Sample records for determination soil amendment

  1. Reclaiming earthen drainage channels using organic soil amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Todd A

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The primary goal of this study was to determine the best combination of organic amendment and vegetation to stabilize and maintain these waterways. A site was selected that had surface soil textures ranging from fine sandy loam to silt loam. Soils...

  2. Possibilities of Sulphur as a Soil Amendment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 414 AUGUST, 1930 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY POSSIBILITIES OF SULPHUR AS A - SOIL AMENDMENT AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS... . --- Agronomist B. C. LANGLEY,'B. S., Assistant in Soils PUBLICATIONS: A. D. JACKSON, Chief VETERINARY SCIENCE: *M. FRANCIS, D. V. M., Chief. H SCHMIDT D V M Veferznarian E: JUNGHE~R, D. V. M.. Veterinarran W T HARDY D V RI., Veterinnrian F.'E.'CARROL;, D...

  3. TSNo s02-staats173645-P Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    TSNo s02-staats173645-P Title Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils. abstract Increased poultry production has contributed to excess nutrient (i.e., phosphorus (P)) problems in Atlantic Coastal Plain soils due to land application of poultry litter and manure

  4. Biochar amendment and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, Sean Daniel Charles

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of biochar amendment on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to elucidate the mechanisms behind these effects. I investigated the suppression of soil carbon dioxide ...

  5. Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

  6. Original article Nutrient leaching from soil amended with apple waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Nutrient leaching from soil amended with apple waste Anne-Marie de COCKBORNE December 2000) Abstract ­ Among the possibilities for disposing of overproduction of apple, land application is flexible and inexpensive. Six soil columns receiving 0, 200 or 500 Mg of apple wasteha­1 were

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural soil amended Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amendments and carbon sinks. Advantages Higher cation... Potential Applications Carbon sequestration Soil ... Source: Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC)...

  8. Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - amended soil microcosms Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amended soil microcosms Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biotechnology Letters 22: 915919, 2000. 2000 Kluwer Academic...

  10. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  11. SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF SOIL AMENDMENT WITH TREE LEGUME BIOMASS ON CARBON AND NITROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF SOIL AMENDMENT WITH TREE LEGUME BIOMASS ON CARBON AND NITROGEN IN PARTICLE-to-N ratio of the added plant material seems to control the eects of soil amendment with tree legume biomass to the total quantity of C and N pre- sent. Physical fractionation of SOM can help to identify more active

  12. Reconciling Apparent Variability in Effects of Biochar Amendment on Soil Enzyme Activities by Assay Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Smith, Jeffery L.; Bolton, Harvey

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying biochar to soils as an ameliorative substance and mechanism for C sequestration has received a great deal of interest in light of the sustained fertility observed in the Terra Preta soils of Brazil. The effects of synthetic biochars on biochemical processes needs to be better understood in order to determine if this is a reasonable practice in managed systems. The biochar studied was formed from the fast-pyrolysis of a switchgrass feedstock. Four soil enzymes were studied: ?-glucosidase, ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase. Both colorimetric and fluorescent assays were used for ?-glucosidase and ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Seven days after biochar was added to microcosms of a Palouse silt loam, the fluorescence-based assays indicated increased activities of the four enzymes, compared to non-amended soil. To clarify the mechanisms of the observed effects,in the absence of soil, purified enzymes or substrates were briefly exposed to biochar and then assayed. Except for ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase, the exposure of substrate to biochar reduced the apparent activity of the remaining three enzymes in vitro, suggesting that sorption reactions between the substrate and biochar either removed the substrate from the assays or impeded the enzyme binding. The activity of purified ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase increased significantly following biochar exposure, suggesting a chemical stimulation of enzyme functioning. We conclude that biochar added to soil acts as a substrate that can stimulate the soil microbial biomass and its activity. Our in vitro study suggests that biochar is not biochemically inert. Biochar amendments are likely to have effects that are currently difficult to predict, and that could impact overall soil function.

  13. Survival of Salmonella typhimurium in soils amended with beef feedlot manure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Jeffrey Allan

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BEEF FEEDLOT MANURE A Thesis by JEFFREY ALLAN WEBB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Soil Science SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BEEF FEEDLOT MANURE A Thesis JEFFREY ALLAN WEBB Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department) er (Member...

  14. acidic soil amended: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  15. TSNo s02-peak104427-P Direct Determination of Phosphate Species in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    TSNo s02-peak104427-P Title Direct Determination of Phosphate Species in Alum-Amended Poultry in the eastern United States today. Decades of intensive poultry litter application to sandy, low-lying soils in poultry litter with wastewater coagulants such as alum (aluminum sulfate). It has been proven

  16. AMENDED

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    x 1 AMENDED CLASS 1 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ATTACHMENT SEPTEMBER 1, 2010 RAINIER BIOGAS LLC COMMUNITY ANAEROBIC MANURE DIGESTER 2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION Applicant's Name: Rainier...

  17. Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal {sup 14}C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.

  18. Effects of compost and phosphate amendments on arsenic mobility in soils and arsenic uptake by the hyperaccumulator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Effects of compost and phosphate amendments on arsenic mobility in soils and arsenic uptake, or biosolid compost. Phosphate amendments sig- nificantly enhanced plant As uptake from the two tested soils was responsible for the enhanced mobility of As and subsequent increased plant uptake. Compost additions

  19. Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

  20. Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

  1. The effect of organic soil amendments and nitrogen rate on field establishment of rabbiteye blueberries (Vaccinium ashei Reade.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellborn, Elizabeth Carol

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is usually a result of inadequate nitrogen (46). In the case of blueberries any increase in soil acidity is usually beneficial (2). Several studies have been conducted on the use of aged or composted sawdust as a soil amendment to compensate for the nitro...THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC SOIL AMENDMENTS AND NITROGEN RATE ON FIELD ESTABLISHMENT OF RABBITEYE BLUEBERRIES (VACCINIUM ASHEI READE. ) A Thesis by ELIZABETH CAROL WELLBORN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

  2. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  3. Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Chemical fractionation and solubility of phosphorus in dairy manure-amended soils as a predictor of phosphorus concentration in runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harstad, Laura Elizabeth

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient over-loading in many dairy manure-amended soils in the dairy producing areas of Texas has led to environmental problems as such eutrophication of local surface water bodies. One of the nutrients contributing to eutrophication problems...

  5. Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    from larger commercial sources such as wood-burning biomass plants which produce heat or electricity in the soil. Wood ash is more soluble and reactive than ground limestone, and brings about a Benefits Recycles

  6. Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardiner, Duane

    Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

  7. Effects of Microbial and Phosphate Amendments on the Bioavailability of Lead (Pb) in Shooting Range Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, Robin; Wilson, Christina; Knox, Anna; Seaman, John; Smith, Garriet

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metals including lead (Pb) are released continually into the environment as a result of industrial, recreational, and military activities. Lead ranked number two on the CERCLA Priority List of Hazardous Substances and was identified as a major hazardous chemical found on 47% of USEPA's National Priorities List sites (Hettiarachchi and Pierzynski 2004). In-situ remediation of lead (Pb) contaminated soils may be accomplished by changing the soil chemistry and structure with the application of microbial and phosphate amendments. Soil contaminated with lead bullets was collected from the surface of the berm at Savannah River Site (SRS) Small Arms Training Academy (SATA) in Aiken, SC. While uncontaminated soils typically have Pb levels ranging from 2 to 200 mg/kg (Berti et al. 1998), previous analysis show Pb levels of the SATA berm to reach 8,673 mg/kg. Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds naturally produced by soil bacteria that can bind metals. Biosurfactants have a wide variety of chemical structures that reduce interfacial surface tensions (Jennings and Tanner 2000) and have demonstrated efficient metal complexion (Lin 1996). Biosurfactants also have the potential to change the availability of natural organic matter (Strong-Gunderson 1995). Two types of bacteria, Alcaligenes piechaudii and Pseudomonas putida, were employed as amendments based on their ability to produce biosurfactants and survive in metal-contaminated soils. Apatites (calcium phosphate compounds) are important in the formation of Pb phosphates. Pb phosphates form rapidly when phosphate is available and are the most stable environmental form of lead in soil (Ruby et al.1998). Pyromorphites in particular remain insoluble under a wide range of environmental conditions (Zhang et al. 1998). The three apatites evaluated in the current study were North Carolina apatite (NCA), Florida apatite (FA), and biological apatite (BA). BA is ground fish bone that has few impurities such as As, Cr, or U and contains about 27% total phosphate, most of which is available. FA and NCA are two types of rock phosphates that release small amounts of phosphate over time. Total phosphate is around 30% with only 1-2% phosphate available (Knox et al. 2005). In this study, we describe the influence of combining the two microbial and three phosphate amendments on reducing lead bioavailability in shooting range soil.

  8. ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphate Reactivity in Long-Term Poultry Litter-Amended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    SocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphate Reactivity in Long-Term Poultry Litter-Amended Southern Delaware Sandy Soils Yuji Arai,* K. J. T; Daniel et al., 1998; Stamm et al., 1998).Eutrophication caused by dissolved P from poultry litter (PL

  9. Soluble arsenic and selenium species in fly ash/organic waste-amended soils using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing coal fly ash with an organic waste increases macronutrient content and may make land application of fly ash a viable disposal alternative. However, trace element chemistry of these mixed waste products warrants investigation. Speciation of As and Se in soil solutions of fly ash-, poultry litter- and sewage sludge-amended soils was determined over a 10-day period by ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Detection limits were 0.031, 0.028, 0.051, 0.161, 0.497, and 0.660 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1} for dimethylarsinate (DMA), As(III), monomethylarsonate (MMA), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI), respectively. Arsenic was highly water-soluble from poultry litter and appeared to be predominantly As(V). Arsenic(V) was the predominant species in soil amended with two fly ashes. Application of fly ash/poultry litter mixtures increased As solubility and led to the prevalence of DMA as the major As species. DMA concentrations of these soil solutions decreased rapidly over the sampling period relative to As(V), suggesting that DMA readily underwent mineralization in the soil solution. Se(VI) was the predominant soluble Se species in all treatments indicating rapid oxidation of Se(IV) initially solubilized from the fly ashes.

  10. Midea: Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Noncompliance Determination to Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. finding that basic model HD-146F, a...

  11. Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

  12. Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    iii SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BIO-RESOURCES FROM LIVESTOCK, BIOENERGY, AND URBAN SYSTEMS A Dissertation by RONNIE WAYNE SCHNELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...-RESOURCES FROM LIVESTOCK, BIOENERGY, AND URBAN SYSTEMS A Dissertation by RONNIE WAYNE SCHNELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  13. The mechanisms and relative importance of abiotic and biological processes for VOC loss from sludge amended soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Environmental and Biological Sciences

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in sewage sludge has been a cause of increasing concern due to the possible risk to human health and the environment when sludge is applied to agricultural soils. Sludge application to agricultural land in the UK is expected to increase as a result of restrictions on alternative disposal routes and also increasingly stringent wastewater treatment requirements. Few studies have examined the fate and behavior of VOCs in sewage sludge amended soils and those reported have used spiked sludge rather than investigating the behavior of VOCs resident in the sludge itself. This study was designed to evaluate the behavior of aromatic VOCs (namely toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene) in unspiked sewage sludge amended soils and assess the relative importance and mechanisms of abiotic and biological loss processes. This was undertaken by adding sewage sludge to sterilized and unsterilized soil in closed and open systems. Results indicated that abiotic loss processes, primarily volatilization, were most important for the removal of VOCs. Initial rate of VOC loss was similar in all systems. After 65 days a residual VOC soil concentration remained which was apparently dependent on the conditions within the system.

  14. Comparison of methods for determining soil hydraulic characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd Humphreys, Kathryn

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Soil cores were centrifuged and the redistribution of water was measured as change in weight with time. Inconsistent results and limited data obtained with this method, consequently, prevented ade- quate conclusions from being made. Hydraulic... storage capacity of a soil is determined by infiltration, redistribution and drainage processes which also rely on knowledge of soil moisture movement. Three approaches used to determine the relevant hydraulic properties utitilized in describing soil...

  15. Vapor phase elemental sulfur amendment for sequestering mercury in contaminated soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Jackson, Dennis G.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of treating elemental mercury within the soil is provided by introducing into the soil a heated vapor phase of elemental sulfur. As the vapor phase of elemental sulfur cools, sulfur is precipitated within the soil and then reacts with any elemental mercury thereby producing a reaction product that is less hazardous than elemental mercury.

  16. Review of municipal sludge use as a soil amendment on disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is examining options of improving soil conditions at Hanford reclamation sites. One promising technology is the incorporation of municipal sewage sludge into the soil profile. This report reviews the potential benefits and adverse consequences of sludge use in land reclamation. Land reclamation comprises those activities instigated to return a mechanically disturbed site to some later successional state. Besides the introduction of suitable plant species to disturbed lands, reclamation generally requires measures to enhance long-term soil nutrient content, moisture retention or drainage, and mitigation of toxic effects from metals and pH. One of the more effective means of remediating adverse soil characteristics is the application of complex organic manures such as municipal sewage sludge. Sewage sludges contain complete macro- and micronutrients necessary to sustain plant growth. The application of sewage sludge may reestablish microbial activity in sterile soils. Physical properties, such as water-holding capacity and percentage water-stable aggregates, also improve with the addition of sewage sludge. Sludge applications may also increase the rate of degradation of some hydrocarbon pollutants in soils. Potential adverse impacts associated with the application of sewage sludge to land include negative public perception of human waste products; concerns regarding pathogen buildup and spread in the soils, plants, and water; entrance and accumulation of heavy metals in the food chain; salt accumulation in the soil and ground water; leaching of nitrates into ground water; and accumulation of other potentially toxic substances, such as boron and synthetic hydrocarbons, in the soil, plants, and food chain. 56 refs., 10 tabs.

  17. Utilizing Animal Waste Amendments to Impaired Rangeland Soils to Reduce Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Diana M.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Composted biological wastes contain vital plant nutrients that assist in plant growth as well as contain organic matter that promotes good soil conditions; both aid in rangeland restoration. Most importantly, it has the potential to restore water...

  18. Physical and hydraulic characteristics of bentonite-amended soil from Area 5, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, W. [University and Community Coll. System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste requires significant isolation from the biosphere. Shallow land burial using low-permeability covers are often used to prevent the release of impounded material. This report details the characterization of a soil mixture intended for use as the low-permeability component of a radioactive waste disposal site. The addition of 6.5 percent bentonite to the sandy soils of the site reduced the value of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub s}) by more than two orders of magnitude to 7.6 {times} 10{minus}{sup 8} cm/sec. Characterization of the soil mixture included measurements of grain density, grain size distribution, compaction, porosity, dry bulk density, shear strength, desiccation shrinkage, K{sub s}, vapor conductivity, air permeability, the characteristic water retention function, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by both experimental and numerical estimation methods. The ability of the soil layer to limit infiltration in a simulated application was estimated in a one-dimensional model of a landfill cover.

  19. Long-term leaching of trace elements in a heavily sludge-amended silty clay loam soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis by ICP-MS of shallow groundwater collected at a field site in New York that had been heavily loaded with sewage sludge more than 15 years earlier revealed elevated concentrations of Cu, Zn, Sr, Rb, Mo, Cd, As, Cr, Ni, Sb, W, Ag, Hg, and Sn compared with a nearby control site. Enhanced leaching of some elements from this near-neutral, fine-textured (silty clay loam) soil could be explained by exchange of soil-bound elements by components of the added sludge. For most of the heavy metals, however, increased leaching was a response to the high metal loadings in the soil, probably facilitated by higher dissolved organic matter in the leachate. Laboratory-determined distribution coefficients, K{sub D}, for the metals in newly prepared sludge/soil mixtures were lower than K{sub D} values of the field-aged sludge-treated soil, suggesting that metal mobility may have been substantially higher shortly after sludge application than many years later. Cumulative losses of certain trace elements from the topsoil have been estimated relative to Cr, a comparatively immobile element. These suggest that relative long-term losses range from 20 to 80%, with the order being: Sr, Mo, Sb {gt} Ni, Cd, Cu {gt} Zn, Ag. Generally, those elements with the smallest K{sub D} values (most soluble) measured recently in the soil had the largest loss estimates. However, present leaching loss rates are too slow to explain the estimated relative losses of several of these elements from the topsoil over the 15 or more years since sludge application.

  20. Sidewall tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sidewall tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, a) a body adapted for insertion into an opening in earthen soil below grade, the body having lateral sidewalls; b) a laterally oriented porous material provided relative to the body lateral sidewalls, the laterally oriented porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body; c) a pressure a sensor in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; and d) sidewall engaging means for engaging a portion of a sidewall of an earth opening to laterally urge the porous material into hydraulic communication with earthen soil of another portion of the opening sidewall. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed.

  1. Determination of soil parameters for wave equation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, William John

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of Soil Parameters for Wave Equation Analysis (August 1973) William J. Berger, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. Harry M. Coyle Load distribution versus depth data are used from static load test results and the amount of load... provided by Dr. Harry M. Coyle, Chairman of the writer's Graduate Advisory Committee and chief investigator for the project. Dr. Robert M. Olson snd Dr. Christopher C. Mathewson, members of the writer' s Graduate Advisory Committee, also furnished...

  2. Rapid Determination Of Radiostrontium In Large Soil Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Shaw, Patrick J.

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

  3. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, a) a body having opposing first and second ends and being adapted for complete insertion into earthen soil below grade; b) a porous material provided at the first body end, the porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body at the first body end, the fluid chamber being fluidically sealed within the body but for the porous material; c) a degassed liquid received within the fluid chamber; d) a pressure transducer mounted in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; e) the body, pressure transducer and degassed liquid having a combined mass; f) a flexible suspension line connected to the body adjacent the second body end, the flexible line being of sufficient strength to gravitationally freely self suspend the combined mass; and c) the combined mass being sufficient to effectively impart hydraulic communication between below-grade earthen soil contacted by the porous material under the weight of the combined mass. Tensiometers configured to engage the sidewalls of an earthen opening are also disclosed. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed.

  4. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable tensiometer to in-situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, (a) a body having opposing first and second ends and being adapted for complete insertion into earthen soil below grade; (b) a porous material provided at the first body end, the porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body at the first body end, the fluid chamber being fluidically sealed within the body but for the porous material; (c) a degassed liquid received within the fluid chamber; (d) a pressure transducer mounted in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; (e) the body, pressure transducer and degassed liquid having a combined mass; (f) a flexible suspension line connected to the body adjacent the second body end, the flexible line being of sufficient strength to gravitationally freely self suspend the combined mass; and (g) the combined mass being sufficient to effectively impart hydraulic communication between below-grade earthen soil contacted by the porous material under the weight of the combined mass. Tensiometers configured to engage the sidewalls of an earthen opening are also disclosed. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed. 12 figs.

  5. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mattson, Earl D. (Albuquerque, NM); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture, potential of earthen soil includes, a) an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and, comprising; b) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; c) a first fluid conduit extending outwardly of the first fluid chamber; d) a first controllable isolation valve provided within the first fluid conduit, the first controllable isolation valve defining a second fluid chamber in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber through the first fluid conduit and the isolation valve, the first controllable isolation valve being received within the below-grade portion; and e) a pressure transducer in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure transducer being received within the below-grade portion. An alternate embodiment includes an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and including: i) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; and ii) a pressure sensing apparatus in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure sensing apparatus being entirely received within the below-grade portion. A method is also disclosed using the above and other apparatus.

  6. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Mattson, E.D.; Sisson, J.B.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A tensiometer to in-situ determine below-grade soil moisture, potential of earthen soil includes, (a) an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and, comprising; (b) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; (c) a first fluid conduit extending outwardly of the first fluid chamber; (d) a first controllable isolation valve provided within the first fluid conduit, the first controllable isolation valve defining a second fluid chamber in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber through the first fluid conduit and the isolation valve, the first controllable isolation valve being received within the below-grade portion; and (e) a pressure transducer in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure transducer being received within the below-grade portion. An alternate embodiment includes an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and including: (1) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; and (2) a pressure sensing apparatus in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure sensing apparatus being entirely received within the below-grade portion. A method is also disclosed using the above and other apparatus. 6 figs.

  7. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphorus Speciation in Manure-Amended Alkaline Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    on the nature of the animal manure. Manure nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and conventional from between composted and raw dairy type. Total P in the subsurface soil was greater in the lagoon compared with the subsurface soils. These results provide piles, which may also be composted, and lagoons

  8. Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Nels Edward

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003...

  9. Determination of soil properties for sandy soils and road base at Riverside Campus using laboratory testing and numerical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez Barrios, Deeyvid O.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    : Chair of Committee, Jean-Louis Briaud Committee Members, Charles Aubeny Julian Kang Head of Department, John Niedzwecki Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Determination of Soil Properties of Sandy... Soils and Road Base at Riverside Campus Using Laboratory Testing and Numerical Simulation. (May 2010) Deeyvid Oscar Saez Barrios, B.En., Technological University of Panama Chair of Advisory Committee: Jean-Louis Briaud This study evaluated...

  10. Comparison of Methods for Determining Soil Hydraulic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Humphreys, K. B.

    (Alemi, et al., 1972). Soil cores were centrifuged and the redistribution of water was measured as change in weight with time. Inconsistent results and limited data obtained with this method, consequently, prevented adequate conclusions from being made...

  11. Field determination of hydraulic conductivity of Norwood silt loam soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffaf, Adham Yassin

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil-water pressure (cb) at different depths during the redistribution of the fourth water application 102 Moisture volume percentage at different depths during the first water application Moisture volume percentage at different depths during... the soil surface 106 12. Moisture volume percentage at different depths during the redistribution of the fourth water application 107 13 Moisture volume percentage at different depths outside the plot 108 LIST OF TABLES CONT'D. TABLE PAGE 14...

  12. Cadmium sulfate application to sludge-amended soils: II. Extraction of Cd, Zn, and Ma from solid phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahler, R.J. (Univ. of Arkansas, Marianna (USA)); Ryan, J.A. (Environmental Protection Agency Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium, Zn and Mn in eleven paired soils (one which had a history of sludge application and a control from adjacent land where sludge had not been used) were partitioned into five fractions: exchangeable, adsorbed, organically bound, carbonate bound and sulfide, by the use of KNO{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, NaHO, EDTA and HNO{sub 3}, respectively. The data indicate that the major portion of the total metals was found in the carbonate, sulfide and organic fractions. Addition of CaCO{sub 3} caused an increase in the exchangeable + soluble fractions of added Cd in the soils, but had little effect on native or sludge derived Cd.

  13. Use of passive sampling devices to determine soil contaminant concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.A. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States); [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Hooper, M.J. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States); Weisskopf, C.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective remediation of contaminated sites requires accurate identification of chemical distributions. A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDs) can provide a thorough site assessment. We have been pursuing their application in terrestrial systems and have found that they increase the ease and speed of analysis, decrease solvent usage and overall cost, and minimize the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a higher sampling frequency than is generally the case using traditional methods. PSDs have been used in the field in soils of varying physical properties and have been successful in estimating soil concentrations ranging from 1 {mu}g/kg (parts per billion) to greater than 200 mg/kg (parts per million). They were also helpful in identifying hot spots within the sites. Passive sampling devices show extreme promise as an analytical tool to rapidly characterize contaminant distributions in soil. There are substantial time and cost savings in laboratory personnel and supplies. By selectively excluding common interferences that require sample cleanup, PSDs can be retrieved from the field and processed rapidly (one technician can process approximately 90 PSDs in an 8-h work day). The results of our studies indicate that PSDs can be used to accurately estimate soil contaminant concentrations and provide lower detection limits. Further, time and cost savings will allow a more thorough and detailed characterization of contaminant distributions. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Compost Science and Utilization, 9(4):274-283 (2001) BIOREMEDIATION OF A PCB-CONTAMINATED SOIL VIA COMPOSTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Jr., Frederick C.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compost Science and Utilization, 9(4):274-283 (2001) BIOREMEDIATION OF A PCB-CONTAMINATED SOIL VIA COMPOSTING Frederick C. Michel Jr.1 , John Quensen, C.A.Reddy NSF Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan and composted in field scale piles to determine the effect of soil to amendment ratio on PCB degradation

  15. DETERMINATION OF SOIL HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES IN A PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT USING SOILPROP SOFTWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    DETERMINATION OF SOIL HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES IN A PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT USING SOILPROP) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K). To model the retention and movement of water and chemicals and hydraulic conductivity. It is often convenient to represent these functions by means of relatively simple

  16. Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Three soil types, plus rock, determine the slope or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety First Safety Last Safety Always · Three soil types, plus rock, determine the slope or safety to be at least 2 feet from the edge. Excavation Requirements Safety Tip #10 If you see a mistake and don't fix it on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet. Please refrain from reading the information verbatim

  17. Direct Speciation of Phosphorus in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Direct Speciation of Phosphorus in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter: Solid-State 31 P NMR Investigation, and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19717 Amending poultry litter prerequisite for the assessment of the sustainability of intensive poultry operations. Both solid- state MAS

  18. Standard test method for the radiochemical determination of americium-241 in soil by alpha spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This method covers the determination of americium241 in soil by means of chemical separations and alpha spectrometry. It is designed to analyze up to ten grams of soil or other sample matrices that contain up to 30 mg of combined rare earths. This method allows the determination of americium241 concentrations from ambient levels to applicable standards. The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precaution statements, see Section 10.

  19. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  20. Physical properties of various soil mixtures used for golf green construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johns, Don

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    amendments in soil mixtures for golf greens and concluded that peat moss seemed to be the most desirable amendment. Davis et al. (5) evaluated sands and amendments used for heavily traf- ficked turfgrass areas. Their findings indicated that ammoniated...) which was ground into pieces small enough to pass through a 2-mesh sieve, and R 6) Polyloam (PL), an artificial soil amendment. The organic amendments were: 1) peat moss (PM), and 2) ammoniated rice hulls (RH) Fourteen soil mixtures werc prepared...

  1. Utilization of a duckweed bioassay to evaluate leaching of heavy metals in smelter contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngman, A.L.; Lydy, M.J. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Williams, T.L. [Laidlaw Environmental Services, Wichita, KS (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a duckweed bioassay could be used to evaluate the downward migration of heavy metals in smelter soils. The duckweed bioassay was initially used to evaluate elutriates prepared from samples of smelter soils. These initial tests verified that the elutriates would elicit toxic responses. Elutriate testing was followed with an evaluation of leachate from untreated soil cores or soil cores that had been amended with organic matter either unplanted or planted to a grass-forb seed mixture. There was an inverse linear relationship between heavy-metal concentrations in leachate and NOEC and IC{sub 50} values expressed as percentages among all soil cores. Based on these preliminary duckweed bioassays, there were no differences between soil types or organic amended or non-amended soil, but leachate from vegetated soil cores were less toxic than were leachates from non-vegetated soil cores. Overall, the duckweed bioassays were useful in detecting heavy metal availability in elutriate and leachate samples from smelter soils.

  2. Determination of thorium, uranium, and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Tzortzis; Haralabos Tsertos

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study was conducted to determine thorium, uranium and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils throughout the accessible area of Cyprus using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A total of 115 soil samples was collected from all over the bedrock surface of the island based on the different lithological units of the study area. The soil samples were sieved through a fine mesh, sealed in 1000-mL plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory in terms of their gamma radioactivity for a counting time of 18 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, elemental concentrations were determined for thorium (range from 2.5x10^-3 to 9.8 micro g g-1), uranium (from 8.1x10^-4 to 3.2 micro g g-1) and potassium (from 1.3x10^-4 to 1.9 %). The Arithmetic mean values (A.M. +- S.D.) calculated are (1.2 +- 1.7) micro g g-1, (0.6 +- 0.7) micro g g-1, and (0.4 +- 0.3) %, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively, which are by a factor of three to six lower than the world average values of 7.4 micro g g-1 (Th), 2.8 micro g g-1 (U) and 1.3 % (K) derived from all data available worldwide. The best-fitting relation between the concentrations of Th and K versus U, and also of K versus Th, is essentially of linear type with a correlation coefficient of 0.93, 0.84, and 0.90, respectively. The Th/U, K/U, and K/Th ratios (slopes) calculated are equal to 2.0, 2.8x10^3,and 1.4x10^3, respectively.

  3. Impacts of Historical Land Use on Soil Nitrogen Cycles in Falmouth, MA and the Threat of Chronic N Amendment Demonstrated at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    composition and soil profiles at each land use site. Nitrification increased from -0.012 g N gds-1 day-1 of downstream water quality. Nitrogen loading to estuaries is of particular concern because of widespread of 50% of the land area in Massachusetts was cleared at one point for agricultural use (Hall et al. 2002

  4. A potential technique to determine the unsaturated soil shear strength parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Renu Uday

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    to understand the various aspects associated with development of shear strength of unsaturated soils. The research is conducted to obtain the most economical and reliable design solutions. The magnitude of positive pore water pressure developed in saturated soil...

  5. A comparison of methods for determining the adsorption of pentachlorophenol on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Eva Lorine

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and undisturbed surface soll cores in which the structure of the soil is preserved. A surface soil 'and the underlying subsurface soil were tested seperately, and the undisturbed surface soil was tested under both saturated and unsaturated flow conditions... flow effects, so the method can not be used to study the mobility of soluble chemicals in porous media [Relyea et al, 1980]. Because the use of crushed material and a high solution to mlids ratio dces not simulate conditions normally found...

  6. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 2332 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of peat soils 23 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 2332 (2003) EGU An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils.Schwaerzel@TU-Berlin.de Abstract A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which

  7. THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Jin

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

  8. Liquid chromatographic method for determination of water in soils and the optimization of anion separations by capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, N.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid chromatographic method for the determination of water in soil or clay samples is presented. In a separate study, the optimization of electrophoretic separation of alkylated phenolate ions was optimized by varying the pH and acetonitrile concentration of the buffer solutions.

  9. Directing ecological restoration: impact of organic amendments on above- and belowground ecosystem characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Lori Ann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfill in Garland, Dallas County, Texas. Treatments included altering the location of organic amendments in the soil profile, either applied to surface or incorporated, and varying the amount applied. Plant community composition, grass population dynamics...

  10. Determination of soil moisture by using resistance blocks with gravimetric comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Paul Burton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BKW . G$'= LXHBTM o. a. ~ . o ~ ~ ~ - ~ o ~ ~ . o. ~ . e' . ~ . ', ~ Ths E888 fox Aoouretoe Soil RQieteore Control ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ~ ~ Pmo88uros 888:Devices us88. ' tIo V~osure;;Soil-Xixietxxre. . . Gh JeotituGS Of the EeseorOh ~ e ~ a ~ ~ o a ~ e...

  11. Environmental assessment for amendments to 10 CFR Part 835

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposed amendment will modify the scope of 10 CFR 835 to explicitly exclude the transportation of radioactive material conducted in conformance with the Department of Transportation regulations, certain activities conducted on foreign soil, add standards for area posting and sealed radioactive source control, and add a removable surface radioactivity value for tritium.

  12. Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

  13. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  14. The jamming surface of granular matter determined from soil mechanics results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical soil mechanics results are used to propose the equation of the jamming transition surface in the (stress, specific volume) space. Taking axis-ymmetric conditions, labelling q the deviatoric stress and p' the mean pressure applied on the granular skeleton, and considering normal range of pressure (10 kPa-10MPa) the equation of the surface of jamming transition is v = vo-m ln(p'/p'o)+ md ln(1+q q/(M' M' p' p')); M' is related to the friction angle, m and md are two constants which depend on soil characteristics; p'o is a "unit" pressure.

  15. Environmental factors determining the trace-level sorption of silver and thallium to soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    of the sorbents, as well as other environmental factors (simulated acid rain application and the presence not effectively sorb Tl. Acid rain and addition of potassium (K+ ) and ammonium (NH4 + ) as competing ions had.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Silver; Thallium; Sorption; Acid rain; Selectivity; Soil 0048

  16. An evaluation of heat flow transducers as a means of determining soil heat flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Barney L. D

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    provided to the Micrometeorology Section, Department of Oceanography and Meteorology, ARM College of Texas by the Signal Corps of the United States Army, under Contract No. DA 36-039 AMC-02195 (E). The heat flow plates used in this study were provided... surface soil heat flow. The results show that acceptable performance of the plates in the measurement of heat flow is possible although in general should not be expected without thorough testing, and even then there are restrictive considerations...

  17. A rapid method for the determination of water in wet soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdick, Robert Linn

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rockwall Rockwell Rockwell 38 33 47 28 15 15 26 16 12 49 13 28 40 LL PI 27 35 29 25 25 19 25 26 SLd LSe Soil SR Class Bbsder 19 6. 3 1. 82 A-2-4 26 22 11. 5 1. 71 A-7 75 17 132 183 A6 84 21 8. 6 1 69 A-6 39 20 4, 1 1 76 A-2...

  18. Comparison of Activity Determination of Radium 226 in FUSRAP Soil using Various Energy Lines - 12299

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Brian [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Stoughton, MA 02072 (United States); Donakowski, Jough [Unites States Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City, MO 64106 (United States); Hays, David [United States Army Corps of Engineers, Maywood, NJ 07607 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma spectroscopy is used at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Maywood Superfund Site as the primary radioanalytical tool for quantization of activities of the radionuclides of concern in site soil. When selecting energy lines in gamma spectroscopy, a number of factors are considered including assumptions concerning secondary equilibrium, interferences, and the strength of the lines. The case of the Maywood radionuclide of concern radium-226 (Ra-226) is considered in this paper. At the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site, one of the daughters produced from radioactive decay of Ra-226, lead-214 (Pb- 214), is used to quantitate Ra-226. Another Ra-226 daughter, bismuth-214 (Bi-214), also may be used to quantitate Ra-226. In this paper, a comparison of Ra-226 to Pb-214 activities and Ra-226 to Bi-214 activities, obtained using gamma spectrometry for a large number of soil samples, was performed. The Pb-214, Bi-214, and Ra-226 activities were quantitated using the 352 kilo electron volt (keV), 609 keV, and 186 keV lines, respectively. The comparisons were made after correcting the Ra-226 activities by a factor of 0.571 and both ignoring and accounting for the contribution of a U-235 interfering line to the Ra-226 line. For the Pb-214 and Bi-214 activities, a mean in-growth factor was employed. The gamma spectrometer was calibrated for efficiency and energy using a mixed gamma standard and an energy range of 59 keV to 1830 keV. The authors expect other sites with Ra-226 contamination in soil may benefit from the discussions and points in this paper. Proper use of correction factors and comparison of the data from three different gamma-emitting radionuclides revealed agreement with expectations and provided confidence that using such correction factors generates quality data. The results indicate that if contamination is low level and due to NORM, the Ra-226 can be measured directly if corrected to subtract the contribution from U-235. If there is any indication that technologically enhanced uranium may be present, the preferred measurement approach for quantitation of Ra-226 activity is detection of one of the Ra-226 daughters, Pb-214 or Bi-214, using a correction factor obtained from an in-growth curve. The results also show that the adjusted Ra-226 results compare very well with both the Pb-214 and Bi-214 results obtained using an in-growth curve correction factor. (authors)

  19. DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in tropical soils of Mali, West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanton-Knewtson, Sharon Joy

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low soil fertility is one of the major biophysical constraints affecting African agriculture. Phosphorus and nitrogen are the two most common limiting nutrients. Before fertility amendment recommendations are made a soil's natural nutrient...

  1. Silicon absorption by sugarcane: effect of soils type and silicate fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartori de Camargo, Mnica; Korndrfer, Gaspar Henrique; Wyler, Patricia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G et al, Effect of Ca-silicate amendments on soil chemicalResponse of sugarcane to silicate source ad rate. I. GrowthSoil and plant silicon and silicate response by sugarcane.

  2. Laboratory determination of gas-side mass transfer coefficients applicable to soil-venting systems for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from vadose-zone soils. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Valkenburg, M.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the subsurface environment by organic solvents has become a national problem. The EPA's Superfund list (40 CFR Part 300, 1990) continues to grow, with continual discovery of new hazardous waste sites. Various techniques are employed to remediate these sites, including excavation and removal of the contaminated soil for proper disposal, pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water and an organic phase if present, containment by slurried soil-bentonite cut-off barriers, in situ biological treatment of the organic wastes, and vadose zone soil venting for gas absorption of volatiles. Each technique, or combination, may have merit at a given site. The soil venting process, an inexpensive but relatively successful technique for removal of contaminants from the vadose (unsaturated) zone, is the focus of the research.

  3. Effects of compost and phosphate on plant arsenic accumulation from soils near pressure-treated wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Effects of compost and phosphate on plant arsenic accumulation from soils near pressure, USA Received 5 September 2003; accepted 21 May 2004 ``Capsule'': Compost amendment can reduce L.) were grown for ten weeks in the soil with or without compost and phosphate amendments

  4. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

  5. CX-005612: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part IICX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7Date: 04/12/2011Location(s): Ellery, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extended. Offers musi acknowledge ceceipl of this amendment prior to the hour and dale specified copies oflhe amendment, (b) By acknowledging receipt ol this amendment on each copy of the offer and amendment numbers FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT

  8. Solid-State Speciation of Natural and Alum-Amended Poultry Litter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Solid-State Speciation of Natural and Alum-Amended Poultry Litter Using XANES Spectroscopy D . P E in lowering water-soluble phosphate levels in poultry litter, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully variable and depends on the type of animal manure and soil properties. For example, poultry, cattle

  9. Nitrogen limiation and nitrogen fixation during alkane biodegradation in a sandy soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toccalino, P.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Boone, D.R. (Oregon Graduate Institute of Science Technology, Portland, OR (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaking underground storage tanks are a significant source of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water. Hydrocarbon biodegradation studies have been conducted in both ground water and topsoil regions, but few studies have been done on the unsaturated zone between these two. This study examines the effects of Nitrogen on propane and butane biodegradiations in an unsaturated sandy soil. Results indicate that nitrogen additions initially stimulated both propane and butane oxidizing organisms in the soil, but that propane-amended soil became N limited whereas butane-amended soil eventually overcame its N limitations by fixing Nitrogen and that nitrogen fixing organisms grew in butane amended but not in propane amended soil. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  10. The Building Standard (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1964

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1964 No. 802 (S. 50) BUILDING AND BUILDINGS The Building Standards (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1964...

  11. CX-011776: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rule for New and Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01292014...

  12. A Critical Evaluation on the Use of Kinetics for DeterminingThermodynamicsof Ion Exchange in Soils1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Words: dynamicsof ion exchange, kineticmeth- ods, physical chemistry of K, film diffusion. Ogwada, R are they often applicable to field conditions. Agricultural soils are nearly always in a state of nonequilibrium

  13. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly ash is sold as a by-product.

  14. Study of soils buried under embankments to determine the potential of burial as a preservation technique for archaeological sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Tania

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . . Thermodynamics Approach . . . . . 1 0 10 , . . . . . 1 3 . . 1 4 Ferrolysis and Other Reactions in Periodically-Saturated Soils. . . . . . . . . . . . . , . 1 7 . . . 21 Literature Review. Navajo Site Cunningham Site. Riverside Site. . Levee Site.... . . . 68 Discussion on Site Variability. Physical and Morphological Changes. Horizon Thickness. . . . . . 70 . . . . . 7 1 . . . . 7 2 Color . . . . 7 6 Texture. . . . . . 7 7 Structure. . Mottling. Calcium Carbonate Concretions. . . . . 78...

  15. The environmental behavior and chemical fate of energetic compounds (TNT, RDX, tetryl) in soil and plant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Harvey, S.D.; Fellows, R.J.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Munitions materials can accumulate or cycle in terrestrial environs at production and manufacturing facilities and thus pose potential heath and environmental concerns. To address questions related to food chain accumulation, the environmental behavior of energetic compounds (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene,TNT; hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, RDX; 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine, tetryl) was evaluated. Emphasis was placed on determining the potential for soil/plant transfer of munitions residues, translocation and distribution within the plant, the extent to which compounds were metabolized following accumulation, and the chemical nature and form of accumulated residues. Both TNT and tetryl undergo extensive chemical transformation in soil, forming aminodinitrotoluene isomers and N-methyl-2,4,6-trinitroaniline residues, respectively, along with a series of unknowns. After 60 days, only 30% of the amended TNT and 8% of the amended tetryl remained unchanged in the soil. In contrast, 78% of the soil-amended RDX remained unchanged after 60 days. After 60 days, plants grown in soils containing 10 ppm residues contained from 5 {mu}g TNT/g to 600 {mu}g RDX/G fresh wt. tissue. TNT and tetryl residues were primarily accumulated in roots (75%), while RDX was concentrated in leaves and seed. The principal transport form for TNT (root to shoot) was an acid labile conjugate of aminodinitrotoluene; RDX was transported unchanged. On accumulation in roots and leaves, highly polar and non-extractable TNT metabolites dominated, with the aminodinitrotoluene isomers accounting for less than 20% of the residues present. Only a few percent were present as the parent TNT. RDX was partitioned similarly to TNT, with 8 to 30% of the RDX appearing as polar metabolites, 20--50% as parent RDX, and the balance as non-extractable residues. Tetryl was metabolized to N-methyl-2,4,6-trinitroaniline and a variety of polar metabolites.

  16. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for former waste management units, legacy contamination source areas and distribution of contamination in soils, and environmental infrastructure (e.g., caps, monitoring systems, etc.) that is in place or planned in association with RAs. (3) Regulatory considerations and processes for management and disposition of waste soil upon generation, including regulatory drivers, best management practices (BMPs), waste determination protocols, waste acceptance criteria, and existing waste management procedures and BMPs for Y-12. This Soil Management Plan provides information to project planners to better coordinate their activities with other organizations and programs with a vested interest in soil disturbance activities at Y-12. The information allows project managers and maintenance personnel to evaluate and anticipate potential contaminant levels that may be present at a proposed soil disturbance site prior to commencement of activities and allows a more accurate assessment of potential waste management requirements.

  17. The Institutes of Technology [as amended by Institutes of Technology,] (Amendment, Act, 1963.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivalingam, Krishna M.

    The Institutes of Technology Act, 1961 [as amended by Institutes of Technology,] (Amendment, Act, 1963.] Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Bombay ­ 400 076 #12;THE INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY ACT. THE SCHEDULE #12;THE INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY, ACT, 1961 No. 59 of 1961 [as amended by Institutes of Technology

  18. Microsoft Word - Alcoa_amendment_CX.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    level of service under an existing power sales contract to a facility (the Intalco smelter) that is already in existence and currently operating. The amendment would extend...

  19. Organic matter added to bareroot nursery beds influences soil properties and morphology of Fraxinus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responses to nursery soil amendments vary with different forms and amounts of OM. Benefits to seedling, including soil properties. Hardwood seedlings are generally more demanding than conifer seedlings in terms). Aggregates formed between OM and the soil help increase filtration and retention of water and increase root

  20. EIS-0441: Amended Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mohave County Wind Farm Project, Mohave County, Arizona EPA is amending the Notice of Availability for...

  1. Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Amendment to Funding Opportunity...

  2. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program...

  3. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PP-371 Amended Northern Pass Transmission FRN More Documents & Publications Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings,...

  4. PHOSPHORUS IN ALUM AMENDED POULTRY LITTER SYSTEMS: DISTRIBUTION, SPECIATION, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    PHOSPHORUS IN ALUM AMENDED POULTRY LITTER SYSTEMS: DISTRIBUTION, SPECIATION, AND INTERACTIONS;PHOSPHORUS IN ALUM AMENDED POULTRY LITTER SYSTEMS: DISTRIBUTION, SPECIATION, AND INTERACTIONS WITH ALUMINUM

  5. Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily Buildings for the Weatherization Assistance Program Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily Buildings for...

  6. The determination of the specific heat of a fine-grained soil by a non-mixing method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Leighton Allen

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for detenaining ths specific heat oi' soils. It consisted of an inner oan& a double- walled container which enolosed ths inner can sm the sides and the bottom, end a cover (reference Figure 8, page 6) ~ The inner can was approximately 18e4 centimeters... to the longitudinal axis of the capsule to faoilitate the transi'er of heat from the specimen tc the calorimeter bath. These wires had a longitudinal spacing of one-half' oentimeter and a radial spacing of sixty degrees& in succession. This wixe maze extended about...

  7. Aggregate stability, infiltration, and glomalin in eroded and compacted soils on Fort Hood Military Reservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applewhite, James Kenneth

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    on soil aggregation, infiltration, and levels of glomalin. A field study was done on plots located inside Fort Hood on a Nuff silty clay (fine-silty, carbonatic, thermic Udic Calciustoll). The plots were amended with composted dairy manure, inorganic...

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CX-012351: Categorical Exclusion Determination Danger Tree Management on Green Mountain-Blue Ridge Repeater 2.4-kilovolt Distribution Line (Amended), Grand County, Colorado CX(s)...

  9. Growth of Phymatotrichum omnivorum in Branyon and Weswood soils: and its interactions with other soil microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Rebecca Lynn

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pathogen vi vi I xiv Control of Phymatotr ichum omnivorum Interactions with Competitive Microflora Interactions wi th Antagonistic Micruflora Suppr essive Soils Survival of Antagonists 10 MATERIALS AND METHODS Selection of Soil 14 Source... 10 cm from the inoculum. Trial 1 67 14. P1ycel i a) growth in ster i le ( top ) and nonster i le & bottom & Br anyon clay pr i or to coming in contact with chitin-amended soil. Notice the browning of the mycelium in the nonsterile soil 69 15...

  10. Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it...

  11. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  12. XAFS determination of the chemical form of lead in smelter-contaminated soils and mine tailings: Importance of adsorption processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Ildefonse, P.; Calas, G. [Univ. de Paris 6 et 7 (France). Lab. de Mineralogie-Cristallographie; Ostergren, J.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences; Brown, G.E. Jr. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences]|[Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated smelter-contaminated soils from Evin-Malmaison, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, and mine tailings from Leadville, Colorado, U.S.A. Bulk Pb concentrations range from 460 to 1900 ppm in the topsoils at Evin-Malmaison site and from 6000 to 10,000 ppm in the tailings samples from the Leadville site. These concentrations necessarily raise human health and environmental concerns, but bioavailability and chemical lability of Pb in these materials vary dramatically and show little correlation with bulk concentrations. This study provides detailed information on the speciation of Pb in these materials. Emphasis is on the identification and characterization of poorly crystalline and/or fine-grained species, such as sorption complexes and poorly crystalline (co)precipitates, which are likely to control Pb bioavailability and mobility in these natural systems. In the Evin-Malmaison samples, direct spectroscopic evidence for Pb sorbed to humic acids was found, as well as to both manganese and iron (oxyhydr)oxides. In the Leadville samples, variations in Pb speciation with pH are consistent with predictions based on simplified model system studies of adsorption processes; specifically, the carbonate-buffered tailings with near-neutral pH contain up to 50% of total Pb as adsorption complexes on iron (oxyhydr)oxides, whereas Pb speciation in sulfide-rich low pH samples is dominated by Pb-bearing jarosites with no evidence for adsorbed Pb in these latter samples.

  13. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of dioxins in contaminated sediment and soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of dioxins in contaminated sediment-derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin values and log- transformed GC/HRMS-derived TEQ values were. Keywords: PCDD; PCDF; 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD; GC/HRMS; Immunoassay 1. Introduction

  14. RFP Amendment_002a.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Page 2 of 2 Block 14 "DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENTMODIFICATION," continued. This amendment is issued to revise Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0001458 as described herein. Deletions...

  15. Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanneschlager, R. E.

    Congress is currently debating amendments to the Clean Air Act which would strengthen and enhance the current Clean Air Act. The bill would guarantee a reduction of 10 million tons of sulfur dioxide from 1980 levels; would sharply reduce pollutants...

  16. Amendment 80 vessel replacement 1 Implementation and of Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Provisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendment 80 vessel replacement 1 Implementation and of Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Provisions vessels to use non-qualifying vessels in the sector, thus allowing replacement of a lost qualifying vessel of the CRP ambiguous as to whether replacement of qualifying vessels with non-qualifying vessels

  17. CX-012123: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Final Rule for Regulatory Amendments for Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps CX(s) Applied: A6 Date: 03272014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden...

  18. CX-012116: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-012116: Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rule for Amended Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-in Coolers and Walk-in Freezers CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 0502...

  19. CX-008156: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Amended Provision of Funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to Purchase the Rapid Lightning Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25...

  20. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    and Loitering, was last amended in November 1987 and requires amendment to conform with new administrative/REPEAL OF REGULATIONS IS: Myrlande Dessalines, Paralegal, Office of the General Counsel, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton

  1. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    .005 was last amended in November 1987 and required amendment to conform with new administrative titles Dessalines, Paralegal, Office of the General Counsel, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, Florida, 33431, (561) 297

  2. Doan Thu et al. published in European Journal of Soil Biology The earthworm species Metaphire posthuma modulates the effect of organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    amendment offers a good way to substantially improve soil quality and therefore agricultural sustainability and biochemical processes in soils are important for the management of farming systems [54]. The utilizationDoan Thu et al. published in European Journal of Soil Biology 1 The earthworm species Metaphire

  3. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: March 22, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    .: Florida Solar Energy Center Operations 6C7-8.001 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT: The amendments INITIATED PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: Philip Fairey, Deputy Director of Florida Solar Energy CenterC7-8.001 Florida Solar Energy Center Operations. (1) The Florida Solar Energy Center, (herein called

  4. November 18, 2011 Amendment to Patent Acknowledgment or Agreement;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    November 18, 2011 Amendment to Patent Acknowledgment or Agreement; Look for E-mail during Week University resources or facilities sign an amendment to the patent document signed by all employees when the Patent Amendment process that commences the week of November 28, 2011. Background The Patent

  5. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: April 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    REGULATION AMENDMENT: Philip Fairey, Deputy Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING.: Solar Thermal Collector and PV Module Testing Standards UCF-8.002 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF6C7-8.002 Solar Thermal Collector

  6. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: August 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    .: Florida Solar Energy Center Operations 6C7-8.001 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT: This regulation is revised to update the location of the Florida Solar Energy Center. This regulation is amended also of Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT SHOULD BE SUBMITTED

  7. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: August 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: Philip Fairey, Deputy Director of Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS.: Solar Collector Certification 6C7-8.003 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT: This regulation is revised-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: 6C7-8.003 Solar Thermal Collector

  8. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: April 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    REGULATION AMENDMENT: Philip Fairey, Deputy Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING.: Solar Thermal Collector and PV Module Certification UCF-8.003 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF6C7-8.003 Solar Thermal Collector

  9. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: April 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    .: Florida Solar Energy Center Operations UCF-8.001 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT: The regulation Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT SHOULD TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF6C7-8.001 Florida Solar Energy Center Operations. (1

  10. Application for Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Page 1 of 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application for Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Page 1 of 6 Revised: 12/23/2013 OMB Control No. 0648-0565 Expiration Date: 01/31/2016 APPLICATION FOR AMENDMENT 80 VESSEL REPLACEMENT United States OF THE AMENDMENT 80 VESSEL BEING REPLACED 1. Vessel Name: 2. ADF&G Vessel Registration No.: 3. USCG Documentation

  11. Phytoremediation of radiocesium-contaminated soil in the vicinity of Chernobyl, Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dushenkov, S. [Phytotech, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)] [Phytotech, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States); Mikheev, A.; Prokhnevsky, A.; Ruchko, M.; Sorochinsky, B. [National Academy of Science, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering] [National Academy of Science, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remediation of soil contaminated with {sup 137}Cs remains one of the most challenging tasks after the Chernobyl 1986 accident. The objectives of this research were to (1) identify extractants that may be used to solubilize {sup 137}Cs in soil solution, (2) study the effect of soil amendments on {sup 137}Cs accumulation by plants, and (3) evaluate the applicability of phytoextraction for environmental restoration of soil contaminated with {sup 137}Cs. The availability of {sup 137}Cs to the plants in Chernobyl soil was limited, because this radionuclide was tightly bound to exchange sites of soil particles or incorporated into the crystalline structure of primary and secondary minerals. Out of 20 soil amendments tested to increase {sup 137}Cs desorption/solubility in the soil, ammonium salts were found to be the most practical soil amendment that can potentially increase {sup 137}Cs bioavailability. Among the screened plants, Amaranth cultivars had the highest {sup 137}Cs accumulation. Three sequential crops of Indian mustard grown in one vegetation season at the experimental plot resulted in a small decrease of {sup 137}Cs specific activity within the top 15 cm of soil. Further improvements are necessary to make phytoremediation technology a feasible option for restoration of {sup 137}Cs-contaminated territories.

  12. Availability and distribution of heavy metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus from sewage sludge in the plant-soil-water continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappaport, B.D.; Scott, J.D.; Martens, D.C.; Reneau, R.B.; Simpson, T.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted during 1984 and 1985 to determine Cd, Cu, N, Ni, P, and Zn availabilities to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and corn (Zea mays) grown on four sludge-amended soils. An aerobically digested sewage sludge, which was dewatered for approximately 2 years on sandbeds, was obtained from a sewage-treatment plant with major industrial inputs. A 14-day anaerobic N incubation study indicated that mineralization of sludge organic N varied from 9.2% at the 42 Mg ha(-1) sludge rate to 4.2% at the 210 Mg ha(-1) rate. This relatively low percentage of N mineralized from the sludge may reflect the inhibitory effects of the high sludge-metal levels on N transformations and the changes in sludge composition during long-term dewatering on sandbeds. Sludge application increased crop yields, except where the amounts of N mineralized from the sludge was inadequate to supply the N requirement of the crop. Crop yields were not decreased by either metal phytotoxity or P deficiency on the four sludge-amended soils.

  13. Review Guidance for the TWRS FSAR amendment for Waste Retrieval and waste feed delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFITH, R.W.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review guidance (Guide) was developed for Office of River Protection (ORP) reviewers to use in reviewing the amendment to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) covering waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. Waste retrieval and waste feed delivery are necessary to supply nuclear waste from TWRS storage tanks to the TWRS Privatization (TWRS-P) Contractor's vitrification facility and to receive intermediate waste from the vitrification facility back into the TWRS tank farms for interim storage. An amendment to the approved TWRS FSAR (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Rev. 0) is necessary to change the authorization basis to accommodate waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. The ORP'S safety responsibility in reviewing the FSAR amendment is to determine that reasonable assurance exists that waste retrieval and waste feed delivery operations can be accomplished with adequate safety for the workers, the public, and the environment. To carry out this responsibility, the ORP will evaluate the Contractor's amendment to the TWRS FSAR for waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to determine whether the submittal provides adequate safety and complies with applicable regulatory requirements.

  14. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat HomeAssurance: DOESoil0 Soils Soil

  15. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Green Building Standards Code not pertain to energy) Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;139 Chapter 13C GREEN BUILDING REQUIREMENTS shall be known as the California San Francisco Green Building Standards Code and may be cited

  16. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Building Standards Code 2010 California Residential Code Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;2 #121 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Building Code 2010 California;3 CHAPTER 1 SCOPE AND ADMINISTRATION DIVISION I CALIFORNIA ADMINISTRATION No San Francisco Building Code

  17. Amendment 25 Fishery Management Plan for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Pie Cooperative Program: Catcher Processor Elements * * * 1.7.2.5 CONVERSION TO CATCHER/PROCESSOR SHARES. (1) This amendment authorizes: (A) an eligible entity holding processor quota shares to elect on an annual basis for the Northern Region; and (B) an eligible entity holding catcher vessel quota shares to elect on an annual basis

  18. NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to:Diesel Engines |ServicesfromJanuary2, 205-12

  19. NEPA Determination: LM-08-12 Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to:Diesel Engines |ServicesfromJanuary2, 205-128-12

  20. Comparison of Three Aqua Regia Digestion Methods for Twenty Florida Soils Ming Chen* and Lena Q. Ma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    amendments such as sewage standard reference materials (SRMs 2704, 2709, and 2711) and 20 sludge sediments. Recov-inated soils and monitoring land application of metal- ery of 43 to 77% for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu ABSTRACT soil and sludge samples based on it, in addition to the total elemental concentrations (Vercoutere

  1. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

  2. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA IN SELECTED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K). This study involved field and laboratory determination of soil

  3. Soil Profile CO2 concentrations in forested and clear cut sites in Nova Scotia, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    concentration; Forest management; Soil temperature; Soil moisture; Soil texture 1. Introduction Subsurface2 production and transport caused by the complex interactions between biotic and environmental content, and soil physical characteristics (transport factors) mainly determine the variability

  4. Probabilistic Analysis of the Compressibility of Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Byoung C.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of surface loads or variable soil deposits. In current practice, the analysis to determine settlements is deterministic. It assumes that the soil profile at a site is uniform from location to location, and only allows limited consideration of the variations...

  5. Glenwood Springs Amendments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Open EnergyAmendments Jump to:

  6. air act amendments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHARES. (1) This amendment authorizes: (A) an eligible entity holding processor quota shares to elect on an annual basis for the Northern Region; and (B) an eligible entity...

  7. air act amendment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHARES. (1) This amendment authorizes: (A) an eligible entity holding processor quota shares to elect on an annual basis for the Northern Region; and (B) an eligible entity...

  8. amendment regulations northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    students that a parking space will be available at all times. (6) Annual, or semester, monthly, weekly or daily term Pilyugin, Sergei S. 200 Certificate of Compliance Amendment...

  9. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of program implementation lessons-learned Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews More Documents & Publications...

  10. amendments irritate businesses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Studies Business and Management Studies (with a professional placement year) Business with Human Resource Sussex, University of 42 Date Created: 2006 Date Amended...

  11. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Amended Application of Northern Pass Transmission LLC for Presidential Permit Exhibit 1 - Opinion of Counsel Exhibit 2 - General Area Map of Proposed Route Exhibit 3 - Diagrams of...

  12. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Northern Transmission Line has submitted an amended application for a Presidential Permit to construct, operate, maintain and connect an electric transmission line across the...

  13. Efficacy of soluble sodium tripolyphosphate amendments for the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of soluble sodium tripolyphosphate amendments for the in-situ immobilisation of uranium."Environmental Chemistry 4:293-300. Authors: DM Wellman EM Pierce MM Valenta...

  14. alnus rubra amended: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amended by F96 in the all-University requirements as presented by Dr. Theodore Norton, Chairman of the Curriculum Committee. (Passed: Meeting of 22673) Copies sent to...

  15. EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Involvement Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Kern County, CA DOE is publishing this Amended...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - amending council directive Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species because it assumes the unharvested QS... interactions between Amendment 80 cooperatives. The commenter may approach the Council in the future... in the Amendment 80...

  17. Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality standards (same as maximum contaminant levels) by reducing water infiltration through strontium-90 contaminated perched water and interbeds. In addition, the remedy will prevent future drinking water wells from being drilled into the contaminated portion of the aquifer that is in and near the INTEC facility until such time as the water is restored to maximum contaminant levels or below.

  18. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: November 8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Martin C.

    PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: Dr. James Fenton, Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING.: Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic System Standards UCF-8.010 and Certification SUMMARY OF REGULATION-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF-8.010 Solar Thermal

  19. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: November 8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Martin C.

    REGULATION AMENDMENT: Dr. James Fenton, Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING.: Solar Thermal PV Equipment Testing Standards UCF-8.007 SUMMARY OF REGULATION: This regulation-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF-8.007 Solar Thermal PV Equipment

  20. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: November 8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Martin C.

    .: Florida Solar Energy Center Operations UCF-8.006 SUMMARY OF REGULATION: This regulation is an updated-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF-8.006 Florida Solar Energy Center AMENDMENT: Dr. James Fenton, Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED

  1. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: November 8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Martin C.

    REGULATION AMENDMENT: Dr. James Fenton, Director, Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING.: Solar Thermal Collector and PV Module Certification UCF-8.008 SUMMARY OF REGULATION: This regulation-mail: regulations@mail.ucf.edu FULL TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF-8.008 Solar Thermal Collector

  2. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: April 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    , Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT SHOULD BE SUBMITTED.: Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic System Standards UCF-8.005 and Certification SUMMARY OF REGULATION OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: UCF6C7-8.005 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic System Standards

  3. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: August 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    , Deputy Director of Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT in the solar hearing industry and to refer to updated standards prepared by the Florida Solar Energy Center TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: 6C7-8.005 SolarThermal and Photovoltaic Domestic Water

  4. CX-011399: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-011399: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High-Enthalpy,...

  5. Tank farm backlog soil sample analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlers, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the measures to collect samples, perform testing on samples, and make decisions to obtain a Contained- in Determination for tank farms backlog soil.

  6. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . is not extended. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT

  7. Plant and Soil 249: 203215, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    including municipal biosolids, woody debris, wood ash, pulp and paper sludge, and compost. The existing soil to less than 4 mg kg-1in two of the treatments. Use of conventional amendments including lime alone-nutrients. Conventional restoration technologies involve covering tailings with an imper- meable plastic material (such

  8. Land Application of Organic Fertilizers or Amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmel, Daren; Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying organic materials to your land can add beneficial nutrients to the soil. But when too much is applied, or when it is applied incorrectly, organic material can cause environmental problems. This publication will help you select the proper...

  9. Managing Soil Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains soil salinity, factors that contribute to it, and methods of correcting saline soils....

  10. CX-011482: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011482: Categorical Exclusion Determination Obtain soil samples for potential D-Area borrow sources CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 11072013...

  11. CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lurance Canyon Burn Site Soil and Groundwater Site Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06142010 Location(s):...

  12. CX-008632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-008632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sampling of Soil Vapor Extraction Wells at the Western Sector Dynamic Underground Stripping System CX(s)...

  13. CX-005672: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    672: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005672: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Systems Integration Facility Excavation Soil Stockpile CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 04...

  14. APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    1 APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT TERM 1 - 2014/15 Lead Instructors*: Maja Krzic indicators to assess sustainability of land management practices. Characterize the soil chemical environment 402-Sustainable Soil Management SOIL 502-Advanced Sustainable Soil Management Final exam 35% Final

  15. IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS PLACEMENT BPG NOTE 5 Best Practice Guidance for Land of heavy industry. Soil material initially present on a site may have been removed or stored in bunds the original soil that has been stored or importing a soil from elsewhere or using a soil-forming material

  16. Applicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    site water balance Image from: (Migliaccio 2007) #12;Background ­ Soil Water Sensors Time DomainApplicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South Florida Urban Soils Kevin Koryto Water: Determine if CS616 soil water sensors are functioning adequately at field site. Hypothesis: Presence of air

  17. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Soil Particle Analysis Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil is an important component of an on-site wastewater treatment system. This publication explains the composition of soils, the sizing of soil particles, and the ways soil particles are analyzed to determine whether a site is suitable for a...

  18. Soils and Environment Soil fertility and soil processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    be removed without blasting. Definition of soil #12; Land use planning, urbanization, timber management, landslides, and earthquakes Soils often carry a climatic signal Soil properties related to environmental soil. The fertile soils formed on glacial deposits in the mid-western United States are transported

  19. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    in 1981, and last revised in 1987. It requires updating to reflect the policies and procedures currently AMENDMENT IS: Myrlande Dessalines, Paralegal, Office of the General Counsel, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton

  20. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    .003 was originally drafted in 1979, and last revised in 1987. It sets forth some, but not all, employee files AMENDMENT IS: Myrlande Dessalines, Paralegal, Office of the General Counsel, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton

  1. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    and distribution of financial aid to students. It was last amended November 11, 1987. This proposal updates: Myrlande Dessalines, Paralegal, Office of the General Counsel, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, Florida, 33431

  2. DOE Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to Amend the External Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    12192014, Apple Inc. met with DOE to discuss the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to Amend the External Power Supply Test Procedure. EPS TP Ex Parte MemoApple12-19-14 More...

  3. Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments_CX.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the same level of service under an existing power sales contract to the Intalco smelter in Ferndale, WA. These amendments would further extend this service for up to an...

  4. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCTURE SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL for the provision of environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section

  5. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCTURE SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL of environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water

  6. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992

  7. SECTION 571 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 571 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION West Virginia pursuant to Section 571 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999, Public Law 106

  8. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992, Public Law 102

  9. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section

  10. SECTION 571 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 571 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN to be developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in central West Virginia pursuant

  11. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992

  12. SECTION 571 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 571 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE assistance to non-Federal interests in central West Virginia pursuant to Section 571 of the Water Resources

  13. SECTION 571 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 571 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN-Federal interests in central West Virginia pursuant to Section 571 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999

  14. SECTION 571 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 571 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in central West Virginia pursuant to Section 571 of the Water

  15. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN to be developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant

  16. SECTION 571 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 571 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE to be developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in central West Virginia pursuant

  17. BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Approved Resource Management Plan AmendmentsRecord of Decision for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  18. SECTION 531 WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 531 ­ WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN in southern and eastern Kentucky pursuant to Section 531 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996

  19. SECTION 531 WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 531 ­ WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN and eastern Kentucky pursuant to Section 531 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996, Public Law 104

  20. SECTION 531 WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 531 ­ WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION to be developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern and eastern Kentucky

  1. amend existing operating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) Amendment Approval Process -UTDPP1056 Biology and...

  2. SECTION 593 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 593 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE (WORK New Mexico pursuant to Section 593 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999, Public Law 106

  3. SECTION 593 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 593 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE (WORK developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in central New Mexico pursuant

  4. An investigation of soil-tool interaction theories as they apply to a Lunar soil simulant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willman, Brian Michael

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed for finding the force required to fail soil with a blade, given the appropriate parameters of the blade, the soil, and their interaction. The properties of interest in the Lunar soil are presented in this thesis. Then the parameters of a... terrestrial analog of the true Lunar soil is determined. Given these, the predictive models are implemented to predict the required force to fail the Lunar soil simulant with a flat blade. An apparatus is developed to fail the prepared Lunar soil simulant...

  5. How the Second Amendment to China's Patent Law Affects Firms' Patenting Behavior In this study, we examine how the second amendment to China's patent law affects the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    How the Second Amendment to China's Patent Law Affects Firms' Patenting Behavior Abstract In this study, we examine how the second amendment to China's patent law affects the patenting behavior passed a second amendment to its patent system in 2000 in accordance with the Trade-Related Aspects

  6. Proposed Amendment Text for Amendment 85 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or on the harvest of 90 percent of the participant's cooperative allocation, if the harvest of the allocation began that elect to remain in the fishery. #12;Rbaker G:\\FMGROUP\\Amendment 85 (GOA) Rockfish July stand down

  7. Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gombert, D. II

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

  8. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality-- Physical and Biological Soil Crusts USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 7 What are soil crusts? A physical crust is a thin layer with reduced porosity and increased density at the surface of the soil. A biological crust

  9. The moisture retention characteristic of four soils from Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landeck, Jonathon Keith

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of air at the surface is relatively facile. Hydraulic Conductivity Redistribution of soil water affects plant growth, and the rate and duration of internal moisture flow determines 19 effective soil water storage. This is important to remember when... in sorption (wetting). This characteristic of wetting versus drying for a soil is known as the hysteresis effect (Lal 1979a). Hillel (1980) notes that hysteresis is important for coarse-textured soils in the process of redistribution of soil water...

  10. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

  11. Testing Your Soil: How to Collect and Send Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil tests can be used to estimate the kinds and amounts of soil nutrients available to plants and as aids in determining fertilizer needs. This publication covers the three-step procedure for obtaining sample bags and instructions, collecting...

  12. Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra N.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine...

  13. Extractable trace elements in the soil profile after years of biosolids application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbarick, K.A.; Ippolito, J.A.; Westfall, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and some state agencies regulate trace element additions to soil from land application of biosolids. The authors generally consider trace elements added in biosolids (sewage sludge) to accumulate in the soil surface without significant transport below the plow layer. They used 11 yr of field-study information from biosolids addition to dryland hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Vona or TAM107) to determine the distribution of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (AB-DTPA)-extractable Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn in 0 to 20 (plow layer), 20 to 60, 60 to 100, and 100 to 150 cm depth increments. This study is unique since it involves multiple biosolids application in a dryland summer fallow agroecosystem. The authors applied five or six applications of biosolids from the cities of Littleton and Englewood, CO, to Weld loam or Platner loam at four locations. This paper focuses on the 0 (control), the 56 or 67 kg of N ha{sup {minus}1} fertilizer rates, and the 6.7 and 26.8 dry Mg of biosolids ha{sup {minus}1} rates that they added every crop year. The authors observed significant (P < 0.10) accumulations of the trace elements in the plow layer of the biosolids-amended soils. Only Zn showed consistent increases in extractable levels below the plow layer at all four sites. The biosolids Zn concentration was larger than any other trace element resulting in larger loading of this element.

  14. Microsoft Word - Port Townsend Amendment DRAFT 5.2.12.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. AMENDMENT OF AGREEMENT BPA and Port Townsend amend the Agreement as follows: (a) The following Section 2.24 ("Wheel Turning Load") shall be added to the Agreement: "2.24...

  15. The Price of Pretrial Release: Can We Afford to Keep Our Fourth Amendment Rights?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Melanie D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Article looks at the intersection of the Fourth Amendment, which protects Americans' personal security against arbitrary and oppressive searches by law enforcement officials, and the Eighth Amendment, which proscribes ...

  16. EA-1086: Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version- 6/98)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue as a final rulemaking an amended version of 10 CFR Part 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection." The amended version provides...

  17. Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, Office Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado,...

  18. A Summary of Utilities' Positions Regarding the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nalepa, K. J.

    This paper summarizes information from the electric utilities in Texas concerning their preliminary plans for compliance with the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act. Enactment of the amendments resulted in a new two phase, market-based allowance...

  19. The Return of Reasonableness: Saving the Fourth Amendment from the Supreme Court

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Melanie D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Supreme Court's Fourth Amendment jurisprudence has been oft criticized. The criticism is not surprising or undeserved. After all, the express language of the Fourth Amendment requires that the government act reasonably ...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - amended bacterial sulfate Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium- (VI) amended at 1.5 M was reduced to less than 1 n... contained immobilized uranium. After an initial loss of the amendments, the ... Source: Istok, Jonathan "Jack" -...

  1. The soil reference shrinkage curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Y. Chertkov

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently proposed model showed how a clay shrinkage curve is transformed to the soil shrinkage curve at the soil clay content higher than a critical one. The objective of the present work was to generalize this model to the soil clay content lower a critical one. I investigated (i) the reference shrinkage curve, that is, one without cracks; (ii) the superficial layer of aggregates, with changed pore structure compared with the intraaggregate matrix; and (iii) soils with sufficiently low clay content where there are large pores inside the intraaggregate clay (so-called lacunar pores). The methodology is based on detail accounting for different contributions to the soil volume and water content during shrinkage. The key point is the calculation of the lacunar pore volume variance at shrinkage. The reference shrinkage curve is determined by eight physical soil parameters: (1) oven-dried specific volume; (2) maximum swelling water content; (3) mean solid density; (4) soil clay content; (5) oven-dried structural porosity; (6) the ratio of aggregate solid mass to solid mass of intraaggregate matrix; (7) the lacunar factor that characterizes the rate of the lacunar pore volume change with water content; and (8) oven-dried lacunar pore volume. The model was validated using available data. The model predicted value of the slope of the reference shrinkage curve in the basic shrinkage area is equal to unity minus the lacunar factor value, and is between unity and zero in the agreement with observations.

  2. CarbBirch (Kolbjrk): Carbon sequestration and soil development under mountain birch (Betula pubescens) in rehabilitated areas in southern Iceland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolka-Jonsson, Pall Valdimar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Understanding soil change when restoring severely degraded land is important to be able to determine when and if the ecosystem services that healthy soil (more)

  3. AMENDMENT RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE NWPCC PERTAINING TO THE FPC and FPCOB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AMENDMENT RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE NWPCC PERTAINING TO THE FPC and FPCOB Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Amendment 2.1.5.4 Fish Passage Center Include the following language in the Program: Retain the existing Fish Passage Center language (2003 Mainstem Amendment, pages 27-28) in the Program

  4. CSEM WP 118 The Impact of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    CSEM WP 118 The Impact of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities and Coal Mines of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities and Coal Mines: Evidence from the Stock Market at Davis, crknittel@ucdavis.edu. #12;2 The Impact of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric

  5. PAGES11. CONTRACT lD CODE IPAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION 0': CONTRACT OF,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    receipt of Offers D is extended. D is not extended. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

  6. AMENDMENT OF SOLIC ITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for receipt of Offers 0 is extended, 0 is not extended. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning copies of the amendment: (b) By acknowledging receipt a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICIT ATION/MODIFICA TION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACTID CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for receipt of Offers is extended, is not extended. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning _copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED

  9. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for receipt of Offers D is extended, 0 is not extended. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15 , and returning copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

  10. Service Contract Act of 1965, As Amended UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Service Contract Act of 1965, As Amended UT-B Contracts Div Jan 2006 Page 1 of 4 sca-1965-ext-jan06.doc SERVICE CONTRACT ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED (Jan 2006) (a) Definitions. "Act," as used in this clause, means the Service Contract Act of 1965, as amended (41 U.S.C. 351, et seq.). "Service employee," as used

  11. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, D.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

  12. Soil chemical changes resulting from irrigation with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganjegunte, G.K.; Vance, G.F.; King, L.A. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land application of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) co-produced water is a popular management option within northwestern Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. This study evaluated the impacts of land application of CBNG waters on soil chemical properties at five sites. Soil samples were collected from different depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-90, and 90-120 cm) from sites that were irrigated with CBNG water for 2 to 3 yr and control sites. Chemical properties of CBNG water used for irrigation on the study sites indicate that electrical conductivity of CBNG water (EC{sub w}) and sodium adsorption ratio of CBNG water (SAR{sub w}) values were greater than those recommended for irrigation use on the soils at the study sites. Soil chemical analyses indicated that electrical conductivity of soil saturated paste extracts (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio of soil saturated paste extracts (SAR(e)) values for irrigated sites were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than control plots in the upper 30-cm soil depths. Mass balance calculations suggested that there has been significant buildup of Na in irrigated soils due to CBNG irrigation water as well as Na mobilization within the soil profiles. Results indicate that irrigation with CBNG water significantly impacts certain soil properties, particularly if amendments are not properly utilized. This study provides information for better understanding changes in soil properties due to land application of CBNG water.

  13. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  14. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  15. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian L.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A.; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry C.

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  16. CX-010034: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-010034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of Soil Vapor Extraction Units CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01152013 Location(s): South...

  17. CX-010031: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-010031: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of Soil Vapor Extraction Units CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01172013 Location(s): South...

  18. CX-010315: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-010315: Categorical Exclusion Determination Western Sector Treatment System Soil Vapor Extraction Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04242013 Location(s): South Carolina...

  19. CX-010657: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-010657: Categorical Exclusion Determination Western Sector Treatment System Soil Vapor Extraction Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06182013 Location(s): South Carolina...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with its foundation well above a sole-source aquifer or upland surface soil 1 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PROCESS CONTROL EQUATIONS TO SUPPORT DETOXIFICATION OF COPPER USING NATURAL HUMATE AMENDMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Halverson, N.; Nichols, R.

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent scientific research and changes in regulatory policies have led to reductions in the allowable discharges of several contaminant metals, including copper, into surface water. Low target concentrations and variable outfall conditions challenge the efficacy of traditional treatment technologies such as ion exchange. In reviewing various treatment options, scientists and engineers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) developed a treatment strategy focusing on toxicity reduction (rather than the removal of the copper) and demonstrated that the method is viable and promising for mitigating copper toxicity. The resulting outfall chemistry protects the ecosystem in the receiving stream in a manner that is equal to, or better than, technologies that remove copper to the emerging regulatory levels. Further, the proposed toxicity reduction strategy results in collateral beneficial changes in outfall water chemistry such that the outfall more closely matches the chemistry of natural streams for key parameters such as the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The detoxification process is based on the EPA BLM. Specifically, modeling indicates that copper toxicity can be mitigated by modest additions of natural organic carbon and that the amount of amendment needed can be determined based on pH and stream flow. The organic carbon amendments proposed for the treatment/detoxification process are extracts of natural materials that are produced for use in organic agriculture. These extracts are known by several common names such as potassium humate, soluble humic acid, and a variety of brand trademarks. When used to reduce ecosystem toxicity in surface water, these amendments bind copper and compete with the biological receptor sites, resulting in a reduction of impacts to key food chain organisms such as the Daphnia ('water flea'). Design and implementation of the process is straightforward. The core equipment consists of storage tank(s), pH sensor(s), outfall flow monitor(s), variable speed pump(s), and a programmable logic controller (PLC). The PLC collects information on pH and outfall flow, and modulates the pump flow rate to meter the correct amount of amendment into the outfall. A mathematical relationship, or control equation, is programmed into the PLC and serves as the basis of the operation. A summary of the development of, and key documentation for, the process control equation is provided.

  2. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation, submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate-scale tests will be used to bridge the gap between the small-scale foam transport studies and the field-scale demonstration. Numerical simulation studies on foam delivery under vadose conditions will be performed to simulate observed foam transport behavior under vadose zone conditions and predict the foam delivery performance at field-scale.

  3. Date Created: March 2008 Date Amended: March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    Date Created: March 2008 Date Amended: March 2009 DYSLEXIA POLICY.doc- 1 - DYSLEXIA POLICY 1 (both written and spoken) reading, memory and organisation associated with the terms dyslexia, dyspraxia this document the term `dyslexia' will be used in a comprehensive way to refer to all of the above. The College

  4. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    to the Florida administrative and judicial appeal process. The Regulation was last amended in 1987. The proposed of the General Counsel, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, Florida, 33431, (561) 297-3007 (phone), (561) 297-2787 (fax) The address of the Agency Clerk is Room 333367, Administration Building, Florida Atlantic University, Boca

  5. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: May 31, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Electric Vehicles which require electricity for power may park in the parking spaces designated "Electric electric motors or other non-fossil fuel for momentum. Only these vehicles will be allowed to park amended to include the addition of high efficiency vehicles; permits for residents of the Apollo and Libra

  6. SECTION 593 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 593 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION-Federal interests in central New Mexico pursuant to Section 593 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999") and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). Compliance with all applicable

  7. SECTION 593 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 593 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION ASSISTANCE New Mexico pursuant to Section 593 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999, Public Law 106, NEPA and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). #12;

  8. SECTION 593 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 593 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION ASSISTANCE to non-Federal interests in central New Mexico pursuant to Section 593 of the Water Resources Development of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). #12;

  9. SECTION 593 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 593 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED CENTRAL NEW MEXICO MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in central New Mexico pursuant to Section 593 of the Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). Compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations

  10. Amendment 46 Revisions to the FMP for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    area In chapter 2.0, section 2.1 entitled "History and Summary of Amendments," add the following to vessels using jig gear; 51 percent to vessels using hook-and- line or pot gear; and 47 percent to vessels. The Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands area Pacific cod TAC shall be allocated among gear groups as follows: 2

  11. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCTURE SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL of six models for the provision of environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992, Public Law 102

  12. Amended on April 6, 2011 Scholarship Award Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Amended on April 6, 2011 Scholarship Award Policy Department of Mining Engineering College the guidelines as stated in the SME Student Chapter Professional and Social Responsibility Policy as outlined in the SME Student Chapter Professional and So- cial Responsibility Policy. This scholarship

  13. December 12, 2012 AMENDED ANNOUNCEMENT OF FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 12, 2012 AMENDED ANNOUNCEMENT OF FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR THE NIST SMART GRID://www.nist.gov/smartgrid/upload/NIST-20121129-Smart-Grid-FFO.pdf) announcing the solicitation of proposals for the fiscal year 2013 Smart Grid. #12;1 12/12/12 ANNOUNCEMENT OF FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY (FFO) Smart Grid Interoperability Standards

  14. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: August 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Plate Liquid Type Solar Collectors," Standard 96-1980 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration.: Solar Collector Testing Standards 6C7-8.002 SUMMARY OF REGULATION AMENDMENT: This regulation is revised to reflect updated information regarding the testing and standards for solar thermal collectors

  15. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: August 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Director of Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT SHOULD been modified to reflect that the Florida Solar Energy Center provides services to the solar energy by the Center shall be collected by at the Florida Solar Energy Center prior to the performance of such tests

  16. Labile Soil Phosphorus as Influenced by Methods of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labile Soil Phosphorus as Influenced by Methods of Applying Radioactive Phosphorus Vilma V. Selvaratnam, Senay Siimer, A. J. Andersen, J. D. Thomsen and G. Gissel Nielsen #12;RIS-R-409 LABILE SOIL barley, ijuckwheat, and rye grass for the L- value determination. The four soils differed greatly

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Microbes in Selected Soils at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the soil prior to dis- posal is required to minimize the quantity of disposed soil. Many of the Pu, microbial species diversity and biomass varies more in deserts than in other ecosystems (Kieft 1991 to determine baseline microbial activity and biomass in soils prior to decontamination. Information from

  18. Dynamic properties of subgrade soils, including environmental effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edris, Earl Victor

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -up, Showing Endcaps With the Induction Coils and Psychrometers . . . . 39 Photograph of Calibration Device 41 27 Schematic of Layered Systems Used to Determine Stresses 44 28 Compaction Curve for the Moscow Soil Showing th~ Soil Suction Contours (in psi..., 1 psi = 6. 9 kN/m ) . 47 Compaction Curve for the Floydada Soil Showing the Soil Suction Contours (in psi, 1 psi 6. 9 kN/mZ) 3O Compaction Curve for the Allenfarm Soil Showing the Soil Suction Contours (in psi, 1 psi 6. 9 kN/mZ) 49 Typical...

  19. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralizatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization...

  20. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

  1. RECIPIENT:NREL PROJECT TITLE: ESIF Excavation Soil Stockpile...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for determination: This proposed project is for the onsite deposition of excavated soil generated by the build-out of the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) building...

  2. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat HomeAssurance: DOE NSoftwareSoil0

  3. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

  4. National Mining Association Experimental Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Mining Association Experimental Determination of Radon Fluxes over Water #12;Introduction research funded by the National Mining Association (NMA) regarding radon fluxes from water surfaces surfaces at uranium recovery operations are insignificant and approximate background soil fluxes for most

  5. Modeling the effect of soil structure on water flow and isoproturon dynamics in an agricultural field receiving repeated urban waste compost application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    field receiving repeated urban waste compost application Vilim Filipovi1,2,3 , Yves Coquet2 , Valrie properties. Tillage practices and compost amendments can modify soil structure and create heterogeneity and compost application on transport processes. A modeling study was performed to evaluate how the presence

  6. Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Eric Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

  7. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  8. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  9. Combating soil erosion: AgriLife scientist discovering what works for Fort Hood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Fort Hood, Texas, was initi- ated with federal funding through NRCS to the Texas Water Resources Institute. The revegetation project brought composted dairy manure from the Bosque River watershed to Fort Hood to use as a soil amendment to test its...tx H2O | pg. 24 When most people think of Fort Hood, they think of the military readying troops for combat. When a group of Texas AgriLife Research scientists think of Fort Hood, it?s combating soil erosion. Fort Hood is one of the largest...

  10. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  11. Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, N.T.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

  12. White paper : the fourth amendment : implications for radiological and nuclear detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Brandon Seth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to improve the radiation detection architecture has given rise to increased concern over the potential of equipment or procedures to violate the Fourth Amendment. Protecting the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is a foremost value of every government agency. However, protecting U.S. residents and assets from potentially catastrophic threats is also a crucial role of government. In the absence of clear precedent, the fear of potentially violating rights could lead to the rejection of effective and reasonable means that could reduce risks, possibly savings lives and assets. The goal of this document is not to apply case law to determine what the precedent may be if it exists, but rather provide a detailed outline that defines searches and seizures, identifies what precedent exists and what precedent doesn't exist, and explore what the existing (and non-existing) precedent means for the use of radiation detection used inside the nation's borders.

  13. Evaluating the Effects of Organic Amendment Applications on Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Salt-Affected Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulla Reddy Gari, Namratha

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methods for examination of composting and compost, in: J.Smith (Ed. ), The US Composting Council, US Governmentto the field sites and composting facilities. I am also

  14. Metal uptake by agricultural plant species grown in sludge-amended soil following ecosystem restoration practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peles, J.D.; Barrett, G.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brewer, S.R. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)] [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of municipal sewage sludge is an important environmental problem presently facing society. Because sludge is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, land application as a fertilizer has been proposed as a cost-effective means of disposal. This method of disposal, however, is frequently the subject of public health concern since municipal sludge may contain heavy metals that potentially could be introduced into the human food chain. This study examined metal concentrations in two agricultural species at a study site where ecosystem restoration practices (liming and tilling) had been conducted for 5 years following 11 years of sludge enrichment. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine on a melamine-based soil amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neitsch, Susan Lynn

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption kinetics and adsorption-desorption of atrazine on organoclay composites prepared with the surfactant 6-piperazin-1-yl-N,N'-bis-(1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-butyl)-(1,3,5)triazine-2,4-diamine and Houston Black clay were studied using the indirect...

  16. The behaviour of technetium during microbial reduction in amended soils from Dounreay, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, 2006). This is in contrast to the increasing body of literature nuclear fission and has been found as a contaminant at sites where nuclear wastes have been processed) a complexing ligand used in nuclear fuel cycle operations. During the development of anoxia mediated

  17. Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil Amendment and Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects the Future Energy Mixmodifications .Carbon

  18. Mutagenic potential of plants grown on a soil amended with mutagenic municipal sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Daniel Alain

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial firms contributing to this system, The sludge from the Houston, Texas, Sims Bayou treatment plant was aerobically digested, chemically precipitated with ferric chloride (FeC13) and flash dried in a C. E. Raymond cage mill flash dryer... the edible crop by flaking off of dried sludge or washing off with precipitation and allows for plant regrowth and pathogen die off. CHEMICALS Chemicals entering a wastewater treatment plant will become constituents of sewage sludge unless volatilized...

  19. Soil Testing and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

  20. Indiana Soil and Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Indiana Soil and Landscape Evaluation Manual Version 1.0 D.P. Franzmeier G.C. Steinhardt D soil scientists to be the state soil. The scale on the gray panel is in decimeters and feet. The upper 18 inches (46 cm) of the soil formed in Wisconsinan age loess, and the lower part formed

  1. CX-006160: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-006160: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pumpernickel Valley: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1,...

  2. CX-006371: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    71: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Confirmation Sampling at the P-Area Operable Unit CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06232011...

  3. CX-010310: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tanks 13 and 15 Soil Samples for Transfer Line Future Design CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 0426...

  4. Speciation and bioavailability of zinc in amended sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Aaron G.B.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; McDermott, Gregory; Gratson, David; Neptune, Dean; Ryan, James A.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and bioavailability of zinc (Zn) in smelter-contaminated sediments were investigated as a function of phosphate (apatite) and organic amendment loading rate. Zinc species identified in preamendment sediment were zinc hydroxide-like phases, sphalerite, and zinc sorbed to an iron oxide via X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Four months after adding the amendments to the contaminated sediment, hopeite, a Zn phosphate mineral, was identified indicating phosphate was binding and sequestering available Zn and Zn pore water concentrations were decreased at levels of 90% or more. Laboratory experiments indicate organic amendments exhibit a limited effect and may hinder sequestration of pore water Zn when mixed with apatite. The acute toxicity of the sediment Zn was evaluated with Hyalella azteca, and bioaccumulation of Zn with Lumbriculus variegates. The survivability of H. azteca increased as a function of phosphate (apatite) loading rate. In contaminated sediment without apatite, no specimens of H. azteca survived. The bioaccumulation of Zn in L. variegates also followed a trend of decreased bioaccumulation with increased phosphate loading in the contaminated sediment. The research supports an association between Zn speciation and bioavailability.

  5. Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Brian P.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers' objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers' test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  6. EIS-0407: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Refinery Project near Hugoton, Kansas Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - amending regulation ec Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this regulation amendment... .003. NAME OF ... Source: Boreman, Glenn D. - School of Optics (CREOLE), University of Central Florida; Wu, Shin-Tson - School of Optics (CREOLE),...

  8. Microsoft Word - Agreement to amend 1-13-09 electronic signature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to implement the amendment and avoid, if possible, any unnecessary interruption of smelter operations, especially given the difficult economic times and potential loss of...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - amendments Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF THE ASSOCIATION OF ALUMNI As Adopted October 27, 2010 Guidelines... for Election of Officers and Committee Members and for Constitutional Amendments 1. All-Media Voting....

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - amendments hot topic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 dated November 15, 2010... , and Amendment 5 dated April 5, 2011 (collectively the "Lease") ... Source: Rebaza, Jorge - Department of Mathematics, Missouri State University...

  11. File:App Commercial Leases and Easements or Amendment or Residential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    App Commercial Leases and Easements or Amendment or Residential Coastal Easements HOA.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:App Commercial...

  12. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory....

  13. Eligibility Conditions for Project Associates - Amendments to the Management's proposals concerning project associates approved by the Finance Committee and the Council in June 1994 - Amendment to Document CERN/2048 (Annex)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eligibility Conditions for Project Associates - Amendments to the Management's proposals concerning project associates approved by the Finance Committee and the Council in June 1994 - Amendment to Document CERN/2048 (Annex)

  14. The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Larry Milton

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the load- settlement behavior of single piles in cohesionless soils is addressed. The available data on instrumerted piles load-tested vertically in sands is collected and analyzed to determine the load transfer characteristics of the soil. A... the distribution of residual stresses in the piles, and methods of obtaining residual stresses from load test results are discussed. Correlations with the results of the Standard Penetration Test are presented and are used to develop a new design procedure which...

  15. An analysis of SO sub 2 emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC's of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

  16. An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

  17. Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils Larry G. Bundy & Laura W. Good Department of Soil Science University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;Introduction Soil test P is often measured Little information is available on total P content of soils Why do we care about total P now? Soil total P

  18. Extraction, Degradation, and Microbial Respiration Effects of Mesotrione in Selected Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Madahy B

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of atrazine on mesotrione degradation in soil; and 3) determine if mesotrione, mesotrione + atrazine treatments, and application rates had an impact on soil microbial activity (respiration). In the first experiment, mesotrione recoveries were...

  19. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

  20. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

  1. The 1994 Net Ban Constitutional Amendment: a case study of marine fisheries management in Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimes, Shepherd Russell

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 8, 1994 the Florida electorate voted 2,876,091 to 1,135,110 in favor of proposed amendment #3 to the state constitution. The amendment effectively reallocated the state's nearshore fisheries to predominantly recreational "hook and line...

  2. Nitrification in Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a high nitrificati is the balmcing of these extremes which redlices the average le between acid ancl non-acid soils. C03TPOSITION OF SOILS TVITFI LOW AND HIGH NITRIFIC-4TION. Table 11 contains the chemical composition of soils having low nitl... are subsoils. Subsoils thus possess nnu~nally high and unusually low nitrification. Table 11.-Chemical composition of soils with nitrification below 10 . I Average .............................. Nitri- fication 7164 7090 4596' 5710 4645 3976 3657 3...

  3. EIS-0470: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1: Draft6: RecordRecord of Decision EIS-0464:Amended

  4. Amendment No. 1 (August 5, 2010) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed.9-0s) All OtherDepartment ofThis tipDepartmentAmendment

  5. EIS-0222: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final9:Department ofofGNARecord ofEnergy-SA-01:2: Amended

  6. EIS-0277: Amendment to Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final9:DepartmentExtensionRecord ofDepartment ofAmendment to

  7. AME:NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration77 Sandia National005-2010 or 1 PAGE 1AME:NDMENT

  8. EIS-0380: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirantPartners,of Energy 50-S1:376: Final380: Amended Record of

  9. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Derek R. Lovley; A. L. NGuessan; Kelly Nevin; C. T. Resch; Evan Arntzen; Jenny Druhan; Aaron Peacock; Brett Baldwin; Dick Dayvault; Dawn Holmes; Ken Williams; Susan Hubbard; Steve Yabusaki; Yilin Fang; D.C. White; John Komlos; Peter Jaffe

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  10. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION DURING PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION QUALITY ASSURANCE Mn !! Performance Based Construction QA !! Unsaturated Soil Mechanics !! What We've Learned !! Next Steps #12.6-6.0 5 - 7 19 0.8 5 7 - 9 24 1.1 4 9 - 11 28 1.2 4 #12;Unsaturated Soil Mechanics #12;Fundamentals

  11. Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

  12. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction USDA, Natural Resources of the soil, the vegetation, the water, and the air as well as the ecological processes of the rangeland ecosystem are balanced and sustained. What is soil? Soil is a dynamic resource that supports plants

  13. Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink The impact and benefits of soil science have only partly been documented. Here I highlight four noteworthy soil science achievements from the state of Wisconsin that took place between 1870 and the early 1980s: (i) the first soil

  14. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1: Draft Environmental Impact StatementPlutonium

  15. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1: Draft Environmental Impact

  16. Predicting farm machinery operation time with a soil moisture mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordovsky, James Paul

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criteria Used to Determine Trafficability Other Moisture Balance Models Evapotranspiration Moisture Redistribution . Runoff and Infiltration 10 Probability Distribution of Available Field Time . . 11 Chapter Summary III PROCEDURES Soil Moisture... Model Step 1 - Infiltration and Drainage Step 2 - Soil Evaporation . 12 14 14 20 vii 1 Chapter III (cont. ) Step 3 - Plant Evaporation Final Step - Redistribution Page 22 24 Trafficability Criteria Probability Distribution of Available...

  17. CX-010140: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Well ASH-06 Tie-In to A-Area Burning Rubble Pit (ABRP) Soil Vapor Extraction Unit (SVEU) CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 03072013 Location(s): South...

  18. Siderite, oxidation, and neutralization potential determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Elizabeth Brooke

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the nature of native soils overlying lignite seams in Texas, mixed overburden is allowed as a topsoil substitute. Determination of suitable topsoil replacements is based on chemical analysis, including neutralization potential (NP), a...

  19. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  20. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  1. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  2. Soil Water Retention Measurements Using a Combined Tensiometer-Coiled Time Domain Reflectometry Probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    Soil Water Retention Measurements Using a Combined Tensiometer-Coiled Time Domain Reflectometry al., 1975; Arya et al.,that can be used to determine soil water retention curves in both 1975; Royer of a standard tensiometer. The combined tensiometer-coiled TDR probe was con- of soil water retention curves

  3. Soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics as affected by inputs of dairy manure and poultry litter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Richard Lee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mineralization in soils receiving animal manure, 2) evaluate the one-day C02 procedure as a possible routine test for estimating N mineralization in manured soils, 3) determine soil microbial biomass C and N on a monthly basis and correlate with weather trends...

  4. Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi model, the Modified Kovacs (MK) model for the determination of soil-water characteristic curve at the low water contents of two horizons of a soil from Burkina Faso. Combining terms from capillary state

  5. Subsidence of residual soils in a karst terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumm, E.C.; Kane, W.F.; Ben-Hassine, J.; Scarborough, J.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Ketelle, R.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Siting and operating landfills for solid waste disposal in eastern Tennessee that can operate with minimum impact on groundwater is problematic. The operational requirement of thick, excavational soils and the regulatory requirement of a buffer between disposal units and an aquifer result in siting most operating East Tennessee landfills in outcrop areas of the Knox Group. However, the common occurrence of karst terrain and sinkholes in the Knox Group indicates the vulnerability of such sites to rapid groundwater recharge and flow and the potential for subsidence or collapse of soil into bedrock cavities. To address the potential for subsidence or collapse of soils at the East Chestnut Ridge site on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the following activities and analyses were completed: The locations of karst features on the site were determined by field reconnaissance; several sinkholes were selected for detailed examination; soil boring, sampling, and physical testing were performed in soils located within, adjacent to, and outside of sinkholes to characterize soil strength at various depths; detailed plane surveys were made for 11 sinkholes to measure accurately their dimension and shape for use in determining profile functions for subsidence basins at the site; The stress-deformation response of a typical soil profile overlying a hypothetical bedrock cavity was analyzed numerically for a range of soil thickness and a range of cavity radii. A consistent estimate of the relationship between subsidence basin dimension, soil thickness, and cavity radius has been derived. 30 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Measurement of dielectric and magnetic properties of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patitz, W.E.; Brock, B.C.; Powell, E.G.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of subsurface imaging using SAR technology has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. One requirement for the successful development of a subsurface imagin system is an understanding of how the soil affects the signal. In response to a need for an electromagnetic characterization of the soil properties, the Radar/Antenna department has developed a measurement system which determines the soils complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability at UHF frequencies. The one way loss in dB is also calculated using the measured values. There are many reports of measurements of the electric properties of soil in the literature. However, most of these are primarily concerned with measuring only a real dielectric constant. Because some soils have ferromagnetic constituents it is desirable to measure both the electric and magnetic properties of the soil.

  7. Optimization of soil mixing technology through metallic iron addition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moos, L. P.

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced soil mixing is a process used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil. In this process, also known as soil mixing with thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, or SM/TESVE, a soil mixing apparatus breaks up and mixes a column of soil up to 9 m (30 ft) deep; simultaneously, hot air is blown through the soil. The hot air carries the VOCs to the surface where they are collected and safely disposed of. This technology is cost effective at high VOC concentrations, but it becomes cost prohibitive at low concentrations. Argonne National Laboratory-East conducted a project to evaluate ways of improving the effectiveness of this system. The project investigated the feasibility of integrating the SM/TESVE process with three soil treatment processes--soil vapor extraction, augmented indigenous biodegradation, and zero-valent iron addition. Each of these technologies was considered a polishing treatment designed to remove the contaminants left behind by enhanced soil mixing. The experiment was designed to determine if the overall VOC removal effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the SM/TESVE process could be improved by integrating this approach with one of the polishing treatment systems.

  8. Phosphorus fertilization of alfalfa on Coastal Plain soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beedy, Tracy Lyn

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing tolerant varieties of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) are being introduced to improve the quality of pastures in the southern Coastal Plain. 'Alfagraze' alfalfa was planted on eight soils near Overton, Texas to determine the P requirement...

  9. Agronomy Facts 35 Some Facts About Soil Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    . These miner- als are from weathered rock, called parent material. The source of parent material is sometimes by ice, water, wind, and gravity. Many soil properties are determined by the type of rock the parent

  10. acid sandy soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  11. acid soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  12. acid sulphate soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  13. acid sandy soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  14. acid soil technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  15. acid sulphate soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  16. 264 September 2013 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 31.3 Ecological Restoration Vol. 31, No. 3, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    , did not decrease either buckthorn reinvasion or soil N availability. The mechanical disturbance. RESEARCH ARTICLE Amending Soil with Mulched European Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) Does Not Reduce a three-year field experiment to determine if amending soils with mulched European buckthorn (Rhamnus

  17. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  18. PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended).xls SLIP Energy WY Gross Gen from Hydro LP Dolores Gen. Total SLIP Gross Gen Avg. Plant Use SLIP Net Gen @ Plant Losses SLIP...

  19. Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments2_CX.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the same level of service under an existing power sales contract to the Intalco smelter in Ferndale, WA. These amendments would further extend this service for up to an...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - amendment enhances phytoaccumulation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100006-03752.50 DOI:10.2113gselements.6.6.375 Summary: hydrocarbons (PAHs), and dioxins, may be improved by an amendment treatment that collectively enhances... .6.6.375...

  1. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595 of the Water Resources

  2. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595

  3. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  4. Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) were established in the 1930s to develop comprehensive programs and plans to conserve soil resources, control and prevent soil erosion, prevent floods...

  5. Soil and Water Conservation (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and...

  6. Soil organic matter factions of no-tilled and tilled soils and their reactivity with herbicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearman, G.K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of soil humic fractions were determined on surface and 7.5-15.0 cm soil samples of continuously (7-year) no-tilled and tilled cotton, corn, and soybean plots in West Tennessee. Soil humic and fulvic acid were extracted by standard methods and the humic acid was characterized by /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy, titration of total acidity and carboxyl groups, and infrared and elemental analysis. Humic acid composition differed by depth and crop. Small differences were observed between tillage systems. Humic acid aliphatic and aromatic carbons ranged from 48 to 65% and 25 to 40% of total peak area, respectively. The humic acids extracted from soils with larger amounts of carbon had larger aliphatic to aromatic ratios, indicating less decomposed organic matter. Carboxyl groups of the humic acids ranged from 9 to 13% and samples from tilled soil had slightly greater amounts of carboxyl and aromatic groups. Carboxyl group determinations by /sup 13/C-NMR, compared more closely with total acidity determinations by titration than with carboxyl determinations by titration. All infrared spectra were similar. Elemental composition of humic acid averaged C, 52.7%, 5.6%; N, 4.8%, and 36.9%.

  7. Bioremediation of soils impacted by chlorinated pesticides/herbicides and nitroaromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.R.; Seech, A.G.; Bucens, P.G. [Grace Dearborn Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated pesticide and herbicide manufacturing and application, coupled with the long natural half-lives of these compounds, has resulted in many incidents of soil contamination throughout the world. Soils impacted by nitroaromatics such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), due largely to past military activities, are also common. The potential environmental and human health risks are spawning development of various technologies to remediate these impacted soils. Bench-scale microcosm studies using four North American soils, containing (1) Metolachlor, (2) 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, (3) chlorinated pesticides (including DDT, DDD, DDE and toxaphene) and (4) TNT, were conducted. The most effective approach involved successive establishment of anoxic and oxic conditions in the soil. The anoxic/oxic cycling process, controlled by the addition of Daramend organic amendments and other agents, enhances reductive decomposition of soil contaminants (in the anoxic phase) and contaminant mineralization (in the oxic phase). Substantial reductions in contaminant concentrations have been observed. Metolachlor concentrations have been reduced from 139 to 4 mg/kg, p,p-DDT from 684 to 2 mg/kg, toxaphene from 1,045 to 244 mg/kg and TNT from 7,200 to 19 mg/kg, all in under 190 days. A patent on this technology has been granted.

  8. Identifying the requirements of an agricultural robot for sensing and adjusting soil nutrient and pH levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teague, Nicole (Nicole Dawn)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nutrient requirements of soils using in agriculture for crop production were examined to determine the needs of a robotic system used to detect and regulate the nutrition levels of the soil. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and ...

  9. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

  10. Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

  11. Soil Conservation Districts Law (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a soil and water conservation division within the Iowa Department of Agriculture, as well as local soil and water conservation districts. The regulations accompanying...

  12. The role of soil in NBT applications to landmine detection problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obhodas, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Nad, Karlo; Valkovic, Vlado [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Nebbia, Giancarlo; Viesti, Giuseppe [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term observations of soil water content as well as determination of physical and chemical properties of different types of soils in Croatia were made in order to provide the necessary background information for landmine explosive detection. Soil water content is the key attribute of soil as a background in neutron backscattering technique (NBT) landmine detection application. If the critical value of the soil water content is reached, the detection of landmine explosives is not possible. It is recommended that soil moisture content for NBT application does not exceed 0.1 kg.kg-1 [1]. Nineteen representative samples of different soil types from different parts of Croatia were collected in order to establish soil bank with the necessary physical and chemical properties determined for each type of soil. In addition soil water content was measured on daily and weekly basis on several locations in Croatia. This procedure also included daily soil moisture measurements in the test field made of different types of soils from several locations in Croatia. This was done in order to evaluate the behavior of different types of soils under the same weather conditions.

  13. Morphology of rain water channelization in systematically varied model sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; C. M. Cejas; R. Barrois; R. Dreyfus; D. J. Durian

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different raining conditions using a quasi-2d experimental set-up, and systematically determine the impact of soil grain diameter and surface wetting property on water channelization phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely-packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates into a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed raining condition, we combine the effects of grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to rain water channelization phenomenon, including pre-wetting sandy soils at different level before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  14. On-Farm Soil Monitoring for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Soil quality and soil management resources the air which helps build soil organic matter and tilth, and sustains the soil resource for future generations and other species. Improving and protecting soil quality can help support sustainable crop

  15. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roots, rills, gullies, wind scours, and soil deposition reflect such processes as runoff and erosion. Waterflow patterns X X 3. Pedestals and/or terracettes X X 4. Bare ground X X 5. Gullies X X 6. Wind. Compaction layer X X X 12. Functional/structural groups X 13. Plant mortality/ decadence X 14. Litter amount

  16. Soils in the Riparian Incorporating Soil Dynamics into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deposits or upland slope wash · Soil particle size reflect the energy (velocity) of depositionalSoils in the Riparian Complex Incorporating Soil Dynamics into Ecological Site Descriptions Kenneth F. Scheffe, SSS August 16, 2007 #12;Water Changes Everything · Water is the trump card over soils

  17. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

  18. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion USDA, Natural Resources of the earth's surface by wind. Wind erosion removes and redistributes soil. Small blowout areas may, fence rows, and roadbanks. In many cases the fine soil particles and organic matter are blown offsite

  19. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion USDA, Natural Resources and removal of soil material by water. The process may be natural or accelerated by human activity. The rate of erosion may be very slow to very rapid, depending on the soil, the local landscape, and weather conditions

  20. Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis -Chemistry Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis - Chemistry Case Study "Sustainability Street are represented by the Podzolic Order, and more specifically form part of the Bose Soil Management Group) with a limited decomposer community dominated by fungi. Any remnants of native soil at the Sustainability Street

  1. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist Committee Membership Dr. John Beasley - committee chair Dr. Jared Whitaker Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (912) 681-0376 Dr. Robert Carrow Dr. Mark Risse Department of Crop & Soil Sciences

  2. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  3. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  4. Unusual persistence of DDT in some western USA soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitch, R.K.; Day, H.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural use of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane) was canceled in 1972. By the late 1970's and early 1980's, the National Soils Monitoring Program of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was consistently finding higher soil residues of the degradate DDE (1,1-dichloro 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene) than of parent DDT. Similarly, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) had been finding during the late 1970's that DDT and related compounds had been decreasing in birds throughout the US. During 1984 and 1985, the EPA and the agriculture departments of Texas and New Mexico, in response to the FWS, conducted soil sampling in 13 areas where contaminated birds had been collected. It was agreed that soil samples containing higher levels of DDT than DDE would serve as a possible indicator of illegal DDT use. This was an intensive soil sampling program; over 236 fields were sampled. A controversy developed as to whether high ratios of DDT and DDE might corroborate the accusations of recent illegal use of DDT products. Dell City area soils containing higher levels of DDT than of DDE became classified as suspicious soils. Soils bearing the expected higher level of DDE were dubbed as normal. To resolve the controversy, the authors, in 1989, conducted a DDT soil metabolism study with representative samples of the suspicious and normal soils. It was felt that a soil metabolism study could, once and for all, determine if there was, indeed, something unusual about the rate at which the suspicious soils degrade DDT.

  5. Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, D G "David"

    Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia Page 1 ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia: historical review, current classification in Croatia Page 2 Summary An historical overview of soil survey and soil classification activities

  6. Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

  7. Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

  8. Soil Erosion (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Water and Soil Resources has adopted a model ordinance to serve as the minimum standard for local governments, which are asked to implement standards and administrative procedures...

  9. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  10. Saving our soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandy, A. Stuart; Billings, Sharon A.; Richter Dan

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when we consider how important the worlds soils are to human civilization. Within the next several decades, about 910 billion people will increasingly require food, timber, fiber, and bioenergy, as well as related ecosystem ser- vices... producers, motivated by short-term finances, increase inputs of fertilizers and pesticides to maximize yields, frequently with adverse environmental impacts. Subsistence farmers coax decreasing crop yields from soils that can no longer be managed sustainably...

  11. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza c ova a,b,, Hana Hrs elova a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  12. Crop and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grnwald, Niklaus J.

    and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________ ID Intensive (SOIL 325) (3) _______ HHS 231 Lifetime Fitness for Health (2. Global Issues (3) (*soil science electives meeting requirement) _______ Science

  13. Cement kiln flue dust as a source of lime and potassium in four East Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Warren David

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design on both sites. Yield, soil pH, plant and soil concentrations of K, Ca, and Mg were determined. Soil pH and extractable Ca increased with increasing rate of flue dust or calcite. Under field conditions, flue dust compared favorably with calcite... was similar to plant uptake from corresponding calcite + KC1 treatments. Soil pH and extractable soil K, Ca, and Mg increased with increased rate of flue dust treatment equally as well as from the corresponding calcite treatments. The flue dust was equal...

  14. Instruction sheet for the consolidation of the standard NF EN 693 dated September 2001 and its amendment A1 Machine tools : Safety : Hydraulic presses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Association Franaise de Normalisation. Paris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instruction sheet for the consolidation of the standard NF EN 693 dated September 2001 and its amendment A1

  15. Phosphorus Speciation in Alum Amended Poultry Litter: Effects of Aging and Al:P ratio. (S02-staats551514-oral)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Phosphorus Speciation in Alum Amended Poultry Litter: Effects of Aging and Al:P ratio. (S02-staats.T. Sims - University of Delaware Abstract: The use of alum (Al2(SO4)3)as a poultry litter (PL) amendment

  16. Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B-1090 December 1969 1 potassium Fixation and Supply By Soils With Misd Clay Minerals I KUS A&M UNIVERSITY Tcrv Agricultural Experiment Station r i 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas Summary to the plants while Cameron clay... supplied onl!. Studies were made on three agriculturally important me/me of exchangeable K. The capacity of all a soils of South Texas and Northern Mexico to determine soils to fix K increased with increasing remo\\dl i their potassium (K)-supplying power...

  17. Method for detecting moisture in soils using secondary cosmic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water content in a soil is determined by measuring the attenuation of secondary background cosmic radiation as this radiation propagates through a layer of soil and water. By measuring the attenuation of secondary cosmic radiation in the range of 5 MeV-15 MeV it is possible to obtain a relative measure of the water content in a soil layer above a suitable radiation detector and thus establish when and how much irrigation is needed. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

  18. Extraction efficiency and quantification of mutagenic chemicals in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggard, Lea Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. K. W. Brown Lack of established extraction procedures for quantification of mutagenic compounds in soil is a major technical limitation to monitoring and assessing the performance of a hazardous waste land treatment facility. In this study... for extracting organic mutagens from the waste or soil/waste mixture. The use of combined biological and chemical testing protocol provided the most practical means of determining extraction efficiency. The bioassay detected additive, synergistic...

  19. Proposal to negotiate amendments to an existing contract for the assembly of interconnections for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the proposal to negotiate amendments to the existing contract for the assembly of interconnections for the LHC. For the reasons explained in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to approve amendments to the existing contract with the consortium INEO (FR), ENDEL (FR) and GTI (NL) for the assembly of interconnections for the LHC for a total amount of 5 181 403 euros (8 095 424 Swiss francs), subject to revision, bringing the total amount of the contract to a maximum of 14 974 239 euros (23 395 751 Swiss francs), subject to revision. The amounts in Swiss francs have been calculated using the present rate of exchange.

  20. Effects of Microbial Litter Amendments on Broiler Performance, Litter Quality and Ammonia Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkle, Matthew

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of the poultry industry. The goal of amendments is to lower levels of NH3 by decreasing litter pH.. This can be accomplished through the use of acidifiers such as alum (aluminum sulfate), Poultry Litter Treatment (PLT), Poultry GuardTM, ferric sulfate... and urea conversion into NH3, which is then, vented utilizing rearing facility ventilation. Unfortunately, at this time there is no scientific data to validate the claims of proposed effectiveness of microbial litter amendments. 14 Alum (Al2(SO4...

  1. Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and GeomorphologyMinerals, and Geomorphology · Soil is unconsolidated material). ·· SoilSoil is unconsolidated material at the surface of the Earth thatis unconsolidated material

  2. 1 INTRODUCTION Researches in unsaturated soil mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 INTRODUCTION Researches in unsaturated soil mechanics considerably developed in the past decades exchanges during shearing were also monitored, and Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics Pierre Delage- mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils

  3. soils.ifas.ufl.edu Soil & Water Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    interested in courses that emphasize sustainability, resource management, valuation of ecosystem servicessoils.ifas.ufl.edu UF/IFAS Soil & Water Science Department DISTANCE EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS #12;SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT The Soil and Water Science Department at the University of Florida

  4. ORNL/TM-2000/97 A New Method to Determine the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests J. A. Shonder Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory J.................................................................................................. 2-3 2.4 Energy Model for Soil, Grout, and FilmORNL/TM-2000/97 A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ

  5. Soil and Water Conservation (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Floridas 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in 1937 under Chapter 582 Florida Statutes. The law was based on federal model legislation to establish Soil and Water...

  6. Residential construction on expansive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, James Frederick

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residences founded on expansive soils experience billions of dollars each year in damage caused by the heaving and shrinking of the foundation soils. It is thought that stiffening the foundation, while increasing the cost of the home, will save...

  7. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

  8. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

  9. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  10. Environmental radiation safety: plutonium/soil interactions for plutonium particles in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, O.R.; Rossingnol, E.J.; Cannon, W.C.; Stevens, D.L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to provide information useful in estimating hazards related to resuspension characteristics and subsequent aerodynamic behavior of aerosols from a mixing of soil and /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Experiments were carried out to determine whether simple models, used to predict the total activity concentration of resuspended particles, need to be modified to account for changes in the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ activity distribution on resuspended particles due to aging of the soil mixture under humid or dry conditions. A literature search revealed that one model, based on the suspension factors, S/sub f/, may be a useful predictor of hazard reduction irrespective of site. Our experiments demonstrated little or no change in the activity of resuspended particles following humid or dry aging of the soil-/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ mixture. Additional terms for activity distribution changes should not be needed for the simple resuspension hazard model.

  11. Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Approaches to the assessment of injuries to soil arising from discharges of hazardous substances and oil: Type B, Technical information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Voris, P.; Dawson, G.W.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, L.E.; Novich, C.M.; Meuser, J.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for determining the nature and magnitude of injury to the following natural resources are described for: soil chemical characteristics (acidity or pH, cation exchange capacity, percent base saturation, salinity); soil physical characteristics (porosity, water holding capacity, aggregate stability); biological characteristics (microbial activities, invertebrate activities, vegetation); and contaminant transport potential (leaching, food chain). In addition, this document explains how injuries to the soil resource can be translated into a reduction in service provided by that soil and how to determine soil recovery potential. That portion of 43 CFR Part 11 that pertains to the soils portion of the geologic resource is explained.

  13. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessen, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , S=straw, SN=straw + Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , P=peat, PN=peat + Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , UC=unfertilized control.straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and

  14. Leachability of Cu and Ni in wood ash-amended soil as impacted by humic and fulvic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    columns. Leaching was conducted, one pore volume (PV) at a time, under unsaturated conditions. Leachate, and shavings in boilers to produce energy at paper mills, plywood plants, and other electrical generating plants. It consists of salts, oxides, and hydroxides of Ca, K, Fe, Al, Mn, Na, and Mg, and other trace

  15. GUIDE TO GRADUATE SOIL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    GUIDE TO GRADUATE PROGRAMS in AGRONOMY and SOIL SCIENCE Updated July 2011 THE DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND SOIL SCIENCES THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY PARK, PA #12;iiii Guide to Graduate Programs in Agronomy and Soil Science Table of Contents Introduction

  16. 5, 95145, 2008 Soil parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    tools to sim- ulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for nu, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulicHESSD 5, 95­145, 2008 Soil parameter inversion ­ potential and limits A. Loew and W. Mauser Title

  17. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35 K

  18. Physiological responses of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to organic and inorganic amended heavy-metal contaminated chat tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngman, A.L. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Study plots established at the Galena subsite of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Southeastern Kansas by the US Bureau of Mines in 1990 were examined during the summer of 1996 to determine whether physiological criteria could be used to determine suitability of switchgrass for remediation of heavy-metal contaminated substrates. Switchgrass was chosen because it was the most frequently encountered species on these plots. Treatment plots included a treatment control, an organic residue treatment of 89.6 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1} composted cattle manure, and two inorganic fertilizer treatments recommended for either native grass or grass/legume mixtures. Plant response variables were photosynthetic rate, leaf conductance to water vapor, internal concentration of carbon dioxide in leaves, foliar transpiration rate, leaf water-use-efficiency, predawn leaf xylem water potential, and midday leaf xylem water potential. Predawn and midday xylem water potentials were higher for grass/legume inorganic treatment than for the other inorganic treatments. Leaf conductances were lower for organically treated plots than those plots not organically amended and both photosynthesis and transpiration were lower for organically treated plots. Leaf conductances and transpiration were higher for grass/legume treated plots than for plots lacking inorganic treatment. Water-use-efficiency was higher for native grass inorganically treated plots than for other inorganic treatments.

  19. Estimating the aggregate/intraaggregate mass ratio of a shrinking soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Y. Chertkov

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently introduced parameter, the ratio of an aggregate solid mass to a solid mass of an intraaggregate matrix (K ratio) is connected with the mean thickness of a deformable, but non-shrinking surface layer of aggregates and is a fundamental property of aggregated soils that essentially influences their shrinkage. The objective of this work is to suggest and validate an approach to estimating the K ratio at any soil clay content through characteristics of soil texture and structure. We derive an equation that reflects the interrelation between the K ratio and soil texture and structure. The K ratio can be estimated as the solution of the equation and is determined by the mean size of soil solids and the maximum size of soil aggregates in the oven-dried state, independently of a measured shrinkage curve. To validate the approach we use available data for eight soils.

  20. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  1. 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT! ORDeR NO. DE-AC05-76RL01830 .. DUNS # 032987476 ~ 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

  2. 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 28 2. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DUNS # 032987476 s DE-AC05-76RL01830 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13} CODE FACILITY ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF COF^TTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

  3. 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE OF PAGESIPAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11. CONTRACT 10 CODE OF PAGESIPAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 1 7 2 ONLY 10 MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14 14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT ORDER NO. IN ITEM 10A D B. THE ABOVE NUMBERED CONTRACTIORDER IS MODIFIED

  4. \\1. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\1. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 1 1 2 ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14 IN ITEM 14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT ORDER NO. IN ITEM 10A. D B. THE ABOVE NUMBERED CONTRACTIORDER

  5. 11. CONTRACT ID CODE IPAGE1 OFI AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11. CONTRACT ID CODE IPAGE1 OFI PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2 2 County, WA 99352 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DUNS# 032987476 DE-AC05-76RL01830 ~ 10B. DATED AND APPROPRIATION DATA (Ifrequired} CHECK ONE D D D 13. THIS ITEM APPLIES ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS

  6. 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE OF PAGESIPAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11. CONTRACT 10 CODE OF PAGESIPAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 1 2 2 ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14 14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT ORDER NO. IN ITEM 10A. D B. THE ABOVE NUMBERED CONTRACT/ORDER IS MODIFIED

  7. \\1. CONTRACT ID CODE OF PAGES-I PAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\1. CONTRACT ID CODE OF PAGES-I PAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 3 3. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DE-AC05-76RLO1830 DUNS # 032987476 ~ 108. DATED (SEE /TEM 13) CODE FACILITY ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

  8. A STUDENT GOVERNANCE MODEL ALIGNED TO H.E ACT OF 1997 (Amended 2013) Student Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    A STUDENT GOVERNANCE MODEL ALIGNED TO H.E ACT OF 1997 (Amended 2013) Student Assembly Debating Forum for Student Leaders Recommends Policy positions to the SRC SRC Members, Residences' Councils, Academic Councils (Undergraduate and Postgraduate), Day Students' Sub-Council, Sports Sub

  9. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  10. Albert Einstein College of Medicine Amendment to Non-human Use of Radioactive Material License

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    RSO-2 Rev.0 Albert Einstein College of Medicine Amendment to Non-human Use of Radioactive Material License INSTRUCTIONS: If you wish to make changes to your license to use radioactive material please exposure; Glove box: Mechanical pipettes: Fume hood: Absorbent liner & Tray Shielding: Lead: Lucite: GM

  11. Student Health Advisory Board Meeting, November 12, 2012. Amended and approved November 26, 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Advisor to Governor Kitzhaber and chair of the Public Employee's Benefit Board, discussed health care to discuss Oregon's health care transformation process, 7 to 9 p.m. at the Corvallis-Benton County PublicMinutes Student Health Advisory Board Meeting, November 12, 2012. Amended and approved November 26

  12. Student Health Advisory Board Meeting, October 15, 2012. Amended and approved November 26, 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    because of the Health Care Reform Act will also offer state exchanges as one option for studentsMinutes Student Health Advisory Board Meeting, October 15, 2012. Amended and approved November 26, 2012. Oregon State University Student Health Services I. Call to Order. A meeting of the Student Health

  13. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595 to, NEPA and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). #12;

  14. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-4347; hereinafter "NEPA") and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor AMENDED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -606 Amended Notice of Proposed Awards Proposed Awards 3 Solar Power, Inc. Photovoltaic Panel Manufacturing of Proposed Awards. The notice is being also posted on the Energy Commission's website at: http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts Score Status 1 CaliSolar, Inc. Manufacturing Capacity Expansion from 60 MW to 155 MW $5,000,000 $5

  16. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH 102 of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 2006, Public Law 109-103. 15 July 2009 for Idaho, rural Nevada, and rural Utah. In addition, text was added at each location of Note 7 to address

  17. High resolution analysis of soil elements with laser-induced breakdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebinger, Michael H. (Santa Fe, NM); Harris, Ronny D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a system and method of detecting a concentration of an element in a soil sample wherein an opening or slot is formed in a container that supports a soil sample that was extracted from the ground whereupon at least a length of the soil sample is exposed via the opening. At each of a plurality of points along the exposed length thereof, the soil sample is ablated whereupon a plasma is formed that emits light characteristic of the elemental composition of the ablated soil sample. Each instance of emitted light is separated according to its wavelength and for at least one of the wavelengths a corresponding data value related to the intensity of the light is determined. As a function of each data value a concentration of an element at the corresponding point along the length of the soil core sample is determined.

  18. Hydrogen oxidation in soils as a possible toxic-effects indicator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D. (U.S. EPA, Las Vegas); McFarlane, J.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient soil bioassays are needed in a screening array to determine the toxicities of industrial products and wastes. Hydrogen consumption is a common soil microbiological process that we evaluated as a possible soil indicator of toxic effects. Elemental tritium was used as a tracer to determine the H/sub 2/ oxidation rates in soils. The H/sub 2/ bioassay can be completed within 24 h using liquid scintillation counting of the tritium tracer. This test was used to evaluate the effects of known toxic chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, herbicides, and air pollutants), as well as a variety of suspected environmentally harmful compounds (e.g., waste waters, particulates, and sludges from industrial processes) on H/sub 2/ oxidation in soils. This bioassay responded to test compounds at concentrations shown to be toxic in other soil microbiological investigations.

  19. Influence of perennial plants on chemical properties of arid calcareous soils in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimian, N.; Razmi, K. (Shiraz Univ. (Iran))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors conducted a study in Bajgah to determine the influence of perennial plants on some selected properties of soils formed on the highly calcareous parent material. The major plant genera were determined to be Agropyron, Artemisia, Astragalus, Dianthus, Eryngium, Peganum, Polygonum, Stipa, and Thymus. Tops of plants genera were found to be significantly different in ash, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Zn, and Cu; the concentration of Fe was not significantly different. The authors found the plants to differ significantly in their influence on soil properties. Peganum caused an accumulation of organic matter (OM) as high as 7% in the soil, in an environment where the soils typically contain less than 1% OM. Soil concentrations of P, K, Mn, Zn, and Cu were also found to vary significantly beneath different plant genera. They suggest these differences in OM accumulation were caused by plant litter. Concentration of Fe in the soils formed beneath different plant genera was statistically unchanged.

  20. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

  1. The influence of chloride ions on the corrosion of copper in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirani, Raju K

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    work the influence of chloride ions upon corrosion behavior of copper in soil has been studied. Open circuit potential, linear polarization and overvoltage data were used to obtain a history of the instantaneous corrosion rate of copper in soil..., evidence exists that pitting corrosion of copper is intensified in the presence of chloride ions. The primary objective of this study was to determine quantitatively the influence of chloride ions upon the corrosion of copper in soil. Instantaneous...

  2. A study of the troxler nuclear soil density and moisture gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedenwald, Robert Lane

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Be 60 source was used in moisture determinations and a Co source in density measurements. Average deviations of 0. 8 pounds of water per cubic foot of soil were reported for moisture measurements. Density measurements varied by 3 pounds per cubic... foot. It was found that moisture readings may be affected by chemically bound water but for mineral soils, soil type generally has little effect on the calibration of these instruments. Goldberg et al (15) in 1955 constructed a sensitive, r liable...

  3. Ultratrace determination of curium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitz, J.V.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a method for detection of curium at near single atom levels is being undertaken as a part of the Advanced Concepts Project at Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. Ultratrace determination of curium, with the ability to quantify the fraction that is curium-242, provides a signature method of detecting clandestine reprocessing of recently irradiated uranium targets. Curium initially present in any of a variety of materials such as air filters, solid or liquid process waste, soil, flora, or fauna can be recovered via current chemical separations processing techniques. Using the ultratrace method being developed, such recovered curium will be quantified with thousand-fold higher sensitivity than the best currently available method which is alpha counting. This high sensitivity arises because, on average, a given trivalent curium (Cm{sup 3+}) ion can emit a very large number of fluorescence photons before alpha decay occurs.

  4. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  5. Deployment of an innovative thermally enhanced soil mixing process augmented with zero-valent iron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, P. L.

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative in-situ soil treatment process, referred to as soil mixing/thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (SM/TESVE), was used to remediate the 317 Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (i.e., Argonne), which is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Following the initial soil treatment, polishing was required to reduce residual concentrations of contaminants. A study of polishing methods was conducted. It determined that injecting metallic iron particles into the soil, in conjunction with soil mixing, would reduce residual VOC concentrations more effectively than the original conventional soil ventilation approach. After the effectiveness of iron injection was verified, it replaced the soil ventilation step. The modified process involved mixing the soil while hot air and steam were injected into it. Off-gases were captured in a hood over the treatment area. During this process, an iron slurry, consisting of up to 50% iron particles in water with guar gum added as a thickening agent, was injected and mixed into the soil by the mixing equipment. Approximately 6,246 m{sup 3} (8, 170 yd{sup 3}) of soil was treated during this project. Confirmatory samples were then collected. In these samples, VOC concentrations were usually reduced by more than 80%.

  6. Dispersion by chemical reaction of Rocky Mountain Arsenal Basin F waste soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, J.R.; Marion, G.M.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many military installations have soil contamination problems that range from heavy metals to petroleum products. Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) Basin F contains high concentrations of salts, heavy metals, ammonia, urea, and organics. The Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR) process leads to a reduction in the mobility of the organic and inorganic constituents by first removing volatile constituents via steam stripping and volatilization, then trapping the nonvolatile contaminants in a nonmobile phase (microencapsulation), and finally compacting the treated material into large soil bodies (macroencapsulation). This report summarizes the results of the DCR testing of soil-amended Basin F sludge from RMA. The primary focus of this study is on pesticide leachability. The DCR process used to treat the Basin F waste soil produced a dry, homogeneous, soil-like material with desirable physical properties that on compaction achieved the following remediation goals: reduction of all leachable volatiles to nondetectable levels, confinement of all metals to below RCRA TCLP levels, and a decrease in pesticide leachability to levels approaching RCRA standards. For example, endrin TCLP concentration was reduced from 74 microgram/L to 20-28 microgram/L (regulatory limit = 20 ug/L). In several cases, reductions in pesticide leachability could be attributed to simple dilution with the calcium oxide (CaO) reagent. However in other cases, microencapsulation and/or macroencapsulation also played a role in reducing pesticide leachability. Additional work is necessary to optimize the amounts of lime-milk, hydrophobic CaO, and benign oil used in the processing of RMA Basin F waste soils. Ideally, the optimum design should achieve the regulatory and client goals, while minimizing materials handling, energy, and reagent inputs.

  7. Methylmercury Production in Tidal Salt Marsh Sediments and Potential Control Using Iron Amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich, Patrick D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phosphorus removal in treatment wetlands (Ann et al. 2000),within a wetland soil following ferric chloride treatment to

  8. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  9. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  10. Apparent adsorption and microbial degradation of phenol by soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, H.D.; Wolf, D.C.; Lavy, T.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine effects of pretreatment, equilibrium time, and concentration on adsorption of the labile organic chemical phenol by two soils: Captina silt loam (Typie Fragiudult) and Palouse silt loam (Ultic Haploxeroll). Adsorption of phenol by soil was determined by radioassay using the batch technique. Since loss from solution is equated with adsorption with the batch method, degradation of phenol is also recorded as adsorption. Adsorption of phenol was low, as evidenced by Freudlich K values of 0.57 and 1.19 for the sterile Captina and Palouse soils, respectively. The addition of water, glucose, or nutrient broth to the non-sterile soil increased the apparent adsorption by reducing the phenol concentration in the solution phase. As equilibration time increased, the apparent adsorption of phenol by the non-sterile soil also increased. When compared with the sterilized soil, this increase suggested that the loss of phenol from solution was largely due to microbial decomposition. As the concentration of phenol increased, there was a corresponding increase in the lag phase and a decrease in the degradation rate constant indicating inhibition and microbial activity by phenol at higher concentrations. The length of time in the lag phase was linearly related to the log of the phenol concentration. At a given concentration, the lag phase of the Captina soil was longer and more sensitive to changes in phenol concentration than was the lag phase in the Palouse soil. This was attributed to its lower phenol adsorption, organic matter content, and initial microbial population.

  11. Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    in a Phragmites australis wetland in Denmark Irving A. Mendelssohn a, , Brian K. Sorrellb,1 ,Hans Brix b , Hans tensile strength loss; Physico-chemistry; Nutrients; Soil reduction; Phragmites australis 1. Introduction rates found along environmental gradients. Relative soil decomposition was determined in a Phragmites

  12. Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naiser, Donald David

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF TABLES Table Page 1. Soil profile considered in all sample calculations, 2. Gardner's coefficient. 3. Measured suction profile values. 4. Summary of vertical differential soil movements for Appendix C. . . . 50 . . . 54 70 . . . . 74 LIST... OF FIGURES Figure 1. United States map of expansive soils after Wiggins. 2. Center lift distortion mode Page 3. Edge lift distortion mode. 4. The structure of kaolinite (a) atomic structure (b) symbolic structure. . . 5. The structure of serpentine (a...

  13. SUMMARY OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO REGULATION FSU-2.024, TUITION AND FEES; MS-NURSE ANESTHESIA PROGRAM; MD TUITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SUMMARY OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO REGULATION FSU-2.024, TUITION AND FEES; MS-NURSE ANESTHESIA for a new Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia program at the Panama City Florida Campus. The new program

  14. CX-008692: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amendment Number 2 to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 06/22/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-008892: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-009201: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 09/14/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-008710: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amendment Number 1 to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 05/23/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-002585: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Westside Substation Additions (Amended)CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 05/25/2010Location(s): Idaho Falls, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-005865: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laboratory Tests in Support of Disodium Silicate Base AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/09/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-012109: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Port Townsend Paper Corporation Power Sales Agreement Amendment CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 04/01/2014 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-010577: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peninsula Light Company Line and Load Interconnection Request L0308 (Amendment) CX(s) Applied: B4.12 Date: 07/25/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. Phytoremediation of Hexavalent Chromium Polluted Soil Using Pterocarpus indicus and Jatropha curcas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarwoko Mangkoedihardjo; Rhenny Ratnawati; Neni Alfianti

    without compost amendment by Pterocarpus indicus and Jatropha curcas. Greenhouse experiment was conducted

  3. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soilsoil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. 2012 American

  4. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brouns, Richard A. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Bonner, William F. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  5. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management Committee Membership Dr. David Radcliffe - committee chair Dr. George Vellidis Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Stripling

  6. Occurrence of Nitrites in Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Sterges, A. J.

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity for producing nitrates may form large amounts of nitrites. Nitrites may persist in the soil or in soil extracts for several weeks. Magnesium carbonate and calcium car- bonate may favor the formation of nitrites. Water equivaIent to 50 per cent... ............................................. Method of work 5 Nitrites in soils without additions of nitrogenous materials ........ 6 Nitrification capacity as measured by nitric nitrogen alone. and by nitric and nitrous nitrogen combined ....................... 6...

  7. The Basicity of Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical prob- lems connected with the investigations of cotton root rot being made by the Division of Plant Pathology and Physiology. Lab- oratory methods were needed for estimating the amounts of acid or sulphur required to bring experimental soils... approxi- mately to a desired degree of acidity. Information was needed regarding the amounts of acid or sulphur required to make acid various kinds of soil. This Bulletin discusses the basicity of Texas soils, and the amounts of acid or sulphur...

  8. Plant and Soil VIII, no. 3 March 1957 PROBLEMS OF SOIL TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Plant and Soil VIII, no. 3 March 1957 PROBLEMS OF SOIL TESTING ON CALCAREOUS SOILS by DAN H. YAALON The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel Chemically and mineralogically the soils of arid and semiarid of limestone, most of the soils are calcareous. Extensive leaching may have removed the CaCO3 from the soil

  9. Original article Soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest: dependence on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Original article Soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest: dependence on soil temperature and soil water 1998) Abstract - Our objective was to quantify the annual soil carbon efflux in a young beech forest in north-eastern France (Hesse Forest, Euroflux site FR02) from measurements of soil CO, efflux. Soil CO

  10. Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen and Nitrate Leaching in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen and Nitrate Leaching in Swedish Arable Soils sa Myrbeck Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Soil and Environment Uppsala field experiment, Paper III. (photo: J. Arvidsson) #12;Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen

  11. Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management -Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management - Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL of Calculus I or MATH 140* (GQ) Calculus With Analytic Geometry I 4 SOILS 101 (GN) Introductory Soil Science 3 AG 150S (First-Year Seminar) Be a Master Student! 2 SOILS 102 Introductory Soil Science Laboratory 1

  12. Incorporating any amendments approved at subsequent Council meetings The University of Dublin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Walsh, of the School of Education. (iv) CL12-13/063, delete the sentence `Professor D C Williams ... two) CL12-13/024 (i), line 5, amend to Dean of Students. (iii) CL12-13/025, third line from end, Professor will be incorporated into DCU and thus form part of the institute of education made up of DCU, St Patrick's College

  13. In situ recycling of contaminated soil uses bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevlin, P.J.; Reel, D.A.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OxyChem Pipeline Operations, primarily an ethylene and propylene products mover, has determined that substantial savings can be realized by adopting a bioremediation maintenance and recycling approach to hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. By this method, the soil can be recycled in situ, or in containers. To implement the soil-recycling program, OxyChem elected to use a soil remediator and natural absorbent product, Oil Snapper. This field maintenance material, based on an Enhanced Urea Technology, provides a diet to stimulate the growth of hydrocarbon-eating microbes. It works well either with indigenous soil microbes or with commercial microbes. The product is carried in field vehicles, which makes it immediately available when leaks or spills are discovered. Procedure for clean-up is to apply product and mix it into affected soil. Thus the contaminant is contained, preventing further migration; the contaminant is dispersed throughout the product, making it more accessible to the microbes; nutrients are immediately available to the microbes; and the material contributes aeration and moisture-retention properties.

  14. Saxton soil remediation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

  15. acid aluminum-rich soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incorporated into in situ soil cores at a rate of 350 kg N ha-1 and compared to unamended controls. Microbial properties were determined by microbial biomass N, dehydrogenase...

  16. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  17. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Madden, Andrew [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  18. Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Joseph L.

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication...

  19. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the inter-aggregate and intra-aggregate pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates was larger than 18 micron. Inter-aggregate pores continued to be the dominant flow pathways even at much smaller spacing; intra-aggregate flow was less than 10% of the total flow when the inter- and intra-aggregate pore sizes were comparable. Such studies are making it possible to identify which model upscaling assumptions are realistic and what computational methods are required for detailed numerical investigation of microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil systems.

  20. Soil Conservation Districts Law (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter aims to provide for the conservation of the soil and soil resources of this state and for the control and prevention of soil erosion, and to preserve the state's natural resources,...

  1. Soil-penetrating synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boverie, B.; Brock, B.C.; Doerry, A.W.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results for the first year of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort. This effort included a system study, preliminary data acquisition, and preliminary algorithm development. The system study determined the optimum frequency and bandwidth, surveyed soil parameters and targets, and defined radar cross section in lossy media. The data acquisition imaged buried objects with a rail-SAR. Algorithm development included a radar echo model, three-dimensional processing, sidelobe optimization, phase history data interpolation, and clutter estimation/cancellation.

  2. Soil Stabilization Methods with Potential for Application at the Nevada National Security Site: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shillito, Rose [DRI] [DRI; Fenstermaker, Lynn [DRI] [DRI

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has resulted in large areas of surficial radionuclide-contaminated soils. Much of the radionuclide contamination is found at or near the soil surface, and due to the dry climate setting, and the long half-life of radioactive isotopes, soil erosion poses a long-term health risk at the NNSS. The objective of this literature review is to present a survey of current stabilization methods used for minimizing soil erosion, both by water and wind. The review focuses on in situ uses of fundamental chemical and physical mechanisms for soil stabilization. A basic overview of the physical and chemical properties of soil is also presented to provide a basis for assessing stabilization methods. Some criteria for stabilization evaluation are identified based on previous studies at the NNSS. Although no specific recommendations are presented as no stabilization method, alone or in combination, will be appropriate in all circumstances, discussions of past and current stabilization procedures and specific soil tests that may aid in current or future soil stabilization activities at the NNSS are presented. However, not all Soils Corrective Action Sites (CASs) or Corrective Action Units (CAUs) will require stabilization of surficial radionuclide-contaminated soils. Each Soils CAS or CAU should be evaluated for site-specific conditions to determine if soil stabilization is necessary or practical for a given specific site closure alternative. If stabilization is necessary, then a determination will be made as to which stabilization technique is the most appropriate for that specific site.

  3. Crop and soil responses to sewage sludge applied to reclaimed prime farmland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in reclamation of surface mined prime farmland may be obtained by adding sewage sludge to topsoil and subsoil. This prime farmland reclamation study was done in western Kentucky. The experiment was conducted to investigate effects of the sludge amendment to topsoil and subsoil on soil and crop responses. The experiment showed, in most cases at highest application rates, that the sludge addition significantly increased the soil organic matter, total N content, and available P levels. However, water holding capacity, CEC, and exchangeable cations were not significantly affected. Higher microbial populations and activates were also obtained. The wheat biomass, tiller number, tissue N, grain N, grain yield, and N removal in grain were well correlated with application rates of sewage sludge. Corn also responded positively to additions of sewage sludge. The corn ear-leaf N concentration, grain yield, and grain N removal increased with application rates of sewage sludge. Experiments indicated that topsoil and subsoil sewage sludge addition was beneficial practices in terms of increasing crop yield and improving some soil properties.

  4. Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana [Institute for Technology of Nuclear and other Mineral Raw Materials, Franche d' Epere 86, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

  5. Nanobiotechnology for enzymatic remediation and soil carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungbae; Amonette, James E.; Russell, Colleen K.

    2005-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the ability of tyrosinase to catalyze the oxidation of various phenolic compounds. As a revolutionary approach to enzyme stabilization, we developed specially-designed nanoporous silica for enzyme immobilization. Our tests show that the active lifetime of the enzymes stabilized in this material can extend to periods as long as several months, which is about a 100-fold increase in stability. The implications of this new approach to enzyme-based bioremedation will be discussed. In soils, the humification process involves phenol oxidation, mediated by tyrosinase, followed by nonenzymatic polymerization of the resulting quinones with amino acids to form humic polymers. We tested the effects of fly ash amendments on a model humification reaction involving tyrosinase and a suite of organic monomers. The combination of fly ashes with tyrosinase increased the amount of polymer formed by several fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of alkaline pH and physical stabilization of the enzyme in porous silica cenospheres.

  6. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served as an ideal method for subsurface biostimulation.

  7. Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for civil engineering consultancy services for the construction of the neutrino platform at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for civil engineering consultancy services for the construction of the neutrino platform at CERN

  8. Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for the supply and installation of an HVAC system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for the supply and installation of an HVAC system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  9. Proposal to negotiate an amendment to a blanket purchase contract for the supply and installation of water-cooled bus bars and cables for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate an amendment to a blanket purchase contract for the supply and installation of water-cooled bus bars and cables for the LHC

  10. Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps PAUL M. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological database. In this technique, rose-pie charts provide an overall assessment of soils hazards structures such as pipelines, power lines, and roads; and regional evaluations of sources of ag- gregate

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medicine Bow Substation Control Building Installation Project (Amended) Carbon County, Wyoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western)...

  12. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Khn, Oliver

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  13. 275-2 Determination of loud, disturbing and unnecessary noise. [Added 8-15-1968; amended 2-2-1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    in the vicinity. F. Exhausts. The discharge into the open air of the exhaust of any stationary internal combustion; the use of any horn, whistle or other device operated by engine exhaust; and the use of any such signaling engine or motor vehicle except through a muffler or other device which will effectively prevent loud

  14. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  15. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  16. Field evaluation of a standard test method for screening fuels in soils at a railroad site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schabron, J.F.; Sorini, S.S. [Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (United States); Butler, E.L. [Gradient Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States); Frisbie, S. [Johnson Co., Inc., Montpelier, VT (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-5831-95 is a standard test method for screening fuel contamination in soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. It is also fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet (UV) absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the information available concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil can be determined. ASTM Method D-5831 was evaluated by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. Soil contaminated with weathered and fresh diesel fuel was sampled and tested for its contaminant concentration. Soil samples were screened in the field using ASTM Method D-5831 and a portable soil test kit. In addition, splits of the soil samples were analyzed in the laboratory using an extractable petroleum hydrocarbon method. Field and laboratory data were compared and show good correlation between field screening and laboratory results.

  17. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLUTONIUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE (NTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Hoeffner

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL) was contracted by the National Energy Technology Center to evaluate technologies that might be used to reduce the volume of plutonium-contaminated soil at the Nevada Test Site. The project has been systematically approached. A thorough review and summary was completed for: (1) The NTS soil geological, geochemical and physical characteristics; (2) The characteristics and chemical form of the plutonium that is in these soils; (3) Previous volume reduction technologies that have been attempted on the NTS soils; (4) Vendors with technology that may be applicable; and (5) Related needs at other DOE sites. Soils from the Nevada Test Site were collected and delivered to the CETL. Soils were characterized for Pu-239/240, Am-241 and gross alpha. In addition, wet sieving and the subsequent characterization were performed on soils before and after attrition scrubbing to determine the particle size distribution and the distribution of Pu-239/240 and gross alpha as a function of particle size. Sequential extraction was performed on untreated soil to provide information about how tightly bound the plutonium was to the soil. Magnetic separation was performed to determine if this could be useful as part of a treatment approach. Using the information obtained from these reviews, three vendors were selected to demonstration their volume reduction technologies at the CETL. Two of the three technologies, bioremediation and soil washing, met the performance criteria. Both were able to significantly reduce the concentration plutonium in the soil from around 1100 pCi/g to 200 pCi/g or less with a volume reduction of around 95%, well over the target 70%. These results are especially encouraging because they indicate significant improvement over that obtained in these earlier pilot and field studies. Additional studies are recommended.

  18. Soil Insulation For Barrier Layer Protection In Landfill Covers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Smith Roy

    Landfill covers are designed to isolate waste from the environment by incorporating low-permeability barrier layers. The barrier layer minimizes and controls gas escaping from the waste and the amount of infiltrating moisture available for leachate generation. Barrier layers are typically designed and constructed of a thick layer of compacted fine-grain native soil material or a manufactured geosynthetic clay liner. The barrier layer must be protected from frost damage. Freezing of a compacted soil layer has been shown to cause quick and irreversible degradation. Large increases in permeability have been demonstrated in compacted clay barriers subjected to a minimum number of freezing and thawing cycles. Design methods to protect the barrier layer from frost damage have not been addressed in the research literature. A design procedure is addressed in this paper that determines the thickness of soil required to protect a barrier layer. The procedure is based on sitespecific temperature ...

  19. Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    and energy fluxes in soils (water, air, nutrients and pollutants) · provide solutions for sustainable land1 Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics CHN F 29.1 Universitätstrasse 16 8092 Zürich dani.or@env.ethz.ch +41 44 633 60 15 Objectives of soil protection major

  20. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist Committee Membership Dr. J. Michael Moore - committee chair Dr. Clint Waltz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences-7300 Fax: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (770) 412-4734 Dr. Eric Prostko Dr. Guy Collins Department of Crop & Soil

  1. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Paul Raymer - committee chair Dr. Scott Jackson Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Horticulture University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  2. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the interconnectedness of soil and water conservation. The course focusses on soil and water management as it relates to relevant issues surrounding agriculture and sustainability. Concepts include current soil and water and societal issues. Course Goals: Understand the basic principles of soil and water management

  3. SOIL QUALITY AND CROP Dick Wolkowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    #12;WHAT IS SOIL QUALITY DEPENDS ON WHO YOU ARE: Farmer: Highly productive, sustainable media Soil test and pH "Artificial" drainage Residue management Microbial activity Salts #12;Soil biology factors into an index #12;Pennsylvania #12;A SOIL MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK (Andrews et al., 2004

  4. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    focusses on soil and water management as it relates to relevant issues surrounding agriculture and sustainability. Concepts include current soil and water resources, historical erosion and sedimentation problems principles of soil and water management and conservation. 2. Discuss strategies for soil or water

  5. Productive soil must be fertile physical fertility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    , structure, drainage, tilth · chemical fertility ­ nutrient supply · soil testing #12;#12;Soil formation-'weathering' · physical ­freezing, thawing, wetting, drying, organisms · chemical ­dissolved minerals moved in water ­soil · improve by adding organic residues ­ decay: 90% CO2 + H2O #12;#12;#12;Problem: `heavy' soil · aggregates

  6. Soil as natural capital Ecosystem services and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    threats Decline in: Lead to: soil carbon soil erosion biological ac2 tool box Information on sustainable soil use incentives After Daiily et al 2009 "decision loop" #12;Soil is a natural capital Ecosystem services Nutrient retention Carbon storage Water retention

  7. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist Tifton campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist ­ Tifton campus Committee Membership Dr. Stanley Culpepper

  8. KSInglett Page 1 MATH FOR SOIL SCIENTISTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    skills that are most relevant to graduate courses in environmental science including Soil and Water transport 9. Soil temperature, heat capacity and conductivity Unit 3 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL BIOCHEMISTRY 10 and gas fluxes Unit 5 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL CHEMISTRY, FERTILITY, and MANAGEMENT (optional) 19. p

  9. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type and management data-Verlag, France 2012 Abstract This report evidences factors controlling soil or- ganic carbon at the national scale by modelling data of 2,158 soil samples from France. The global soil carbon amount, of about 1

  11. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community plants and biological soil crusts on desert soil nematode and protozoan abundance and community composition. In the first experiment, biological soil crusts were removed by physical trampling. Treatments

  12. Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic C. J. Miller, M.ASCE1 the variation of water content and pore water suction for compacted clayey soils. The soils had varying amounts of clay fraction with plasticities ranging from low to high plasticity. The unsaturated soil behavior

  13. Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Survey Part II. A Framework for Soil and Vegetation Dynamics Arlene Tugel, Soil Scientist Liaison to ARS, USDA-NRCS Las Cruces, NM and the Soils-ESD Advisory Group #12;What makes a site a site? Soil forming factors: climate, parent, material, biotic factors

  14. Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test fertility status of the soil in each field can invest wisely in fertilizer and lime to produce the most economical crop yields. A soil test provides the needed information about soil pH, lime need and available

  15. Soil drainage as an active agent of recent soil evolution: a David Montagnea,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Soil drainage as an active agent of recent soil evolution: a review* David Montagnea,b , Sophie on pedogenesis mainly focuses on the long-term soil formation and most often neglects recent soil evolution drainage on soil evolution. Artificial drainage is considered as an example of the impact of recent changes

  16. Soil Aggregate Size Affects Phosphorus Desorption from Highly Weathered Soils and Plant Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Soil Aggregate Size Affects Phosphorus Desorption from Highly Weathered Soils and Plant Growth X of P around soil aggregates (Gunary et al., 1964; Linquist etfrom soil, understanding P desorption from soils may improve the precision of P diagnosis and fertilization recommendations. Many al., 1997

  17. Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil Cation Composition Sarah E the influence of tree species on soil carbon and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a common garden of replicated substantial divergence in foliar and soil base cation concentrations and soil pH among spe- cies, we

  18. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  19. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  20. Recommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to operate the FCRPS to maximize energy revenue so Bonneville can pay its nuclear power plant gambling debtsRecommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power to the Northwest Power Planning Council's March 14, 2001 request for recommended amendments to the mainstem