National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination soil amendment

  1. Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1 - Simulations of beneficial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mae Sexauer Gustin; Jody Ericksen; George C. Fernandez

    2008-05-15

    This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ashamended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Organic waste amendments effect on zinc fraction of two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M.

    1999-10-01

    Organic soil amendments can ameliorate metal toxicity to plants by redistributing metals to less available fractions. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of organic amendments on Zn distribution among soil fractions. Two soils were amended with five organic waste materials (some of which contained Zn) or commercial humic acid with and without 400 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Zn, incubated, and fractionated using a sequential extraction technique. Where no Zn was added most of the metals were in the residual fraction. Commercial compost, poultry litter, and industrial sewage sludge increased Zn in the exchangeable (EXC), organic (OM), and manganese oxide (MnOx) fractions due to Zn in the materials. Spent mushroom compost (SMC) redistributed Zn from the EXC fraction to the MnOx fraction for the coarse-textured soil. Where Zn was added, most of the metal was in the EXC and OM fractions. The SMC and humic acid lowered Zn in the EXC fraction and increased Zn in the other fractions. Effects of the organic materials on Zn in soil fractions were more evident for the sandy soil dominated by quartz in the clay than for the finer-textured soil dominated by kaolinite in the clay-size fraction. It was concluded that organic materials high in Zn can increase Zn in the EXC, OM, and MnOx fractions where the soil is not contaminated and others such as SMC and HA can lower the potential availability of Zn in contaminated soils by redistributing it from the EXC to less soluble fractions.

  3. NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5-12 Amendment NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment Obtain Access Agreement to Sample Homestake Mining Company Groundwater Monitoring Well HMC-951 Amendment CX(s) Applied: B3.1...

  4. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12082008) DOE is ...

  5. NEPA Determination: LM-08-12 Amendment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grazing Agreement Amendment, Acid Pond, Spook, WyomingCX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 09/12/2012Location(s): Spook, WYOffices(s): Legacy Management

  6. Midea: Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012-SE-1402)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Amended Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. finding that basic model HD-146F, a refrigerator-freezer, and basic model HS-390C, a freezer, do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  7. Formation of Chloropyromorphite in a Lead-Contaminated Soil Amended with Hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RYAN,JAMES A.; ZHANG,PENGCHU; HESTERBERG,DEAN; ZHOU,WEIQING; SAYERS,DALE E.

    2000-07-14

    To confirm conversion of soil Pb to pyromorphite [Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl], a Pb contaminated soil collected adjacent to a historical smelter was reacted with hydroxyapatite in slurries of soil and hydroxyapatite separated by a dialysis membrane and incubated. A crystalline precipitate formed on the dialysis membrane in the slurry systems was identified as chloropyromorphite. Soluble species measured in the soil slurry indicated that dissolution of solid-phase soil Pb was the rate-limiting step for pyromorphite formation. Additionally samples reacted with hydroxyapatite were incubated at field-capacity moisture content. The sequential chemical extraction used to identify species in the field-moist soil incubation experiment showed that hydroxyapatite treatment reduced the first four fractions of extractable Pb and correspondingly increased the recalcitrant extraction residue fraction by 35% of total Pb at 0 d incubation and by 45% after 240 d incubation. the increase in the extraction residue fraction in the 240 d incubation as compared to the 0 d incubation implies that the reaction occurs in the soil but the increase in the hydroxyapatite amended 0 d incubated soil as compared to the control soil illustrates the chemical extraction procedure caused changes in the extractability. Thus, the chemical extraction procedure cannot easily be utilized to confirm changes occurring in the soil as a result of incubation. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy indicated that the 240 d incubated hydroxyapatite treatment caused a change in the average, local molecular bonding environment of soil Pb. Low-temperature EXAFS spectra (chi data and radial structure functions - RSFs) showed a high degree of similarity between the chemical extraction residue and synthetic pyromorphite. Thus, confirming that the change of soil Pb to pyromorphite is possible by simple amendments of hydroxyapatite to soil.

  8. Barley seedling growth in soils amended with fly ash or agricultural lime followed by acidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renken, R.R.; McCallister, D.L.; Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Marx, D.B.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium-rich coal combustion fly ash can be used as an amendment to neutralize soil acidity because of its oxides and carbonate content, but its aluminum content could inhibit plant growth if soil pH values fall below optimal agronomic levels. This study measured root and shoot growth of an acid-sensitive barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Kearney') grown in the greenhouse on three naturally acid soils. The soils were either untreated or amended with various liming materials (dry fly ash, wet fly ash, and agricultural lime) at application rates of 0, .5, 1, and 1.5 times the recommended lime requirement, then treated with dilute acid solutions to simulate management-induced acidification. Plant growth indexes were measured at 30 days after planting. Root mass per plant and root length per plant were greater for the limed treatments than in the acidified check. Root growth in the limed treatments did not differ from root growth in the original nonacidified soils. Top mass per plant in all limed soils was either larger than or not different from that in the original nonacidified soils. Based on top mass per plant, no liming material or application rate was clearly superior. Both fly ash and agricultural lime reduced the impact of subsequent acidification on young barley plants. Detrimental effects of aluminum release on plant growth were not observed. Calcium-rich fly ash at agronomic rates is an acceptable acid-neutralizing material with no apparent negative effects.

  9. Extractability of zinc, cadmium, and nickel in soils amended with EDTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenbin; Shuman, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Synthetic chelating agents are produced in large quantities for use in many industrial applications. Certain chelates, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), are persistent in the environment. The presence of EDTA in soil may alter the mobility and transport of Zn, Cd, and Ni in soils because of the formation of water soluble chelates, thus increasing the potential for metal pollution of natural waters. Mobility of metals is related to their extractability. To investigate metal extractability affected by EDTA, Zn, Cd, and Ni were added to a portion of eight Georgia topsoil samples at rates of 75.9, 1.62, and 4.30 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. Both natural and metal-amended soils were treated with Na{sub 2-}EDTA at rates of 0, 1.0, and 2.0 g kg{sup -1}. After 5 months of incubation, soil samples were extracted with Mehlich-1, DTPA (diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid) and 1 M Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, the latter of which extracts the exchangeable form of metals. Results showed that Zn and Ni in Mehlich-1 and DTPA extractions increased with increasing rates of EDTA. The increase for Cd was not as great as for Zn or Ni. Similar changes were found for the Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} extraction. As a percentage of total metal concentration, the Mehlich-1 and DTPA extractable Zn was greater than Ni in the natural soils, and the order for the metal-amended soils was Cd > Zn > Ni. The results also suggested that EDTA significantly elevated the extractability of Zn and Ni in both natural and metal-amended soils. The order of mobility based on extractability was: Cd > Zn > Ni for metals added to soils, but when EDTA was present, added Ni was more extractable than Zn or Cd. 36 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  11. Effect of organic waste amendments on zinc adsorption by two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M. . Georgia Experiment station)

    1999-03-01

    Two soils (fine and coarse textured) were amended with five organic wastes or humic acid. One adsorption experiment was carried out at 1 mmol L[sup [minus]1] Zn and at pH levels from 4 to 8. A second experiment was at pH 6 and 0 to 4 mmol/L[sup [minus]1] Zn. The greatest variation in Zn adsorption among organic treatments came at pH 6, with a lesser range for the fine textured soil (pH 5--6) and a wider range for the sandy soil (pH 5--7). Adsorption followed a two-site Langmuir model, and maxima were higher for the finer textured soil compared with the sandy soil. Adsorption maxima were not changed by the organic wastes for the fine textured soil, but all were increased over the controls for the sandy soil. Zinc adsorption for poultry litter was lower than the control for the sandy soil. Industrial sewage sludge and humic acid increased Zn adsorption more than did commercial compost, spent mushroom compost, and cotton litter. It was concluded that organic materials have more influence on Zn adsorption for sandy soils than for fine textured soils and that most materials will increase Zn adsorption, whereas those with high soluble C can decrease Zn adsorption.

  12. Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil Amendment and Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Sequestration - Energy Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil Amendment and Global Carbon Sequestration Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryPhotosynthesis captures more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than any other process on Earth. However, because biomass is not stable and is always decomposing, it is of limited

  13. Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P.

    2008-05-15

    To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

  14. Coal fly ash and phospho-gypsum mixture as an amendment to improve rice paddy soil fertility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.B.; Ha, H.S.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, P.J.

    2008-04-15

    Rice is a plant that requires high levels of silica (Si). As a silicate NOD source to rice, coal fly ash (hereafter, fly ash), which has an alkaline pH and high available silicate and boron (B) contents, was mixed with phosphor-gypsum (hereafter, gypsum, 50%, wt wt{sup -1}), a by-product from the production of phosphate fertilizer, to improve the fly ash limitation. Field experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of the mixture on soil properties and rice (Oryza sativa) productivity in silt loam (SiL) and loamy sand (LS) soils to which 0 (FG 0), 20 (FG 20), 40 (FG 40), and 60 (FG 60) Mg ha{sup -1} were added. The mixture increased the amount of available silicate and exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents in the soils and the uptake of silicate by rice plant. The mixture did not result in accumulation of heavy metals in soil and an excessive uptake of heavy metals by the rice grain. The available boron content in soil increased with the mixture application levels up to 1.42 mg kg{sup -1} following the application of 60 Mg ha{sup -1} but did not show toxicity. The mixture increased significantly rice yield and showed the highest yields following the addition of 30-40 Mg ha{sup -1} in two soils. It is concluded that the fly ash and gypsum mixture could be a good source of inorganic soil amendments to restore the soil nutrient balance in rice paddy soil.

  15. Vapor phase elemental sulfur amendment for sequestering mercury in contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Jackson, Dennis G.

    2014-07-08

    The process of treating elemental mercury within the soil is provided by introducing into the soil a heated vapor phase of elemental sulfur. As the vapor phase of elemental sulfur cools, sulfur is precipitated within the soil and then reacts with any elemental mercury thereby producing a reaction product that is less hazardous than elemental mercury.

  16. Assessment of produced water contaminated soils to determine remediation requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clodfelter, C.

    1995-12-31

    Produced water and drilling fluids can impact the agricultural properties of soil and result in potential regulatory and legal liabilities. Produced water typically is classified as saline or a brine and affects surface soils by increasing the sodium and chloride content. Sources of produced water which can lead to problems include spills from flowlines and tank batteries, permitted surface water discharges and pit areas, particularly the larger pits including reserve pits, emergency pits and saltwater disposal pits. Methods to assess produced water spills include soil sampling with various chemical analyses and surface geophysical methods. A variety of laboratory analytical methods are available for soil assessment which include electrical conductivity, sodium adsorption ratio, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable sodium percent and others. Limiting the list of analytical parameters to reduce cost and still obtain the data necessary to assess the extent of contamination and determine remediation requirements can be difficult. The advantage to using analytical techniques is that often regulatory remediation standards are tied to soil properties determined from laboratory analysis. Surface geophysical techniques can be an inexpensive method to rapidly determine the extent and relative magnitude of saline soils. Data interpretations can also provide an indication of the horizontal as well as the vertical extent of impacted soils. The following discussion focuses on produced water spills on soil and assessment of the impacted soil. Produced water typically contains dissolved hydrocarbons which are not addressed in this discussion.

  17. Soil and fertilizer amendments and edge effects on the floral succession of pulverized fuel ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, P.

    2009-01-15

    Plots of fresh pulverized fuel ash (PFA, an industrial waste) were inoculated with soils from existing PFA sites and fertilizers in a factorial design, then left unmanaged for 12 years during which time the floral development and soil chemistry were monitored annually. For the first 3 years, the site supported a sparse mix of chenopods (including the scarce Chenopodium glaucum) and halophytes. As salinity declined, ruderals, legumes, and grasses plus the fire-site moss Funaria hygrometrica colonized, followed by Festuca arundinacea grassland (NVC community MG12) and Hippophae rhamnoides scrub. Dactylorhiza incarnata (orchidacea) appeared after 7 years, but only in plots that had received soil from existing orchid colonies. Four years later, a larger second generation of Dactylorhiza appeared, but only in the central zone of the site where vegetation was thinnest. By year 12, the site was dominated by coarse grasses and scrub, with early successional species persisting only in the sparsely vegetated center, where nitrate levels were lowest. This edge effect is interpreted as centripetal encroachment, a process of potentially wider concern for the conservation of low-fertility habitat patches. Overall, seed bank inoculation seems to have introduced few but desirable species (D. incarnata, Pyrola rotundifolia, some halophytes, and annuals), whereas initial application of organic fertilizer had long-lasting ({ge} 10 years) effects on cover and soil composition.

  18. Introduction of mercury resistant bacterial strains to Hg(II) amended soil microcosms increases the resilience of the natural microbial community to mercury stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse D.; Serensen, Soren J.

    2004-03-17

    Heavy metals are among the most important groups of pollutant compounds, and they are highly persistent in the soil environment. Techniques that can be used for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated environments thus need to be evolved. In the present study we evaluated the effect of introducing a Hg resistance plasmid in subsurface soil communities. This was done in microcosms with DOE subsurface soils amended with 5-10 ppm of HgCl2. Two microcosms were set up. In microcosm A we studied the effect of adding strain S03539 containing either the Hg resistance conjugative plasmid, pJORD 70, or the Hg resistance mobilizable plasmid, pPB117. In microcosm B we studied the effect of adding strain KT2442 with and without pJORD70. For both microcosms, the effect on the resilience of the indigenous bacterial community as well as the effect on the soil concentration of Hg was evaluated.

  19. Sidewall tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2001-01-01

    A sidewall tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, a) a body adapted for insertion into an opening in earthen soil below grade, the body having lateral sidewalls; b) a laterally oriented porous material provided relative to the body lateral sidewalls, the laterally oriented porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body; c) a pressure a sensor in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; and d) sidewall engaging means for engaging a portion of a sidewall of an earth opening to laterally urge the porous material into hydraulic communication with earthen soil of another portion of the opening sidewall. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed.

  20. Rapid Determination Of Radiostrontium In Large Soil Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Shaw, Patrick J.

    2012-05-24

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

  1. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Mattson, E.D.; Sisson, J.B.

    1998-06-02

    A tensiometer to in-situ determine below-grade soil moisture, potential of earthen soil includes, (a) an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and, comprising; (b) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; (c) a first fluid conduit extending outwardly of the first fluid chamber; (d) a first controllable isolation valve provided within the first fluid conduit, the first controllable isolation valve defining a second fluid chamber in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber through the first fluid conduit and the isolation valve, the first controllable isolation valve being received within the below-grade portion; and (e) a pressure transducer in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure transducer being received within the below-grade portion. An alternate embodiment includes an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and including: (1) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; and (2) a pressure sensing apparatus in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure sensing apparatus being entirely received within the below-grade portion. A method is also disclosed using the above and other apparatus. 6 figs.

  2. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Mattson, Earl D.; Sisson, James B.

    1998-01-01

    A tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture, potential of earthen soil includes, a) an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and, comprising; b) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; c) a first fluid conduit extending outwardly of the first fluid chamber; d) a first controllable isolation valve provided within the first fluid conduit, the first controllable isolation valve defining a second fluid chamber in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber through the first fluid conduit and the isolation valve, the first controllable isolation valve being received within the below-grade portion; and e) a pressure transducer in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure transducer being received within the below-grade portion. An alternate embodiment includes an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and including: i) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; and ii) a pressure sensing apparatus in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure sensing apparatus being entirely received within the below-grade portion. A method is also disclosed using the above and other apparatus.

  3. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    1997-01-01

    A portable tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, a) a body having opposing first and second ends and being adapted for complete insertion into earthen soil below grade; b) a porous material provided at the first body end, the porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body at the first body end, the fluid chamber being fluidically sealed within the body but for the porous material; c) a degassed liquid received within the fluid chamber; d) a pressure transducer mounted in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; e) the body, pressure transducer and degassed liquid having a combined mass; f) a flexible suspension line connected to the body adjacent the second body end, the flexible line being of sufficient strength to gravitationally freely self suspend the combined mass; and c) the combined mass being sufficient to effectively impart hydraulic communication between below-grade earthen soil contacted by the porous material under the weight of the combined mass. Tensiometers configured to engage the sidewalls of an earthen opening are also disclosed. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed.

  4. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1997-07-08

    A portable tensiometer to in-situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, (a) a body having opposing first and second ends and being adapted for complete insertion into earthen soil below grade; (b) a porous material provided at the first body end, the porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body at the first body end, the fluid chamber being fluidically sealed within the body but for the porous material; (c) a degassed liquid received within the fluid chamber; (d) a pressure transducer mounted in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; (e) the body, pressure transducer and degassed liquid having a combined mass; (f) a flexible suspension line connected to the body adjacent the second body end, the flexible line being of sufficient strength to gravitationally freely self suspend the combined mass; and (g) the combined mass being sufficient to effectively impart hydraulic communication between below-grade earthen soil contacted by the porous material under the weight of the combined mass. Tensiometers configured to engage the sidewalls of an earthen opening are also disclosed. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed. 12 figs.

  5. Amendment 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Date: 6/30/2016 ISSUED BY: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 PROJECT NAME & LOCATION Service and Preventive Maintenance Agreement for Standby Power Generators The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth below. The hour and date specified for receipt of offers [XX ] is not extended. [] is extended to OFFERORS ARE ADVISED TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT IN THEIR PROPOSAL. FAILURE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF

  6. Amendment 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Date: 7/25/2016 ISSUED BY: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 PROJECT NAME & LOCATION Service and Preventive Maintenance Agreement for Standby Power Generators The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth below. The hour and date specified for receipt of offers [] is not extended. [x] is extended to August 3, 2016. OFFERORS ARE ADVISED TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT IN THEIR PROPOSAL. FAILURE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT MAY RESULT IN

  7. Use of passive sampling devices to determine soil contaminant concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.A. |; Hooper, M.J.; Weisskopf, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    The effective remediation of contaminated sites requires accurate identification of chemical distributions. A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDs) can provide a thorough site assessment. We have been pursuing their application in terrestrial systems and have found that they increase the ease and speed of analysis, decrease solvent usage and overall cost, and minimize the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a higher sampling frequency than is generally the case using traditional methods. PSDs have been used in the field in soils of varying physical properties and have been successful in estimating soil concentrations ranging from 1 {mu}g/kg (parts per billion) to greater than 200 mg/kg (parts per million). They were also helpful in identifying hot spots within the sites. Passive sampling devices show extreme promise as an analytical tool to rapidly characterize contaminant distributions in soil. There are substantial time and cost savings in laboratory personnel and supplies. By selectively excluding common interferences that require sample cleanup, PSDs can be retrieved from the field and processed rapidly (one technician can process approximately 90 PSDs in an 8-h work day). The results of our studies indicate that PSDs can be used to accurately estimate soil contaminant concentrations and provide lower detection limits. Further, time and cost savings will allow a more thorough and detailed characterization of contaminant distributions. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Amendment 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Page 1 of 1 This Amendment incorporates the following significant changes to solicitation DE-RP36- 07GO97036: I. Section K, Representations and Certifications is deleted and replaced with Attachment 1 of this Amendment: II. Section L.5 (c) is deleted and replaced with Attachment 2. This change reflects the addition of funds and associated maximum fee for the construction of the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). III. Section M.2 (a) (4) is deleted and replace with Attachment 3. IV

  9. Amendment 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Page 1 of 1 This Amendment incorporates the following significant changes to solicitation DE-RP36- 07GO97036: I. Sections L3(f)(2)(1)-(2) are deleted and replaced as indicated in Attachment 1. II. Section L4(e)(2)(vi) is deleted and replaced as indicated in attachment 1. III

  10. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Devleena; Kumar, T. Satish; Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V.

    2011-03-15

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  11. Rapid fusion method for the determination of refractory thorium and uranium isotopes in soil samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    Recently, approximately 80% of participating laboratories failed to accurately determine uranium isotopes in soil samples in the U.S Department of Energy Mixed Analyte Performance Evaluation Program (MAPEP) Session 30, due to incomplete dissolution of refractory particles in the samples. Failing laboratories employed acid dissolution methods, including hydrofluoric acid, to recover uranium from the soil matrix. The failures illustrate the importance of rugged soil dissolution methods for the accurate measurement of analytes in the sample matrix. A new rapid fusion method has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to prepare 1-2 g soil sample aliquots very quickly, with total dissolution of refractory particles. Soil samples are fused with sodium hydroxide at 600 C in zirconium crucibles to enable complete dissolution of the sample. Uranium and thorium are separated on stacked TEVA and TRU extraction chromatographic resin cartridges, prior to isotopic measurements by alpha spectrometry on cerium fluoride microprecipitation sources. Plutonium can also be separated and measured using this method. Batches of 12 samples can be prepared for measurement in <5 hours.

  12. Rapid fusion method for the determination of refractory thorium and uranium isotopes in soil samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    Recently, approximately 80% of participating laboratories failed to accurately determine uranium isotopes in soil samples in the U.S Department of Energy Mixed Analyte Performance Evaluation Program (MAPEP) Session 30, due to incomplete dissolution of refractory particles in the samples. Failing laboratories employed acid dissolution methods, including hydrofluoric acid, to recover uranium from the soil matrix. The failures illustrate the importance of rugged soil dissolution methods for the accurate measurement of analytes in the sample matrix. A new rapid fusion method has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to prepare 1-2 g soil sample aliquots very quickly, withmore » total dissolution of refractory particles. Soil samples are fused with sodium hydroxide at 600 ºC in zirconium crucibles to enable complete dissolution of the sample. Uranium and thorium are separated on stacked TEVA and TRU extraction chromatographic resin cartridges, prior to isotopic measurements by alpha spectrometry on cerium fluoride microprecipitation sources. Plutonium can also be separated and measured using this method. Batches of 12 samples can be prepared for measurement in <5 hours.« less

  13. Rapid fusion method for the determination of refractory thorium and uranium isotopes in soil samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    Recently, approximately 80% of participating laboratories failed to accurately determine uranium isotopes in soil samples in the U.S Department of Energy Mixed Analyte Performance Evaluation Program (MAPEP) Session 30, due to incomplete dissolution of refractory particles in the samples. Failing laboratories employed acid dissolution methods, including hydrofluoric acid, to recover uranium from the soil matrix. The failures illustrate the importance of rugged soil dissolution methods for the accurate measurement of analytes in the sample matrix. A new rapid fusion method has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to prepare 1-2 g soil sample aliquots very quickly, with total dissolution of refractory particles. Soil samples are fused with sodium hydroxide at 600 ºC in zirconium crucibles to enable complete dissolution of the sample. Uranium and thorium are separated on stacked TEVA and TRU extraction chromatographic resin cartridges, prior to isotopic measurements by alpha spectrometry on cerium fluoride microprecipitation sources. Plutonium can also be separated and measured using this method. Batches of 12 samples can be prepared for measurement in <5 hours.

  14. Amendment No.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. 11PB-12330 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION This AMENDMENT to the Firm Power Sales Agreement (Agreement)...

  15. Methane emission from single cropping rice paddies amended different manures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Daodeng; Tao Zhan

    1996-12-31

    Methane emission fluxes were determined from single cropping rice paddies amended with different manures through a productively comparative experiment. The average fluxes in the whole growth season ranged from 3.92 to 10.96 mg/m{sup 2}.hr. The compost amended paddies gave the highest emission fluxes of 10.26 mg/m{sup 2}.hr, while the fluxes from the other manure amended paddies ranked as follows: horse dung biogas digester sediment 10.02, chemical fertilizer only 8.81, nightsoil biogas sediment 7.76, chicken dropping biogas digester sediment 4.48 and pig dung biogas digester sediment 3.92 mg/m{sup 2}.hr. The latter 3 sediments gave the significant less ({alpha} < 0.05) fluxes than compost. The highest fluxes peaks of all treated paddies appeared unanimously between the stages of the midtillering and the earing, with a half of total CH{sub 4} emissions were produced in this period which could be chosen as the key period for control of CH{sub 4} emission from the single cropping rice paddies. The positive correlation of the fluxes with the temperatures in 5 cm soil layers and the negative correlation of the fluxes with the rice yields, the soil N and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} contents were also observed.

  16. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  17. Nitric oxide emissions from engineered soil systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peirce, J.J.; Aneja, V.P.

    2000-03-01

    Sophisticated laboratory equipment and procedures are developed and used in controlled experiments to measure nitric oxide (NO) emissions ranging from 42 to 75 ng N/m{sup 2}{center_dot}s from sludge-amended soil of concern to environmental engineers because nitric oxide emitted to the troposphere is a precursor to troublesome ozone formation and also of concern to agricultural engineers because valuable nitrogen as fertilizer is lost from the soil. Water-filled pore space is confirmed to be of critical importance to NO flux, and the upper layers of soil are determined to contribute the larger portion of the NO fluxing from the soil to the troposphere. More than 42% of the total NO flux comes from the top 1 cm of soil, with NO contributions decreasing exponentially with soil depth and very little if any tropospheric NO contributed from soil at a depth of 20 cm or greater. The results are discussed in terms of microbiological, chemical, and soil transport processes that influence NO flux from sludge-amended soil.

  18. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  19. Determination of trace elements in soils with an axial sequential ICP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, J.; Flajnik, C.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past few years the popularity of axial viewed ICP has increased greatly. The major claimed advantage of axial ICP is improvement in detection limits by an order of magnitude over radial viewed plasmas. It has also been noted however, that axial ICP suffers from greater chemical and ionization interferences than radial ICP, making it less desirable for samples with a {open_quotes}matrix{close_quotes}. In this paper we will describe the determination of a number of trace paper elements in soil samples by axial ICP. The chemical and ionization interferences will be examined and the accuracy and precision will be evaluated. Comparisons to the same determinations done on a radial ICP with ultrasonic nebulizer will also be discussed.

  20. Determination of the toxicity characteristic for metals in soil: A comparison of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and total metal determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, D.A.; Taylor, J.D.

    1994-12-01

    A comparison is made of the concentrations of metals extracted from soils using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a total determination method. This information is of interest in two ways. First, it is hoped that a relationship might be established between the amount of each metal determined after extraction by the TCLP and the amount determined using a total determination method. And second, data are also presented which indicate the general extractability of various metals in soil samples using the TCLP. This study looks specifically at inorganic elements (Sb, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Mg, Hg, Se, Ag, Sn, and Zn) in soils from a firing range. Results show that total determination methods for metals can not generally be used for heterogeneous samples, such as soil samples from a firing range. Some correlation between a total determination method and TCLP was observed when Ba and Cd were present in the samples at lower concentrations (less than 80 mg/kg for Ba and less than 25 mg/kg for Cd); however, additional data are necessary to verify this correlation.

  1. Can standard sequential extraction determinations effectively define heavy metal species in superfund site soils?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Williamson, Connie A.; Collins, Wesley K.; Dahlin, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Speciation and distribution of heavy metals in soils controls the degree to which metals and their compounds are mobile, extractable, and plant-available. Consequently, speciation impacts the success of remediation efforts both by defining the relationship of the contaminants with their environment and by guiding development and evaluation of workable remediation strategies. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center (Albany, OR), under a two-year interagency project with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), examined the suitability of sequential extraction as a definitive means to determine species of heavy metals in soil samples. Representative soil samples, contaminated with lead, arsenic, and/or chromium, were collected by EPA personnel from two Superfund sites, the National Lead Company site in Pedricktown, NJ, and the Roebling Steel, Inc., site in Florence, NJ. Data derived from Tessier=s standard three-stage sequential-extraction procedure were compared to data from a comprehensive characterization study that combined optical- and scanning-electron microscopy (with energy-dispersive x-ray and wavelength-dispersive x-ray analyses), x-ray diffraction, and chemical analyses. The results show that standard sequential-extraction procedures that were developed for characterizing species of contaminants in river sediments may be unsuitable for sole evaluation of contaminant species in industrial-site materials (particularly those that contain larger particles of the contaminants, encapsulated contaminants, and/or man-made materials such as slags, metals, and plastics). However, each sequential extraction or comprehensive characterization procedure has it=s own strengths and weaknesses. Findings of this study indicate that the use of both approaches, during the early stages of site studies, would be a best practice. The investigation also highlights the fact that an effective speciation study does not simply identify metal contaminants as

  2. Plutonium Consolidation Amended ROD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision: Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Amended Record of Decision SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511

  3. Uranium in soils integrated demonstration site characterization at Fernald, Ohio. Report of uranium concentrations in soil determined by in situ LA-ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.; Zamzow, D.; Bajic, S.J.

    1993-02-02

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry was used for in situ determination of uranium and thorium concentrations in soil at 80 sampling sites in the Sewage Treatment Plant area. This work was performed by the Environmental Technology Development Program of the Ames Laboratory using a completely self-contained mobile laboratory. This laboratory, the mobile demonstration laboratory for environmental screening technologies and the robotic sampling accessory, were designed and constructed by the Ames Laboratory during FY 1992. The instrumentation is capable of analyzing each sample for twenty operator-defined elements simultaneously. Using the MDLEST/RSA, the uranium concentrations in the soil at the 80 sampling sites were found to range from <20 parts-per-million (ppM)(<13.5 pCi/g) to 303 ppM (205 pCi/g). The 95% confidence interval for these field determined values range from 80 to 110 ppM. Bore hole samples from two sites were analyzed. No measurable uranium concentration was detected below the one foot depth. Seven samples taken from sites within an area currently under remediation were analyzed and found to contain uranium concentrations ranging from 101 ppM (68.3 pCi/g) to 788 ppM (532 pCi/g). Soil samples were taken from twelve of the 80 sampling sites in the field, using conventional sampling techniques. These samples were prepared by microwave digestion, using the wet chemistry capability in the MDLEST, and field analyzed using solution nebulization ICP-AES. The laboratory procedure followed for microwave digestion required the samples to be diluted by a factor of 100. This dilution resulted in uranium intensities too low to be accurately quantitated in the field. Optimization of the instrumentation and sample preparation will make this field capability useful in determining near real-time the soil matrix, and enable the performance of this quality assurance process in the field with greater sensitivity and accuracy.

  4. EO 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management (1977, amended 2015) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1988 (as amended): Floodplain Management (1977, amended 2015) EO 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management (1977, amended 2015) E.O. 11988 (as amended) incorporates changes from E.O. 13690 and directs that, for federally funded projects, federal agencies will use a higher vertical flood elevation and corresponding horizontal floodplain than the 100-year base floodplain used for most other federal actions. EO 11988_as amended by EO 13690_2015.pdf (96.36 KB) More Documents

  5. Lethal body concentrations and accumulation patterns determine time-dependent toxicity of cadmium in soil arthropods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crommentuijn, T.; Doodeman, C.J.A.M.; Doornekamp, A.; Pol, J.J.C. van der; Bedaux, J.J.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. van )

    1994-11-01

    Time-dependent toxicity in bioassays is usually explained in terms of uptake and elimination kinetics of the toxicant. By comparing different species with essentially different accumulation kinetics, a firm test of this concept may be made. This article compares the sensitivity of six soil arthropods, the collembolans Orchesella cincta and Tomocerus minor, the oribatid mite Platynothrus peltifer, the isopods Porcellio scaber and Oniscus asellus, and the diplopod Cylindroiulus britannicus, when exposed to cadmium in the food. Survival was determined at various time intervals; accumulation of cadmium in the animals was measured at one time interval. Kinetic-based toxicity models were fitted to the data, and estimates were obtained for lethal body concentration, uptake rate constant, elimination rate constant, and ultimate LC50. Two different accumulation patterns could be discerned; these were correlated with time-survival relationships. One, species that have the possibility to eliminate cadmium will reach an equilibrium for the internal concentration and also an ultimate LC50. Two, species that are unable to eliminate cadmium but store it in the body will have an ultimate LC50 equal to zero. For these species the time in which the lethal body concentration is reached is more important. Taxonomically related species appeared to have comparable accumulation patterns, but lethal body concentrations differed. It is concluded that knowledge of the accumulation pattern is indispensable for the evaluation of species' sensitivities to toxicants.

  6. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02

    local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short

  7. CX-005610: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part IICX(s) Applied: B3.7Date: 04/12/2011Location(s): Rosalia, KansasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-004274: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part IICX(s) Applied: B3.7Date: 10/19/2010Location(s): Blackwell, OklahomaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. Rapid fusion method for the determination of Pu, Np, and Am in large soil samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    A new rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method for the preparation of 10-20 g soil samples has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The method enables lower detection limits for plutonium, neptunium, and americium in environmental soil samples. The method also significantly reduces sample processing time and acid fume generation compared to traditional soil digestion techniques using hydrofluoric acid. Ten gram soil aliquots can be ashed and fused using the new method in 1-2 hours, completely dissolving samples, including refractory particles. Pu, Np and Am are separated using stacked 2mL cartridges of TEVA and DGA Resin and measured using alpha spectrometry. The method can be adapted for measurement by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two 10 g soil aliquots of fused soil may be combined prior to chromatographic separations to further improve detection limits. Total sample preparation time, including chromatographic separations and alpha spectrometry source preparation, is less than 8 hours.

  10. Rapid fusion method for the determination of Pu, Np, and Am in large soil samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    A new rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method for the preparation of 10-20 g soil samples has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The method enables lower detection limits for plutonium, neptunium, and americium in environmental soil samples. The method also significantly reduces sample processing time and acid fume generation compared to traditional soil digestion techniques using hydrofluoric acid. Ten gram soil aliquots can be ashed and fused using the new method in 1-2 hours, completely dissolving samples, including refractory particles. Pu, Np and Am are separated using stacked 2mL cartridges of TEVA and DGA Resin and measuredmore » using alpha spectrometry. The method can be adapted for measurement by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two 10 g soil aliquots of fused soil may be combined prior to chromatographic separations to further improve detection limits. Total sample preparation time, including chromatographic separations and alpha spectrometry source preparation, is less than 8 hours.« less

  11. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented

  12. Comparison of Laboratory and Field Methods for Determining the Quasi-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field ponded infiltration tests in quasi-saturated soils (containing entrapped air) exhibit the same three-stage temporal variability for the flow rate and hydraulic conductivity. However, the values for the hydraulic conductivity may differ by as much as two orders of magnitude due to differences in the geometry and physics of flow when different laboratory and field methods are applied. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this variability using a comparison of results of ponded infiltration tests conducted under laboratory conditions using confined cores, with results of field tests conducted using partially isolated cores and double-ring infiltrometers. Under laboratory conditions in confined cores, during the firs stage, the water flux decreases over time because entrapped air plugs the largest pores in the soils; during the second stage, the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity increases by one to two orders of magnitude, essentially reaching the saturated hydraulic conductivity, when entrapped air is discharged from the soils; during the third stage, the hydraulic conductivity decreases to minimum values due to sealing of the soil surface and the effect of biofilms sealing the pores within the wetted zone. Under field conditions, the second stage is only partially developed, and when the surface sealing process begins, the hydraulic pressure drops below the air entry value, thereby causing atmospheric air to enter the soils. As a result, the soils become unsaturated with a low hydraulic conductivity, and the infiltration rate consequently decreases. Contrary to the laboratory experiments in confined cores, the saturated hydraulic conductivity cannot be reached under field conditions. In computations of infiltration one has to take into account the variations in the quasi-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities, moisture and entrapped air content, and the hydraulic gradient in the quasi-saturated or unsaturated soils.

  13. Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012) Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012) Amended Environmental Impact ...

  14. Record of Decision Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact of groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank far soil and groundwater at INTEC.

  15. PowerSlicing to determine fluorescence lifetimes of water-soluble organic matter derived from soils, plant biomass, and animal manures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Tsutomu; Wang, Zheming; Bro, Rasmus

    2008-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) which plays an important role in soil ecosystem processes. WSOM was extracted from plant biomass, animal manures, and soils from controlled cropping systems studies with known histories of organic amendments. Lifetime constants were derived using the multi-way PowerSlicing method which provides a non-iterative, multi-exponential fitting of decay profiles. The lifetimes obtained by PowerSlicing were not significantly different from those obtained using the traditional discrete components analysis. The three components attributed to WSOM had lifetimes of 0.38 0.14, 2.110.72, and 7.081.18 ns which are in agreement with previous lifetimes reported for humic substances. This study provides further support for the new paradigm for the structure of soil organic matter where the organic matter is composed of low-molecular-weight components held together by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions.

  16. Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

    2012-08-10

    Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

  17. Environmental assessment for amendments to 10 CFR Part 835

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This proposed amendment will modify the scope of 10 CFR 835 to explicitly exclude the transportation of radioactive material conducted in conformance with the Department of Transportation regulations, certain activities conducted on foreign soil, add standards for area posting and sealed radioactive source control, and add a removable surface radioactivity value for tritium.

  18. Determining effective soil formation thermal properties from field data using a parameter estimation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Beck, J.V.

    1998-11-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model is derived to describe the temperature field around a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) for a geothermal heat pump. The inlet and outlet pipe flows are modeled as one, and an effective heat capacity is added to model the heat storage in the fluid and pipes. Parameter estimation techniques are then used to estimate various parameters associated with the model, including the thermal conductivity of the soil and of the grout which fills the borehole and surrounds the u-tube. The model is validated using test data from an experimental rig containing sand with known thermal conductivity. The estimates of the sand thermal conductivity derived from the model are found to be in good agreement with independent measurements.

  19. Determining Effective Soil Formation Thermal Properties From Field Data Using A Parameter Estimation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Beck, Dr. James V.

    1999-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model is derived to describe the temperature field around a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEX) for a geothermal heat pump. The inlet and outlet pipe flows are modeled as one, and an effective heat capacity is added to model the heat storage in the fluid and pipes. Parameter estimation techniques are then used to estimate various parameters associated with the model, including the thermal conductivity of the soil and the grout that fills the borehole and surrounds the U-tube. The model is validated using test data from an experimental rig containing sand with known thermal conductivity. The estimates of the sand's thermal conductivity derived from the model are found to be in good agreement with independent measurements.

  20. DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-07-26

    A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

  1. Laboratory determination of gas-side mass transfer coefficients applicable to soil-venting systems for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from vadose-zone soils. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Valkenburg, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Contamination of the subsurface environment by organic solvents has become a national problem. The EPA's Superfund list (40 CFR Part 300, 1990) continues to grow, with continual discovery of new hazardous waste sites. Various techniques are employed to remediate these sites, including excavation and removal of the contaminated soil for proper disposal, pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water and an organic phase if present, containment by slurried soil-bentonite cut-off barriers, in situ biological treatment of the organic wastes, and vadose zone soil venting for gas absorption of volatiles. Each technique, or combination, may have merit at a given site. The soil venting process, an inexpensive but relatively successful technique for removal of contaminants from the vadose (unsaturated) zone, is the focus of the research.

  2. Final Rule Technical Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule Technical Amendment Federal Register Announcement: The Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this technical amendment to the regulations for the loan guarantee ...

  3. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application

  4. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Whitehouse Waste Oil Pits Site, Duval County, Jacksonville, FL. (First remedial action), (Amendment), June 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-16

    The 7-acre Whitehouse Waste Oil Pits site was used by Allied Petroleum Products (Allied) to dispose of acidic waste oil sludges from its oil reclamation process in Whitehouse, Duval County, Florida. A cypress swamp system and residential area are immediately adjacent to the site. The acid sludge produced in the first step and clay used to decolorize the oil were dumped into the unlined pits at the site. A 1985 ROD addressed source control as a containment remedy consisting of a slurry wall construction, soil cap, and a ground water recovery and treatment system; however, EPA has re-evaluated the 1985 ROD selection and determined that the containment remedy failed to meet the requirements of SARA. As a result, the ROD Amendment focuses on an alternative for treating Whitehouse wastes by eliminating direct contact risk associated with pit soil/sludge wastes and preventing contaminated ground water in the surficial aquifer from migrating laterally. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; organics, including PCBs and phenols; and metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The amended remedial action for the site are included.

  5. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determinants of Household Use of Selected Energy Star Appliances May 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Determinants of Household Use of Selected Energy Star Appliances i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

  6. Laser ablation ICP-mass spectrometry determination of Th{sup 230} in soils at the Gunnison, Colorado UMTRA site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.S.; Braymen, S.; McIntosh, R.

    1994-02-16

    This report describes an innovative technology, laser ablation-inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), operated in a mobile laboratory, to rapidly detect thorium 230 activity levels in soil samples. This technology was demonstrated on-site during November 1993 at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project site in support of their remediation effort. The LA-ICP-MS sampling and analysis technique was chosen because of the capability for rapid analysis, approximately three samples per hour, with minimal sample preparation.

  7. Superfund Record of Decision amendment (EPA Region 4): Coleman-Evand Wood Preserving Co., Whitehouse, FL, September 25, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This decision document represents an amendment to the selected remedial action for the Coleman-Evans Wood preserving Site (Site) in Whitehouse, Florida. This amendment is necessary because during design of the remedy that was selected in the 1990 Amended Record of Decision, dioxin was discovered at the Site as a new contaminant of concern. This document selects a new interim remedy to address an estimated 45,000 cubic yards of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and dioxin-contaminated source material (i.e., soil, sediment, and debris) and expands the scope of the groundwater remedy to permanently address PCP-, and potentially dioxin-, contaminated groundwater in the upper surficial aquifer.

  8. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for

  9. INTERACTIONS AMONG PHOSPHATE AMENDMENTS, MICROBES AND URANIUM MOBILITY IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A

    2007-08-30

    The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for long-term environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of four phosphate amendments and two microbial amendments on U availability. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of the untreated U-contaminated sediment showed that U was closely associated with Mn. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentration more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31% respectively. Uranium sorption in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of microbes. However, increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to reduction of phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract from U amended sediment was 437 {micro}g/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved sediment), the extractable U concentration was only 103 {micro}g/kg. When the autoclaved amended sediment was treated with autoclaved biological apatite, U concentration in the 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract was {approx}0 {micro}g/kg. Together these tests suggest that microbes may enhance U leaching and reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

  10. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 3 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Construction & Specialty Acquisition NA-APM-123 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000001 PAGE 3 OF 3 AMENDMENT 000002 The purpose of Amendment 000002 to Solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Provide clarification on Amendment 000001: (i) Item 14 of Amendment 00001 was

  11. Glenwood Springs Amendments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Glenwood Springs Amendments Citation BLM Colorado River Valley Field Office...

  12. Draft Advice: ERDF ROD Amendment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advice: ERDF ROD Amendment 8/5/14 Author: Pam Larsen BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to move forward with CERCLA cleanup at Hanford in a manner that addresses the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs) for a limited amount of large, heavy hazardous waste debris that is contaminated with radioactive material. The current plan contained in a Record of Decision (ROD) is to dispose of this material in the on-site EDRF landfill. DOE is seeking a CERCLA ARAR waiver to treat this

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11. CONTRACT 10 CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. \5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 361 See Block 16C 12SC002265 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* streat. county. Stata and ZIP Coda) ~ 9A AMENDMENT OF

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLICITATIONMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 COTATI OE AEO AE 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicatble) 127 See Block 16C 110M003568 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00)603 7. ADMINISTERED BY If lotfertan Item ) CODE 100603 Office of River Prooection Office of River Protection Decarzment of Energy .S.Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Prooection B C.Eox 450 PO o 5 Richiandn WA 99352 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR

  15. Landfarming of phthalate ester-contaminated soil: Two years of bioremediation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunze, C.M.; Yu, J.; Wilson, S.; Rezin, J.L.; Andronico, A.

    1995-12-31

    Biorem Technologies Inc. collaborated with Regal Plastics Corporation over 2 years to clean up approximately 600 cubic yards of soil contaminated with di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate ester (DEHP) and No. 2 fuel oil using a landfarming bioremediation process. The contaminated soils consisted of sandy backfill material which had been excavated during the removal of two underground storage tanks (USTs). In 1994, the initial average DEHP concentration was 4,551 ppm while the TPH concentration was 7,252 ppm. In 1995, the initial DEHP concentration was 1067 ppm while TPH was 3,733 ppm. Prior to the implementation of the project, Biorem Technologies completed a laboratory biofeasibility study to demonstrate that a bacterial culture isolated from the site had the capacity to efficiently degrade DEBP in the soil. It was determined during this study that nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient amendments were needed to promote the bioremediation process. In 1994, the soils were loaded on to a lined treatment bed to a depth of 14--16 in. The bed was covered with a greenhouse structure to eliminate stormwater runoff concerns associated with the contaminated soil. To optimize biodegradation, soil moisture and nutrient levels were adjusted. In 1995, a windrow turner replaced the 1994 tilling system. Tarps were used to cover the piles in place of the greenhouse. A leachate collection system was implemented to contain stormwater and leachate.

  16. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soils Soil Series and Phase DBaC i:JFu IIiiiiIO!:l _PK _TuE _Ud DVeD o o o 1180 Meters o 590 \' Community _ Loblolly Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwood D Bonomland Hardwood iiiI Bonomland HardwoodlPine N Streams * TES Plants (1) D TES Plants (2) U Monitoring Wells o SRS Bays 6 ~ Utili1y ROW !.! Openwells tit NPDES outfalls ** Areas WI Roads rnOther Set-Asides ~ Hydric Soils Figure 15-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the WhippldOH ER Study Site Set-Aside Area. 15-7

  17. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soils Soil Series and Phase D Fa D LaB _ TrB D TrC _ VeC .Wm '" Vegetation Compartment 28 Community D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwod D Bottomland Hardwood _Water D Sandhill Scrub oak/Pine D Sandhill Pine/Scrub oak N Streams Roads _Water [2LJ Other Set-Asides DTES Plants (2) llilliJ Hydric Soils Road 8.11 560 Meters Figure 29-1. Plant cOllll1lunities and soils associated with the Scrub Oak Natural Area. 29-5 Set-Aside 29: Scrub Oak Natural Area

  18. E.O. 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E.O. 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management E.O. 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management E.O. 11988 (as amended) incorporates changes from E.O. 13690 and directs that, for ...

  19. EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to the Record of Decision EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste Under this amendment to its Record of Decision (ROD),...

  20. Microsoft Word - Port Townsend Amendment DRAFT BLACKLINE 1.29...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Contract No. 11PB-12330 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION This AMENDMENT to the Firm Power Sales Agreement (Agreement)...

  1. EIS-0470: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    70: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption EIS-0470: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts The Environmental Protection Agency's Notice ...

  2. Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Amendment to Funding Opportunity...

  3. EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Amended Record of Decision EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington DOE has decided to...

  4. EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision (April 2002) EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program Amended Record of Decision: The U.S. Department of Energy's National...

  5. Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application to Amend ...

  6. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PP-371 Amended Northern Pass Transmission FRN More Documents & Publications Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, ...

  7. First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Texas Programmatic Agreement First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement First Amendment to the Programmatic Agreement among the U.S. Department of Energy, the Texas ...

  8. Microsoft Word - DSI Amendment 01-08-09 _after Implementation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    06PB-11744 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and ALCOA INC. and PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF WHATCOM COUNTY, WASHINGTON This AMENDMENT to the BLOCK...

  9. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Amendment 5 23 12.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0PB-12175 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and ALCOA INC. This AMENDMENT to the Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) is executed by the UNITED STATES OF...

  10. Microsoft Word - Draft Amendment to CFAC block power sales agreement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. 06PB-11745 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and COLUMBIA FALLS ALUMINUM COMPANY, LLC and FLATHEAD ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC This AMENDMENT to...

  11. Microsoft Word - Draft Amendment to CFAC block power sales agreement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amendment No. 1 Contract No. 06PB-11745 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and COLUMBIA FALLS ALUMINUM COMPANY, LLC and FLATHEAD ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC...

  12. EIS-0217: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0217: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina This Record of ...

  13. ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO ... ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR ...

  14. DE-SOL-0003641 Amendment 002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02/2013 000002 5 1 13. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS. IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS DESCRIBED IN ITEM 14. 12. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA (If required) is not extended. is extended, Items 8 and 15, and returning Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation or as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The

  15. DE-SOL-0003641 Amendment 003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3641 Amendment 003 Page 2 of 4 The purpose of this amendment is to revise the solicitation and to provide the attached "DE-SOL- 0003641 Questions and Responses 1-9-13." Accordingly the solicitation is amended as follows: 1. The solicitation is hereby revised as follows: a. Clause M.3 Basis for Contract Award is deleted in its entirety and replaced with the following. Changes are delineated in bold yellow highlighted text. "M.3 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD The Government intends to

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TO AMEI DMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS The above numbered solicitation is amended as sel forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers is extended. is not...

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPLIES TO ' ... OF SOLICITATIONS The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers is extended. is not...

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TO,. .MENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS J The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers : j is extended. 0 is...

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Amarillo TX 79 1 20 - 0030 8 NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., streel, county, Siele end ZIP Code) 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. (xl - BABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES ...

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONlMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* slffHIl. county. Stale and ZIP Codo) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O....

  1. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* treot. county. State and ZIP Codo) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. i - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O....

  2. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, county, Stato and ZIP Codo) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r-- o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

  3. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone

  4. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and

  5. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area ...

  6. FFTF Final Safety Analysis Report Amendment 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAUTEL, W.A.

    2003-03-01

    This is the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 82 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) FSAR set assigned to you. This page change amendment incorporates changes previously approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. This amendment provides updates to the FSAR to facilitate FFTF shutdown and deactivation. Among the changes are the following: Chapter 11 is updated to describe upgrades to the Solid Waste Cask. Additional fuel handling accidents are added to Chapter 15. Appendix G is revised to clearly identify systems and their safety functions. Appendix H is revised to remove the discussion of material that has been removed from the Interim Storage Area. Appendix I is revised to provide a general description of liquid metal removal from FFTF. Other changes include minor technical updates from the FSAR annual review and editorial and procedure references.

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I PAGlE 01 PAGES 1 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO. NO. I' PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 04 94 See Block 16C No PR 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00516 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE I u.s. Department of Energy ORNL Site Office P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state and ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 0 AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 0

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID <!;ODE 1 PAGE 1 OF 3 I PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE IS. P1ROJECT NO. (If applicable) M528 See Block 16C REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration I Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county,

  9. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 1PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 25 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ . NO . 5 PROJECT NO. (If applicab/e) See Bl ock 1 6C 1 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 105007 NNSA / Pantex Site Office 05007 NNSA/Pantex Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Nt SA/ Pantex S it e Offi ce NNSA/Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 P . O . Box 30030

  10. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1. CONTRACT ID <!;ODE 1 PAGE 1 OF 3 I PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE IS. P1ROJECT NO. (If applicable) M528 See Block 16C REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration I Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF S<DLlCITATIONNO. I

  11. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Page 1 of 4 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. M0538 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Sandia Corporation P. O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  12. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 8 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Non-M&O Contracting Operations NA-APM-12 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000001 PAGE 3 OF 8 AMENDMENT 000001 The purpose of Amendment 000001 to solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Revise Standard Form (SF) 33 to change proposal due date and number of pages noted in Section

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 3 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Construction & Specialty Acquisition NA-APM-123 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000003 PAGE 3 OF 3 AMENDMENT 000003 The purpose of Amendment 000003 to Solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Revise Attachment L-4 Past Performance Questionnaire (PPQ), for clarification.

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    . CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) M058 See Block 16 C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road, Building 1410, TA-3 Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION

  15. Microsoft Word - Northern Pass Amended Application - FINAL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY NORTHERN PASS TRANSMISSION LLC DOCKET NO. PP-371 AMENDED APPLICATION JULY 1, 2013 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. LIST OF EXHIBITS iii LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS iv INTRODUCTION 1 OVERVIEW OF AMENDMENTS TO APPLICATION 1 SECTION 1 - INFORMATION REGARDING THE APPLICANT 1.1 Legal Name of the Applicant 6 1.2 Legal Names of All Partners 6 1.3 Communications and Correspondence 7 1.4 Foreign Ownership

  16. Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site- Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. –The Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with the Washington Department of Ecology, have made plans for remediating contaminated soil at four locations in the center of the Hanford Site.

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT /1. CONTRACT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 12212005 11. THIi ITt:M ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOL CITATIONS OThe above numbered solicitation IS amended as set forth In Item 14. The hour...

  18. Microsoft Word - Posted DSI Amendment of Alcoa Block Power Sales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No. 1 Contract No. 06PB-11744 DRAFT AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and ALCOA INC. This AMENDMENT to the BLOCK POWER SALES AGREEMENT is executed by the...

  19. Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Maryland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Maryland Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Maryland U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), Maryland State Historic Preservation Office, Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) md_amendment.pdf (432.88 KB) More Documents & Publications First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Missouri

  20. EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    83: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program EIS-0283-AmROD-2003a.pdf (50.43 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0229: Supplement Analysis (September 2007) EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact

  1. Microsoft Word - CADROD amendment FINAL 091511

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION/RECORD OF DECISION AMENDMENT FOR ROCKY FLATS PLANT (USDOE) CENTRAL OPERABLE UNIT JEFFERSON AND BOULDER COUNTIES, COLORADO This page intentionally left blank Page 1 of 26 Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. 2 1.0 Introduction and Purpose ...................................................................................................... 3 1.1 Site

  2. EIS-0222: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0222: Amended Record of Decision Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan In amending the 1999 ROD, DOE seeks to clarify two points: that when considering land-use proposals, DOE will use regulatory processes in addition to the implementing procedures in Chapter 6 of the HCP-EIS to ensure consistency with CLUP land-use designations, and that DOE will continue to apply the process under HCP-EIS Chapter 6 to modify or amend the CLUP, as needed. DOE/EIS-0222, Amended

  3. Review Guidance for the TWRS FSAR amendment for Waste Retrieval and waste feed delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFITH, R.W.

    1999-10-01

    This review guidance (Guide) was developed for Office of River Protection (ORP) reviewers to use in reviewing the amendment to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) covering waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. Waste retrieval and waste feed delivery are necessary to supply nuclear waste from TWRS storage tanks to the TWRS Privatization (TWRS-P) Contractor's vitrification facility and to receive intermediate waste from the vitrification facility back into the TWRS tank farms for interim storage. An amendment to the approved TWRS FSAR (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Rev. 0) is necessary to change the authorization basis to accommodate waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. The ORP'S safety responsibility in reviewing the FSAR amendment is to determine that reasonable assurance exists that waste retrieval and waste feed delivery operations can be accomplished with adequate safety for the workers, the public, and the environment. To carry out this responsibility, the ORP will evaluate the Contractor's amendment to the TWRS FSAR for waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to determine whether the submittal provides adequate safety and complies with applicable regulatory requirements.

  4. Artificial Soiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components Patrick D. Burton and Bruce H. King Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque NM 87185 USA Email: pdburto@sandia.gov Abstract-Effective evaluation and prediction of photovoltaic performance loss due to soiling requires consistent test methods. Natural grime accumulation is time-consuming and location- specific, and thus does not provide reproducible results across different geographic regions. Therefore, we have

  5. Clear Air Act Amendments Overview and update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, W.C.; Frazier, R.S.

    1995-06-01

    The new Clean Air Act is rapidly establishing itself as the leading industry affecting environmental legislation of today and perhaps of all time. Numerous developments are occurring daily that can and will impact industry over the next few years. This paper summarizes the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act and attempts to bring the reader {open_quotes}up to date{close_quotes}. The paper ends with some management suggestions as to what industry should be doing today.

  6. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505)...

  7. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-09-04

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (0–0.5 or 0–10 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha–1 yr–1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Provided the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.

  8. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-09-04

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing ofmore » ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (0–0.5 or 0–10 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha–1 yr–1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Provided the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.« less

  9. The effect of compost on carbon cycling and the active soil microbiota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Esther; Woyke, Tanja; Ryals, Rebecca; Silver, Whendee

    2014-09-02

    Rangelands cover an estimated 40-70percent of global landmass, approximately one-third of the landmass of the United States and half of California. The soils of this vast land area has high carbon (C) storage capacity, which makes it an important target ecosystem for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emission and effects on climate change, in particular under land management techniques that favor increased C sequestration rates. While microbial communities are key players in the processes responsible for C storage and loss in soils, we have barely shed light on these highly complex processes in part due to the tremendous and seemingly intractable diversity of microbes, largely uncultured, that inhabit soil ecosystems. In our study, we compare Mediterranean grassland soil plots that were amended with greenwaste compost in a single event 6 years ago. Subsampling of control and amended plots was performed in depth increments of 0-10 cm. We present data on greenhouse gas emissions and budgets of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and micronutrients in dependence of compost amendment. Changes in the active members of the soil microbial community were assessed using a novel approach combining flow cytometry and 16S tag sequencing disclosing who is active. This is the first study revealing the nature of actively metabolizing microbial community members linked to the geochemical characteristics of compost-amended soil.

  10. Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 The Federal Advisory Committee Act became law in 1972 and is the legal foundation defining how federal advisory committees operate. The law has special emphasis on open meetings, chartering, public involvement, and reporting. This version is from the House website, complete with all Amendments and annotations. Federal Advisory Committee Act (79.63 KB) More Documents &

  11. First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Colorado | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Colorado First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Colorado First amendment to the programmatic agreement between DOE, the Colorado Governor's Energy Office, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Office regarding EECBG, SEP and WAP undertakings. First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Colorado (1.78 MB) More Documents & Publications Programmatic Agreement for Colorado Vermont State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement NEW JERSEY STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION

  12. First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Missouri | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Missouri First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Missouri U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Missouri Department of Natural Resources Division of Energy (DE), Missouri State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs mo_amendment.pdf (976.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Programmatic Agreement for Colorado Amendment to

  13. EIS-0387: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0387: Amended Record of Decision Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex The National Nuclear Security Administration, a separately organized agency within the Department of Energy, is issuing this Amended Record of Decision for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex issued on March 4, 2011. A Supplement Analysis was issued on May 2, 2016. For more information, see:

  14. EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer

  15. EIS-0310: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0310: Amended Record of Decision Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its Record of Decision (ROD) (66 FR 7877, January 26, 2001) for its Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the

  16. DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation DOE amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, DOE decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511 additional 3013-compliant packages containing surplus non-pit weapons-usable plutonium metals and oxides to the Savannah River Site

  17. Letter, proposed amendment to power sales agreement with Columbia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13, 2009 In reply refer to: PT-5 To regional customers, stakeholders and other interested parties: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to amend its 2007 Block Power...

  18. EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement. This document corrects an error in that notice. DOEEIS-0287, Department of Energy, Amended Record of Decision: Idaho...

  19. EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated ...

  20. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 6217 Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section 6217 Webpage...

  1. EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand ... (residual radioactive material) at the Moab milling site and vicinity properties in Utah. ...

  2. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure? ...

  3. NUSAR: N Reactor Updated Safety Analysis Report, Amendment 21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G L

    1989-12-01

    The enclosed pages are Amendment 21 of the N Reactor Updated Safety Analysis Report (NUSAR). NUSAR, formerly UNI-M-90, was revised by 18 amendments that were issued by UNC Nuclear Industries, the contractor previously responsible for N Reactor operations. As of June 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) acquired the operations and engineering contract for N Reactor and other facilities at Hanford. The document number for NUSAR then became WHC-SP-0297. The first revision was issued by WHC as Amendment 19, prepared originally by UNC. Summaries of each of the amendments are included in NUSAR Section 1.1.

  4. BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan AmendmentsRecord of Decision for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  5. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PP-398 Minnesota Power - Great Northern Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 222 - Nov. 18, 2014 Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. ...

  6. Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 2, 2010 SUBJECT: FINAL RULE ON AMENDING ELIGIBILITY PROVISIONS TO MULTI-FAMILY BUILDINGS FOR THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM PURPOSE: To issue guidance on implementing...

  7. Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily Buildings for the Weatherization Assistance Program U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

  8. Vermont Minor Amendment Application for Groundwater | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vermont Minor Amendment Application for Groundwater Citation Vermont...

  9. Part I: Amendment of Solicitiation / Modification of Contract (SF30)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (x) x DE-AC36-08GO28308 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted ; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment you desire to change an offer already submitted ,

  10. 36CFRPart800_as_amended2004_web.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36 CFR PART 800 -- PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES (incorporating amendments effective August 5, 2004) Subpart A -- Purposes and Participants Sec. 800.1 Purposes. 800.2 ...

  11. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO, 3, EFFECTIVE DATE 4, REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ, NO, I' PROJECT NO, (If applicable) 176 See Block 16C 10SC007515 Item 10 6 ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7, ADMINISTERED BY (If olher loon lIem 6) CODE L00518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Depart:nent of Energy U.S. Departmer.t of Energy 2.0. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge T~ 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. _ , county, sttJIe IJ1Id ZIP COde) (x) 9A, AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO, t-- OAK RIDGE

  12. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 326 See Block 16C 11SC007443 Item 6 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, COllllty, Stato and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r-- o AK RIDGE

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 CODE \ PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. \5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 330 See Block 16C 11SC007443 Item 11 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE \00518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, COWlIy, Ststo and ZIP Corio) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* sIntfIl, county. SIms and ZIP Codo) OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 OAK RIDGE TN 37830-6218 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. 12SC000484 Item 4 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. t-- 9B. DATED

  15. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT 10 CODE 1 PAGE OF PAGES 1 1 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. /5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 340 See Block 16C 12SC000849 Item 6 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroet, coooty, Stote /JIId ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    [0 CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIF[CATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQU[SITJONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. r' PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 357 See Block 16C 12SC002265 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., slmot, county, Sloto and ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. o

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT 10 CODE / PAGE OF PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 I 2 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 358 See Block 16C 12SC002265 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stme/, county, S/olo ond ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . CONTRACT ID CODEPAEOPGS 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFI CATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 046 See Block 16C 12EM000343 6 ISSUED BY CODE 00603 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If otherthan Item 6) CODE 100603 Office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Depar7nent of Energy UJ.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richiand WA 99352 Richiand WA 99352 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    , 1. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 . REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15 PROJECT NO. (ff applicable) 0250 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (ff other than Item 6) coDE jo5003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Off ice NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Off ice 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos NM 87544 Los Alamos NM 87544 8.

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 OF30 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 192 See Block 16 C G. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos, NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR

  1. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTRACT ID CODE j PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2 AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (II applicable) 220 See Block 16C 6 ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7 ADMINISTERED BY (lfolherthan Item 6) CODE 105003 NNSA/Los Alamos Sile Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office u.s. Department of Energy u.s. Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos Los Alamos NM 87544 NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  2. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO . 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 0232 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 NNSA/Los Al amos Si t e Office U. S . Dep a rtme nt of Ene r gy Los Alamo s Sit e Off i ce 3747 We st Jemez Road Los Al a mos NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. , street, county, State and ZIP Code) L A OS ALAMOS NAT I ONAL SECURI TY, ttn : STEVE K. SHOOK P.O . BOX 1663 , M S P222 L OS ALAMOS NM 875450001 CODE 175252894 LLC FACILITY CODE 11 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 4.

  3. CX-100189 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    89 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100189 Categorical Exclusion Determination Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Conventional Cooking Products RIN: 1904-AD15 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE- Buildings Technology Program Date: 02/26/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this proposed rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for residential conventional cooking products. DOE has determined that the amended energy

  4. CX-100270 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100270 Categorical Exclusion Determination Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fan Light Kits RIN: 1904-AC87 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE- Buildings Technology Program Date: 06/05/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this proposed rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for ceiling fan light kits. Doe has determined that the amended energy conservation standards for these

  5. CX-100291 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100291 Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rulemaking Regarding Energy Conservation Standards for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners RIN: 1904-AC82 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE- Buildings Technology Program Date: 06/017/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this proposed rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for ceiling fan light kits. Doe has determined that the amended energy conservation standards

  6. CX-100339 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    39 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100339 Categorical Exclusion Determination Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans (1904-AC87) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE- Buildings Technology Program Date: 08/28/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this NOPR, DOE proposes to adopt amended energy conservation standards with respect to ceiling fans. DOE has determined that the amended energy conservation standards for these products

  7. CX-100653 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100653 Categorical Exclusion Determination Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Uninterruptible Power Supplies RIN 1904-AD69 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 06/09/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this proposed rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for Uninterruptible Power Supplies. DOE has determined that the new and amended energy conservation

  8. CX-100667 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100667 Categorical Exclusion Determination Notice of Final Rulemaking Regarding Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans RIN 1904-AD28 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 07/19/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this final rule, DOE adopts amended energy conservation standards with respect to ceiling fans. DOE has determined that the amended energy conservation standards for these products would

  9. CX-100423 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100423 Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fan Lights Kits RIN 1904-AC87 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 12/18/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this final rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for Ceiling Fan Light kits. DOE has determined that the amended energy conservation standards for these products would

  10. CX-100427 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100427 Categorical Exclusion Determination Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Portable Air Conditioners RIN 1904-AD02 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 12/22/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office In this proposed rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for portable air conditioners. DOE has determined that the new and amended energy conservation standards for

  11. Implementation of CAA amendments: The federal perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, M.

    1995-12-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established a rigorous timetable for EPA to develop and implement an unprecedented number of regulatory and policy initiatives. EPA has made great progress in meeting these mandates; however, much remains to be done if the Act`s health and environmental goals are to be achieved. EPA must issue dozens of additional regulations, guidance documents, and studies and reports over the next several years. The largest group of remaining rulemakings will be those controlling air toxics emissions. Other significant actions will include final rulemakings on emission standards for non-road engines, emissions standards for municipal and medical waste combustion, enhanced emissions monitoring, Federal operating permits, and newsource review simplification. EPA also must accelerate and expand a host of activities to ensure that the Agency and the States are implementing and enforcing the Act effectively. For example, EPA must assess hundreds of SIP revisions, as well as 120 State and local permit programs, and provide technical assistance to States and sources. Ms. Nichols will present EPA`s will present EPA`s plans for implementing these activities over the next several years. She will present a summary of the Agency`s current achievements under the 1990 amendments and EPA`s framework for completing the challenging tasks that lie ahead.

  12. Preparing for the clean air act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, B.; Bensinger, D. Midwest Research Inst., Cary, NC )

    1993-09-09

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state air quality control agencies are in the midst of developing regulations and programs to meet the ambitious goals of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. The CAAA--which call for stricter air quality standards, a greater number of pollutants and sources to be regulated, new operating permits, and more stringent enforcement of air quality violations--are expected to have a significant impact on virtually every facility in the country. An important deadline in the implementation of the CAAA is November 1993. That is when individual states must submit their proposed operating permit programs to the EPA, as mandated by Title 5 of the Amendments. The EPA then has one year after receiving a state program to accept or reject it. Once a state's program is accepted, all major sources of air pollution in that state have one year to apply for an operating air permit. Although the initial deadlines for business and industry are up to two years away, sufficient information is now available to take the first steps toward compliance with the new air quality regulations. Even while the details of the new rules are being hammered out, plant engineering can and should begin laying the groundwork for their own permit applications. Time and effort spent preparing now for the provisions of the CAAA will pay off in the long run.

  13. Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-16

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality

  14. Microsoft Word - Port Townsend Amendment DRAFT 5.2.12.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1PB-12330 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION This AMENDMENT to the Firm Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) is executed by...

  15. EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Amended Notice of Intent EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent Surplus ... (SPD Supplemental EIS, DOEEIS-0283-S2) and to conduct additional public scoping. ...

  16. WPN 10-15: Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WPN 10-15: Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily Buildings for the Weatherization Assistance Program WPN 10-15: Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions...

  17. Assessment of a Sequential Extraction Procedure for Perturbed Lead Contaminated Samples With and Without Phosphorus Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheckel, Kirk G.; Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Ryan, James A.

    2003-03-26

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEP) attempt to determine the solid-phase association of elements in natural matrices. However, a major obstacle confronting SEP is species alteration of extracted metals before separation of solids from solution. The objectives of this study were to investigate the potential formation of pyromorphite during the sequential extraction steps of Pb-spiked samples with and without phosphate amendments and examine the differences in the operationally defined distribution of Pb in samples with and without the presence of phosphate. The systems that were examined in the absence of phosphate behaved adequately according to operational definitions. The results changed when the samples were amended with phosphate. Pb redistribution occurred due to pyromorphite formation during the SEP as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. These results indicate that sequential extraction methods may not be suitable for Pb speciation in perturbed environmental systems.

  18. Multi-analytical approach reveals potential microbial indicators in soil for sugarcane model systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui; Lehman, R. Michael

    2015-06-09

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that were correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions

  19. Multi-analytical approach reveals potential microbial indicators in soil for sugarcane model systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui; Lehman, R. Michael

    2015-06-09

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that weremore » correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Love Canal (93rd Street School), Niagara County, City of Niagara Falls, NY. (Third remedial action), (amendment), May 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-15

    The Love Canal (93rd Street) site is an inactive hazardous waste site located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 19-acre 93rd Street School site, one of several operable units for the Love Canal Superfund site, is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD). The fill material is reported to contain fly ash and BHC (a pesticide) waste. The ROD amends the 1988 ROD, and addresses final remediation of onsite contaminated soil through excavation and offsite disposal. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including toluene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs and pesticides; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A5 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A5 Existing Regulations A5: Interpretive rulemakings with no change in environmental effect Rulemakings interpreting or amending an existing rule or regulation that does not change the environmental effect of the rule or regulation being amended. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 2, 2016 CX-023000: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nuclear Classification and Declassification; 10 CFR Part 1045 Docket No. AU60-2016-1045; RIN 1992-AA49 CX(s) Applied: A5

  2. Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 January 1, 2008 In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. (a) In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b)

  3. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  4. Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment for New Reactors Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors The following document is a contract amendment to a standard contract between the United States of America, represented by the U.S. Department of Energy, and a corporation organized and existing under the laws of a given state to dispose of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF)and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (HRW). (446.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Standard Contract for Disposal of SNF and/or HRW Locations of Spent

  5. Federal Register Notice, Amending 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Ssubustance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Register Notice, Amending 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Ssubustance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites

  6. EIS-0220: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Materials: Savannah River Site Waste Management In this amended ROD, DOE is announcing that it ... a small portion of a second type of nuclear materials analyzed in the IMNM EIS. ...

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT \\1. CONTRACT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, county, State and ZIP Code) J1 SA. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 9B. ...

  8. Section L Attachment I - Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002 Nevada National Security Site Management and Operating (M&O) Contract PROPOSED 2017 Mgt Team Costs 2018 Mgt Team Costs Subtotal 0 FEE CLIN ...

  9. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, as amended...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, as amended The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (Public Law 101-601; 25 U.S.C. 3001-3013) describes ...

  10. EPA-- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance for Implementing 40 CFR 1506.9 and 1506.10 of the Council on Environmental Qualitys Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

  11. Savannah River Site Settlement Agreement Amendment, June 15,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Amendment to Settlement Agreement 87-27-SW State South Carolina Agreement Type Settlement Agreement Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Establish course of action due to DOE's ...

  12. DOE Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to Amend the External Power...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Supply Test Procedure; Docket No. EERE-2014-BT-TP-0043 RIN 1904-AD36 DOE Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to Amend the External Power Supply Test Procedure; Docket No. ...

  13. Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance for Implementing 40 CFR 1506.9 and 1506.10 of the Council on Environmental Quality’s Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

  14. OT SPECIFIED I OTHER AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATI ON/MODIFICATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MODIFIC ATION OF CO NTRACTIORD ER NO A DE-AC05 - 060R 23 100 l OB DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 12 21 2005 11 . THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITA TI ONS L the above numbered...

  15. Amendment: Energy and Emissions Benefit Table (December 30, 2008)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This amendment replaces the Energy Benefits and Emissions Table on page 52 of Solicitation DE-FOA-0000005 and page 44 of Solicitation Number DE-FOA-0000008 with the following data request form.

  16. Microsoft Word- DE-FOA-0000013 Amendment 000003.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This amendment extends the application due date for State Applicants from May 11, 2009 to June 25, 2009 for Recovery Act Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) formula grants.

  17. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We find that litter quality – not quantity – regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ‘‘microbial biosynthesis acceleration’’ (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.

  18. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We findmore » that litter quality – not quantity – regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ‘‘microbial biosynthesis acceleration’’ (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.« less

  19. EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Revised by State The U.S. Department of Energy is amending its initial ROD published December 19, 2005, pursuant to the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, issued in October 2002. Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Revised by State, DOE/EIS-0287 (January 2010) 75 FR 137 (2.25 MB) More Documents & Publications

  20. ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO NAVIGATE THE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION INTERACTIVE PROCESS | Department of Energy AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO NAVIGATE THE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION INTERACTIVE PROCESS ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO NAVIGATE THE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION INTERACTIVE PROCESS The Rehabilitation Act requires federal agencies to provide

  1. Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 The Federal Advisory Committee Act became law in 1972 and is the legal foundation defining how federal advisory committees operate. The law has special emphasis on open meetings, chartering, public involvement, and reporting. This version is from the House web site, complete with all Amendments and annotations. 5 USC TITLE 5 - APPENDIX 01/02/01 TITLE 5 - GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION AND EMPLOYEES TITLE 5 - APPENDIX Item Federal Advisory Committee

  2. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soil Series and Phase D Bae D Da rn Fa D FuB D LuB ~ 09 _ Pk _ TrB _ TuE DUo _ vee D VeD o o * '='1 ~*.1* **..oC'" ~) OJ rI.:) o.Q 600 1200 Soils n O~:-* ilL 10., 1800 O~ c? ~ 0 ~ O~ Community _ Loblolly Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood o Upland Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood _ Water a Bottomland HardwoodlPine o Monitoringwells .._.' *** TES Plants (1) :l!.-.~I ... 0 TES Plants (2) :='.Y-r::.: ~ Streams ){" ~ Rails . :1'\;:'/ Utility ROW ""If WasteSItes III NPDES outfalls CZI

  3. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.8 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.8 Existing Regulations B5.8: Import or export natural gas, with new cogeneration powerplant Approvals or disapprovals of new authorizations or amendments of existing authorizations to import or export natural gas under section 3 of the Natural Gas Act that involve new cogeneration powerplants (as defined in the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978, as amended) within or contiguous to an existing industrial complex and requiring generally less

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fan Light Kits (RIN: 1904-AC87) EERE- Buildings Technology Program Nationwide In this final rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for ceiling fan light kits. DOE has determined that the amended energy conservation standards for these products would result in significant conservation of energy, and are technologically feasible and economically justified. These standards apply to all products listed in Table

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Portable Air Conditioners (RIN: 1904-AD02) EERE- Buildings Technology Program Nationwide In this proposed rule, DOE proposes new and amended energy conservation standards for portable air conditioners. DOE has determined that the new and amended energy conservation standards for these products would result in significant conservation of energy, and are technologically feasible and economically justified. These proposed standards, if

  6. Soils | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soils Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoils&oldid612253" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  7. Thermal properties of soils and soils testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-17

    The thermal properties of soils are reviewed with reference to the use of soils as heat sources, heat sinks, or thermal storage. Specific heat and thermal conductivity are discussed. (ACR)

  8. Title III List of Lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as amended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This consolidated chemical list includes chemicals subject to reporting requirements under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and chemicals listed under Section 112(r) of Title III of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990. This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 314 or SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It also will also help firms determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r).

  9. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration

  10. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N

  11. Heavy metal movement in metal-contaminated soil profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenbin; Shuman, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Heavy metal movement in soil profiles is a major environmental concern because even slow transport through the soil may eventually lead to deterioration of groundwater quality. In this study, three metal-contaminated soil (Fuquay, Dothan, and Clarendon) were selected from cropland were a high-metal flue dust had been applied annually for 6 years to raise soil pH, with application ending 4 years before sampling. One uncontaminated soil (Tifton) from the same physiographic area was also sampled as a control. Soil samples were collected in 15-cm increments from the surface to 105 cm in depth. Total contents of Zn, Cd, and Pb in the soils samples were determined. To better understand metal movement in relation to metal fractions in the soil profile, soil samples were also extracted sequentially for exchangeable (EXC), organic matter (OM), Mn oxide (MNO), amorphous Fe oxide (AFEO), crystalline Fe oxide (CFEO), and residual (RES) fractions. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Soil samples collected from 34 locations will be analyzed at DOE's Environmental Sciences Laboratory in Grand Junction, Colorado, to determine amounts of uranium in the solid form ...

  13. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

  14. Soil Separator and Sampler and Method of Sampling - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Soil Separator and Sampler and Method of Sampling Fluidized Bed system Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos. Description The apparatus uses a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample, which is connected to a vacuum for drawing air through the bed and suspends particulate matter of the soil sample in the air, and draws

  15. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must

  16. L AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L _ AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 25 7 See Block 16C 6 . 1SSUED BY CODE 0500 8 NNSA/ Oa kridge Site Office u.s. De pa rtment of Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 S it e Offic e P. O. Box 2 05 0 Bu ilding 97 0 4- 2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8 . NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county. state and ZIP Code) ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL B A t t n: W ILLIE J. W I LSON PO BOX 2009 SERVICES Y- 12 , LLC ,1 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I

  17. AME:NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AME:NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE 1 OF 224 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. M202 3. EFFECTIVE DATE October 1, 2003 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.s. Department of Energy N.itional Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office Mail Stop 0184 P.O. Box 5400 AlbuauerQue, NM 87185-5400 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I~' CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I~' CONTRACT ID CODE IPAGE OF PAGES DE-NR0000031 . 1 I 1 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 003 Same as Block 16G . N~ 6. ISSUED BV CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BV (If other than Item 6) Code I U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office P.O. Box 109 West Mifflin, PA 15122-0109 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. street, county, State and ZIP Code) (*...) 9.A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Bechtel Marine

  19. X AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ? X AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 1 PAGE 1 of7 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE M197 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 AC PAGES 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE I5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) REQ. NO. NOPR 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & Wilcox

  20. Title 43 CFR 1610.5-5 Amendment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 Amendment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43 CFR 1610.5-5 AmendmentLegal Abstract...

  1. Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, Office Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, ...

  2. File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  3. 18 CFR 4.104 FERC Amendment of Exemption | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4.104 FERC Amendment of Exemption Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 18 CFR 4.104 FERC Amendment of...

  4. EA-1086: Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version- 6/98)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue as a final rulemaking an amended version of 10 CFR Part 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection."  The amended version provides...

  5. EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement DOE issued an amended Notice of Intent and is conducting additional public scoping on its Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0447) for the Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc., transmission system project (Champlain Hudson Project). An amended application was filed with DOE on February 28, 2012, for a

  6. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  7. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1995-11-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion with the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  8. U.S.-Israel Energy Agreement Amendment Text_04042016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -Israel Energy Agreement Amendment Text_04042016 U.S.-Israel Energy Agreement Amendment Text_04042016 U.S.-Israel Energy Agreement Amendment Text_04042016.pdf (14.16 KB) More Documents & Publications Scanned_Agreement.pdf MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF International_Agreements_January_2001_December_2004.pdf

  9. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICA TlON OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge TN 37831 8 NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR No. ooun.oy. SiDle tJNJ liP Codo (x) 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO - OAK RIDGE ASSCCIATED UNIVERS:TIES, INC. P.O. BOX...

  10. EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – EM issued an amended Record of Decision (ROD) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Spent Nuclear Fuel Environmental Impact Statement to expand the operations of the H-Canyon Facility at SRS to support a major nuclear non-proliferation goal and save taxpayer dollars.

  11. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-16

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate

  12. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  13. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  14. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  15. ARM - Campaign Instrument - soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Soil Measurement from the SGP (SOIL) Instrument Categories SurfaceSubsurface Properties Campaigns ...

  16. ARM - Instrument - soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Soil Measurement from the SGP (SOIL) Instrument Categories SurfaceSubsurface ...

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Coleman Evans Wood-Preserving site, Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida (first remedial action (amendment)). Final report, September 9, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-26

    The 11-acre Coleman-Evans Wood Preserving site is a former wood treatment facility, which was operated from 1954 to the late 1980s, in the community of Whitehouse, Duval County, Florida. Prior to 1970, wastewater from the facility was precipated and discharged to the onsite drainage ditch. The precipitated sludge was deposited into two unlined pits until 1970, when the sludge was stored in tanks. The wastewater treatment process was also enhanced in 1970 with lime precipitation and chlorination. In 1980, onsite ground water contamination was detected and activated charcoal filters were added to the treatment process to remove organics. The primary contaminant in onsite soil and ground water has been identified as pentachlorophenol (PCP). The highest areas of PCP concentration were in the vicinity of onsite chemical tanks and the unlined pit areas. In 1985, EPA conducted an emergency response, which included excavating and disposing of pit material offsite and filling excavated areas with clean fill. The Record of Decision (ROD) amends a 1986 ROD, which documented the selection of incineration for an estimated 9,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil. Since that time, additional studies during the remedial design phase indicated that there are approximately 27,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil. Based on the excessive volume of soil and the high cost of incineration, treatability studies were conducted and an alternative source control treatment was selected. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, and ground water are organics including PCP and metals.

  18. ARM - Datastreams - soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamssoil Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : SOIL ABLE: soil temperature, moisture, heat flow, 30-min avg Active Dates 1999.05.23 - 2004.04.01 Originating Instrument Soil Measurement from the SGP (SOIL) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Locations Southern

  19. ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available

  20. A pilot-scale field study on the anaerobic biotreatment of soil impacted with highly chlorinated benzenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanand, K.; Foulke, B.; Delnicki, W.A.; Ying, A.C.; Baek, N.H.; Coats, M.L.; Duffy, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    An on-site pilot-scale demonstration of anaerobic biodegradation of highly chlorinated benzenes was successfully performed at a chemical manufacturing industrial facility in Niagara Falls, New York. The field investigation was conducted in 6-yd{sup 3} capacity soil boxes. Approximately 4 yd{sup 3} of soil impacted with chlorinated compounds was placed in each soil box. Chlorinated benzenes with 3 or more chlorines accounted for about 85% of the total chemistry in the soil. The soil box amended with water, nutrients, and acclimated soil microbial inoculum exhibited greater than 78% reduction in the levels of highly chlorinated compounds after one year of field study. The total concentrations of hexa-, penta-, tetra-, and trichlorobenzenes decreased from 920 mg/kg to less than 190 mg/kg, while the total concentrations of di-, and monochlorobenzene increased from 8 mg/kg to greater than 400 mg/kg during one year of field operation. The control soil that did not receive any external nutrient or microbial amendments maintained the same percentage of the highly chlorinated benzenes after one year and di-, and monochlorobenzene never exceeded more than 4 mg/kg at any given time period. The anaerobic activity was further confirmed by monitored parameters such as nutrient consumption (butyrate, nitrogen, organic matter), sulfate depletion, and methane production.

  1. White paper : the fourth amendment : implications for radiological and nuclear detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Brandon Seth

    2010-01-01

    The need to improve the radiation detection architecture has given rise to increased concern over the potential of equipment or procedures to violate the Fourth Amendment. Protecting the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is a foremost value of every government agency. However, protecting U.S. residents and assets from potentially catastrophic threats is also a crucial role of government. In the absence of clear precedent, the fear of potentially violating rights could lead to the rejection of effective and reasonable means that could reduce risks, possibly savings lives and assets. The goal of this document is not to apply case law to determine what the precedent may be if it exists, but rather provide a detailed outline that defines searches and seizures, identifies what precedent exists and what precedent doesn't exist, and explore what the existing (and non-existing) precedent means for the use of radiation detection used inside the nation's borders.

  2. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume

  3. Nuclear forensics: Soil content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beebe, Merilyn Amy

    2015-08-31

    Nuclear Forensics is a growing field that is concerned with all stages of the process of creating and detonating a nuclear weapon. The main goal is to prevent nuclear attack by locating and securing nuclear material before it can be used in an aggressive manner. This stage of the process is mostly paperwork; laws, regulations, treaties, and declarations made by individual countries or by the UN Security Council. There is some preliminary leg work done in the form of field testing detection equipment and tracking down orphan materials; however, none of these have yielded any spectacular or useful results. In the event of a nuclear attack, the first step is to analyze the post detonation debris to aid in the identification of the responsible party. This aspect of the nuclear forensics process, while reactive in nature, is more scientific. A rock sample taken from the detonation site can be dissolved into liquid form and analyzed to determine its chemical composition. The chemical analysis of spent nuclear material can provide valuable information if properly processed and analyzed. In order to accurately evaluate the results, scientists require information on the natural occurring elements in the detonation zone. From this information, scientists can determine what percentage of the element originated in the bomb itself rather than the environment. To this end, element concentrations in soils from sixty-nine different cities are given, along with activity concentrations for uranium, thorium, potassium, and radium in various building materials. These data are used in the analysis program Python.

  4. WPN 10-19: Guidance for Grant Amendments for the Sustainable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources for Consumer's Funding | Department of Energy 9: Guidance for Grant Amendments for the Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumer's Funding WPN 10-19: Guidance for Grant Amendments for the Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumer's Funding Archived 09/30/15, SERC Completion To issue guidance for the Grantees who need to complete grant amendments based on the receipt of funding to undertake Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) projects. WPN 10-19: Guidance for Grant

  5. EIS-0407: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement | Department of Energy Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0407: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Refinery Project near Hugoton, Kansas Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Abengoa Refinery Project near Hugoton, Kanasas, DOE/EIS-0407 (April 2009) 74 FR 19543 (2.34 MB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0407:

  6. EIS-0402: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0402: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Remediation of Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE is amending its 2008 notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa

  7. Microsoft Word - NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1-18-07.doc |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1-18-07.doc Microsoft Word - NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1-18-07.doc Microsoft Word - NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1-18-07.doc (69.15 KB) More Documents & Publications EXHIBIT A: CRADA, WFO, PUA and NPUA Comparison Table, with suggested changes Class_Waiver_NPUA-2.pdf ClassWaiver-PUA.pdf

  8. Optimization of viral resuspension methods for carbon-rich soils along a permafrost thaw gradient

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trubl, Gareth; Solonenko, Natalie; Chittick, Lauren; Solonenko, Sergei A.; Rich, Virginia I.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2016-05-17

    Permafrost stores approximately 50% of global soil carbon (C) in a frozen form; it is thawing rapidly under climate change, and little is known about viral communities in these soils or their roles in C cycling. In permafrost soils, microorganisms contribute significantly to C cycling, and characterizing them has recently been shown to improve prediction of ecosystem function. In other ecosystems, viruses have broad ecosystem and community impacts ranging from host cell mortality and organic matter cycling to horizontal gene transfer and reprogramming of core microbial metabolisms. Here we developed an optimized protocol to extract viruses from three types ofmore » high organic-matter peatland soils across a permafrost thaw gradient (palsa, moss-dominated bog, and sedge-dominated fen). Three separate experiments were used to evaluate the impact of chemical buffers, physical dispersion, storage conditions, and concentration and purification methods on viral yields. The most successful protocol, amended potassium citrate buffer with bead-beating or vortexing and BSA, yielded on average as much as 2-fold more virus-like particles (VLPs) g–1of soil than other methods tested. All method combinations yielded VLPs g–1of soil on the 108order of magnitude across all three soil types. The different storage and concentration methods did not yield significantly more VLPs g–1of soil among the soil types. In conclusion, this research provides much-needed guidelines for resuspending viruses from soils, specifically carbon-rich soils, paving the way for incorporating viruses into soil ecology studies.« less

  9. AL 2012-10, Implementation of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    be made by DOE and NNSA Contracting Officers. Subject: Implementation of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 2005 References: DEAR 952.250-70, Nuclear Hazards Indemnification...

  10. EIS-0026: Amendment to a Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for storage pending possible disposition. PDF icon DOEEIS-0026, Amendment to a Record of Decision for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ...