a framework of climate, substrate chemistry, and coupled soil C and N stocks. Although less SOM decomposition is indicated at cool, high-elevation sites, low substrate C-to-N ratios in these N-rich systems result in more N release (N mineralization) for each unit of C converted to CO{sub 2} by soil microorganisms.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Soil samples at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harmful pests or diseases. Examples of soil are: topsoil, forest litter, wood or plant compost, humus, and earthworm castings." 3. What is not soil? Materials free of organic...

322

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

323

Soil Classification Using GATree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper details the application of a genetic programming framework for classification of decision tree of Soil data to classify soil texture. The database contains measurements of soil profile data. We have applied GATree for generating classification decision tree. GATree is a decision tree builder that is based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs). The idea behind it is rather simple but powerful. Instead of using statistic metrics that are biased towards specific trees we use a more flexible, global metric of tree quality that try to optimize accuracy and size. GATree offers some unique features not to be found in any other tree inducers while at the same time it can produce better results for many difficult problems. Experimental results are presented which illustrate the performance of generating best decision tree for classifying soil texture for soil data set.

Bhargavi, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Linear Combination Analyses Approach For Directly Speciating Ni Contaminated Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Linear Combination Analyses Approach For Directly Speciating Ni Contaminated Soils. (S02-trivedi215458-Oral) Abstract: To provide an accurate description of the fate of Ni in aerial- contaminated soils to combine multiple analytical techniques to accurately determine metal speciation in complex soil systems

Sparks, Donald L.

325

Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greater knowledge of the short- and long-term effects of biomass production practices on soil biological and chemical properties is needed to determine influences on sustainable land management. Soil samples under switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), other forage grasses, cultivated crops, and forest were collected seasonally at six locations. Soil organic C (SOC), total N, soil microbial biomass C (SMBC) and N (SMBN), soil mineralizable C and N, and basal soil respiration (BSR) were in general greatest under long-term coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] pasture (>40 years), second highest under Alamo switchgrass and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum L.) planted in 1992 and forest, followed by Alamo switchgrass planted in 1997, and was lowest under the cultivated soils. Soil organic C at 0-5 cm was 42-220% greater in soils under Alamo switchgrass planted in 1992 than cultivated soils, except at College Station where SOC values under Alamo planted in 1992 and the cultivated rotation were not significantly different. Although the rotation treatment is cultivated at this location, two high residue crops are used, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.]. Similar trends were noted for total N, SMBC, SMBN, mineralizable C and N, BSR, and the ratio of SMBC/SOC. Insufficient information was collected in this study to determine whether the parameters evaluated for forest and switchgrass were different. In addition to its high yield potential, adaptation to marginal sites and tolerance to water and nutrient limitations, switchgrass appeared to be a competitive crop in terms of land sustainability, resulting in enhanced soil quality characteristics compared to long-term cultivated soils.

Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage to lightly loaded structures, paving and service piping in areas of expansive clay soils has occurred throughout the world. The cause of this damage has been the inability to accurately model expansive soil movement so that foundations are adequately designed to withstand the movement. The amount and rate of differential soil movement for expansive soils is due to a combination of soil characteristics, namely: suction compression index, unsaturated permeability, and diffusivity. Currently, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a simple lack of understanding of the theory. The procedures delineating the step by step process used to calculate suction profiles and volume strains of expansive soils is presented. These procedures include the methodology to predict soil heave and shrink underneath shallow foundations which generate maximum center lift and maximum edge lift slab distortion modes. The main contributions of this research are: equations and procedures to calculate the equilibrium suction profile and depth to constant suction for a particular soil profile and location, equations to calculate the horizontal velocity flow of water in unsaturated soils, the methodology to predict differential soil movement shortly after a slab has been constructed and before the soil under the slab has reached an equilibrium moisture content, and the procedures to apply differential soil movement theory to soil profiles with shallow foundation design.

Naiser, Donald David

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

License amendment for neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the issuance by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of a license amendment to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the use of the MIT Research Reactor's (MITR-II) medical therapy facility beam for the treatment of humans using neutron capture therapy (NCT). This amendment is one of 11 required approvals. The others are those of internal MIT committees, review panels of the Tufts-New England Medical Center (NEMC), which is directing the program jointly with MIT, that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and an NRC amendment to the NEMC hospital license. This amendment is the first of its type to be issued by NRC, and as such it establishes a precedent for the conduct of human therapy using neutron beams. Neutron capture therapy is a bimodal method for treating cancer that entails the administration of a tumor-seeking boronated drug followed by the irradiation of the target organ with neutrons. The latter cause boron nuclei to fission and thereby release densely ionizing helium and lithium nuclei, which destroy cancerous cells while leaving adjacent healthy cells undamaged. Neutron capture therapy is applicable to glioblastoma multiforme (brain tumors) and metastasized melanoma (skin cancer). Both Brookhaven National Laboratory and MIT conducted trials of NCT more than 30 yr ago. These were unsuccessful because the available boron drugs did not concentrate sufficiently in tumor and because the thermal neutron beams that were used did not enable neutrons to travel deep enough into the brain.

Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambride, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nor AMENDMENT OF SOUCITAnONlM001~CA.nQN ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nor AMENDMENT OF SOUCITAnONlM001CA.nQN OF CONTRACT r 1 -I , 0110112010 I m "" 00518 " " 10OSlO '" Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Oep4lrtlent of Energy P.O. Box...

330

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH.H. of the agreement to increase the program limits for Idaho, rural Nevada, and rural Utah. In addition, text of six models developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana

US Army Corps of Engineers

331

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH clauses and Article I.J. of the agreement to increase the program limits for Idaho, rural Nevada environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah

US Army Corps of Engineers

332

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH in the Whereas clauses and Article I.J. of the agreement to increase the program limits for Idaho, rural Nevada-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595

US Army Corps of Engineers

333

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH in the Whereas clauses and Article I.H. of the agreement to increase the program limits for Idaho, rural Nevada-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595

US Army Corps of Engineers

334

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH I.J. of the agreement to increase the program limits for Idaho, rural Nevada, and rural Utah-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595

US Army Corps of Engineers

335

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH for Idaho, rural Nevada, and rural Utah. In addition, text was added at each location of Note 7 to address for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico

US Army Corps of Engineers

336

Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Authorization Basis Amendment Task Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This task plan is a documented agreement between Nuclear Safety and Licensing and Retrieval Engineering. The purpose of this task plan is to identify the scope of work, tasks and deliverables, responsibilities, manpower, and schedules associated with an authorization basis amendment as a result of the Waste Feed Delivery Program, Project W-211, Project W-521, and Project W-522.

HARRIS, J.P.

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Authorization Basis Amendment Task Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This task plan is a documented agreement between Nuclear Safety and Licensing and Retrieval Engineering. The purpose of this task plan is to identify the scope of work, tasks and deliverables, responsibilities, manpower, and schedules associated with an authorization basis amendment as a result of the Waste Feed Delivery Program, Project W-211, Project W-521, and Project W-522.

HARRIS, J.P.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Chemical Forms of Phosphorus in Alum Amended  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Chemical Forms of Phosphorus in Alum Amended Poultry Litter. (S) seems to be the most promising. In this work, results from a solid-state 31-P NMR investigation: (302) 831-0605 e-mail: hunger@udel.edu #12;Keywords: Phosphorus, 31-P NMR spectroscopy, animal wastes

Sparks, Donald L.

339

A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

Analytical mass leaching model for contaminated soil and soil stabilized waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model for evaluating mass leaching from contaminated soil or soil stabilized waste is presented. The model is based on mass transport due to advection, dispersion, and retardation and can be used to evaluate the suitability and/or efficiency of soil washing solutions based on the results of column leaching studies. The model differs from more traditional models for column leaching studies in that the analysis is based on the cumulative mass of leachate instead of leachate concentration. A cumulative mass basis for leaching eliminates the requirement for determination of instantaneous effluent concentrations in the more traditional column leaching approach thereby allowing for the collection of relatively large effluent volumes. The cumulative masses of three heavy metals -- Cd, Pb, and Zn -- leached from two specimens of soil mixed with fly ash are analyzed with the mass leaching model to illustrate application and limitation of the model.

Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Glade, M.J. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proposed amendment to presidential permit PP-63 and associated modifications to 500 kV international transmission line, Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada. Addendum to the final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Addendum to the Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada (DOE/EA-587) addresses Northern States Power Company`s (NSP) proposed expansion of the Forbes Substation. The applicant has requested that the expansion take place on the west side of the substation, within the existing property line, instead of on the north side as originally proposed. All of the proposed construction would take place on property already owned by NSP. DOE has reviewed the environmental impacts associated with this minor modification and has determined that the conclusions reached in the environmental assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact prepared in connection with NSP`s original amendment request remain valid.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500-kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada, Northern States Power Company. Addendum to the final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Addendum to the Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500 kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada (DOE/EA-587) addresses Northern States Power Company`s (NSP) proposed expansion of the Forbes Substation. The applicant has requested that the expansion take place on the west side of the substation, within the existing property line, instead of on the north side as originally proposed. All of the proposed construction would take place on property already owned by NSP. DOE has reviewed the environmental impacts associated with this minor modification and has determined that the conclusions reached in the environmental assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact prepared in connection with NSP`s original amendment request remain valid.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Revegetation of an Acid Mine Drainage - Impacted Soil Using Low Rates of Lime and Compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??AbstractA study was designed to determine whether a degraded soil overlain by acid mine drainage (AMD) precipitates could be remediated with low rates of lime… (more)

Lupton, Mary Kay

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Using gypsUm and Other CalCiUm amendments in sOUthwestern sOils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials, waste products of phosphate fertilizer production (phosphogypsum) or from power plant stack

Sanderson, Mike

345

Identifying the requirements of an agricultural robot for sensing and adjusting soil nutrient and pH levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nutrient requirements of soils using in agriculture for crop production were examined to determine the needs of a robotic system used to detect and regulate the nutrition levels of the soil. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and ...

Teague, Nicole (Nicole Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Assessment of Aided Phytostabilization of Copper-Contaminated Soil by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Extractions  

SciTech Connect

Field plots were established at a timber treatment site to evaluate remediation of Cu contaminated topsoils with aided phytostabilization. Soil containing 2600 mg kg{sup -1} Cu was amended with a combination of 5 wt% compost and 2 wt% iron grit, and vegetated. Sequential extraction was combined with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to correlate changes in Cu distribution across five fractions with changes in the predominant Cu compounds two years after treatment in parallel treated and untreated field plots. Exchangeable Cu dominated untreated soil, most likely as Cu(II) species non-specifically bound to natural organic matter. The EXAFS spectroscopic results are consistent with the sequential extraction results, which show a major shift in Cu distribution as a result of soil treatment to the fraction bound to poorly crystalline Fe oxyhydroxides forming binuclear inner-sphere complexes.

J Kumpiene; M Mench; C Bes; J Fitts

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

CX-008831: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Categorical Exclusion Determination 31: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008831: Categorical Exclusion Determination Algaecide Use at Wastewater Treatment Facility - Amendment 01 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/07/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office This amended action would allow the use of an additional algaecide, AgriTec® 2, to control algae at the Wastewater Treatment Facility and in the Sub-surface Drip Irrigation System. The AgriTec® is a copper sulfate based algaecide that would remain in solution and provide a more even dispersal for better control of the algae than the previously approved Cutrine® Plus. The AgriTec® 2 would be applied separately to the facultative lagoon, each holding lagoon, and the drip irrigation system to control the algae. The application rates would be in accordance with the

348

CX-002585: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85: Categorical Exclusion Determination 85: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002585: Categorical Exclusion Determination Westside Substation Additions (Amended) CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 05/25/2010 Location(s): Idaho Falls, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration An environmental clearance memorandum was completed for the project on May 5, 2008. The original document is amended to more fully describe the proposed work and electrical equipment required at the Westside Substation. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to install electrical equipment within the existing Westside Substation to support Idaho Falls Power's (IFP) continuing improvements to upgrade their system from 46-kilovolts to 161-kilovolts in response to load growth in their service territory. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

349

CX-008823: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23: Categorical Exclusion Determination 23: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008823: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Pressure Fire Loop and Lead-In Replacement in the MAA - Amendment 01 CX(s) Applied: B5.4 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office Additional sections of the high pressure fire loop (HPFL) main line pipe would be replaced in Zone 12 South. Four options are being proposed, and pending bids from the subcontractor on one or more of the four options would be chosen for completion. This would extend the period of performance, pending which options are chosen. The scope of work associated with this amendment is identical (mainline pipe, valves, and hydrants) to the original scope, it only increases the area/length of deteriorated pipe being replaced. The subcontractor would use Horizontal Directional Drilling

350

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A5 A5 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A5 Existing Regulations A5: Interpretive rulemakings with no change in environmental effect Rulemakings interpreting or amending an existing rule or regulation that does not change the environmental effect of the rule or regulation being amended. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 2, 2013 CX-010755: Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rule to Exempt 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conversion Standards CX(s) Applied: A5 Date: 08/02/2013 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 2, 2013 CX-010744: Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rule to Exempt 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conversion Standards CX(s) Applied: A5 Date: 08/02/2013

351

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2, 2011 May 2, 2011 CX-007145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade Amendment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/02/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region April 28, 2011 CX-007144: Categorical Exclusion Determination Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade Amendment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region April 28, 2011 CX-005765: Categorical Exclusion Determination Feed Pump Flush Water Connection/Lifting Bail Interference (General - F/H Tank Farms) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

352

X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

EVALUATION OF AMENDMENTS FOR MENDING THE INSITU REDOX MANIPULATION (ISRM) BARRIER  

SciTech Connect

In May of 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from DOE Headquarters EM-23 to provide a team of technical experts to evaluate likely chemical/biological amendments for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. This request was a follow-on to an earlier request for assistance regarding the cause of chromium (Cr) breakthrough and recommendations for mending the barrier (March 2004 workshop). This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the ISRM technology, was installed at a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to estimate barrier longevity, calculated to be in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in approximately 17 wells has been found to contain elevated Cr concentrations. The March 2004 technical assistance team (TAT) identified potential causes of Cr breakthrough as likely related to physical and chemical heterogeneity within the aquifer (including loss of reductive capacity within preferential flow paths) and the presence of other oxidants (DO and nitrate) significantly affecting the reductive capacity of the treated aquifer. These aquifer characteristics may limit the ability of alternative amendments to extend the reducing capacity of the barrier. A 2001 Bechtel Hanford report and evaluation of the ISRM performance data and barrier longevity assessment corroborate the observations and findings of the March 2004 TAT. The March 2004 TAT recommended the collection of new aquifer characterization data in combination with the interpretation of existing data to develop a conceptual model of aquifer heterogeneity to enable design of the most appropriate barrier mending system. The current TAT was convened to examine the most promising amendment that could be applied to mend the ISRM barrier. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) performed the following activities: (1) Evaluate the most appropriate single or combination of chemical/biological amendments suitable for increasing the reductive capacity of the ISRM barrier; (2) Evaluate the most practicable means of introducing chemical/biological amendments in the target zones along the current BRM barrier; (3) Provide recommendations for laboratory treatability-testing protocol development to evaluate the type and delivery mechanisms of amendments in the current ISRM barrier location. Sections of this report present analyses and recommendations of potential amendments and delivery options to improve performance of the ISRM barrier. The report covers the spectrum of passive barrier mending to chemical and biological amendments that have been shown to perform more efficiently in more active remedial design approaches. Because DOE/RL is considering significant aquifer characterization studies as additional time and cost investment to mending the barrier, the TAT strongly recommends that DOE/RL conduct cost-benefit analyses of alternative designs to mend the barrier. In this way, the value and extent of characterization studies, compared to passive amendment delivery, compared to engineering redesign, can be quantitatively estimated for decision-making purposes.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

355

Biological control of Striga hermonthica by Cubitermes termite mound powder amendment in sorghum culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is provided by Elsevier for the author's benefit and for the benefit of the author's institution, for non, ant mounds, and bulk soil from an agricultural field. Mound soil was most enriched in inorganic N than burrow, mound and bulk soil for most substrates. Casts also had the highest MPNs for particular

Thioulouse, Jean

356

Straw Compost and Bioremediated Soil as Inocula for the Bioremediation of Chlorophenol-Contaminated Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straw compost and bioremediated soil as inocula for the bioremediation of chlorophenol-contaminated soil.

M M Laine; K S Jorgensen; M. Minna; Laine; Kirsten S. Jørgensen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

CX-010140: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-010140: Categorical Exclusion Determination Well ASH-06 Tie-In to A-Area Burning Rubble Pit (ABRP) Soil Vapor Extraction Unit (SVEU) CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 0307...

358

Soil mechanics and analysis of soils overlying cavitose bedrock  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the residual soils existing at the West Chestnut Ridge Site, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, was evaluated. The weathered bedrock below this residual soil contains numerous solution cavities, and several karst features were identified. The West Chestnut Ridge site was evaluated with respect to deformation and collapse of the residual soil into the bedrock cavities. A finite element analysis investigated the effects of bedrock cavity radius, thickness of soil overburden, and surface surcharge upon the deformational and stability characteristics of the residual soil. The results indicate that for small cavity radii, the thickness of the soil cover has little effect on the zone of yielded soil. For large cavity radii, a smaller zone of distressed soil occurs under thick soil cover than under thin soil cover. Dimensionless curves are presented to enable the prediction of the vertical extent of the zone of yielded soil for a range of site geometries. Although the thick soil deposits (100 feet or greater) typically found on the ridges result in high stresses adjacent to the cavity, the area of the distressed or yielded soil is small and unlikely to extend to the surface. In addition, the surface deformation or subsidence is expected to be minimal. Thus, the siting of waste facilities on the ridges where the overburden is maximum would tend to reduce the effects of deformation into the cavities. 29 refs., 37 figs., 7 tabs.

Drumm, E.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I ' CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

' ' CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE 1 OF 12 PAGES 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE REQ. NO. 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI39 extended. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the

360

The economics of pollution permit banking in the context of Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tradable pollution permits are the basis of a new market-based approach to environmental control. The Acid Rain Program, established under Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and aimed at drastically reducing ...

Schennach, Susanne M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.8 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.8 Existing Regulations B5.8: Import or export natural gas, with new cogeneration powerplant Approvals or disapprovals of new authorizations or amendments of existing authorizations to import or export natural gas under section 3 of the Natural Gas Act that involve new cogeneration powerplants (as defined in the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978, as amended) within or contiguous to an existing industrial complex and requiring generally less than 10 miles of new natural gas pipeline or 20 miles within previously disturbed or developed rights-of-way. Previous Regulations Categorical Exclusion Determinations dated before November 14th, 2011 were issued under previous DOE NEPA regulations. See the Notice of Final

363

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan. Distribution Plan for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Amendment No. 3. Energy Action DOE No. 5  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Plan Amendment is to provide a Distribution Plan, setting forth the method of drawdown and distribution of the Reserve. Chapter VII of the SPR Plan contained a Distribution Plan which identified and discussed the major objectives, criteria and other factors that will be considered in developing the detailed plan. This Amendment replaces Chapter VII of the SPR Plan in its entirety.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2008 Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast with a force stronger than the category 2 storm at which it was rated. With a 3.8 m (12.5 ft) storm surge, the agricultural industry in the area was devastated. The goal of this research was to determine the length of time required to reduce the salt levels brought by the storm surge to near pre-hurricane levels. To do this, four sets of samples were taken across two years and analyzed for salinity using the saturated paste extract method. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 79% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 30% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In April 2009, 38% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 13% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 71% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 39% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By December 2009, none of the soils sampled in the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 21% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 33% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By October 2010, all soils sampled had leached sufficient salts to be classified as non-saline to very slightly saline soils. Utilizing the November 2008 data set, 28 random samples were selected for exchangeable Na percent (ESP) in order to develop the ESP-SAR (Na adsorption ratio) predictive equation, ESP= 1.19(SAR)^0.82. The SAR-ESP relationship is statistically significant (95% confidence level), with a correlation coefficient of 0.964 (df=26).

Mueller, Ryan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

New Soil Property Database Improves Oklahoma Mesonet Soil Moisture Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture data from the Oklahoma Mesonet are widely used in research efforts spanning many disciplines within Earth Sciences. These soil moisture estimates are derived by translating measurements of matric potential into volumetric water ...

Bethany L. Scott; Tyson E. Ochsner; Bradley G. Illston; Christopher A. Fiebrich; Jeffery B. Basara; Albert J. Sutherland

366

PacifiCorp New Amended RFP Replacing May 2001, Issued Aug. 23, 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PacifiCorp PacifiCorp REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR TRADABLE RENEWABLE CREDITS (GREEN TAGS, as defined herein) AND ASSOCIATED RETAIL MARKETING FOR OREGON PORTFOLIO BLENDED RENEWABLE AND/OR HABITAT MITIGATION OPTIONS NEW AMENDED RFP REPLACING MAY 2001 GREEN TAGS ONLY RFP ISSUE DATE: August 23, 2001 DUE DATE: At or before 2 p.m. PDT on Thursday, September 20, 2001 CONTACT: Roby Roberts PacifiCorp 825 NE Multnomah Avenue, Suite 600 Portland, Oregon 97232 503 813 - 5975 voice 503 813 - 6260 fax roby.roberts@pacificorp.com PacifiCorp Marketing and Green Tags RFP New Amended RFP August 23, 2001 Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section * REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS 1 * GENERAL PROCEDURES 2 * DEFINITIONS 3 * SCHEDULE 4 * EVALUATION 5 * DETAILED PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS 6 * CONTENT OF RESPONSE 7 * DISCUSSIONS AND RIGHT TO REJECT PROPOSALS

367

I l1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

I I l1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. IS. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 218 See Block 16C 6 . ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) 05008 CODE 105008 NNSA/Oakridge Site Office NNSA/Oakridge Site Office U.S . Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Y-12 Site Office NNSA/Y-12 Site Office P.O. Box 2050 P.O. Box 2050 301 Bear Creek Road 301 Bear Creek Road Building Building Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., MI'H/. county. Stole /JIId ZIP Codo) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. {xl f-- BABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES Y-12, LLC Attn: WILLIE J. WILSON

368

AL 2012-10, Implementation of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No. AL 2012-10 No. AL 2012-10 Acquisition Regulation August 16, 2012 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the Senior Procurement Executives of DOE and NNSA. It is intended for use by procurement professions of DOE and NNSA, primarily Contracting Officers, and other officials of DOE and NNSA that are involved in the acquisition process. Other parties are welcome to its information, but definitive interpretations of its effect on contracts, and related procedures if any, may only be made by DOE and NNSA Contracting Officers. Subject: Implementation of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 2005 References: DEAR 952.250-70, Nuclear Hazards Indemnification Agreement. The Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 2005, § 601-610 of the Energy Policy

369

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 PAGE 1 OF 1 PAGE 1 OF 23 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE M188 See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE I5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185·5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, TX 79120 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 CODE I FACILITY CODE 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11)

370

Radionuclide Activities in Contaminated Soils: Effects of Sampling Bias on Remediation of Coarse-Grained Soils in Hanford Formation  

SciTech Connect

Only a limited set of particle size-contaminant concentration data is available for soils from the Hanford Site. These data are based on bench-scale tests on single soil samples from one waste site each in operable units 100-BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-FR-1, and three samples from the North Pond 300-FF-1 operable unit. The objective of this study was to 1) examine available particle size-contaminant of concern activity and concentration data for 100 and 300 Area soils, 2) assess the effects of sampling bias, 3) suggest sampling protocols, and 4) formulate a method to determine the contaminant of concern activities and concentrations of the whole soil based on the measurements conducted on a finer size fraction of the whole soil.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Radionuclide Activities in Contaminated Soils: Effects of Sampling Bias on Remediation of Coarse-Grained Soils in Hanford Formation  

SciTech Connect

Only a limited set of particle size-contaminant concentration data is available for soils from the Hanford Site. These data are based on bench-scale tests on single soil samples from one waste site each in operable units 100-BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-FR-1, and three samples from the North Pond 300-FF-1 operable unit. The objective of this study was to (1) examine available particle size-contaminant of concern activity and concentration data for 100 and 300 Area soils, (2) assess the effects of sampling bias, (3) suggest sampling protocols, and (4) formulate a method to determine the contaminant of concern activities and concentrations of the whole soil based on the measurements conducted on a finer size fraction of the whole soil.

Mattigod, Shas V; Martin, Wayne J

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I, CONTRACT ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I, CONTRACT ID CODE I, CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V A 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM I I ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No.. street, county, state, ZIP Code) I ( DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 3 8 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

373

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRA'T ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CONTRA'T ID CODE CONTRA'T ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V A 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 / Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 0 8 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. DE-AC04-00AL66620 1 1 108. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

374

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRA'T ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTRA'T ID CODE CONTRA'T ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V A 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 / Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 0 8 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. DE-AC04-00AL66620 1 1 108. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

375

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American ...

376

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, with appropriations acts appended. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This act provides for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, low-level radioactive wastes, and spent nuclear fuels. In addition, it establishes research and development programs, as well as demonstration programs regarding the disposal of these wastes. This Act consists of the Act of Jan. 7, 1983 (Public Law 97-425; 96 Stat. 2201), as amended by Public Law 100-203 and Public Law 102-486.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

OT SPECIFIED I OTHER AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATI ON/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OT SPECIFIED I OT SPECIFIED I OTHER AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATI ON/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2 AM EN DMENT/MODIFIC ATION NO 1 B 6 ISSUED BY CODE Oak UrJge u . s . De arcment of Energ y P . O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 3 EFFccnv E DA E Sep Bl c..c.k _6C 00518 8 NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR INo ~/e.' CO Ull/y. Sial. and ZIP Cod.) OAK RIDGE A SOCIATED Ul IVERSITIES , P . O. BOX 117 OAK R-DGE Ttl 37830-6218 N . CODE 0411522 24 FAC ILITY CODE 1 CONTRACT 10 CODE 4 R OUISITIONIPU RCHASr. REO NO IuS lL 7 ADMIN ISTER ED BY rlf QlherlhBn lIem B) Oak Ridge o . s . Dep rtment of Energ y P . O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (xl 9A AMENDMENT OF SOlICrTATlON NO. 98 DA TEO I SEE ITEM 11) .. 10A MODIFIC ATION OF CO NTRACTIORD ER NO A DE-AC05 - 060R 23 100 l OB DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 12/ 21/ 2005 11 . THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITA

378

AMENDMENT OF SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRACr ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRACr ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) DE-AC04-00AL66620 I I IOB. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI41 9A. AMENDMENT OF Sol-ICITATION NO. CODE I ~ H L I L I I Y L U U ~ I I - 11. THlS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS 1. l l is not The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified- receipt of Offers is extendec 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C . - extended. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center

379

File:Amending LUPs with Programmatic EISs 2.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amending LUPs with Programmatic EISs 2.pdf Amending LUPs with Programmatic EISs 2.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Amending LUPs with Programmatic EISs 2.pdf Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,500 × 1,125 pixels, file size: 665 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 11 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:05, 5 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:05, 5 November 2012 1,500 × 1,125, 11 pages (665 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

380

AMENDMENT OF SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRACr ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRACr ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) DE-AC04-00AL66620 I I IOB. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI41 9A. AMENDMENT OF Sol-ICITATION NO. CODE I ~ H L I L I I Y L U U ~ I I - 11. THlS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS 1. l l is not The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified- receipt of Offers is extendec 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C . - extended. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Proposed License Amendments "Revised Pressure/Temperature (P/T) Curves, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(FPL) requests that Appendix A of Facility Operating Licenses DPR-31 and DPR-41 for Turkey Point Units 3 and 4 be amended to extend the heatup, cooldown, and inservice test limitations for the Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The present pressure/temperature (P/T) limits specified in Technical Specification (TS) 3/4.4.9, and in TS Figures 3.4-2, 3.4-3 and 3.4-4 apply for operation up to 19 Effective Full Power Years (EFPY). The proposed amendments will extend the service period for the new P/T limits to a maximum of 32 EFPY. The proposed amendments also revise TS 3.4.9.3, Cold Overpressure Mitigation System (COMS) setpoints. COMS is the Westinghouse version of Low Temperature Overpressure Protection (LTOP). The maximum permissible Power Operated Relief Valve (PORV) setpoint for low temperature operation of the RCS is being changed from 415 + 15 psig to < 561 psig, which includes instrument uncertainty of 70 psig, as a result of the P/T limit changes. The enable temperature for the

In Accordance Cfr; Florida Power; Light Company

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf -FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:25, 18 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:25, 18 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (136 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 16:00, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:00, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (86 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

383

Executive Director for Operations PROPOSED RULE: AMENDMENTS TO MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS (RIN 3150-AI61)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To request Commission approval to publish a proposed rule, in the Federal Register, that would amend Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) to revise and consolidate within 10 CFR Part 74 requirements for material control and accounting (MC&A) of special nuclear material (SNM). The proposed changes would primarily affect 10 CFR Part 70 licensees. These changes are intended to update, clarify and strengthen the MC&A requirements. Minor conforming changes would be made to 10 CFR Parts 40, 70, 72 and 150. This paper does not address any new commitments. The proposed changes would be applicable to licensees authorized to possess quantities of SNM greater than 350 grams. Licensees authorized to possess SNM in quantities limited to 350 grams or less, whether licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or by an Agreement State, would not be affected by this rulemaking. BACKGROUND: In 1985, the NRC created 10 CFR Part 74 to separate the MC&A requirements in 10 CFR Part 70 from safety requirements for licensees authorized to possess SNM under 10 CFR Part 70. Since that time, most of the MC&A requirements have been moved to 10 CFR Part 74. In 2003, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) conducted an audit to determine whether the NRC adequately ensures that its licensees control and account for SNM. In its report

R. W. Borchardt; Tom Pham Nmss/fcss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the following topics; Global distribution of the major soils and land cover types, Geographic quantification of soil and changes on their properties, Sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, Partitioning of solar energy, Soils, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Carbon dioxide, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Methane.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater: lessons from the field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of plants and associated microorganisms to remove, contain, inactivate, or degrade harmful environmental contaminants (generally termed phytoremediation) and to revitalize contaminated sites is gaining more and more attention. In this review, prerequisites for a successful remediation will be discussed. The performance of phytoremediation as an environmental remediation technology indeed depends on several factors including the extent of soil contamination, the availability and accessibility of contaminants for rhizosphere microorganisms and uptake into roots (bioavailability), and the ability of the plant and its associated microorganisms to intercept, absorb, accumulate, and/or degrade the contaminants. The main aim is to provide an overview of existing field experience in Europe concerning the use of plants and their associated microorganisms whether or not combined with amendments for the revitalization or remediation of contaminated soils and undeep groundwater. Contaminations with trace elements (except radionuclides) and organics will be considered. Because remediation with transgenic organisms is largely untested in the field, this topic is not covered in this review. Brief attention will be paid to the economical aspects, use, and processing of the biomass. It is clear that in spite of a growing public and commercial interest and the success of several pilot studies and field scale applications more fundamental research still is needed to better exploit the metabolic diversity of the plants themselves, but also to better understand the complex interactions between contaminants, soil, plant roots, and microorganisms (bacteria and mycorrhiza) in the rhizosphere. Further, more data are still needed to quantify the underlying economics, as a support for public acceptance and last but not least to convince policy makers and stakeholders (who are not very familiar with such techniques).

Vangronsveld, J.; van der Lelie, D.; Herzig, R.; Weyens, N.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, K.; Ruttens, A.; Thewys, T.; Vassilev, A.; Meers, E.; Nehnevajova, E.; Mench, M.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 1, 2012 May 1, 2012 CX-008153: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maupin-Tygh Valley Number 1 Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration May 1, 2012 CX-008152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Whitefish In-line Hydroelectric Project CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 30, 2012 CX-008154: Categorical Exclusion Determination In-Kind Wood Pole Replacements - Driscoll-Naselle Number 1 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/30/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 24, 2012 CX-008156: Categorical Exclusion Determination Amended Provision of Funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG)

387

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 22, 2012 June 22, 2012 CX-008692: Categorical Exclusion Determination Amendment Number 2 to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 06/22/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 21, 2012 CX-008695: Categorical Exclusion Determination Munro Control Center Expansion CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 06/21/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 20, 2012 CX-008694: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acquisition and Disposition of Property CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 06/20/2012 Location(s): Washington, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 20, 2012 CX-008693: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Structure Replacements on the Chehalis-Centralia No. 2 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line

388

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 14, 2012 September 14, 2012 CX-009204: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bonneville-Hood River Number 1 Danger Pole Replacement and Access Road Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/14/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 14, 2012 CX-009201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 09/14/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 12, 2012 CX-009206: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chahalpam Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09/12/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 12, 2012 CX-009205: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rice Flats Electrode Site Maintenance and Inspection Project

389

Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Compost teas and compost amended container media for plant disease control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary goal of this dissertation research was to assess the use of compost for the control of several foliar and soil borne diseases commercially… (more)

[No author

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This study involved the field collection and laboratory analysis of Al-horizon soil samples in the vicinity of a known geothermal source at Long Valley, California. The samples were analyzed for several constituents known to have influence on Hg retention by soils, including pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, as well as Hg. The data compiled for these secondary parameters and the field-determined parameters of geology, soil

392

High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served as an ideal method for subsurface biostimulation.

Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

393

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

396

High resolution analysis of soil elements with laser-induced breakdown  

SciTech Connect

The invention is a system and method of detecting a concentration of an element in a soil sample wherein an opening or slot is formed in a container that supports a soil sample that was extracted from the ground whereupon at least a length of the soil sample is exposed via the opening. At each of a plurality of points along the exposed length thereof, the soil sample is ablated whereupon a plasma is formed that emits light characteristic of the elemental composition of the ablated soil sample. Each instance of emitted light is separated according to its wavelength and for at least one of the wavelengths a corresponding data value related to the intensity of the light is determined. As a function of each data value a concentration of an element at the corresponding point along the length of the soil core sample is determined.

Ebinger, Michael H. (Santa Fe, NM); Harris, Ronny D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2011 9, 2011 CX-005865: Categorical Exclusion Determination Laboratory Tests in Support of Disodium Silicate Base Amendment CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/09/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office March 8, 2011 CX-005870: Categorical Exclusion Determination Titration Analysis Using the Radiometer Analytical TIM870 Titration Manager with Autosampler CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/08/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office March 8, 2011 CX-005869: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/08/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina

399

The behavior of soil-applied cyclotri- and cyclotetraphosphate in Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclotriphosphate (C3P) is of interest to soil scientists because it demonstrates little or no retention by soil constituents. Non-sorption is desirable in the development of mobile P fertilizers. Work was expanded to include cyclotetraphosphate (C4P), a larger but commercially unavailable cyclic P compound that is more stable than C3P in solution. High-purity C4P was prepared by ethanol precipitation of the hydrolysis products Of P4010. Improved methods of ion chromatography were applied to the analysis of cyclic P and all hydrolysis products extracted from soil using a water/0-5 M H2SO4/1 .0 M NAOH extraction procedure developed for this work. Separation and direct quantitative analysis of linear and cyclic polyphosphates were accomplished in less than 15 minutes. The rapidity and ease of these analyses represent a vast improvement over previous methods of polyphosphate analysis. Four diverse Texas soils received 1 00 and 400 gg cyclic P g-1 soil as either C3P or C4P and were incubated under different water, temperature, biological activity, and time regimes. The larger C4P was not appreciably sorbed in soil and was more stable than C3P under all conditions. Rate constants and the time to one half of initial P concentration were determined for each P. Kinetic data suggested that the hydrolysis of cyclic P in soils is complex, but cyclic P hydrolysis most likely follows first-order kinetics. The mechanism of C4P hydrolysis- particularly at low P application rates-may involve direct conversion of C4P to diphosphate and triphosphate (in addition to tetraphosphate), possibly due to phosphatase action in C4P hydrolysis. Temperature dependency of C3P and C4P hydrolysis was examined. All treatments showed Qlo treatments on Branyon clay). Nineteen soil parameters were examined for correlation with C3P and C4P hydrolysis. Numerous significant correlations (P < 0.05) were reported, but high intercorrelation among related soil factors was suspected, thus reducing the value of correlation analysis.

Trostle, Calvin Lewie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIOLOGY OF CHLORINATED ETHENE CONTAMINATED SOILS: EFFECTS ON PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID CONTENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microbial degradation of chlorinated ethenes (CE) in rhizosphere soils was investigated at seepline areas impacted by CE plumes. Successful bioremediation of CE in rhizosphere soils is dependent on microbial activity, soil types, plant species, and groundwater CE concentrations. Seepline soils were exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in the 10-50 ppb range. Greenhouse soils were exposed to 2-10 ppm TCE. Plants at the seepline were poplar and pine while the greenhouse contained sweet gum, willow, pine, and poplar. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses were performed to assess the microbial activity in rhizosphere soils. Biomass content was lowest in the nonvegetated control soil and highest in the Sweet Gum soil. Bacterial rhizhosphere densities, as measured by PLFA, were similar in different vegetated soils while fungi biomass was highly variable. The PLFA soil profiles showed diverse microbial communities primarily composed of Gram-negative bacteria. Adaptation of the microbial community to CE was determined by the ratio of {omega}7t/{omega}7c fatty acids. Ratios (16:1{omega}7v16:1{omega}7c and 18:l{omega}7t/18:1{omega}7c) greater than 0.1 were demonstrated in soils exposed to higher CE concentrations (10-50 ppm), indicating an adaptation to CE resulting in decreased membrane permeability. Ratios of cyclopropyl fatty acids showed that the vegetated control soil sample contained the fastest microbial turnover rate and least amount of environmental stress. PLFA results provide evidence that sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are active in these soils. Microcosm studies with these soils showed CE dechlorinating activity was occurring. This study demonstrates microbial adaptation to environmental contamination and supports the application of natural soil rhizosphere activity as a remedial strategy.

Brigmon, R. L.; Stanhopc, A.; Franck, M. M.; McKinsey, P. C.; Berry, C. J.

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

proposes to amend its Trade Regulation Rule Concerning the Labeling and Advertising of Home Insulation (‘‘Rvalue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rule’ ’ or ‘‘Rule’’) to streamline and increase the benefits of the Rule to consumers and sellers, minimize its costs, and respond to the development and utilization of new technologies to make American homes more energy efficient and less costly to heat and cool. This document provides background on the R-value Rule and this proceeding; proposes amendments to recognize technological advances in R-value testing and specimen preparation procedures, and to clarify, streamline, and improve the Rule’s requirements; and discusses public comments

Proposed Rule

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber - Oak Ridge National ...  

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber ... A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural

403

A survey on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in soil in Chiang-Mai, Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 30 sampling sites along roadsides in the city of Chiang-Mai, Thailand, in February 1996, and concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. The distribution of PAH concentration in the soil samples was almost log-normal for all PAHs. Concentrations of pyrene (Py) and fluoranthene (Fluor) were the highest, followed by those of benzo[ghi]perylene and coronene (Cor). Since PAH concentrations were highest on the roadside where the traffic density was high, vehicles were the main determinants of PAH concentration in soil in Chiang-Mai. Significant correlations among PAH concentrations were found for almost all PAHs. PAH profiles in the air were different from those in the soil. For example, relative benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentration in the soil was significantly lower than that in the air. Relative concentrations of Fluor, Py, chrysene, and Cor in the soil were considerably higher than those in the air, due presumably to their difference in photochemical reactivities and in sources. The sampling of soil has advantages relative to that of air: (1) collection of soil is easy; (2) it needs no special equipment and electricity; (3) it takes little time; and (4) it can be collected anywhere. Therefore PAH analysis in soil was useful as a proxy-screening tool for air pollution levels with consideration of compositional differences between soil and air samples.

Amagai, Takashi; Takahashi, Yukari; Matsushita, Hidetsuru [Univ. of Shizuoka (Japan); Morknoy, D.; Sukasem, P.; Taucanon, M. [Technopolis, Pathumthani (Thailand). Environmental Research and Training Center

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C) and thus are critically important in determining global cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agriculture over the past 150 years released 30- 50% of soil organic carbon (SOC) stores [Mann, 1986]. Improved agricultural practices could recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby sequestering billions of tons of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., through crop rotation, higher biomass crops, and perennial crops) and decreasing losses (e.g., through reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; Schumaker, Bonny L.; West, Tristram O.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

Bioavailable organic carbon in wetland soils across a broad climogeographic area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soils from a broad climogeographic region of the U.S., ranging from Alaska to Louisiana and Texas, were obtained from the NRCS National Soils Laboratory in Lincoln, Nebraska. Soils were also collected in the summer of 1996 from upland and poorly drained areas in northern Alaska for comparison of biological properties and to determine the effects of drying on estimation of microbial biomass and activity. Air-dried soils were moistened and incubated 48 h, during which time CO? evolution was measured. Following the preincubation, microbial biomass was determined using a modification of the chloroform-fumigation-incubation method to accommodate limited sample quantity. Carbohydrates were determined using bicinchoninic acid reagent and total extractable carbon was determined by analysis of 0.5-M K?SO? extracts with a total carbon analyzer. The objectives of this study were to elucidate geographical trends and meaningful relationships between the bioavailable C parameters. Soil microbial biomass, determined by chloroform fumigation incubation, correlated best with organic C and basal respiration with subtraction of unfumigated controls. Extraction of C with hot water was a rapid, simple procedure that provided the best predictor of soil respiration. Potassium sulfate-extractable carbon was consistently lower than hot water extractable C. Soils from northern states tended to contain more organic carbon than soils in southern states, however, not necessarily more bioavailable C. Detecting geographical trends for bioavailable C proved more difficult due to numerous factors such as topographic position, surface vegetation, climate, and land use.

Baker, Andrew Dwight

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

407

Wireless sensor networks for soil science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks can revolutionise soil ecology by providing measurements at temporal and spatial granularities previously impossible. This paper presents our first steps towards fulfilling that goal by developing and deploying two experimental ... Keywords: WSNs, environmental monitoring, soil moisture, soil monitoring, soil science, soil temperature, urban forests, web services, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Andreas Terzis; Razvan Musaloiu-E.; Joshua Cogan; Katalin Szlavecz; Alexander Szalay; Jim Gray; Stuart Ozer; Chieh-Jan Mike Liang; Jayant Gupchup; Randal Burns

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Measurements of Plutonium and Americium in Soil Samples from Project 57 using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the preliminary site characterization conducted for Project 57, soils samples were collected for separation into several size-fractions using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS). Soil samples were collected specifically for separation by the SSPSS at three general locations in the deposited Project 57 plume, the projected radioactivity of which ranged from 100 to 600 pCi/g. The primary purpose in focusing on samples with this level of activity is that it would represent anticipated residual soil contamination levels at the site after corrective actions are completed. Consequently, the results of the SSPSS analysis can contribute to dose calculation and corrective action-level determinations for future land-use scenarios at the site.

John L. Bowen; Rowena Gonzalez; David S. Shafer

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Degradation and environmental risk of surfactants after the application of compost sludge to the soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of surfactants in soil amended with sewage sludge during 100 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature influences on the degradation of the studied compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall, the LAS degradation is faster than the NP compounds degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Therefore, the LAS presented lower environmental risk than the NP compounds. - Abstract: In this work, the degradation of anionic and non-ionic surfactants in agricultural soil amended with sewage sludge is reported. The compounds analysed were: linear alkylbenzene sulphonates (LAS) with a 10-13 carbon alkylic chain, and nonylphenolic compounds (NPE), including nonylphenol (NP) and nonylphenol ethoxylates with one and two ethoxy groups (NP1EO and NP2EO). The degradation studies were carried out under winter (12.7 Degree-Sign C) and summer (22.4 Degree-Sign C) conditions in Andalusia region. The concentration of LAS was reduced to 2% of the initial concentration 100 day after sludge-application to the soil. The half-life time measured for LAS homologues were ranged between 4 and 14 days at 12.7 Degree-Sign C and between 4 and 7 days at 22.4 Degree-Sign C. With regard to NPE compounds, after 8 and 4 days from the beginning of the experiment at 12.7 and 22.4 Degree-Sign C, respectively, their concentration levels were increased to 6.5 and 13.5 mg/kg dm (dry matter) as consequence of the degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylates. These concentration levels were reduced to 5% after 63 and 70 days for 12.7 Degree-Sign C and 22.4 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The half-life times measured for NPEs were from 8 to 16 days at 12.7 Degree-Sign C and from 8 to 18 days at 22.4 Degree-Sign C. Environmental risk assessment revealed that for LAS homologues no environment risk could be expected after 7 and 8 days of sludge application to the soil for 22.4 and 12.7 Degree-Sign C, respectively; however, potential toxic effects could be observed for the nonylphenolic compounds during the first 56 days after sludge application to the soil.

Gonzalez, M.M.; Martin, J.; Camacho-Munoz, D.; Santos, J.L.; Aparicio, I. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Escuela Politecnica Superior, University of Seville, C/Virgen de Africa 7, E-41011 Seville (Spain); Alonso, E., E-mail: ealonso@us.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Escuela Politecnica Superior, University of Seville, C/Virgen de Africa 7, E-41011 Seville (Spain)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Why Sequence Permafrost Soil Microbiota?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Research Principal Investigators: Mark Waldrop, US Geological Services Program: CSP 2010 Home > Sequencing > Why Sequence Permafrost Soil Microbiota? UC logo DOE logo...

411

Why sequence soil bacterial communities?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as part of this project. Principal Investigators: Stephanie Eichorst, Los Alamos National Laboratory Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence soil bacterial communities...

412

Carbon Sequestration in European Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments...

413

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids ...

414

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan. Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Amendment No. 2, Energy Action DOE No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Amendment provisions are to provide for the expansion of the reserve size from 500 million barrels to 1,000 million barrels and an implementation plan for the third 250 million barrels and to provide for storage of petroleum products for U.S. East Coast. The Amendment describes proposed changes to the program and discusses the required implementation activities as well as the benefits and costs of the actions. The relevant economic and environmental impacts that would result from implementation are assessed. (LK)

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

X JNTRACT 10 CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATt-.. 4/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.< .< JNTRACT 10 CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATt-.. 4/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISmONIPURCHASE REQ NO. S. PROJECT NO. (If sppf"teable) AOO3 See Block 16C. N/A Below 09CH11469.007 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) Code I U.S. Department of Energy ·Chicago Office Office of Science ·9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne,IL 60439 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. street county, State and ZIP Code) W!1. Spectra 1ech, Inc. 9.B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 132 Jefferson Court Oak Ridge,TN 37830 fOA MODIFICATION OF ContractlOrder NO. V' DE-AC02-09CH11469· 10.B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) Nqvember 13, 2008 CODE N/A . IFACILlTY.CODE N/A

416

Two rival versions of historical inquiry and their application to the study of the Sixteenth Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation I identify the philosophy of Giambattista Vico and Karl Marx as representing, broadly, two rival versions of historical inquiry. Put simply, these rival versions endorse either reasons or causes, respectively, as the proper objects of study for historians. After introducing the study of the ratification of the Sixteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution as an example of the type of historical event towards which these versions of inquiry might by directed, I then outline the arguments Vico and Marx give for these rival versions. Paying special attention to the assumptions about human nature, reason, and freedom at work in these arguments, I propose that comparing the plausibility and feasibility of these assumptions might allow a means of adjudicating between these comprehensive and mutually incompatible methods of historical study. I proceed to draw on the work of John Rawls and Alasdair MacIntyre, among others, to show that MarxÂ?s conceptions of human nature, reason, and freedom are ultimately flawed and therefore untenable. I conclude by arguing that VicoÂ?s version of historical inquiry relies on an understanding of these concepts that is more plausible than MarxÂ?s and withstands the objections to which MarxÂ?s understanding succumbs. Finally, I return my focus to the study of the Sixteenth Amendment and consider how VicoÂ?s version of historical inquiry might inform this project.

Noland, James R. L.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I I PAGE OF PAGES 1 1 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REaUISITIONIPURCHASE REa. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 335 See Block 16C 12SCOO0484 Item 7 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED 8Y (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* stroot. COlUlty. Stato and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. f-'-- o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) o AK RIDGE TN 37830-6218 x 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. DE-AC05-060R23100 108. DATED (SEE /TEM 13) CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 12/21/2005 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS

418

In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport  

SciTech Connect

Nocturnal increases in water potential ( ) and water content (WC) in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the upper soil for a seasonally dry old-growth ponderosa pine site. However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the diurnal patterns in WC, confounding efforts to determine the actual magnitude of HR. In this study, we estimated liquid (Jl) and vapor (Jv) soil water fluxes and their impacts on quantifying HR in situ by applying existing data sets of , WC, temperature (T) and soil physical properties to soil water transport equations. Under moist conditions, Jl between layers was estimated to be larger than necessary to account for measured nocturnal increases in WC of upper soil layers. However, as soil drying progressed unsaturated hydraulic conductivity declined rapidly such that Jl was irrelevant (< 2E-06 cm hr-1 at 0-60 cm depths) to total water flux by early August. In surface soil at depths above 15 cm, large T fluctuations can impact Jv leading to uncertainty concerning the role, if any, of HR in nocturnal WC dynamics. Vapor flux was estimated to be the highest at the shallowest depths measured (20 - 30 cm) where it could contribute up to 40% of hourly increases in nocturnal soil moisture depending on thermal conditions. While both HR and net soil water flux between adjacent layers contribute to WC in the 15-65 cm soil layer, HR was the dominant process and accounted for at least 80% of the diurnal increases in WC. While the absolute magnitude of HR is not easily quantified, total diurnal fluctuations in upper soil water content can be quantified and modeled, and remain highly applicable for establishing the magnitude and temporal dynamics of total ecosystem water flux.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Brooks, J Renee [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR; Dragila, Maria [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Meinzer, Rick [USDA Forest Service

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine scaling properties of surface soil moisture using passive microwave remote sensing. The study was divided into two parts. For the first study, a root zone soil moisture assessment tool (SMAT) was developed in the ArcGIS platform by fully integrating a one-dimensional vadose zone hydrology model (HYDRUS-ET) with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation capability. The tool was tested with dataset from the Southern Great Plain 1997 (SGP97) hydrology remote sensing experiment. Results demonstrated that SMAT displayed a reasonable capability to generate soil moisture distribution at the desired resolution at various depths of the root zone in Little Washita watershed during the SGP97 hydrology remote sensing experiment. To improve the model performance, several outstanding issues need to be addressed in the future by: including "effective" hydraulic parameters across spatial scales; implementing subsurface soil properties data bases using direct and indirect methods; incorporating appropriate hydrologic processes across spatial scales; accounting uncertainties in forcing data; and preserving interactions for spatially correlated pixels. The second study focused on spatial scaling properties of the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-based remotely sensed surface soil moisture fields in a region with high row crop agriculture. A wavelet based multi-resolution technique was used to decompose the soil moisture fields into larger-scale average soil moisture fields and fluctuations in horizontal, diagonal and vertical directions at various resolutions. The specific objective was to relate soil moisture variability at the scale of the PSR footprint (800 m X 800 m) to larger scale average soil moisture field variability. We also investigated the scaling characteristics of fluctuation fields among various resolutions. The spatial structure of soil moisture exhibited linearity in the log-log dependency of the variance versus scale-factor, up to a scale factor of -2.6 (6100 m X 6100 m) irrespective of wet and dry conditions, whereas dry fields reflect nonlinear (multi-scaling) behavior at larger scale-factors.

Das, Narendra N.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Point Probability Distributions of Frozen Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some areas of the Pacific Northwest, frozen soils play a major role in surface runoff, soil erosion and sedimentation, but quantitative descriptions of the frequency and severity of soil frost are lacking.

J. F. Zuzel; J. L. Pikul Jr.; R. N. Greenwalt

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Amendment 8  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the rates that we should use in our calculations for using central chilled water or district hot water. Answer No. 1: Average Seasonal Delivery temperatures are noted below...

424

Amendment 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

option. The site is an integral component of this project, and in order to attain LEED platinum, the design-builder needs to control this portion of the work. Will NREL...

425

Amendment 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUSINESS OFFICER (Name and telephone no.) 11. DOE PROJECT OFFICER (Name, address, zip code, telephone no.) 12. ADMINISTERED FOR DOE BY (Name, address, zip code, telephone...

426

Amendment 6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPBldgPROJECTSNREL RSFZEB definitions20070310ZEB Definitions- RSF.doc 3 If cogeneration is used within the building footprint, electricity cannot be exported at the time...

427

Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter Responses to Increased Rainfall  

SciTech Connect

Shifts in regional precipitation patterns will be a major component of global climate change. Rainfall will show greater and more variable changes in response to rising earth surface temperatures than most other climatic variables, and will be a major driver of ecosystem change. We studied the consequences of predicted changes in California’s rainy season for storage and stabilization mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM). In a controlled and replicated experiment, we amended rainfall over large plots of natural grassland in accordance with alternative scenarios of future climate change. Results show that increases in annual rainfall have important consequences for soil C storage, but that the strength and even direction of these effects depend entirely on seasonal timing. Rainfall increases during the winter rainy season led to pronounced C loss from soil while rainfall increases after the typical rainy season increased soil C stocks. Analysis of mineral-OM associations reveals a powerful mechanism underlying this difference: increased winter rainfall vastly diminished the role of Fe and Al oxides in SOM stabilization. Dithionite extractable crystalline Fe oxides explained more than 35 percent of the variability in C storage in ambient control and spring-addition treatments, compared to less than 0.01 percent in the winter-addition treatment. Likewise, poorly crystalline Fe and Al oxides explained more than 25 and 40 percent of the variability in C storage, respectively, in the control and spring-addition treatments compared to less than 5 percent in the -winter-addition treatment. Increases in annual precipitation identical in amount but at three-month offsets produced opposite effects on soil C storage. These results highlight the complexity inherent in biospheric feedbacks to the climate system, and the way that careful experimentation can penetrate that complexity to improve predictions of ecosystem and climatic change.

Berhe, Asmeret A.; Suttle, K. Blake; Burton, Sarah D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geoenvironmental and engineering properties of rock, soil, and aggregate. Transportation research record  

SciTech Connect

Partial Contents: Use of Waste Materials in Highway Construction: State of the Practice and Evaluation of the Selected Waste Products; Physical and Environmental Properties of Asphalt-Amended Bottom Ash; Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Fly Ash, and Recycling Technique in Low-Volume Road Rehabilitation; Use of By-Product Phosphogypsum in Road Construction; Stabilization of Water Treatment Plant Sludge for Possible Use as Embankment Material; Construction and Performance of a Shredded Waste Tire Test Embankment; Corrosion of Steel Piles in Some Waste Fills; Recycled Plastics for Highway Agencies; Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Contamination in Soils on Corrosion of Steel and Concrete; Permeability and Leaching Characteristics of Fly Ash Liner Materials; Evaluation of Recycled Concrete, Open-Graded Aggregate, and Large Top-Size Aggregate Bases; Engineering Properties of Phosphogypsum-Based Slag Aggregate.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Characterization of thorium and uranium contaminated soil from a nuclear fuel facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the utility of soil characterization using electron microscopy to support decontamination efforts of contaminated soil. Soil contaminated with thorium and uranium from the grounds of a nuclear fuel manufacturing facility was subjected to remediation efforts. A light acid leach was able to remove only 30% of the thorium suggesting that the thorium was present in two or more forms. Analytical electron microscopy determined that all of the thorium was present as ThO{sub 2}, but in a bimodal size distribution and occasionally closely associated with other minerals. Electron microscopy was useful in understanding the remediation data and demonstrates the need for characterization of contaminated soils.

Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carlson, B. [Ecotek, Inc., Erwin, TN (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

~l Categorical Exclusion DetermInation Fornl  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l Categorical Exclusion DetermInation Fornl l Categorical Exclusion DetermInation Fornl "hn:Sll' Project Title: Parts Washer Project (4560) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope includes the removal of existing Devlieg side boring machine and the installation of new parts washers. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 - Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property. use unchanged OAS - Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training

432

CLASS DEVIATION FINDINGS AND DETERMINATION Trade Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trade Agreements Trade Agreements FAR 25.402(b) Findings 1. On December 29,2009, the United States Trade Representative (USTR) established new procurement thresholds for the various Trade Agreements identified at FAR 25.402(b). The revised thresholds were effective on January 1,2010. 2. Civilian Agency Acquisition Letter 2010-01, issued on January 19,201 0, recommends that civilian agencies authorize issuance of a class deviation to use the new procurement thresholds for the Trade Agreements until such time as FAR 25.402(b) is formally amended. Determination It is hereby determined that a class deviation from FAR 25.402(b) is appropriate to allow the use of the revised procurement thresholds for the various Trade Agreements that were issued by the USTR on December 29,2009.

433

Radiolytic evolution of gases from Z-9 soils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The total gas evolution rate was correlated with the plutonium and combined moisture and organic soil content. The maximum measured gas evolution rate was 1.3 x 10/sup -6/ gram-mole/hour - gram of plutonium. The major components of the evolved gas were determined to be 49.5 mole percent, (M%) nitrogen, 23.3 M% hydrogen, 14.1 M% oxygen and 13.1 M% carbon dioxide. This composition was determined from gas evolved by water-rich soil. Soils which are rich in organics may evolve gas with less oxygen. The data established the magnitude of the hydrogen evolution problem. Evolution of both oxygen and hydrogen means that the gas mixture will remain within the explosive range, once the lower explosion limit is exceeded.

Pajunen, A. L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Humate Injection Humate Injection Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina SRNL is conducting a humate injection study at the F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (FHWMF) as part of the Department of Energy EM-12 Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation "Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)". SRNL will perform a humate injection test in a monitoring well downgradient of the seepage basins at the FHWMF to evaluate the use of a humate amendment for the stabilization of dissolved uranium, strontium-90 and iodine-129 in an acidic groundwater plume. B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD,

435

Soiling by atmospheric aerosols in an urban industrial area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gradual and progressive soiling of structures exposed to the atmosphere is commonplace. Material soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric aerosols. Both wet and dry deposition occurs. The particle size and the orientation, exposure and roughness of the surface determine the dominant deposition mechanisms. Wet deposition is not an important cause of surface soiling, but precipitation removes particles from a surface. Aged atmospheric particles are characterized by a bimodal size distribution of coarse and fine particles. Coarse particles tend to be inactive chemically and are removed by washout and runoff. A primary cause of building soiling in urban areas has been attributed to the fine-particle mode. When fine particles contain carbon they tend to be black, and adhere more tenaciously to surface than do course particles. Elemental carbon is usually 10-20 percent of the urban fine aerosol mass, and vehicular emissions, particularly diesel emissions, are the major source of urban black smoke. The soiling of buildings occurs over the years from fine particle deposition and is associated with low atmospheric concentrations. This paper describes the influences of particle size and rainfall on the deposition, and on the soiling of surfaces with different surface glosses, orientations and exposures.

Creighton, P.J. (Rutgers: The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA)); Lioy, P.J. (Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ (USA)); Haynie, F.H.; Lemmons, T.J.; Miller, J.L.; Gerhart, J. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of soil samples from California. Additional data came from soil surveys of Italy, Greece, Iran, Thailand, Vietnam, various tropical Amazonian areas, and U.S. forests and from...

437

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

438

A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Soil gases have been used as an exploration tool for minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy, through the detection of anomalous gas levels. This paper describes a soil gas survey conducted over a large part of the Rotorua geothermal field to supplement the sparse gas data from drillhole samples and to determine gas distribution patterns over the field. Data collected from a reference hole were used to observe the effect changing meteorological conditions had on soil gas levels. The results were

439

Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem analysis and research needs  

SciTech Connect

In May 1979, The Institute of Ecology held a workshop to determine the role of organic soils in the global carbon cycle and to ascertain their past, present and future significance in world carbon flux. Wetlands ecologists and soil scientists who participated in the workshop examined such topics as Soils as Sources of Atmospheric CO/sub 2/, Organic Soils, Primary Production and Growth of Wetlands Ecosystems, and Management of Peatlands. The major finding of the workshop is that the organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and Gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/.

Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil ...  

Biochar also acts as a carbon sink by sequestering ... Amendment and Global Carbon Sequestration -2055 Contact: Gregory C. Flickinger Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination soil amendment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Independent Oversight Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades, November 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope and Approach .............................................................................................................................. 2

442

Effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities: An Update, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on SO2 emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. It updates and expands the EIA report, Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

Information Center

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides that certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is not considered high-level waste (HLW) if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), determines that the waste meets the statutory criteria set forth in Section 3116(a). Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination More Documents & Publications EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-296-B Rainbow Energy Marketing Corp: Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 66 - April 4, 2012 SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination

444

A Coupled Soil Moisture and Surface Temperature Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for soil moisture and soil surface temperature prediction for bare soil is considered in this paper. In describing evaporation rate. soil structure and moisture were taken into account as much as possible. Soil moisture prediction was ...

F. Ács; D. T. Mihailovi?; B. Rajkovi?

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic soil characterization is an under-explored field in the forensic sciences. One aspect of forensic sciences is Locard’s Exchange Principle, which states that every contact leaves a trace. As soil characterization technology improves, applications of soil forensics can more accurately identify if a soil sample collected from a suspect corresponds to samples collected at a crime scene. This research focuses on the use of visible near and infrared, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR DRS) to develop spectral “fingerprints” of soils. Our hypothesis is that VNIR spectra of soils from a crime scene are unique from other soils, even soils of the same soil series. If soil spectra from a crime scene are unique, this data can be used to accurately assess Locard’s Exchange Principle. Soil samples were collected within in a thirty-mile radius of a designated “crime scene” in the Brazos River floodplain near Texas A

Kobylinski, Catherine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication illustrations the effects of vegetation management on water availability.

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort.

Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

1994-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Final Environmental Assessment PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT PP-63 AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l' l' Addendum to the Final Environmental Assessment PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT PP-63 AND ASSOCIATED MODIFICATIONS TO 500 KV INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION LINE Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada Northern States Power Company u.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20545 October 1992 DISTAraunON OF11-ISDOOUMENT IS UNLIMITID DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

449

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 I, 'ONTRACT ID CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF