National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination silica polymer

  1. Composite Polymer Electrolytes Based on Poly(ethylene glycol) and Hydrophobic Fumed Silica: Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Composite Polymer Electrolytes Based on Poly(ethylene glycol) and Hydrophobic Fumed Silica: Dynamic are used to probe the microstructures present in fumed silica-based composite polymer electrolytes electrolytes based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO).1 Solid polymer electrolytes can potentially eliminate battery

  2. A comparative study of inverted-opal titania photonic crystals made from polymer and silica colloidal crystal templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuai, S.-L.; Truong, V.-V.; Hache, Alain; Hu, X.-F.

    2004-12-01

    Photonic crystals with an inverted-opal structure using polymer and silica colloidal crystal templates were prepared and compared. We show that the behaviors of the template during the removal process and heat treatment are determinant factors on the crystal formation. While both templates result in ordered macroporous structures, the optical quality in each case is quite different. The removal of the polymer template by sintering causes a large shrinkage of the inverted framework and produces a high density of cracks in the sample. With a silica template, sintering actually improves the quality of the inverted structure by enhancing the template's mechanical stability, helping increase the filling fraction, and consolidating the titania framework. The role of the other important factors such as preheating and multiple infiltrations is also investigated.

  3. Micro-molded high Q polymer resonators for optical loss determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro-molded high Q polymer resonators for optical loss determination A. Martin, A. Srinivasan, D toroidal resonators (Q>108) Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Fiber Waveguide #12;Replica Molding of Microresonators Perfect Master · Silica UHQ Microtoroid Negative Mold · PDMS Flexible Mold (Polydimethylsiloxane

  4. Self-Assembled Silica Nano-Composite Polymer Electrolytes: Synthesis, Rheology & Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Saad A.: Fedkiw Peter S.; Baker, Gregory L.

    2007-01-24

    The ultimate objectives of this research are to understand the principles underpinning nano-composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) and facilitate development of novel CPEs that are low-cost, have high conductivities, large Li+ transference numbers, improved electrolyte-electrode interfacial stability, yield long cycle life, exhibit mechanical stability and are easily processable. Our approach is to use nanoparticulate silica fillers to formulate novel composite electrolytes consisting of surface-modified fumed silica nano-particles in polyethylene oxides (PEO) in the presence of lithium salts. We intend to design single-ion conducting silica nanoparticles which provide CPEs with high Li+ transference numbers. We also will develop low-Mw (molecular weight), high-Mw and crosslinked PEO electrolytes with tunable properties in terms of conductivity, transference number, interfacial stability, processability and mechanical strength

  5. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  6. Luminescent organosilicon polymers and sol-gel synthesis of nano-structured silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, H. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescent   Polymers   Containing   Metalloles.  Metallole-­? Containing  Polymers.   Journal  of  Forensic  S.   J. ;   Trogler,   W.   C. ,   Polymer   sensors   for  

  7. POLYMER END-GROUP ANALYSIS: THE DETERMINATION OF AVERAGE MOLECULAR WEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    POLYMER END-GROUP ANALYSIS: THE DETERMINATION OF AVERAGE MOLECULAR WEIGHT Background reading. 11. Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch, 7th ed., Chap. 14. Introduction Polymers Polymers are a special in this experiment, or may be of different types. Polymers are very important in biological systems. For example

  8. Luminescent organosilicon polymers and sol-gel synthesis of nano-structured silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, H. Paul

    2011-01-01

    and   Determination   of   PETN   and   TNT   by   HPTLC.  HMX,  CL-­?20,  and  PETN. 32   Figure  8  shows  HMX,   CL-­?20,   and   PETN   done   in   cyclohexanone  

  9. Microstructure determines the yield of free charge in neat semiconducting polymers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microstructure determines the yield of free charge in neat semiconducting polymers. Understanding the fundamental photophysics of poly(3-hyxylthiophene) films, and that of conjugated polymers in general-state microstructure of the film. The microstructure was varied systematically through control of the polymers

  10. Electrospinning of silica nanofibers: characterization and application to biosensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsou, Pei-Hsiang

    2009-06-02

    and experimental time were studied. Materials used in the process are Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), butanol and spin-on-glass coating solution, which act as polymer carrier, solvent, and silica-precursor, respectively. Polymer/silica precursor composite fibers were...

  11. Polymer ejection from bacteriophages is fully determined by confinement energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piili, J

    2015-01-01

    The ejection dynamics through a nanoscale pore of a flexible polymer that is initially strongly confined inside a spherical capsid is examined. By extensive simulations using the stochastic rotation dynamics method we show that the time for an individual monomer to eject grows exponentially with the number of ejected monomers under constant initial monomer density. This dependence is a consequence of the excess free energy of the polymer due to confinement growing exponentially with the initial monomer number inside the capsid, which we address to strong monomer-monomer interactions. Consequently, for sufficiently strong initial confinement and long polymers ejection times for polymers of different lengths depend linearly on the length. At polymer lengths amenable to computer simulations the dependence is superlinear due to the finite-size effect related to the retraction of polymer tails at final stages of ejection.

  12. Incorporation of H2 in vitreous silica, qualitative and quantitative determination from Raman and infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the quench. #12;1. Introduction The incorporation of volatiles such as noble gases, carbon dioxide and water properties affected by the presence of the volatiles and their related species in the silicate network (see] and to affect optical properties of vitreous silica [14, 15]. Therefore, the dissolution mechanisms of water

  13. Tethered Constrained-Geometry Catalysts in Mesoporous Silica: Probing the Influence of the "Second Sphere" on Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sphere" on Polymer Properties Sandra L. Burkett,* Stephen Soukasene, Kelly L. Milton, Ryan Welch Rajeswari M. Kasi and E. Bryan Coughlin* Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Uni recycling or recovery are often ignored when operating at the benchtop scale, although these considerations

  14. Binary and ternary cluster integrals of polymer segments as determined by small angle neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -ku, Tokyo, Japan E. Wada, K. Kurita, H. Hiramatsu and H. Fukuro College of Science and Technology, NihonL-171 Binary and ternary cluster integrals of polymer segments as determined by small angle neutron integrals of polymer segments in these semi-dilute, poor solvent, solutions. In the present note we show

  15. Pore-structure determinations of silica aerogels by {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy and imaging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D. M.; Gerald, R. E., II; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

    1998-04-01

    Silica aerogels represent a new class of open-pore materials with pore dimensions on a scale of tens of nanometers, and are thus classified as mesoporous materials. In this work, we show that the combination of NMR spectroscopy and chemical-shift selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can resolve some of the important aspects of the structure of silica aerogels. The use of xenon as a gaseous probe in combination with spatially resolved NMR techniques is demonstrated to be a powerful, new approach for characterizing the average pore structure and steady-state spatial distributions of xenon atoms in different physicochemical environments. Furthermore, dynamic NMR magnetization transfer experiments and pulsed-field gradient (PFG) measurements have been used to characterize exchange processes and diffusive motion of xenon in samples at equilibrium. In particular, this new NMR approach offers unique information and insights into the nanoscopic pore structure and microscopic morphology of aerogels and the dynamical behavior of occluded adsorbates. MRI provides spatially resolved information on the nature of the flaw regions found in these materials. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for magnetization transfer among the bulk and occluded xenon phases indicate xenon-exchange rate constants on the order of 1 s-1 for specimens having volumes of 0.03 cm3. PFG diffusion measurements show evidence of anisotropic diffusion for xenon occluded within aerogels, with nominal self-diffusivity coefficients on the order of D= 10-3cm2/s.

  16. Highly Efficient siRNA Delivery from Core-Shell Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Multifunctional Polymer Caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Karin; Engelke, Hanna; Braeuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A new general route for siRNA delivery is presented combining porous core-shell silica nanocarriers with a modularly designed multifunctional block copolymer. Specifically, the internal storage and release of siRNA from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with orthogonal core-shell surface chemistry was investigated as a function of pore-size, pore morphology, surface properties and pH. Very high siRNA loading capacities of up to 380 microg/mg MSN were obtained with charge-matched amino-functionalized mesoporous cores, and release profiles show up to 80% siRNA elution after 24 h. We demonstrate that adsorption and desorption of siRNA is mainly driven by electrostatic interactions, which allow for high loading capacities even in medium-sized mesopores with pore diameters down to 4 nm in a stellate pore morphology. The negatively charged MSN shell enabled the association with a block copolymer containing positively charged artificial amino acids and oleic acid blocks, which acts simultaneously as capping func...

  17. Highly Efficient siRNA Delivery from Core-Shell Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Multifunctional Polymer Caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin Moeller; Katharina Mueller; Hanna Engelke; Christoph Braeuchle; Ernst Wagner; Thomas Bein

    2015-09-10

    A new general route for siRNA delivery is presented combining porous core-shell silica nanocarriers with a modularly designed multifunctional block copolymer. Specifically, the internal storage and release of siRNA from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with orthogonal core-shell surface chemistry was investigated as a function of pore-size, pore morphology, surface properties and pH. Very high siRNA loading capacities of up to 380 microg/mg MSN were obtained with charge-matched amino-functionalized mesoporous cores, and release profiles show up to 80% siRNA elution after 24 h. We demonstrate that adsorption and desorption of siRNA is mainly driven by electrostatic interactions, which allow for high loading capacities even in medium-sized mesopores with pore diameters down to 4 nm in a stellate pore morphology. The negatively charged MSN shell enabled the association with a block copolymer containing positively charged artificial amino acids and oleic acid blocks, which acts simultaneously as capping function and endosomal release agent. The potential of this multifunctional delivery platform is demonstrated by highly effective cell transfection and siRNA delivery into KB-cells. A luciferase reporter gene knock-down of up to 90% was possible using extremely low cell exposures with only 2.5 microg MSN containing 32 pM siRNA per 100 microL well.

  18. Determining the Density Profile of Confined Polymer Brushes with Neutron Reflectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Tonya L.

    , University of South Florida, Florida 33620 3 Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805Determining the Density Profile of Confined Polymer Brushes with Neutron Reflectivity W. A. HAMILTON,1 G. S. SMITH,1 N. A. ALCANTAR,2 J. MAJEWSKI,3 R. G. TOOMEY,4 T. L. KUHL5 1 Center for Neutron

  19. Mass fractal characteristics of silica sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donatti, D.A.; Vollet, D.R.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Mesquita, A.; Silva, T.F.P. [Unesp-Universidade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 178 CEP, 13500-970 Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-01-01

    A sample series of silica sonogels was prepared using different water-tetraethoxysilane molar ratio (r{sub w}) in the gelation step of the process in order to obtain aerogels with different bulk densities after the supercritical drying. The samples were analyzed by means of small-angle x-ray-scattering (SAXS) and nitrogen-adsorption techniques. Wet sonogels exhibit mass fractal structure with fractal dimension D increasing from {approx}2.1 to {approx}2.4 and mass-fractal correlation length {xi} diminishing from {approx}13 nm to {approx}2 nm, as r{sub w} is changed in the nominal range from 66 to 6. The process of obtaining aerogels from sonogels and heat treatment at 500 deg. C, in general, increases the mass-fractal dimension D, diminishes the characteristic length {xi} of the fractal structure, and shortens the fractal range at the micropore side for the formation of a secondary structured particle, apparently evolved from the original wet structure at a high resolution level. The overall mass-fractal dimension D of aerogels was evaluated as {approx}2.4 and {approx}2.5, as determined from SAXS and from pore-size distribution by nitrogen adsorption, respectively. The fine structure of the 'secondary particle' developed in the obtaining of aerogels could be described as a surface-mass fractal, with the correlated surface and mass-fractal dimensions decreasing from {approx}2.4 to {approx}2.0 and from {approx}2.7 to {approx}2.5, respectively, as the aerogel bulk density increases from 0.25 (r{sub w}=66) up to 0.91 g/cm{sup 3} (r{sub w}=6)

  20. Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raman, N.K.; Brinker, C.J.

    1999-08-10

    A process is described for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film. 11 figs.

  1. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  2. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  3. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  4. Determination of photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation using spectroscopic techniques as applied to polymer: Fullerene blend films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanemoto, Katsuichi Nakatani, Hitomi; Domoto, Shinya

    2014-10-28

    We propose a method to determine the density of photocarrier under continuous photoirradiation in conjugated polymers using spectroscopic signals obtained by photoinduced absorption (PIA) measurements. The bleaching signals in the PIA measurements of polymer films and the steady-state absorption signals of oxidized polymer solution are employed to determine the photocarrier density. The method is applied to photocarriers of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a blended film consisting of P3HT and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation of 580 mW/cm{sup 2} is determined to be 3.5?×?10{sup 16?}cm{sup ?3}. Using a trend of the carrier density increasing in proportion to the square root of photo-excitation intensity, we provide a general formula to estimate the photocarrier density under simulated 1 sun solar irradiation for the P3HT: PCBM film of an arbitrary thickness. We emphasize that the method proposed in this study enables an estimate of carrier density without measuring a current and can be applied to films with no electrodes as well as to devices.

  5. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-06-21

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

  6. Log-Gamma Polymer Free Energy Fluctuations via a Fredholm Determinant Identity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borodin, Alexei

    We prove that under n[superscript 1/3] scaling, the limiting distribution as n ? ? of the free energy of Seppalainen’s log-Gamma discrete directed polymer is GUE Tracy-Widom. The main technical innovation we provide is a ...

  7. Silica extraction from geothermal water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourcier, William L; Bruton, Carol J

    2014-09-23

    A method of producing silica from geothermal fluid containing low concentration of the silica of less than 275 ppm includes the steps of treating the geothermal fluid containing the silica by reverse osmosis treatment thereby producing a concentrated fluid containing the silica, seasoning the concentrated fluid thereby producing a slurry having precipitated colloids containing the silica, and separating the silica from the slurry.

  8. Application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for determining the location of buried polymer interfaces with tens of nanometer precision

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Damin, Craig A.; Nguyen, Vy H. T.; Niyibizi, Auguste S.; Smith, Emily A.

    2015-02-11

    Near-infrared scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy was utilized to determine the interface location in bilayer films (a stack of two polymer layers) of polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC). Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the sum square electric field (SSEF) for films with total bilayer thicknesses of 1200–3600 nm were used to construct models for simultaneously measuring the film thickness and the location of the buried interface between the PS and PC layers. Samples with total thicknesses of 1320, 1890, 2300, and 2750 nm and varying PS/PC interface locations were analyzed using SA Raman spectroscopy. Comparing SA Raman spectroscopy and optical profilometrymore »measurements, the average percent difference in the total bilayer thickness was 2.0% for films less than ~2300 nm thick. The average percent difference in the thickness of the PS layer, which reflects the interface location, was 2.5% when the PS layer was less than ~1800 nm. The SA Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable, non-destructive method capable of determining the total bilayer thickness and buried interface location for bilayer samples consisting of thin polymer films with comparable indices of refraction.« less

  9. The Determination of the Water Vapor Content in the Pulkovo VKM-100 Multipass Vacuum Cell Using Polymer Sensors of Humidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Nikanorova, I N; Sal'nikov, I B; Leiterer, U; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Dauß, D

    2010-01-01

    In spectral studies of water vapor under laboratory conditions (determination of molecular constants, measurement for spectral transmission functions), the amount of water vapor in the time of the measurements is one of the most essential parameters, which should be determined accurately. We discuss the application for this purpose of polymer sensors of humidity manufactured by Praktik-NC (Moscow) and used in the Pulkovo VKM-100 multipass vacuum cell. These sensors were examined in the laboratory of Lindenberg Meteorological observatory (Germany) by comparison between their readings and those of standard measuring devices for various values of relative humidity, pressure, and temperature. We also carried out measurements of relative humidity in boxes with saline solution, in which the relative humidity that corresponds to a given solution is guaranteed with the accuracy of several tenths of percent. The analysis of the results of the laboratory examination of the sensors and extended sets of measurements made...

  10. Experimental determination of the fracture toughness via microscratch tests: Application to polymers, ceramics, and metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akono, Ange-Therese

    This article presents a novel microscratch technique for the determination of the fracture toughness of materials from scratch data. While acoustic emission and optical imaging devices provide quantitative evidence of ...

  11. Communication Improving silica fume cement by using silane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    for enhancing the bond between a ceramic filler and a polymer matrix [57] because the epoxy structure at the end for enhancing the bond between a ceramic filler and a cement matrix [51]. In spite of the difference in chemicalCommunication Improving silica fume cement by using silane Yunsheng Xu, D.D.L. Chung* Composite

  12. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heidegger; S. Niedermayer; A. Schmidt; D. Gößl; C. Argyo; S. Endres; T. Bein; C. Bourquin

    2015-09-03

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications.

  13. Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

  14. Luffa fibers and gamma radiation as improvement tools of polymer Gonzalo Martnez-Barrera a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    improvement of polymer concrete based on a polyester resin/foundry sand mixture. Different concentra- tions-5017, USA h i g h l i g h t s Polymer concrete with silicious sand, unsaturated polyester resin and luffa, silica fume, silica sand; the last one the most used due to size distribution, ranging from 0.6 to 4.0 mm

  15. Solid State Ionics 111 (1998) 117123 Composite polymer electrolytes using surface-modified fumed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    1998-01-01

    Solid State Ionics 111 (1998) 117­123 Composite polymer electrolytes using surface-modified fumed April 1998 Abstract We report results from our studies on composite polymer electrolytes based on novel surface-modified fumed silicas. The electrolytes were prepared by dispersing fumed silica in a matrix

  16. CX-010520: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Silica Polymer Initiator Conformance Gel Applications in Geothermal Zonal Isolation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B3.11 Date: 06/17/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

  18. Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

  19. Polymer films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve (Champaign, IL); Sukhishvili, Svetlana A. (Maplewood, NJ)

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  20. Mesoporous-silica films, fibers, and powders by evaporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruinsma, Paul J.; Baskaran, Suresh; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Liu, Jun

    2008-05-06

    This invention pertains to surfactant-templated nanometer-scale porosity of a silica precursor solution and forming a mesoporous material by first forming the silica precursor solution into a preform having a high surface area to volume ratio, then rapid drying or evaporating a solvent from the silica precursor solution. The mesoporous material may be in any geometric form, but is preferably in the form of a film, fiber, powder or combinations thereof. The rapid drying or evaporation of solvent from the solution is accomplished by layer thinning, for example spin casting, liquid drawing, and liquid spraying respectively. Production of a film is by layer thinning, wherein a layer of the silica precursor solution is formed on a surface followed by removal of an amount of the silica precursor solution and leaving a geometrically thinner layer of the silica precursor solution from which the solvent quickly escapes via evaporation. Layer thinning may be by any method including but not limited to squeegeeing and/or spin casting. In powder formation by spray drying, the same conditions of fast drying exists as in spin-casting (as well as in fiber spinning) because of the high surface-area to volume ratio of the product. When a powder is produced by liquid spraying, the particles or micro-bubbles within the powder are hollow spheres with walls composed of mesoporous silica. Mesoporous fiber formation starts with a similar silica precursor solution but with an added pre-polymer making a pituitous mixture that is drawn into a thin strand from which solvent is evaporated leaving the mesoporous fiber(s).

  1. Mesoporous-silica films, fibers, and powders by evaporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruinsma, Paul J. (Kennewick, WA); Baskaran, Suresh (Kennewick, WA); Bontha, Jagannadha R. (Richland, WA); Liu, Jun (West Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to surfactant-templated nanometer-scale porosity of a silica precursor solution and forming a mesoporous material by first forming the silica precursor solution into a preform having a high surface area to volume ratio, then rapid drying or evaporating a solvent from the silica precursor solution. The mesoporous material may be in any geometric form, but is preferably in the form of a film, fiber, powder or combinations thereof. The rapid drying or evaporation of solvent from the solution is accomplished by layer thinning, for example spin casting, liquid drawing, and liquid spraying respectively. Production of a film is by layer thinning, wherein a layer of the silica precursor solution is formed on a surface followed by removal of an amount of the silica precursor solution and leaving a geometrically thinner layer of the silica precursor solution from which the solvent quickly escapes via evaporation. Layer thinning may be by any method including but not limited to squeegeeing and/or spin casting. In powder formation by spray drying, the same conditions of fast drying exists as in spin-casting (as well as in fiber spinning) because of the high surface-area to volume ratio of the product. When a powder is produced by liquid spraying, the particles or micro-bubbles within the powder are hollow spheres with walls composed of mesoporous silica. Mesoporous fiber formation starts with a similar silica precursor solution but with an added pre-polymer making a pituitous mixture that is drawn into a thin strand from which solvent is evaporated leaving the mesoporous fiber(s).

  2. Mesoporous-silica films, fibers, and powders by evaporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruinsma, P.J.; Baskaran, S.; Bontha, J.R.; Liu, J.

    1999-07-13

    This invention pertains to surfactant-templated nanometer-scale porosity of a silica precursor solution and forming a mesoporous material by first forming the silica precursor solution into a preform having a high surface area to volume ratio, then rapid drying or evaporating a solvent from the silica precursor solution. The mesoporous material may be in any geometric form, but is preferably in the form of a film, fiber, powder or combinations thereof. The rapid drying or evaporation of solvent from the solution is accomplished by layer thinning, for example spin casting, liquid drawing, and liquid spraying respectively. Production of a film is by layer thinning, wherein a layer of the silica precursor solution is formed on a surface followed by removal of an amount of the silica precursor solution and leaving a geometrically thinner layer of the silica precursor solution from which the solvent quickly escapes via evaporation. Layer thinning may be by any method including but not limited to squeegeeing and/or spin casting. In powder formation by spray drying, the same conditions of fast drying exists as in spin-casting (as well as in fiber spinning) because of the high surface-area to volume ratio of the product. When a powder is produced by liquid spraying, the particles or micro-bubbles within the powder are hollow spheres with walls composed of mesoporous silica. Mesoporous fiber formation starts with a similar silica precursor solution but with an added pre-polymer making a pituitous mixture that is drawn into a thin strand from which solvent is evaporated leaving the mesoporous fiber(s). 24 figs.

  3. Silica Supported Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Modifier in Polyethylene Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    Silica Supported Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Modifier in Polyethylene Composites Neal D. Mc.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: Composites have been made from single- wall carbon nanotubes in a polyethylene (PE) matrix: additives; composites; conducting polymers; nanocomposites; polyethylene INTRODUCTION Polyethylene (PE

  4. Nonmonotonic fracture behavior of polymer nanocomposites J. G. de Castro,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    Nonmonotonic fracture behavior of polymer nanocomposites J. G. de Castro,1 R. Zargar,1,a) M. Habibi-sized silica particles. We find that small amounts of silica increase the fracture stress and strain, but too much filler makes the material become brittle and consequently fracture happens at small deformations

  5. Molecular-dynamics simulations of thin polyisoprene films confined between amorphous silica substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guseva, D. V., E-mail: d.v.guseva@tue.nl [Theory of Polymers and Soft Matter, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Physics Department, Chair of Polymer and Crystal Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Komarov, P. V. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tver State University, Sadovyj per. 35, 170002 Tver, Russia and Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova st. 28, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tver State University, Sadovyj per. 35, 170002 Tver, Russia and Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova st. 28, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lyulin, Alexey V. [Theory of Polymers and Soft Matter, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Theory of Polymers and Soft Matter, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-03-21

    Constant temperature–constant pressure (NpT) molecular-dynamics computer simulations have been carried out for the united-atom model of a non-crosslinked (1,4) cis-polyisoprene (PI) melt confined between two amorphous, fully coordinated silica surfaces. The Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential was implemented to describe the polymer–silica interactions. The thickness H of the produced PI–silica film has been varied in a wide range, 1 < H/R{sub g} < 8, where R{sub g} is the individual PI chain radius of gyration measured under the imposed confinement. After a thorough equilibration, the PI film stratified structure and polymer segmental dynamics have been studied. The chain structure in the middle of the films resembles that in a corresponding bulk, but the polymer-density profile shows a pronounced ordering of the polymer segments in the vicinity of silica surfaces; this ordering disappears toward the film middles. Tremendous slowing down of the polymer segmental dynamics has been observed in the film surface layers, with the segmental relaxation more than 150 times slower as compared to that in a PI bulk. This effect increases with decreasing the polymer-film thickness. The segmental relaxation in the PI film middles shows additional relaxation process which is absent in a PI bulk. Even though there are fast relaxation processes in the film middle, its overall relaxation is slower as compared to that in a bulk sample. The interpretation of the results in terms of polymer glassy bridges has been discussed.

  6. Synthesis of mesoporous silica materials from municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu Li, Wen-Kai; Huang, Chun-Yi

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The optimal alkaline agent for the extraction of silica from bottom ash was Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • The pore sizes for the mesoporous silica synthesized from bottom ash were 2–3.8 nm. • The synthesized materials exhibited a hexagonal pore structure with a smaller order. • The materials have potential for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. - Abstract: Incinerator bottom ash contains a large amount of silica and can hence be used as a silica source for the synthesis of mesoporous silica materials. In this study, the conditions for alkaline fusion to extract silica from incinerator bottom ash were investigated, and the resulting supernatant solution was used as the silica source for synthesizing mesoporous silica materials. The physical and chemical characteristics of the mesoporous silica materials were analyzed using BET, XRD, FTIR, SEM, and solid-state NMR. The results indicated that the BET surface area and pore size distribution of the synthesized silica materials were 992 m{sup 2}/g and 2–3.8 nm, respectively. The XRD patterns showed that the synthesized materials exhibited a hexagonal pore structure with a smaller order. The NMR spectra of the synthesized materials exhibited three peaks, corresponding to Q{sup 2} [Si(OSi){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}], Q{sup 3} [Si(OSi){sub 3}(OH)], and Q{sup 4} [Si(OSi){sub 4}]. The FTIR spectra confirmed the existence of a surface hydroxyl group and the occurrence of symmetric Si–O stretching. Thus, mesoporous silica was successfully synthesized from incinerator bottom ash. Finally, the effectiveness of the synthesized silica in removing heavy metals (Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Cr{sup 2+}) from aqueous solutions was also determined. The results showed that the silica materials synthesized from incinerator bottom ash have potential for use as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

  7. Some Rigorous Results on Semiflexible Polymers I. Free and confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velenik, Yvan

    Some Rigorous Results on Semiflexible Polymers I. Free and confined polymers O. Hryniva , Y 4, Switzerland Abstract We introduce a class of models of semiflexible polymers. The latter, called the persistence length, being of the same order as the polymer length. We determine

  8. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-10-15

    For the sol-gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol-gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water-ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1-2 {mu}m). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol-gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of {approx}900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH{sup -}) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  9. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  10. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  11. Smart polymer inverse-opal photonic crystal films by melt-shear organization for hybrid core–shell architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, C. G.; Winter, T.; Heidt, S.; Dietz, C.; Ding, T.; Baumberg, J. J.; Gallei, M.

    2015-01-16

    A feasible strategy to achieve large-area mechano-, thermo- and solvatochromic hybrid opal (OPC) and inverse opal photonic crystal (IOPC) films based on polymer hydrogels is described. Silica core particles featuring surface-anchored stimuli...

  12. Antireflective graded index silica coating, method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoldas, Bulent E. (Churchill, PA); Partlow, Deborah P. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

    1985-01-01

    Antireflective silica coating for vitreous material is substantially non-reflecting over a wide band of radiations. This is achieved by providing the coating with a graded degree of porosity which grades the index of refraction between that of air and the vitreous material of the substrate. To prepare the coating, there is first prepared a silicon-alkoxide-based coating solution of particular polymer structure produced by a controlled proportion of water to alkoxide and a controlled concentration of alkoxide to solution, along with a small amount of catalyst. The primary solvent is alcohol and the solution is polymerized and hydrolized under controlled conditions prior to use. The prepared solution is applied as a film to the vitreous substrate and rapidly dried. It is thereafter heated under controlled conditions to volatilize the hydroxyl radicals and organics therefrom and then to produce a suitable pore morphology in the residual porous silica layer. The silica layer is then etched in order to enlarge the pores in a graded fashion, with the largest of the pores remaining being sufficiently small that radiations to be passed through the substrate are not significantly scattered. For use with quartz substrates, extremely durable coatings which display only 0.1% reflectivity have been prepared.

  13. Stabilized fuel with silica support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1991-12-31

    This report describes a stabilized fuel which is supported by a silica support structure. The silica support structure provides a low density, high porosity vehicle for safely carrying hydrocarbon fuels. The silica support structure for hydrocarbon fuel does not produce toxic material residues on combustion which would pose environmentally sensitive disposal problems. The silica stabilized fuel composition is useful as a low temperature, continuous burning fire starter for wood or charcoal.

  14. Removal of dissolved and colloidal silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Midkiff, William S. (Ruidoso, NM)

    2002-01-01

    Small amorphous silica particles are used to provide a relatively large surface area upon which silica will preferentially adsorb, thereby preventing or substantially reducing scaling caused by deposition of silica on evaporative cooling tower components, especially heat exchange surfaces. The silica spheres are contacted by the cooling tower water in a sidestream reactor, then separated using gravity separation, microfiltration, vacuum filtration, or other suitable separation technology. Cooling tower modifications for implementing the invention process have been designed.

  15. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  16. Fundamental studies of polymer filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.F.; Lu, M.T.; Robison, T.W.; Rogers, Y.C.; Wilson, K.V.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were (1) to develop an enhanced fundamental understanding of the coordination chemistry of hazardous-metal-ion complexation with water-soluble metal-binding polymers, and (2) to exploit this knowledge to develop improved separations for analytical methods, metals processing, and waste treatment. We investigated features of water-soluble metal-binding polymers that affect their binding constants and selectivity for selected transition metal ions. We evaluated backbone polymers using light scattering and ultrafiltration techniques to determine the effect of pH and ionic strength on the molecular volume of the polymers. The backbone polymers were incrementally functionalized with a metal-binding ligand. A procedure and analytical method to determine the absolute level of functionalization was developed and the results correlated with the elemental analysis, viscosity, and molecular size.

  17. A New Concept for the Fabrication of Hydrogen Selective Silica Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Tsapatsis

    2006-07-31

    We are attempting to fabricate H{sub 2}-selective silica-based films by ''layer-by-layer'' deposition as a new approach for thin films. A sonication-assisted deposition method was mainly used for ''layer-by-layer'' deposition. In addition, other approaches such as a dip-coating and the use of a polymer matrix with a layered silicate were contrived as well. This report shows the progress done during the 2nd Year of this award.

  18. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Polymers (code 8100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Nonmetals: Polymers (code 8100) Prepared of Materials Nonmetals: Polymers (code 8100) 1. General Polymers are a diverse category of materials be processed in numerous ways with almost infinite variation. The properties of polymers are determined

  19. Control of Polymer Structures in Phase-Separated Liquid Crystal-Polymer Composite Systems Qingbing WANG, Jung O. PARK1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasarao, Mohan

    Control of Polymer Structures in Phase-Separated Liquid Crystal-Polymer Composite Systems Qingbing, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, USA 1 School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering and diffusion of small molecules, play important roles in determining a specific PSCOF polymer structure

  20. Silica Deposition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for LowInformationShoshoneEnergyMountain,SilescentSilica

  1. Some Rigorous Results on Semiflexible Polymers. I. Free and confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostap Hryniv; Yvan Velenik

    2009-04-20

    We introduce a class of models of semiflexible polymers. The latter are characterized by a strong rigidity, the correlation length associated to the gradient-gradient correlations, called the persistence length, being of the same order as the polymer length. We determine the macroscopic scaling limit, from which we deduce bounds on the free energy of a polymer confined inside a narrow tube.

  2. Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  3. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A. (Lexington, MA); Li, Jiali (Fayetteville, AR); Stein, Derek (Delft, NL); Gershow, Marc H. (Cambridge, MA)

    2010-12-07

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  4. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.; Li, Jiali; Stein, Derek; Gershow, Marc H.

    2013-03-12

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  5. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2013-09-10

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes include chemical compounds comprising a polymer backbone with side chains that include guanidinium cations.

  6. Modeling of Intermediate Structures and Chain Conformation in Silica-Latex Nanocomposites Observed by SANS During Annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne-Caroline Genix; Mouna TATOU; Ainara Imaz; Jacqueline Forcada; Ralph Schweins; Isabelle Grillo; Julian Oberdisse

    2012-02-29

    The evolution of the polymer structure during nanocomposite formation and annealing of silica-latex nanocomposites is studied using contrast-variation small angle neutron scattering. The experimental system is made of silica nanoparticles (Rsi \\approx 8 nm) and a mixture of purpose-synthesized hydrogenated and deuterated nanolatex (Rlatex \\approx 12.5 nm). The progressive disappearance of the latex beads by chain interdiffusion and release in the nanocomposites is analyzed quantitatively with a model for the scattered intensity of hairy latex beads and an RPA description of the free chains. In silica-free matrices and nanocomposites of low silica content (7%v), the annealing procedure over weeks at up to Tg + 85 K results in a molecular dispersion of chains, the radius of gyration of which is reported. At higher silica content (20%v), chain interdiffusion seems to be slowed down on time-scales of weeks, reaching a molecular dispersion only at the strongest annealing. Chain radii of gyration are found to be unaffected by the presence of the silica filler.

  7. Addressable morphology control of silica structures by manipulating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Addressable morphology control of silica structures by manipulating the reagent addition time Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Addressable morphology control of silica...

  8. Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hill Communications 865.241.0709 Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive manufacturing The screw-like spikes grown from a spherical silica particle...

  9. Synthesis and properties of Chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Michael R.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    2001-01-01

    chitosan-silica composite aerogels can be easily synthesizedphysical properties of these aerogels. These materials may1. Top: Chitosan-silica aerogel (sample 4), Bottom: Same

  10. Synthesis and properties of Chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, Michael R.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    2001-06-01

    Chitosan, a polymer that is soluble in dilute aqueous acid, is derived from chitin, a natural polyglucosamide. Aquagels where the solid phase consists of both chitosan and silica can be easily prepared by using an acidic solution of chitosan to catalyze the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. Gels with chitosan/TEOS mass ratios of 0.1-1.1 have been prepared by this method. Standard drying processes using CO{sub 2} give the corresponding aerogels. The amount of chitosan in the gel plays a role in the shrinkage of the aerogel during drying. Gels with the lowest chitosan/silica ratios show the most linear shrinkage, up to 24%, while those with the highest ratios show only a 7% linear shrinkage. Pyrolysis at 700 C under nitrogen produces a darkened aerogel due to the thermal decomposition of the chitosan, however, the aerogel retains its monolithic form. The pyrolyzed aerogels absorb slightly more infrared radiation in the 2-5 {micro}m region than the original aerogels. B.E.T. surface areas of these aerogels range from 470-750 m{sup 2}/g. Biocompatibility screening of this material shows a very high value for hemolysis, but a low value for cytotoxicity.

  11. Polymer inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed Moeez Hassan; Viqar Husain; Sanjeev S. Seahra

    2015-03-05

    We consider the semi-classical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semi-classical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by a epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckain initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  12. Protein Localization in Silica Nanospheres Derived via Biomimetic Mineralization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, Mateus B [ORNL; Luckarift, Heather [Air Force Research Laboratory; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Johnson, Glenn [Air Force Research Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Lysozyme-templated precipitation of silica synthesized by sol-gel chemistry produces a composite material with antimicrobial properties. This study investigates the structural properties of the composite material that allow for retention of the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy reveal that the composite has a hierarchical structure composed of quasi-spherical structures ({approx}450 nm diameter), which are in turn composed of closely packed spherical structures of {approx}8-10 nm in diameter. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with contrast variation, the scattering signatures of the lysozyme and silica within the composite were separated. It was determined that the lysozyme molecules are spatially correlated in the material and form clusters with colloidal silica particles. The size of the clusters determined by SANS agrees well with the structural architecture observed by TEM. BET analysis revealed that the surface area of the composite is relatively low (4.73 m{sup 2}/g). However, after removal of the protein by heating to 200 C, the surface area is increased by {approx}20%. In addition to demonstrating a well organized sol-gel synthesis which generates a functional material with antimicrobial applications, the analysis and modeling approaches described herein can be used for characterizing a wide range of mesoporous and ultrastructural materials.

  13. Nonmonotonic fracture behavior of polymer nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janaina G. de Castro; Rojman Zargar; Mehdi Habibi; Samet H. Varol; Sapun H. Parekh; Babak Hosseinkhani; Mokhtar Adda-Bedia; Daniel Bonn

    2015-06-02

    Polymer composite materials are widely used for their exceptional mechanical properties, notably their ability to resist large deformations. Here we examine the failure stress and strain of rubbers reinforced by varying amounts of nano-sized silica particles. We find that small amounts of silica increase the fracture stress and strain, but too much filler makes the material become brittle and consequently fracture happens at small deformations. We thus find that as a function of the amount of filler there is an optimum in the breaking resistance at intermediate filler concentrations. We use a modified Griffith theory to establish a direct relation between the material properties and the fracture behavior that agrees with the experiment.

  14. Supercritical carbon dioxide behavior in porous silica aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciccariello, Salvino [Universita di Padova; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the tails of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) intensities relevant to samples formed by porous silica and carbon dioxide at pressures ranging from 0 to 20 MPa and at temperatures of 308 and 353 K confirms that the CO2 fluid must be treated as a two-phase system. The first of these phases is formed by the fluid closer to the silica wall than a suitable distance [delta] and the second by the fluid external to this shell. The sample scattering-length densities and shell thicknesses are determined by the Porod invariants and the oscillations observed in the Porod plots of the SANS intensities. The resulting matter densities of the shell regions (thickness 15-35 {angstrom}) are approximately equal, while those of the outer regions increase with pressure and become equal to the bulk CO2 at the higher pressures only in the low-temperature case.

  15. Role of Polymer Segment?Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F. (UIUC)

    2014-09-24

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, {var_epsilon}{sub pc}, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of {var_epsilon}{sub pc}.

  16. Polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  17. Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore R. Podgornik, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States ABSTRACT: We investigate polymer partitioning from polymer

  18. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers" Prof. Joey Mead University Lowell has developed a suite of processes to enable the nanomanufacturing of polymer based products of properties (e.g. biocompatibility, polarity, and modulus). Polymer materials can be used as substrates

  19. An Experimental Method for Determining the Time Constants of Capacitive Thin-Film Polymer Humidity sensors at Various Duct Air Velocities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, B.; O'Neal, D.

    2008-01-01

    of capacitive thin-jïlm polymer humidity sensors to step changes in humidity and temperature as a function of air velocity was investigated. Two duct-mounted humidity sensors (designated Candidate X and Candidate Y) from two manufacturers, each with thin... changes in RH and temperature over a range of air velocities. Duct air velocities ofO (stili air). 200. 500. 800, and UOOft/min (0. 1.0, 2.5. 4.1, and 5.6 m/s) were considered along with .step changes in RH of 20%-40% and step changes in air temperature...

  20. Silylation of low-density silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriend, K. A. (Kimberly A.); Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); Salazar, K. V. (Kenneth V.); Wilson, K. V. (Kennard V.)

    2004-01-01

    Silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels are low-density materials that are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation, porous separation media or catalyst supports, adsorbents, and cometary dust capture agents. However, aerogels are notoriously weak and brittle making it difficult to handle and machine monoliths into desired forms. This complication prevents the development of many applications that would otherwise benefit from the use of the low-density materials. Here, we will describe our efforts to chemically modify and mechanically enhance silica-based aerogels using chemical vapor techniques without sacrificing their characteristic low densities. Monolithic silica and organic-bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of the respective methoxysilane monomers followed by supercritical carbon dioxide drying of the gels. Then the gels were reactively modified with silylating agents to demonstrate the viability of CVD modification of aerogels, and to determine the effects of silylation of surface silanols on the morphology, surface area, and mechanical properties of the resulting aerogels.

  1. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In addition, Pt-mesoporous silica core-shell structured NPs (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}) were prepared, where the individual Pt NP is encapsulated by the mesoporous silica layer. The Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} catalysts showed promising catalytic activity in high temperature CO oxidation. The design of catalytic structures with tunable parameters by rational synthetic methods presents a major advance in the field of catalyst synthesis, which would lead to uncover the structure-function relationships in heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

  2. Phase behavior of polymers and monomers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purifoy, Jonathan Patrick

    1998-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the effects of polymer structure and composition on the cloud-point of polymer-solvent mixtures. Mixtures of ethylene gas with poly(ethylene-co-methyl methacrylate), poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) and poly...

  3. Hydration structure on crystalline silica substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Cole, David R [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University

    2009-01-01

    The structure of interfacial water at the silica solid surfaces was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Different degrees of surface hydroxylation where employed to assess the effect of the surface chemistry on the structure of interfacial water. Density profiles, in-plane radial distribution functions, in-plane density distribution, and hydrogen bond profiles were calculated to quantify these effects. Our results show that the surface hydroxylation affects the structure, orientation, and hydrogen bond network of interfacial water molecules. Data analysis suggests that the degree of hydroxylation controls the amount of water molecules in the first interfacial layer as well as the distance between the first adsorbed layer and the substrate. Well-organized and uniform structures of interfacial water appear on the homogeneously hydroxylated surface, while a heterogeneous interfacial structure, characterized by extensive water-water hydrogen bonds, forms on the partially hydroxylated surface. We demonstrate that both the local surface chemistry and water-water hydrogen bonds are the dominant factors that determine the structural properties of interfacial water.

  4. Controlling the Morphology of Polymer and Fullerene Blends in Organic Photovoltaics Through Sequential Processing and Self-Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Jordan C.

    2015-01-01

    Method for Determining the Composition of Polymer:Fullerene157 ix L IST OF F IGURES Conjugated polymers studied in thisOn the Morphology of Polymer:Fullerene Organic

  5. LIGHT SCATTERING STUDIES OF SILICA AEROGELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    S.S. , "Coherent Expanded Aerogels," J. of Phys. Chern.Production of Silica Aerogel," Physica Scripta 23, Nicolaon,S.J. , "Preparation des aerogels de silice a partir

  6. Dynamic shear responses of polymer-polymer interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuya Nakayama; Kiyoyasu Kataoka; Toshihisa Kajiwara

    2012-07-17

    In multi-component soft matter, interface properties often play a key role in determining the properties of the overall system. The identification of the internal dynamic structures in non-equilibrium situations requires the interface rheology to be characterized. We have developed a method to quantify the rheological contribution of soft interfaces and evaluate the dynamic modulus of the interface. This method reveals that the dynamic shear responses of interfaces in bilayer systems comprising polypropylene and three different polyethylenes can be classified as having hardening and softening effects on the overall system: a interface between linear long polymers becomes more elastic than the component polymers, while large polydispersity or long-chain-branching of one component make the interface more viscous. We find that the chain lengths and architectures of the component polymers, rather than equilibrium immiscibility, play an essential role in determining the interface rheological properties.

  7. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01

    strain in dielectric elastomers, Journal of Polymer SciencePart B: Polymer Physics. 49 (2011) 504–515. [25] X. Zhao, Z.Electroactive nanostructured polymers as tunable actuators,

  8. Polymer Physics Research Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Physics Research Profile Our main interests are the theory of simplification and some behavior on different autonomous levels of description. Our favorite applications range from polymer + Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics + Coarse Graining + Soft Matter + Polymer Physics + Rheology + Competences

  9. Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated environmental crises such as global warming and ocean acidication, efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) capture As CO2 capture mate- rials, numerous solid adsorbents such as silica5 and carbon materials,6 metal

  10. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01

    AgNW) polymer composite material that is conductive enoughAgNW/polymer composite was nominated as a highly conductive,

  11. SILICA FOULING BY GEOTHERMAL PART III SILICA FOULING BY GEOTHERMAL WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    PART III SILICA FOULING BY GEOTHERMAL WATERS #12;- 49 - PART III SILICA FOULING BY GEOTHERMAL WATERS 1. INTRODUCTION In recent years the world-wide interest in geothermal energy has been stimulated in geothermal engineering; that of deposition and fouling. Presently, geothermal waters containing useful energy

  12. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  13. Silica and acid-detergent fiber content of five varieties of bermudagrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jungman, Frederick Michael

    1971-01-01

    were grown on four different soils and at two fertility levels to determine variety, soil, and fertility effects on silica and acid-detergent fiber content of the plant tissues. Initial growth was harvested at three weeks of age and regrowth at five... content of bermudagrass. An average of three and five weeks of growth . 45 A7 Acid-detergent fiber content (T) of tissue of bermudagrass varieties grown on four soils at three and five weeks of growth 46 Silica content (X) of tissue of bermudagrass...

  14. Polymers with increased order

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Rochester, MI); Taylor, Craig M. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1998-08-25

    The invention features polymers with increased order, and methods of making them featuring a dense gas.

  15. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidegger, S; Schmidt, A; Gößl, D; Argyo, C; Endres, S; Bein, T; Bourquin, C

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-funct...

  16. Physics of liquid crystals embedded in silica gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sungil, 1967-

    2001-01-01

    Octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) embedded in silica aerosil gels have been studied by means of high resolution X-ray scattering experiments. The silica particles form a hydrogen-bonded fractal gel network that introduces quenched ...

  17. High resolution patterning of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertino, M.F.; Hund, J.F.; Sosa, J.; Zhang, G.; Sotiriou-Leventis, C.; Leventis, N.; Tokuhiro, A.T.; Terry, J. (UMR-MUST); (IIT)

    2008-10-30

    Three-dimensional metallic structures are fabricated with high spatial resolution in silica aerogels. In our method, silica hydrogels are prepared with a standard base-catalyzed route, and exchanged with an aqueous solution typically containing Ag{sup +} ions (1 M) and 2-propanol (0.2 M). The metal ions are reduced photolytically with a table-top ultraviolet lamp, or radiolytically, with a focused X-ray beam. We fabricated dots and lines as small as 30 x 70 {micro}m, protruding for several mm into the bulk of the materials. The hydrogels are eventually supercritically dried to yield aerogels, without any measurable change in the shape and spatial resolution of the lithographed structures. Transmission electron microscopy shows that illuminated regions are composed by Ag clusters with a size of several {micro}m, separated by thin layers of silica.

  18. Measurement of muonium emission from silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bakule; G. A. Beer; D. Contreras; M. Esashi; Y. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. Hirota; H. Iinuma; K. Ishida; M. Iwasaki; T. Kakurai; S. Kanda; H. Kawai; N. Kawamura; G. M. Marshall; H. Masuda; Y. Matsuda; T. Mibe; Y. Miyake; S. Okada; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; H. Onishi; N. Saito; K. Shimomura; P. Strasser; M. Tabata; D. Tomono; K. Ueno; K. Yokoyama; S. Yoshida

    2013-06-17

    Emission of muonium ($\\mu^{+}e^{-}$) atoms from silica aerogel into vacuum was observed. Characteristics of muonium emission were established from silica aerogel samples with densities in the range from 29 mg cm$^{-3}$ to 178 mg cm$^{-3}$. Spectra of muonium decay times correlated with distances from the aerogel surfaces, which are sensitive to the speed distributions, follow general features expected from a diffusion process, while small deviations from a simple room-temperature thermal diffusion model are identified. The parameters of the diffusion process are deduced from the observed yields.

  19. Measurement of muonium emission from silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakule, P; Contreras, D; Esashi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Fukao, Y; Hirota, S; Iinuma, H; Ishida, K; Iwasaki, M; Kakurai, T; Kanda, S; Kawai, H; Kawamura, N; Marshall, G M; Masuda, H; Matsuda, Y; Mibe, T; Miyake, Y; Okada, S; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Onishi, H; Saito, N; Shimomura, K; Strasser, P; Tabata, M; Tomono, D; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Yoshida, S

    2013-01-01

    Emission of muonium ($\\mu^{+}e^{-}$) atoms from silica aerogel into vacuum was observed. Characteristics of muonium emission were established from silica aerogel samples with densities in the range from 29 mg cm$^{-3}$ to 178 mg cm$^{-3}$. Spectra of muonium decay times correlated with distances from the aerogel surfaces, which are sensitive to the speed distributions, follow general features expected from a diffusion process, while small deviations from a simple room-temperature thermal diffusion model are identified. The parameters of the diffusion process are deduced from the observed yields.

  20. A threshold Cherenkov detector for K separation using silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magiera, Andrzej

    A threshold Cherenkov detector for Kþ =pþ separation using silica aerogel R. Siudak a,b , A August 2008 Keywords: Threshold Cherenkov detector Silica aerogel Reaction pp ! Kþ ðLp� Kþ =pþ separation in the focal plane of a magnetic spectrograph. Silica aerogel with refractive index of n ¼ 1:05 is applied

  1. Silica Coating of hydrophilic SPIO nanoparticles via microemulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    Silica Coating of hydrophilic SPIO nanoparticles via microemulsion Mehdi Sadegh Ahmadi, Lionel Silica coating is a well-known method for surface modification of varoius nano-sized materials in order to improve their colloi- dal and chemical stability. Silica coating can also be employed as an alternative

  2. The strict-weak lattice polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Corwin; Timo Seppäläinen; Hao Shen

    2015-07-06

    We introduce the strict-weak polymer model, and show the KPZ universality of the free energy fluctuation of this model for a certain range of parameters. Our proof relies on the observation that the discrete time geometric q-TASEP model, studied earlier by A. Borodin and I. Corwin, scales to this polymer model in the limit q->1. This allows us to exploit the exact results for geometric q-TASEP to derive a Fredholm determinant formula for the strict-weak polymer, and in turn perform rigorous asymptotic analysis to show KPZ scaling and GUE Tracy-Widom limit for the free energy fluctuations. We also derive moments formulae for the polymer partition function directly by Bethe ansatz, and identify the limit of the free energy using a stationary version of the polymer model.

  3. Polystyrene grafting from silica nanoparticles via Nitroxide-Mediated-Polymerization (NMP): synthesis and SANS analysis with contrast variation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chloé Chevigny; Didier Gigmes; Denis Bertin; Jacques Jestin; François Boué

    2010-05-10

    We present a new convenient and efficient "grafting from" method to obtain well defined polystyrene (PS) silica nanoparticles. The method, based on Nitroxide-Mediated Polymerization (NMP), consists to bind covalently the alkoxyamine, which acts as initiator controller agent, at the silica nanoparticles surface in two steps. The first step is a reaction between the aminopropylsilane and the silica particles in order to functionalize the particles surface with amino group. In a second step, the initiating-controlling alkoxyamine moiety is introduced via an over grafting reaction between the amino group and the N-hydroxysuccinimide based MAMA-SG1 activated ester. To simplify both their chemical transformation and the polymerization step, the native silica particles, initially dispersed in water, have been transferred in an organic solvent, the dimethylacetamide, which is also a good solvent for the polystyrene. The synthesis parameters have been optimized for grafting density, conversion rates, and synthesis reproducibility while keeping the colloidal stability and to avoid any aggregation of silica particles induced by the inter-particles interaction evolution during the synthesis. After synthesis, the final grafted objects have been purified and the non-grafted polymer chains formed in the solvent have been washed out by ultra filtration. Then the particles have been studied using Small angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) coupled to neutron contrast variation method. To optimize the contrast conditions, both hydrogenated and deuterated monomers have been used for the synthesis. A refined fitting analysis based on the comparison on two models, a basic core-shell and the Gaussian Pedersen model, enables us to fit nicely the experimental data for both the hydrogenated and deuterated grafted case. Differences are seen between grafting of normal or deuterated chains which can be due to monomer reactivity or to neutron contrast effect variations. The synthesis and the characterization method established in this work constitute a robust and reproducible way to design well defined grafted polymer nanoparticles. These objects will be incorporated in polymer matrices in a further step to create Nanocomposites for polymer reinforcement.

  4. Enhanced Specific Heat of Silica Donghyun Shin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    Enhanced Specific Heat of Silica Nanofluid Donghyun Shin Debjyoti Banerjee e-mail: dbanerjee instrument was used to measure the specific heat of the neat molten salt eutectic and after addition of nanoparticles. The specific heat of the nanofluid was enhanced by 19­24%. The mea- surement uncertainty

  5. DEPOSITION OF SILICA FROM GEOTHERIAL WATERS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    DEPOSITION OF SILICA FROM GEOTHERIAL WATERS ON HEAT T RAN5FER SU R FACES by J.S, GUDMtJNDSSQN & T in specia1l designed equipment have been carried out on deposition from hot geothermal water from two, it was stated that low temperature waters (8O--ll0°C) have traditionally been used for district heating purposes

  6. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2012-01-01

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  7. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  8. Kinetics of silica-phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    In addition to the stable silica polymorph quartz, several metastable silica phases are present in Yucca Mountain. The conversion of these phases to quartz is accompanied by volume reduction and a decrease in the aqueous silica activity, which may destabilize clinoptilolite and mordenite. The primary reaction sequence for the silica phases is from opal or glass to disordered opal-CT, followed by ordering of the opal-CT and finally by the crystallization of quartz. The ordering of opal-CT takes place in the solid state, whereas the conversion of opal-CT takes place through dissolution-reprecipitation involving the aqueous phase. It is proposed that the rate of conversion of opal-CT to quartz is controlled by diffusion of defects out of a disordered surface layer formed on the crystallizing quartz. The reaction rates are observed to be dependent on temperature, pressure, degree of supersaturation, and pH. Rate equations selected from the literature appear to be consistent with observations at Yucca Mountain.

  9. The static structure factor of amorphous silicon and vitreous silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam M. R. de Graff; M. F. Thorpe

    2009-09-14

    Liquids are in thermal equilibrium and have a non-zero static structure factor S(Q->0) = [-^2]/ = rho*k_B*T*Chi_T where rho is the number density, T is the temperature, Q is the scattering vector and Chi_T is the isothermal compressibility. The first part of this result involving the number N (or density) fluctuations is a purely geometrical result and does not involve any assumptions about thermal equilibrium or ergodicity and so is obeyed by all materials. From a large computer model of amorphous silicon, local number fluctuations extrapolate to give S(0) = 0.035+/-0.001. The same computation on a large model of vitreous silica using only the silicon atoms and rescaling the distances gives S(0) = 0.039+/-0.001, which suggests that this numerical result is robust and similar for all amorphous tetrahedral networks. For vitreous silica, we find that S(0) = 0.116+/-0.003, close to the experimental value of S(0) = 0.0900+/-0.0048 obtained recently by small angle neutron scattering. More detailed experimental and modelling studies are needed to determine the relationship between the fictive temperature and structure.

  10. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  11. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kleinert

    2007-05-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the moments and of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  12. Polymer Reaction & Colloidal Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Reaction & Colloidal Engineering Research Profile The Morbidelli Group is carrying out research in numerous areas related to polymer and colloid science and enginee- ring. Our research activity combines a variety of experimen- tal techniques for polymers and particles characterization with advanced

  13. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Brian (Wheat Ridge, CO); Nguyen, Vinh (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2012-04-24

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  14. Entropic Trapping of Particles at Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galen T. Pickett

    2015-05-22

    I consider the possibility that Gaussian random walk statistics are sufficient to trap nanoscopic additives at either a polymer interface or surface. When an additive particle goes to the free surface, two portions of the polymer surface energy behave quite differently. The purely enthalpic contribution increases the overall free energy when the additive protrudes above the level of the polymer matrix. The entropic part of the surface energy arising from constraints that segments near a surface can't cross it, is partly relaxed when the additive moves to the free surface. These two portions of the polymer surface energy determine the equilibrium wetting angle formed between the additive and the polymer matrix, the measurement of which in an experiment would allow an independent determination of each piece of the polymer surface energy.

  15. Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Christopher E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Manuel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duque, Juan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gupta, Gautam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Kimberly A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

  16. Nano-Structured Mesoporous Silica Wires with Intra-Wire Lamellae via Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly in Space-Confined Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Shi, Donglu [University of Cincinnati; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of silica sol-gel ethanol-water solution mixtures with block-copolymer were studied inside uniform micro/nano channels. Nano-structured mesoporous silica wires, with various intra-wire self-assembly structures including lamellae, were prepared via EISA process but in space-confined channels with the diameter ranging from 50 nm to 200 nm. Membranes made of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) and track-etched polycarbonate (EPC) were utilized as the arrays of space-confined channels (i.e., 50, 100, and 200-nm EPC and 200-nm AAO) for infiltration and drying of mixture solutions; these substrate membranes were submerged in mixture solutions consisting of a silica precursor, a structure-directing agent, ethanol, and water. After the substrate channels were filled with the solution under vacuum impregnation, the membrane was removed from the solution and dried in air. The silica precursor used was tetra-ethyl othosilicate (TEOS), and the structure-directing agent employed was triblock copolymer Pluronic-123 (P123). It was found that the formation of the mesoporous nanostructures in silica wires within uniform channels were significantly affected by the synthesis conditions including (1) pre-assemble TEOS aging time, (2) the evaporation rate during the vacuum impregnation, and (3) the air-dry temperature. The obtained intra-wire structures, including 2D-hexagonal rods and lamellae, were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A steric hindrance effect seems to explain well the observed polymer-silica mesophase formation tailored by TEOS aging time. The evaporation effect, air-drying effect, and AAO-vs-EPC substrate effect on the mesoporous structure of the formed silica wires were also presented and discussed.

  17. Monolithically integrated waveguide-coupled silica microtoroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, Jens; Witzens, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a new type of microtoroid high-Q silica resonators monolithically coupled to on-chip silicon nanowire waveguides. In order to enable monolithic waveguide coupling, the microtoroid geometry is inverted such that the resonator is formed by thermal reflow at the circumference of a hole etched in a suspended SiO2 membrane. This configuration is shown to be conducive to integration with a fully functional Silicon Photonics technology platform.

  18. Light-scattering studies of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-02-01

    Due to its combination of transparency and low thermal conductivity, aerogel holds considerable promise for use as insulating window materials for residential and commercial applications. This paper reports on the preliminary investigation of the optical and scattering properties of silica aerogels. It briefly describes the properties of aerogels important for window glazing applications. The optical properties are then described, followed by a discussion of the scattering measurements and their interpretation.

  19. Stabilization of Colloidal Silica Using Small Polyols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GULLEY, GERALD L.; MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-09-07

    We have discovered that small polyols are reasonably effective at stabilizing colloidal silica against aggregation, even under the conditions of high pH and salt concentration. Both quasielastic and elastic light scattering were used to show that these polyols dramatically decrease the aggregation rate of the suspension, changing the growth kinetics from diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation to reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. These polyols maybe useful in the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site.

  20. Recent progress in silica aerogel Cherenkov radiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Hideyuki Kawai; Masato Kubo; Takeshi Sato

    2012-03-19

    In this paper, we present recent progress in the development of hydrophobic silica aerogel as a Cherenkov radiator. In addition to the conventional method, the recently developed pin-drying method for producing high-refractive-index aerogels with high transparency was studied in detail. Optical qualities and large tile handling for crack-free aerogels were investigated. Sufficient photons were detected from high-performance aerogels in a beam test.

  1. Recent progress in silica aerogel Cherenkov radiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Kubo, Masato; Sato, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent progress in the development of hydrophobic silica aerogel as a Cherenkov radiator. In addition to the conventional method, the recently developed pin-drying method for producing high-refractive-index aerogels with high transparency was studied in detail. Optical qualities and large tile handling for crack-free aerogels were investigated. Sufficient photons were detected from high-performance aerogels in a beam test.

  2. Adsorption of polymer chains at penetrable interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerasimchuk, I. V.; Sommer, J.-U.; Gerasimchuk, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the problem of adsorption (localization) of polymer chains in the system of two penetrable interfaces within the mean-field approximation. The saturation of the polymer system in the limit case of zero bulk concentration is studied. We find the exact solution of this mean-field polymer adsorption problem that opens the possibility to treat various localization problems for polymer chains in such environments using appropriate boundary conditions. The exact solution is controlled by a single scaling variable that describes the coupling between the interfaces due to the polymer chains. We obtain a nonmonotonic behavior of the amount of adsorbed polymers as a function of the distance between the interfaces. This leads to a high-energy and a low-energy phase for the double layer with respect to the amount of polymers localized. At the saturation point, we find the total energy of the system and determine the force acting between the interfaces to be strictly attractive and to monotonically decay to zero when the interface distance increases.

  3. FIDDLER CREEK POLYMER AUGMENTATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.

    2001-10-31

    The Fiddler Creek field is in Weston County, Wyoming, and was discovered in 1948. Secondary waterflooding recovery was started in 1955 and terminated in the mid-1980s with a fieldwide recovery of approximately 40%. The West Fiddler Creek Unit, the focus of this project, had a lower recovery and therefore has the most remaining oil. Before the project this unit was producing approximately 85 bbl of oil per day from 20 pumping wells and 17 swab wells. The recovery process planned for this project involved adapting two independent processes, the injection of polymer as a channel blocker or as a deep-penetrating permeability modifier, and the stabilization of clays and reduction of the residual oil saturation in the near-wellbore area around the injection wells. Clay stabilization was not conducted because long-term fresh water injection had not severely reduced the injectivity. It was determined that future polymer injection would not be affected by the clay. For the project, two adjoining project patterns were selected on the basis of prior reservoir studies and current well availability and production. The primary injection well of Pattern 1 was treated with a small batch of MARCIT gel to create channel blocking. The long-term test was designed for three phases: (1) 77 days of injection of a 300-mg/l cationic polyacrylamide, (2) 15 days of injection of a 300-mg/l anionic polymer to ensure injectivity of the polymer, and (3) 369 days of injection of the 300-mg/l anionic polymer and a 30:1 mix of the crosslinker. Phases 1 and 2 were conducted as planned. Phase 3 was started in late March 1999 and terminated in May 2001. In this phase, a crosslinker was added with the anionic polymer. Total injection for Phase 3 was 709,064 bbl. To maintain the desired injection rate, the injection pressure was slowly increased from 1,400 psig to 2,100 psig. Early in the application of the polymer, it appeared that the sweep improvement program was having a positive effect on Pattern 1 with lesser effects in Pattern 2. These early observations did not continue to develop. The oil production for both patterns remained fairly constant to the rates established by the restart of waterflooding. The water production declined but stabilized in both patterns. The stabilization of the oil at prepolymer rates and water production at the lower rates can be attributed to the polymer injection, but the effect was not as great as originally predicted. The sweep improvement for the patterns appeared to be negatively impacted by extended shutdowns in the injection and production systems. Such problems as those experienced in this project can be expected when long-term polymer injection is started in old waterflood fields. To prevent these problems, new injection and production tubulars and pumps would be required at a cost prohibitive to the present, independent operators. Unless the future results from the continued waterflood show positive effects of the long-term polymer injection, it appears that the batch-type polymer treatment may have more promise than the long-term treatment and should be more cost effective.

  4. Experimental stress–strain analysis of tapered silica optical fibers with nanofiber waist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holleis, S.; Hoinkes, T.; Wuttke, C.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, TU Wien—Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-21

    We experimentally determine tensile force–elongation diagrams of tapered optical fibers with a nanofiber waist. The tapered optical fibers are produced from standard silica optical fibers using a heat and pull process. Both, the force–elongation data and scanning electron microscope images of the rupture points indicate a brittle material. Despite the small waist radii of only a few hundred nanometers, our experimental data can be fully explained by a nonlinear stress–strain model that relies on material properties of macroscopic silica optical fibers. This is an important asset when it comes to designing miniaturized optical elements as one can rely on the well-founded material characteristics of standard optical fibers. Based on this understanding, we demonstrate a simple and non-destructive technique that allows us to determine the waist radius of the tapered optical fiber. We find excellent agreement with independent scanning electron microscope measurements of the waist radius.

  5. Methods of coping with silica deposition - the PNOC experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candelaria, M.N.R.; Garcia, S.E.; Baltazar, A.D.J. Jr.; Solis, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    Several methods of coping with silica deposition from geothermal waters have been undertaken by PNOC-EDC to maximize Power Output from these fluids. Initially, the problem of amorphous silica deposition in surface pipelines and the reinjection well was prevented by operating the production separators at pressures higher or equal to amorphous silica saturation. However, increasing demands for additional power and stringent environmental controls have dictated the need to find alternative methods of coping with silica deposition. Several options have been studied and tested to be able to optimize fluid utilization for production. These include: acid treatment polymerization and deposition of silica in surface ponds or sumps, and chemical inhibition. As each brine is unique, methodologies used for mitigation of the silica problem have been varied.

  6. Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-08-05

    The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this technical note, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that would yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Air-water contact angles were less sensitive to differences between silanized silica and glass surfaces, often yielding similar values while the oil-water contact angles were quite different. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane, while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HDMS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400oC. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscisble fluid displacements in the pore network.

  7. Mechanics of amorphous polymers and polymer gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Shawn Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Many applications of amorphous polymers require a thermo-mechanically coupled large-deformation elasto-viscoplasticity theory which models the strain rate and temperature dependent response of amorphous polymeric materials ...

  8. Treatment of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Treatment of Difficult Waters:...

  9. Non-destructively shattered mesoporous silica for protein drug...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mesoporous silicas resulting in reduced particle sizes and improved intramesoporous structures in aqueous solution by a powerful sonication, where the mesoporous structures were...

  10. Treatment of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery. Brady, Patrick Vane Abstract not provided. Sandia National Laboratories...

  11. Effect of Bubbles and Silica Dissolution on Melter Feed Rheology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bubbles and Silica Dissolution on Melter Feed Rheology during Conversion to Glass As the nuclear waste glass melter feed is converted to molten glass, the feed becomes a...

  12. Enhanced structural color generation in aluminum metamaterials coated with a thin polymer layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Fei; Yang, Xiaodong; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana; Czaplewski, David; Gao, Jie

    2015-09-18

    A high-resolution and angle-insensitive structural color generation platform is demonstrated based on triple-layer aluminum-silica-aluminum metamaterials supporting surface plasmon resonances tunable across the entire visible spectrum. The color performances of the fabricated aluminum metamaterials can be strongly enhanced by coating a thin transparent polymer layer on top. The results show that the presence of the polymer layer induces a better impedance matching for the plasmonic resonances to the free space so that strong light absorption can be obtained, leading to the generation of pure colors in cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK) with high color saturation.

  13. Tunneling of Polymer Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Martín-Ruiz; E. Chan-López; A. Carbajal-Domínguez; J. Bernal

    2014-08-28

    In this paper we study the tunneling using a background independent (polymer) quantization scheme. We show that at low energies, for the tunneling through a single potential barrier, the polymer transmission coefficient and the polymer tunneling time converge to its quantum-mechanical counterparts in a clear fashion. As the energy approaches the maximum these polymer quantities abruptly decrease to zero. We use the transfer matrix method to study the tunneling through a series of identical potential barriers. We obtain that the transmission coefficients (polymer and quantum-mechanical) behave qualitatively in a similar manner, as expected. Finally we show that the polymer tunneling time exhibits anomalous peaks compared with the standard result. Numerical results are also presented.

  14. Engineering Polymer Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Nico; Ryder, Jennifer; Jessop, David M; Corbett, Peter; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2007-12-17

    stream_source_info Engineering Polymer Informatics.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9453 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Engineering Polymer Informatics.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... Engineering Polymer Informatics Nico Adams, Jen Ryder, Nicholas England, David Jessop, Peter Corbett, Peter Murray-Rust Our mission is to develop an informatics toolbox, which will take into account the special computational needs of polymers and will make...

  15. Polymer Composites for Radiation Scintillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    J. B. Peng and Y. Cao, Polymer, 2008, 49, G. Yu, S. W. Yin,and K. C. Tsou, Journal of Polymer Science Part a-Generaland K. C. Tsou, Journal of Polymer Science Part a-General

  16. Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow Erin flow on the alignment of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer solutions. Two different-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed using an anionic surfactant and a weakly binding polymer. It was determined

  17. Shapes of Knotted Cyclic Polymers Eric J. Rawdon, University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul, MN, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Shapes of Knotted Cyclic Polymers Eric J. Rawdon, University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul, MN, USA, USA Momentary configurations of long polymers at thermal equilibrium usually deviate from spherical of asphericity (or prolateness) that describe these momentary ellipsoidal shapes of a polymer are determined

  18. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  19. SILICA GEL BEHAVIOR UNDER DIFFERENT EGS CHEMICAL AND THERMAL CONDITIONS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J D; Ezzedine, S M; Bourcier, W; Roberts, S

    2012-01-19

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for migration of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, fluids in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), oil and gas in petroleum reservoirs, carbon dioxide leakage from geological carbon sequestration, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. When dealing with EGS fracture networks, there are several major issues to consider, e.g., the minimization of hydraulic short circuits and losses of injected geothermal fluid to the surrounding formation, which in turn maximize heat extraction and economic production. Gel deployments to direct and control fluid flow have been extensively and successfully used in the oil industry for enhanced oil recovery. However, to the best of our knowledge, gels have not been applied to EGS to enhance heat extraction. In-situ gelling systems can either be organic or inorganic. Organic polymer gels are generally not thermostable to the typical temperatures of EGS systems. Inorganic gels, such as colloidal silica gels, however, may be ideal blocking agents for EGS systems if suitable gelation times can be achieved. In the current study, we explore colloidal silica gelation times and rheology as a function of SiO{sub 2} concentration, pH, salt concentration, and temperature, with preliminary results in the two-phase field above 100 C. Results at 25 C show that it may be possible to choose formulations that will gel in a reasonable and predictable amount of time at the temperatures of EGS systems.

  20. Hydrophobic silica aerogel production at KEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Hideyuki Kawai; Takayuki Sumiyoshi; Hiroshi Yokogawa

    2011-12-14

    We present herein a characterization of a standard method used at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) to produce hydrophobic silica aerogels and expand this method to obtain a wide range of refractive index (n = 1.006-1.14). We describe in detail the entire production process and explain the methods used to measure the characteristic parameters of aerogels, namely the refractive index, transmittance, and density. We use a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique to relate the transparency to the fine structure of aerogels.

  1. Hydrophobic silica aerogel production at KEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Yokogawa, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We present herein a characterization of a standard method used at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) to produce hydrophobic silica aerogels and expand this method to obtain a wide range of refractive index (n = 1.006-1.14). We describe in detail the entire production process and explain the methods used to measure the characteristic parameters of aerogels, namely the refractive index, transmittance, and density. We use a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique to relate the transparency to the fine structure of aerogels.

  2. Community Geothermal Technology Program: Silica bronze project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchini, H.

    1989-10-01

    Objective was to incorporate waste silica from the HGP-A geothermal well in Pohoiki with other refractory materials for investment casting of bronze sculpture. The best composition for casting is about 50% silica, 25% red cinders, and 25% brick dust; remaining ingredient is a binder, such as plaster and water.

  3. Microstructured Porous Silica Obtained via Colloidal Crystal Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Microstructured Porous Silica Obtained via Colloidal Crystal Templates O. D. Velev,* T. A. Jede, R modified colloidal crystals as templates for silica polymerization is reported. 3D close-packed crystals, representing a negative replica of the original colloidal crystal. The size of the pores can be controlled

  4. Impact of polymer film thickness and cavity size on polymer flow during embossing : towards process design rules for nanoimprint lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; King, William P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Rowland, Harry D.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents continuum simulations of polymer flow during nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The simulations capture the underlying physics of polymer flow from the nanometer to millimeter length scale and examine geometry and thermophysical process quantities affecting cavity filling. Variations in embossing tool geometry and polymer film thickness during viscous flow distinguish different flow driving mechanisms. Three parameters can predict polymer deformation mode: cavity width to polymer thickness ratio, polymer supply ratio, and Capillary number. The ratio of cavity width to initial polymer film thickness determines vertically or laterally dominant deformation. The ratio of indenter width to residual film thickness measures polymer supply beneath the indenter which determines Stokes or squeeze flow. The local geometry ratios can predict a fill time based on laminar flow between plates, Stokes flow, or squeeze flow. Characteristic NIL capillary number based on geometry-dependent fill time distinguishes between capillary or viscous driven flows. The three parameters predict filling modes observed in published studies of NIL deformation over nanometer to millimeter length scales. The work seeks to establish process design rules for NIL and to provide tools for the rational design of NIL master templates, resist polymers, and process parameters.

  5. Polymers 2014, 6, 311-326; doi:10.3390/polym6020311 ISSN 2073-4360

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;Polymers 2014, 6, 311-326; doi:10.3390/polym6020311 polymers ISSN 2073-4360 www.mdpi.com/journal/polymers copolymers, star polymers, and concentrated polymer brushes on solid surfaces were prepared using living catalysts; block copolymers; triblock copolymers; star polymers; polymer brushes OPEN ACCESS #12;Polymers

  6. Department of Polymer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Department of Polymer Science The University of Akron, OH 330-972-6246 ali4@uakron.edu www2.uakron to develop synthetic adhesives and coatings. He has patents in carbon nanotube- based adhesives and coatings of molecules at the interface. The Dhinojwala laboratory has developed SFG technique to study polymer

  7. Melons are branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan Gurau; James P. Ryan

    2013-02-18

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  8. Stiff quantum polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kleinert

    2009-10-19

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  9. Synthesis of silica coated zinc oxide–poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) matrix and its UV shielding evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Kim, Yu Jun; Gao, Haiyan; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Jeong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Well layer thickness controlled silica shell was made on ZnO nanoparticles. • PEAA, an interfacial agent is used to make nanocomposite–polymer matrix by twin-screw extruder. • Si-ZnO/PEAA matrix is highly stable and UV protective as compared to ZnO/PEAA matrix. • Nanoparticle embedded polymer matrix is suggested to make UV shielding fabrics with Nylon4. - Abstract: Silica coated zinc oxide nanoparticles (Si-ZnO NPs) (7 nm thick) were synthesized successfully and melt blended with poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PEAA resin) to improving ultraviolet (UV) shielding of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs). The photostability of both the ZnO NPs and Si-ZnO NPs were analyzed by the difference in photoluminescence (PL) and by methylene blue (MB) degradation. Photo-degradation studies confirmed that Si-ZnO NPs are highly photostable compared to ZnO NPs. The melt blended matrices were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy interfaced with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDX). The UV shielding property was analyzed from the transmittance spectra of UV–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy. The results confirmed fine dispersion of thick Si-ZnO NPs in the entire resin matrix. Moreover, the Si-ZnO/PEAA showed about 97% UV shielding properties than the ZnO/PEAA.

  10. Porous polymer media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Highly crosslinked monolithic porous polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a porous polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.

  11. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Kirby Goertzen

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Polymer-Metal Nanocomposites via Polymer Thin Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Polymer-Metal Nanocomposites via Polymer Thin Film T. P. Radhakrishnan School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad Polymer-metal nanocomposite thin films are versatile materials that not only Chemistry Inside a Polymer Thin Film P. Radhakrishnan School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad metal

  13. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Nanofibers: Electrospinning, Structure, and Properties"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Nanofibers: Electrospinning, Structure, and Properties" Dr. Masaya been widely employed as a technique to produce sub-micron and nanometer scale polymer fibers. The technique utilizes electrical forces induced by a high voltage to draw charged polymer solution jet

  14. On hereditary models of polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. De Angelis

    2012-03-02

    An equivalence between an integro-differential operator M and an evolution operator Ln is determined. From this equivalence the fundamental solution of Ln is estimated in terms of the fundamental solution related to the third-order operator L1 whose behavior is now available. Moreover, properties typical of wave hierarchies can be applied to polymeric materials. As an example the case n= 2 is considered and results are applied to the Rouse model and the reptation model which describe different aspects of polymer chains.

  15. Influence of confinement on polymer-electrolyte relaxational dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Smith, L. J.; Price, D. L.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Lab. Leon Brillouin (CEA-CRNS); Clark Univ.; CRMHT (CNRS); CRMD (CNRS)

    2004-01-01

    Conception and industrial production of viable high specific energy/power batteries is a central issue for the development of non-polluting vehicles. In terms of stored energy and safety, solid-state devices using polymer electrolytes are highly desirable. One of the most studied systems is PEO (polyethylene oxide) complexed by Li salts. Polymer segmental motions and ionic conductivity are closely related. Bulk PEO is actually a biphasic system where an amorphous and a crystalline state (Tm 335 K) coexist. To improve ionic conduction in those systems requires a significant increase of the amorphous phase fraction where lithium conduction is known to mainly take place. Confinement strongly affects properties of condensed matter and in particular the collective phenomena inducing crystallization. Confinement of the polymer matrix is therefore a possible alternative route to the unpractical use of high temperature. Results of a quasi-elastic incoherent neutron scattering study of the influence of confinement on polyethylene oxide (PEO) and (PEO)8Li+[(CF3SO2)2N]- (or (POE)8LiTFSI) dynamics are presented. The nano-confining media is Vycor, a silica based hydrophilic porous glass (characteristic size of the 3D pore network 50 {angstrom}). As expected, the presence of Li salt slows down the bulk polymer dynamics. The confinement also affects dramatically the apparent mean-square displacement of the polymer. Local relaxational PEO dynamics is described KWW model. We also present an alternate model and show how the detailed polymer dynamics (correlation times and local geometry of the motions) can be described without the use of such stretched exponentials so as to access a rheology-related meaningful physical quantity: the monomeric friction coefficient.

  16. Study of Organosilicon Plasma Polymer Used in Composite Layers with Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radeva, E.; Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Iacob, E.; Vanzetti, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Krasteva, N.; Spassov, T.

    2010-01-21

    In this work we study the ability of plasma polymer (PP) films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) on silica glass (SG) to induce hydroxyapatite (HA)-based composite layers from a mixture of simulated body fluid (SBF) and clear solution of detonation nanodiamond (DND) by a biomimetic process. The grown composites (PPHMDS/HADND) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. FTIR spectra of the PPHMDS indicated diminishing of the polymer characteristic bands when the polymer is immersed in DND clear solution. Furthermore, after sample immersion in the SBF-DND mixture, the FTIR spectra showed the presence of carbonate-containing HA through the characteristic vibration modes of P-O in the phosphate group and C-O in the carbonate group. The formation of HA layers, rich in silica and/or carbon was confirmed by RBS and SEM. The cell viability measured after 7 days on the polymer surface is more then 95% for all samples. The results show that the PPHMDS is promising as a substrate for growing HA/DND layers and that the materials obtained are biocompatible. The variations of plasma polymerization conditions and modification of the composite layers will aid in using such materials for biomedical applications.

  17. Ambient-pressure silica aerogel films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, S.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurd, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Very highly porous (aerogel) silica films with refractive index in the range 1.006--1.05 (equivalent porosity 98.5--88%) were prepared by an ambient-pressure process. It was shown earlier using in situ ellipsometric imaging that the high porosity of these films was mainly attributable to the dilation or `springback` of the film during the final stage of drying. This finding was irrefutably reconfirmed by visually observing a `springback` of >500% using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Ellipsometry and ESEM also established the near cent per cent reversibility of aerogel film deformation during solvent intake and drying. Film thickness profile measurements (near the drying line) for the aerogel, xerogel and pure solvent cases are presented from imaging ellipsometry. The thickness of these films (crack-free) were controlled in the range 0.1-3.5 {mu}m independent of refractive index.

  18. Grafting Sulfated Zirconia on Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong; Lee, Kwan Young; Choi, Saemin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Peden, Charles HF

    2007-06-01

    Sulfated zirconia has received considerable attention as a potential solid acid catalyst in recent years. In this paper, the preparation and properties of acid catalysts obtained by grafting ziconia with atomic precision on MCM-41 mesoporous silica were studied. TEM and potential titration characterizations revealed that ZrO2/MCM-41 with monolayer coverage can be obtained using this grafting technique. Sulfated ZrO2/MCM-41 exhibits improved thermal stability than that of bulk sulfated zirconia, as evidenced by temperature programmed characterizations and XRD analysis. Temperature programmed reaction of isopropanol was used to evaluate the acidity of sulfated ZrO2/MCM-41. It was found that the acid strength of sulfated ZrO2/MCM-41 with monolayer coverage is weaker than bulk sulfated zirconia but stronger than SiO2-Al2O3, a common strong acid catalyst.

  19. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  20. Rechargeable solid polymer electrolyte battery cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terji (East Patchoque, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A rechargeable battery cell comprising first and second electrodes sandwiching a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a layer of a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte adjacent said polymer blend and a layer of dry solid polymer electrolyte adjacent said layer of polymer blend and said second electrode.

  1. Origins of secondary silica within Yucca Mountain, Nye County, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moscati, R.J.; Whelan, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    The accuracy of predictions of the hydrologic response of Yucca Mountain to future climate depends largely on how well relations between past climate and hydrology can be resolved. To advance this reconstruction, secondary minerals in and near Yucca Mountain, deposited by ground waters that originated both as surficial recharge at Yucca Mountain and from regional aquifers, are being studied to determine past ground-water sources and chemistries. Preliminary data on stable oxygen isotopes indicate that, although silica (opal, quartz, and chalcedony) and calcite and have formed in similar settings and from somewhat similar fluids, the authors have found no compelling evidence of coprecipitation or formation from identical fluids. If verified by further analyses, this precludes the use of silica-calcite mineral pairs for precise geothermometry. The preliminary data also indicate that opal and calcite occurrences in pedogenic and unsaturated-zone settings are invariably compatible with formation under modern ambient surface or subsurface temperatures. Silica and calcite stable-isotope studies are being integrated with soil geochemical modeling. This modeling will define the soil geochemical condition (climate) leading to opal or calcite deposition and to the transfer functions that may apply at the meteorologic soil unsaturated-zone interfaces. Additional study of pedogenic and unsaturated-zone silica is needed to support these models. The hypothesis that the transformation of vapor-phase tridymite to quartz requires saturated conditions is being tested through stable oxygen-isotope studies of lithophysal tridymite/quartz mixtures. Should this hypothesis be verified, mineralogic analysis by X-ray diffraction theoretically would permit reconstruction of past maximum water-table elevations.

  2. Heavily fluorinated electronic polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jeewoo

    2011-01-01

    Building blocks, containing majority fluorine content by weight, for PPEs and PPVs have been synthesized. Some of the monomers were shown to give exclusively fluorous-phase soluble polymers, the syntheses of which were ...

  3. Sulfonated polyphenylene polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Christopher J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fujimoto, Cy H. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickner, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-11-27

    Improved sulfonated polyphenylene compositions, improved polymer electrolyte membranes and nanocomposites formed there from for use in fuel cells are described herein. The improved compositions, membranes and nanocomposites formed there from overcome limitations of Nafion.RTM. membranes.

  4. Polymer quantization and Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanashyam Date; Nirmalya Kajuri

    2013-02-24

    Polymer quantization was discovered during the construction of Loop Quantum Cosmology. For the simplest quantum theory of one degree of freedom, the implications for dynamics were studied for the harmonic oscillator as well as some other potentials. For more degrees of freedom, the possibility of continuous, kinematic symmetries arises. While these are realised on the Hilbert space of polymer quantum mechanics, their infinitesimal versions are not supported. For an invariant Hamiltonian, these symmetry realizations imply infinite degeneracy suggesting that the symmetry should be spontaneously or explicitly broken. The estimation of symmetry violations in some cases have been analysed before. Here we explore the alternative of shifting the arena to the distributional states. We discuss both the polymer quantum mechanics case as well as polymer quantized scalar field.

  5. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01

    of Electronically Conductive Polymer Nanostructures,” Acc.et al. , “Conjugated-Polymer Micro- and Milliactuators for3. Y. Berdichevsky, Y. -H. Lo, “Polymer Microvalve Based on

  6. Polymer Surface Modification for Bioengineering Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Discharge. Plasmas and Polymers, vol. 1, pp. 299–326. FengS. , 2003, A Review on Polymer Nanofibers by Electrospinningeffect of hydrophilized porous polymer scaffolds in tissue-

  7. Modulating Protein Activity through Polymer Conjugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Caitlin Gayle

    2015-01-01

    D. “A Heparin-mimicking Polymer Conjugate Stabilizes BasicG. ;?  Haddleton,  D.  M.  Polymer   Chemistry  2011,  2,  ?  Nolte,  R.  J.  M.  Polymer  Chemistry  2011,  2,  333.  

  8. Permselective, metal chelate containing, plasma polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morosoff, N.C. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States); Clymer, S.D.; Stannett, V.T. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Skelly, J.M.; Crumbliss, A.L. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Metal chelates, including cobalt Schiff bases and a cobalt porphyrin complex, have been codeposited with hydrocarbon plasma polymers to form thin films. The hydrocarbon monomers used were trans-2-butene and cyclooctene. The sorption of O{sub 2} by such membranes before and after reaction with pyridine (Pyr) or 1-methylimidazole (1-MeIm) was measured and the association FTIR and uv/visible absorption spectra were obtained. In addition permeability to O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} was determined. It was found that the structure of the metal chelates, which were sublimed into the plasma, was preserved. When bound to an axial base (Pyr or 1-MeIm), the plasma polymer occluded chelates bound O{sub 2} reversibly. O{sub 2} diffusion coefficients varied with the nature of the plasma polymer matrix. The ideal separation factor (O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) increased for metal chelate containing plasma polymers vis-a-vis that for the plasma polymer matrix (without metal chelate). The ideal separation factor was at a maximum for low metal chelate loading and at a {open_quotes}mass thickness{close_quotes} of {approximately} 10 {mu}g/(cm{sup 2}min).

  9. Polymers in disordered environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; N. Fricke; W. Janke

    2014-11-18

    A brief review of our recent studies aiming at a better understanding of the scaling behaviour of polymers in disordered environments is given. The main emphasis is on a simple generic model where the polymers are represented by (interacting) self-avoiding walks and the disordered environment by critical percolation clusters. The scaling behaviour of the number of conformations and their average spatial extent as a function of the number of monomers and the associated critical exponents $\\gamma$ and $\

  10. Bioresponsive Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Neetu

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential carriers for therapeutic payloads. However, achieving triggered drug release from MSNPs in vivo has been challenging. Here, we ...

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Cubic and Hexagonal Mesoporous Silica Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coquil, Thomas; Richman, Eric K.; Hutchinson, Neal J.; Tolbert, S H; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    properties of silica aerogels between 1.4 and 330 k”,mesoporous thin ?lms are (i) aerogel and xerogel processes [processes [21,22]. Both aerogel and xerogel have very low

  12. A novel synthesis of micrometer silica hollow sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan Wen; Ye Junwei [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Zhongshan Road 158-43, Dalian 116012 (China); Ning Guiling [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Zhongshan Road 158-43, Dalian 116012 (China)], E-mail: ninggl@dlut.edu.cn; Lin Yuan; Wang Jing [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Zhongshan Road 158-43, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2009-02-04

    Silica microcapsules (hollow spheres) were synthesized successfully by a novel CTAB-stabilized water/oil emulsion system mediated hydrothermal method. The addition of urea to a solution of aqueous phase was an essential step of the simple synthetic procedure of silica hollow spheres, which leads to the formation of silica hollow spheres with smooth shell during hydrothermal process. The intact hollow spheres were obtained by washing the as-synthesized solid products with distilled water to remove the organic components. A large amount of silanol groups were retained in the hollow spheres by this facile route without calcination. The morphologies and optical properties of the product were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, on the basis of a series of SEM observations, phenomenological elucidation of a mechanism for the growth of the silica hollow spheres has been presented.

  13. Evaluation and recommendations for reduction of a silica dust exposure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruben, Raymond L

    2000-01-01

    A brick cutting task was identified as a job with a potential overexposure to crystalline silica dust. A sampling plan was proposed and implemented. Both the NIOSH approved method, using cyclone filters to select out ...

  14. Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes Mark D. Losego inorganic materials and anharmonic polymers have potentially intriguing thermal transport behavior. The low thermal conductivity of amorphous polymers limits significant interfacial effects to polymer film

  15. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  16. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (?hads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reachingmore »its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.« less

  17. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (?hads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reaching its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.

  18. Silica diagenesis in Monterey Formation: controls and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kablanow, R.I. II

    1987-05-01

    The factors controlling diagenesis of biogenic silica (opal-A to opal-CT to quartz) in the Monterey Formation of California has been an ongoing subject of study. The accepted concept proposes that a high detrital content inhibits the opal-A to opal-CT reaction, whereas it accelerates the opal-CT to quartz reaction. Others have suggested that clay minerals directly influence the rate of silica transformation by the adsorption of silica from solution. It is proposed that the primary control on silica diagenesis is the thermal regime of the basin. Important variables which influence the temperature development include time, sediment accumulation rate, burial depth, porosity, thermal conductivity, temperature of silica phase change, and heat flow. The Miocene Monterey Formation had fairly rapid sedimentation rates which produced a thick section of fine-grained sediments (up to 13,000 ft, 4 km, in the Salinas basin). As these sediments underwent progressive burial, both compaction and silica transformation reduced porosity, resulting in an increase in thermal conductivity. To simulate the thermal, depositional, and diagenetic events, detailed thermal models were used. These models clearly reflect the difference in the geologic history observed between the Huasna, Pismo, and Salinas basins. The thermal models used in this study strongly confirm that silica diagenesis is primarily dependent on the temperature structure of a basin and that any catalytic influence which detrital minerals may have on silica diagenesis is a second-order effect and does not alter the regional reaction boundaries. These models can also be used as powerful tools in hydrocarbon exploration by providing a clearer picture of the thermal development of the basin.

  19. Interfacial aggregation of a nonionic surfactant: Effect on the stability of silica suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano-Palmino, F.; Denoyel, R.; Rouquerol, J. . Centre de thermodynamique et Microcalorimetrie)

    1994-06-01

    Nonionic surfactants are in widespread use in technological applications such as flotation, detergency, suspension stabilization (paints, ceramic preparation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics), and enhanced oil recovery. The adsorption of the nonionic surfactant TX 100 in two silica suspensions (Ludox HS40 and Syton W30) has been studied with the aim of relating the structure of the adsorbed layer to the stability of the suspension. First, a thermodynamic study based on the determination of adsorption isotherms and displacement enthalpies as a function of pH and solid/liquid ratio was carried out and lead to the conclusion that such a surfactant forms micelle-like aggregates on the silica surface. Then, a stability study based on visual observation, turbidimetry, and particle size determination (by photon correlation spectroscopy) was performed in order to determine the TX 100 concentration range in which flocculation occurs. Considering that the surface is covered with micelle-like aggregates in the flocculation range and that the [zeta]-potential (determined by microelectrophoresis) has varied only slightly at the onset of flocculation, it is concluded that the flocculation mechanism is a bridging of particles by surface micelles. This bridging of particles by aggregates similar in size and shape could be an explanation of the presence, in such systems, of optimum flocculation at half surface coverage.

  20. Flory-Huggins theory for the solubility of heterogeneously-modified polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick B. Warren

    2007-04-05

    Many water soluble polymers are chemically modified versions of insoluble base materials such as cellulose. A Flory-Huggins model is solved to determine the effects of heterogeneity in modification on the solubility of such polymers. It is found that heterogeneity leads to decreased solubility, with the effect increasing with increasing blockiness. In the limit of extreme blockiness, the nature of the phase coexistence crosses over to a polymer-polymer demixing transition. Some consequences are discussed for the synthesis of partially modified polymers, and the experimental characterisation of such systems.

  1. Rapid synthesis of polymer-silica hybrid nanofibers by biomimetic mineralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    (organic/inorganic) materials for various functional purposes through biomineralization processes [1 materials, organic molecules are closely integrated with inorganic moieties for various structural composites represent one such class of hybrid organic/inorganic material with various applications

  2. Danish Polymer Centre Annual Report 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danish Polymer Centre Annual Report 2002 #12;2 The Danish Polymer Centre, DTU and Risø Annual.1 Polymer based solar cells (photovoltaics) ................................ 5 2.2 Structuring Plastic ........................................................................ 17 2.7 Biodegradable polymer composites .......................................... 19 2

  3. Polymer Synthesis Figure 1: Typical thermal response shape memory cycle. The polymer is heated past a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    associated with phase changes as a function of temperature. · We use it to determine the melting (transition. Contact Angle Characterization · Water is dropped on the polymer film and the contact angle is recorded is heated past a transition temperature and if it is cooled past that temperature under strain, it keeps

  4. Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation polymercompositemembranes.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  5. The Polymer Bouncer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Martin-Ruiz; A. Frank; L. F. Urrutia

    2015-05-31

    Polymer Quantization (PQ) is a background independent quantization scheme that is deployed in Loop Quantum Gravity. This framework leads to a new short-distance (discretized) structure characterized by a fundamental length. In this paper we use PQ to analyze the problem of a particle bouncing on a perfectly reflecting surface under the influence of Earth's gravitational field, what we have called "\\textit{The Polymer Bouncer}". In this scenario, deviations from the usual quantum effects are induced by the spatial discreteness, but not by a new short-range gravitational interaction. We solve the polymer Schr\\"odinger equation in an analytical fashion, and we evaluate numerically the corresponding energy levels. We find that the polymer energy spectrum exhibits a negative shift compared to the obtained for the quantum bouncer. The comparison of our results with those obtained in the GRANIT experiment leads to an upper bound for the fundamental length scale, namely $\\lambda \\ll 0.6 \\buildrel _{\\circ} \\over {\\mathrm{A}}$. We find polymer corrections to the probability of transitions between levels, induced by small vibrations, together with the probability of spontaneous emission in the quadrupole approximation.

  6. Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauzi, Iqbal Arcana, I Made

    2014-03-24

    Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component’s composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it’s characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10{sup ?6} S/cm up to 6.01 × 10{sup ?4} S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10{sup ?3} S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

  7. Composite solid polymer electrolyte membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Formato, Richard M. (Shrewsbury, MA); Kovar, Robert F. (Wrentham, MA); Osenar, Paul (Watertown, MA); Landrau, Nelson (Marlborough, MA); Rubin, Leslie S. (Newton, MA)

    2001-06-19

    The present invention relates to composite solid polymer electrolyte membranes (SPEMs) which include a porous polymer substrate interpenetrated with an ion-conducting material. SPEMs of the present invention are useful in electrochemical applications, including fuel cells and electrodialysis.

  8. Composite solid polymer electrolyte membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Formato, Richard M.; Kovar, Robert F.; Osenar, Paul; Landrau, Nelson; Rubin, Leslie S.

    2006-05-30

    The present invention relates to composite solid polymer electrolyte membranes (SPEMs) which include a porous polymer substrate interpenetrated with an ion-conducting material. SPEMs of the present invention are useful in electrochemical applications, including fuel cells and electrodialysis.

  9. Branched Polymers and Hyperplane Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    We generalize the construction of connected branched polymers and the notion of the volume of the space of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie (Ann Math, 158:1019–1039, 2003), and Kenyon and Winkler ...

  10. Polymer Composites for Radiation Scintillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    gamma-ray and fast neutron spectroscopy. Firstly, new polymergamma-ray and fast neutron spectroscopy. Firstly, new polymer

  11. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maitland, Duncan (Pleasant Hill, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Bearinger, Jane P. (Livermore, CA); Wilson, Thomas S. (San Leandro, CA); Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Jensen, Wayne A. (Livermore, CA); Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Marion, III, John E. (Livermore, CA); Loge, Jeffrey M. (Stockton, CA)

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  12. Antibacterial polymer coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Allen, Ashley N.; Barnhart, Meghan; Tucker, Mark David; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2009-09-01

    A series of poly(sulfone)s with quaternary ammonium groups and another series with aldehyde groups are synthesized and tested for biocidal activity against vegetative bacteria and spores, respectively. The polymers are sprayed onto substrates as coatings which are then exposed to aqueous suspensions of organisms. The coatings are inherently biocidal and do not release any agents into the environment. The coatings adhere well to both glass and CARC-coated coupons and they exhibit significant biotoxicity. The most effective quaternary ammonium polymers kills 99.9% of both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and the best aldehyde coating kills 81% of the spores on its surface.

  13. BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS KAROLA M´ESZ´AROS ALEXANDER POSTNIKOV Abstract. We of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie [BI], and Kenyon and Winkler [KW] to any hyperplane arrangement A. The volume of the resulting configuration space of connected branched polymers

  14. Polymer blend containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer and a matrix polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-28

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents in forming a polymer blend.

  15. Augmenting a Microbial Selective Plugging Technique with Polymer Flooding to Increase the Efficiency of Oil Recovery - A Search for Synergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Lewis R.; Pittman Jr., Charles U.; Lynch, F. Leo; Vadie, A. Alex; French, W. Todd

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to determine if the effectiveness of a microbial permeability profile modification technique can be improved through polymer flooding.

  16. Surface characterization of silica glass substrates treated by atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Masuno, Atsunobu, E-mail: masuno@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishibashi, Keiji [Canon ANELVA Corporation, Asao-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8550 (Japan); Tawarayama, Hiromasa [Kawazoe Frontier Technologies Corporation, Kuden 931-113, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 247-0014 (Japan); Zhang, Yingjiu; Utsuno, Futoshi [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Koya, Kazuo; Fujinoki, Akira [Shin Etsu Quartz Prod. Co., Ltd., Res and Applicat Lab, Fukushima 963-0725 (Japan); Kawazoe, Hiroshi [Kawazoe Frontier Technologies Corporation, Kuden 931-113, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 247-0014 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Silica glass substrates with very flat surfaces were exposed to atomic hydrogen at different temperatures and durations. An atomic force microscope was used to measure root-mean-square (RMS) roughness and two-dimensional power spectral density (PSD). In the treatment with atomic hydrogen up to 900 °C, there was no significant change in the surface. By the treatment at 1000 °C, the changes in the RMS roughness and the PSD curves were observed. It was suggested that these changes were caused by etching due to reactions of atomic hydrogen with surface silica. By analysis based on the k-correlation model, it was found that the spatial frequency of the asperities became higher with an increase of the treatment time. Furthermore, the data showed that atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces by controlling heat-treatment conditions. - Highlights: • Silica glass surface was treated by atomic hydrogen at various temperatures. • Surface roughness was measured by an atomic force microscope. • Roughness data were analyzed by two-dimensional power spectral density. • Atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces.

  17. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  18. Dynamic Fracture Toughness of Polymer Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmeet Kaur

    2012-02-14

    to fully charac- terize material properties before using them for applications in critical industries, like that of defense or transport. In this project, the focus is on determining dy- namic fracture toughness property of ber reinforced polymer... : : : : 33 III Wave speeds and traveling times making a particular angle to laminate ber direction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 37 IV Mode-I quasi-static fracture toughness values (KIC) : : : : : : : : : : 45 V Mode-II quasi...

  19. High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles and Polymers Enabled by Vapor Permeable Polymer Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demko, Michael Thomas

    2012-01-01

    polymers for gas separation membranes. Polymer Chemistry 1,L. M. Polymer membranes for gas separation. Current Opinionapplication as membranes in gas separations. 109–111 These

  20. Conducting Polymers for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimblin, Clare; Miller, Kirk; Vogel, Bob; Quam, Bill; McHugh, Harry; Anthony, Glen; Mike, Grover

    2007-12-01

    Conjugated polymers have emerged as an attractive technology for large-area electronic applications. As organic semiconductors, they can be used to make large-area arrays of diodes or transistors using fabrication techniques developed for polymer coatings, such as spraying and screen-printing. We have demonstrated both neutron and alpha detection using diodes made from conjugated polymers and have done preliminary work to integrate a boron carbide layer into the conventional polymer device structure to capture thermal neutrons. The polymer devices appear to be insensitive to gamma rays, due to their small physical thickness and low atomic number.

  1. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  2. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  3. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  4. Mesoporous carbons and polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, William (Boulder, CO); Dietz, Steven (Denver, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A mesoporous material prepared by polymerizing a resorcinol/formaldehyde system from an aqueous solution containing resorcinol, formaldehyde and a surfactant and optionally pyrolyzing the polymer to form a primarily carbonaceous solid. The material has an average pore size between 4 and 75 nm and is suitable for use in liquid-phase surface limited applications, including sorbent, catalytic, and electrical applications.

  5. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS: The Gas Diffusion Layer Johannah Itescu Princeton University PRISM REU #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information I. What do fuel cells do? Generate electricity through chemical reaction #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information -+ + eHH 442 2 0244 22 He

  6. Solid polymer electrolyte compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garbe, James E. (Stillwater, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (St. Paul, MN); Le, Dinh Ba (St. Paul, MN)

    2001-01-01

    An electrolyte composition is featured that includes a solid, ionically conductive polymer, organically modified oxide particles that include organic groups covalently bonded to the oxide particles, and an alkali metal salt. The electrolyte composition is free of lithiated zeolite. The invention also features cells that incorporate the electrolyte composition.

  7. Sedimentation of Knotted Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joonas Piili; Davide Marenduzzo; Kimmo Kaski; Riku Linna

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the sedimentation of knotted polymers by means of stochastic rotation dynamics, a molecular dynamics algorithm that takes hydrodynamics fully into account. We show that the sedimentation coefficient s, related to the terminal velocity of the knotted polymers, increases linearly with the average crossing number n_c of the corresponding ideal knot. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first direct computational confirmation of this relation, postulated on the basis of experiments in "The effect of ionic conditions on the conformations of supercoiled DNA. I. sedimentation analysis" by Rybenkov et al., for the case of sedimentation. Such a relation was previously shown to hold with simulations for knot electrophoresis. We also show that there is an accurate linear dependence of s on the inverse of the radius of gyration R_g^-1, more specifically with the inverse of the R_g component that is perpendicular to the direction along which the polymer sediments. When the polymer sediments in a slab, the walls affect the results appreciably. However, R_g^-1 remains to a good precision linearly dependent on n_c. Therefore, R_g^-1 is a good measure of a knot's complexity.

  8. Primordial polymer perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeev S. Seahra; Iain A. Brown; Golam Mortuza Hossain; Viqar Husain

    2012-09-25

    We study the generation of primordial fluctuations in pure de Sitter inflation where the quantum scalar field dynamics are governed by polymer (not Schrodinger) quantization. This quantization scheme is related to, but distinct from, the structures employed in Loop Quantum Gravity; and it modifies standard results above a polymer energy scale $M_{\\star}$. We recover the scale invariant Harrison Zel'dovich spectrum for modes that have wavelengths bigger than $M_{\\star}^{-1}$ at the start of inflation. The primordial spectrum for modes with initial wavelengths smaller than $M_{\\star}^{-1}$ exhibits oscillations superimposed on the standard result. The amplitude of these oscillations is proportional to the ratio of the inflationary Hubble parameter $H$ to the polymer energy scale. For reasonable choices of $M_{\\star}$, we find that polymer effects are likely unobservable in CMB angular power spectra due to cosmic variance uncertainty, but future probes of baryon acoustic oscillations may be able to directly constrain the ratio $H/M_{\\star}$.

  9. A density functional theory study of the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over vanadia supported on silica, titania, and zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.

    2002-01-01

    on Silica, Titania, and Zirconia Rustam Z. Khaliullin andon silica, titania, and zirconia. The catalytically activegreater for titania- and zirconia-supported vanadia than for

  10. The Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Nanostructures using Novel Computational Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doblack, Benjamin Nelson

    2013-01-01

    that is cast and dried, resulting in an aerogel (Figure 2).The silica aerogel - a dry porous structure - is sintered todensity of the initial aerogel [3]. Ultra-low density silica

  11. PATCHY SILICA-COATED SILVER NANOWIRES AS SERS SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.; Murphy, C.

    2013-03-29

    We report a class of core-shell nanomaterials that can be used as efficient surface-enhancement Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The core consists of silver nanowires, prepared through a chemical reduction process, that are used to capture 4- mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA), a model analyte. The shell was prepared through a modified Stöber method and consists of patchy or full silica coats. The formation of silica coats was monitored via transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and phase-analysis light scattering for measuring effective surface charge. Surprisingly, the patchy silica coated silver nanowires are better SERS substrate than silver nanowires; nanomolar concentration of 4-MBA can be detected. In addition, “nano-matryoshka” configurations were used to quantitate/explore the effect of the electromagnetic field at the tips of the nanowire (“hot spots”) in the Raman scattering experiment.

  12. Surface modification of low density silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriend, K. A. (Kimberly A.); Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); Salazar, K. V. (Kenneth V.); Wilson, K. V. (Kennard V.)

    2004-01-01

    Silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels are low density materials that are attractive for applications such as, thermal insulation, porous separation media or catalyst supports, adsorbents. However, aerogels are notoriously weak and brittle making it difficult to handle and machine monoliths into desired forms. This prevents the development of many applications that would otherwise benefit from the use of the low density materials. We will describe our efforts to chemically modify and mechanically enhance silica-based aerogels using chemical vapor techniques without sacrificing their characteristic low densities. Monolithic silica and organically bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of the respective methoxysilane monomers followed by supercritical carbon dioxide drying of the gels. Reactive modification of the gels with volatile silylating compounds during and after the drying process and these effects on the mechanical properties and density of the aerogels will be described.

  13. 9422 Stratospheric ice catalyzes chlorine reactions 9428 Fusing silk and silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    of spider silk dragline protein and the silica- cored proteins of diatoms. Taking advantage of silk's self

  14. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  15. Characterizing Radiation-Aged Polysiloxane-Silica Composites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    circumvented largely by developing models of NMR observables that are based on basic polymer physics. We compare two such models, one previously published and one derived herein,...

  16. AB initio free energy calculations of the solubility of silica in metallic hydrogen and application to giant planet cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González-Cataldo, F. [Grupo de NanoMateriales, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, B., E-mail: fgonzalez@lpmd.cl [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    By combining density functional molecular dynamics simulations with a thermodynamic integration technique, we determine the free energy of metallic hydrogen and silica, SiO{sub 2}, at megabar pressures and thousands of degrees Kelvin. Our ab initio solubility calculations show that silica dissolves into fluid hydrogen above 5000 K for pressures from 10 and 40 Mbars, which has implications for the evolution of rocky cores in giant gas planets like Jupiter, Saturn, and a substantial fraction of known extrasolar planets. Our findings underline the necessity of considering the erosion and redistribution of core materials in giant planet evolution models, but they also demonstrate that hot metallic hydrogen is a good solvent at megabar pressures, which has implications for high-pressure experiments.

  17. Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness, and Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness algae that is mainly composed of amorphous silica, which features a hierarchical structure that ranges in diatom algae as a basis to study a bioinspired nanoporous material implemented in crystalline silica. We

  18. Analysis of the elastic behaviour of silica aerogels taken as a percolating system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    289 Analysis of the elastic behaviour of silica aerogels taken as a percolating system T. Woignier of silica aerogels are performed using the three points flexural technique. The elastic behaviour is studied measurement - for silica aerogels. These highly porous materials are obtained from a sol-gel process. Solvent

  19. e-Polymers 2010, no. 100 http://www.e-polymers.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    resistivity. Keywords: scratch resistance, dynamic friction, effective surface area, carbon black in polymers, electric conductivity threshold, polymer reinforcement. Introduction Polymer composites containing carbon fibers, binders or solid friction modifiers, or else irradiation [17]. For carbon-containing polymer

  20. Appendix B: Glossary of Polymer Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    -334 (Wiley, New York, 1985). Acrylic ester polymers A group of amorphous carbon-chain polymers of whichAppendix B: Glossary of Polymer Materials This glossary emphasises the individuality of polymers and polymer families, historically, scientifically and technically. It complements the rest of the book

  1. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  2. Mesoporous carbons and polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, William; Dietz, Steven

    2004-05-18

    A polymer is prepared by polymerizing a polymerizable component from a mixture containing the polymerizable component and a surfactant, the surfactant and the polymerizable component being present in the mixture in a molar ratio of at least 0.2:1, having an average pore size greater than 4 nm and a density greater than 0.1 g/cc. The polymerizable component can comprise a resorcinol/formaldehyde system and the mixture can comprise an aqueous solution or the polymerizable component can comprise a divinylbenzene/styrene system and the mixture can comprise an organic solution. Alternatively, the polymerizable component can comprise vinylidene chloride or a vinylidene chloride/divinylbenzene system. The polymer may be monolithic, have a BET surface area of at least about 50 m.sup.2 /g., include a quantity of at least one metal powder, or have an electrical conductivity greater than 10 Scm.sup.-1.

  3. Scratch behavior of polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Goy Teck

    2005-11-01

    of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, J.N. Reddy Committee Members, H.-J. Sue A. Srinvas S. Suh Paul N. Roschke Head of Department, Dennis O?Neal August 2005 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT... Scratch Behavior of Polymers. (August 2005) Goy Teck Lim, B.Eng., National University of Singapore; M.Eng., National University of Singapore Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. J.N. Reddy This dissertation work is focused on the analytical...

  4. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Alamgir, M.; Choe, H.S.

    1995-12-12

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li{sup +}) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiAsF{sub 6}, and LiClO{sub 4}. 2 figs.

  5. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Choe, Hyoun S. (Waltham, MA)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  7. Polymer Crowding and Shape Distributions in Polymer-Nanoparticle Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Kang Lim; Alan R. Denton

    2014-10-24

    Macromolecular crowding can influence polymer shapes, which is important for understanding the thermodynamic stability of polymer solutions and the structure and function of biopolymers (proteins, RNA, DNA) under confinement. We explore the influence of nanoparticle crowding on polymer shapes via Monte Carlo simulations and free-volume theory of a coarse-grained model of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures. Exploiting the geometry of random walks, we model polymer coils as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor. Accounting for the entropic cost of a nanoparticle penetrating a larger polymer coil, we compute the crowding-induced shift in the shape distributions, radius of gyration, and asphericity of ideal polymers in a theta solvent. With increased nanoparticle crowding, we find that polymers become more compact (smaller, more spherical), in agreement with predictions of free-volume theory. Our approach can be easily extended to nonideal polymers in good solvents and used to model conformations of biopolymers in crowded environments.

  8. The Statistical Mechanics of Stretched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

    2009-08-04

    We describe some recent results concerning the statistical properties of a self-interacting polymer stretched by an external force. We concentrate mainly on the cases of purely attractive or purely repulsive self-interactions, but our results are stable under suitable small perturbations of these pure cases. We provide in particular a precise description of the stretched phase (local limit theorems for the end-point and local observables, invariance principle, microscopic structure). Our results also characterize precisely the (non-trivial, direction-dependent) critical force needed to trigger the collapsed/stretched phase transition in the attractive case. We also describe some recent progress: first, the determination of the order of the phase transition in the attractive case; second, a proof that a semi-directed polymer in quenched random environment is diffusive in dimensions 4 and higher when the temperature is high enough. In addition, we correct an incomplete argument from one of our earlier works.

  9. Silica-Supported Tantalum Clusters: Catalyst for Alkane Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemana ,S.; Gates, B.

    2006-01-01

    Silica-supported tantalum clusters (on average, approximately tritantalum) were formed by the treatment, in either H{sub 2} or ethane, of adsorbed Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5}; the supported catalyst is active for ethane conversion to methane and propane at 523 K, with the used catalyst containing clusters of the same average nuclearity as the precursor.

  10. Photochemical Pattern Transfer and Enhancement of Thin Film Silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Photochemical Pattern Transfer and Enhancement of Thin Film Silica Mesophases Andrew M. Dattelbaum chemical treatment of the film can selectively remove the mesostructured regions, leading to patterned, hydrophobicity, and structural morphology of the mesoscopic thin film material on a wide range of substrates

  11. Silica Fume as a Radon Retardant from Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Silica Fume as a Radon Retardant from Concrete K . N . Y U , * , R . V . B A L E N D R A N of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Radon, and tracheobronchial deposition of radon progeny can lead to lung cancers. Aggregates (granite) are known

  12. Fractal Studies on Titanium-Silica Aerogels using SMARTer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putra, E. Giri Rachman; Ikram, A.; Bharoto; Santoso, E. [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, BATAN, Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia); Fang, T. Chiar; Ibrahim, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Mohamed, A. Aziz [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division Agensi Nuklear Malaysia, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2008-03-17

    Power-law scattering approximation has been employed to reveal the fractal structures of solid-state titanium-silica aerogel samples. All small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements were performed using 36 meters SANS BATAN spectrometer (SMARTer) at the neutron scattering laboratory (NSL) in Serpong, Indonesia. The mass fractal dimension of titanium-silica aerogels at low scattering vector q range increases from -1.4 to -1.92 with the decrease of acid concentrations during sol-gel process. These results are attributed to the titanium-silica aerogels that are growing to more polymeric and branched structures. At high scattering vector q range the Porod slope of -3.9 significantly down to -2.24 as the roughness of particle surfaces becomes higher. The cross over between these two regimes decreases from 0.4 to 0.16 nm{sup -1} with the increase of acid concentrations indicating also that the titanium-silica aerogels are growing.

  13. Formation of Secondary Containment Systems Using Permeation of Colloidal Silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    the tanks. This study evaluates the formation of hydraulic barriers for secondary containment through the permeation of colloidal silica grout. A sim- plified infiltration model is presented to predict the downward. Because the simplified infiltration model cannot predict the soil-grout interaction or the permeation

  14. Photovoltaic's silica-rich waste sludge as supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quercia, G., E-mail: g.quercia@tue.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, P.O. Box 5008, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Putten, J.J.G. van der [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hüsken, G. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Brouwers, H.J.H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Waste sludge, a solid recovered from wastewater of photovoltaic-industries, composes of agglomerates of nano-particles like SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. This sludge deflocculates in aqueous solutions into nano-particles smaller than 1 ?m. Thus, this sludge constitutes a potentially hazardous waste when it is improperly disposed. Due to its high content of amorphous SiO{sub 2}, this sludge has a potential use as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) in concrete. In this study the main properties of three different samples of photovoltaic's silica-rich waste sludge (nSS) were physically and chemically characterized. The characterization techniques included: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen physical adsorption isotherm (BET method), density by Helium pycnometry, particle size distribution determined by laser light scattering (LLS) and zeta-potential measurements by dynamic light scattering (DLS). In addition, a dispersability study was performed to design stable slurries to be used as liquid additives for the concrete production on site. The effects on the hydration kinetics of cement pastes by the incorporation of nSS in the designed slurries were determined using an isothermal calorimeter. A compressive strength test of standard mortars with 7% of cement replacement was performed to determine the pozzolanic activity of the waste nano-silica sludge. Finally, the hardened system was fully characterized to determine the phase composition. The results demonstrate that the nSS can be utilized as SCM to replace portion of cement in mortars, thereby decreasing the CO{sub 2} footprint and the environmental impact of concrete. -- Highlights: •Three different samples of PV nano-silica sludge (nSS) were fully characterized. •nSS is composed of agglomerates of nano-particles like SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. •Dispersability studies demonstrated that nSS agglomerates are broken to nano-size. •nSS can be classified as a pozzolanic material with activity index higher than 100. •nSS can be use as a potential SCM to partly replace cement in concrete.

  15. Third virial coefficient for 4-arm and 6-arm star polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Caracciolo; Bortolo Matteo Mognetti; Andrea Pelissetto

    2008-02-15

    We discuss the computation of the third virial coefficient in polymer systems, focusing on an additional contribution absent in the case of monoatomic fluids. We determine the interpenetration ratio and several quantities that involve the third virial coefficient for star polymers with 4 and 6 arms in the good-solvent regime, in the limit of a large degree of polymerization.

  16. Biomaterials 27 (2006) 41654168 Molecularly imprinted polymers for tobacco mosaic virus recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterials 27 (2006) 4165­4168 Molecularly imprinted polymers for tobacco mosaic virus mosaic virus (TMV) have been synthesized. Batch equilibrium studies using imprinted and non-imprinted polymer hydrogels in TMV and TNV solutions were conducted to determine virus-binding capacities. TMV

  17. Acid Diversion in Carbonate Reservoirs Using Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomaa, Ahmed Mohamed Mohamed

    2012-07-16

    and determine factors that impact its performance. Lab test of polymer-based in-situ gelled acids reveal that polymer and other additives separate out of the acid when these acids are prepared in high salinity water. In coreflood tests, in-situ gelled acid...

  18. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  19. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA)

    1993-01-01

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  20. Dynamics of tungsten hexacarbonyl, dicobalt octacarbonyl, and their fragments adsorbed on silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Valentí, Roser; Jeschke, Harald O.

    2014-05-14

    Tungsten and cobalt carbonyls adsorbed on a substrate are typical starting points for the electron beam induced deposition of tungsten or cobalt based metallic nanostructures. We employ first principles molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamics and vibrational spectra of W(CO){sub 6} and W(CO){sub 5} as well as Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} and Co(CO){sub 4} precursor molecules on fully and partially hydroxylated silica surfaces. Such surfaces resemble the initial conditions of electron beam induced growth processes. We find that both W(CO){sub 6} and Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} are stable at room temperature and mobile on a silica surface saturated with hydroxyl groups (OH), moving up to half an Angström per picosecond. In contrast, chemisorbed W(CO){sub 5} or Co(CO){sub 4} ions at room temperature do not change their binding site. These results contribute to gaining fundamental insight into how the molecules behave in the simulated time window of 20 ps and our determined vibrational spectra of all species provide signatures for experimentally distinguishing the form in which precursors cover a substrate.

  1. Formation of conical emission of supercontinuum during filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandidov, V. P. Smetanina, E. O.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Kompanets, V. O.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2011-09-15

    The formation of conical emission of supercontinuum during filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses with central wavelengths in a wide range is studied experimentally, numerically, and analytically. The frequency-angular intensity distribution of the spectral components of conical emission is determined by the interference of supercontinuum emission in a filament of a femtosecond laser pulse. The interference of supercontinuum emission has a general character, exists at different regimes of group velocity dispersion, gives rise to the fine spectral structure after the pulse splitting into subpulses and the formation of a distributed supercontinuum source in an extended filament, and causes the decomposition of the continuous spectrum of conical emission into many high-contrast maxima after pulse refocusing in the filament. In spectroscopic studies with a tunable femtosecond radiation source based on a TOPAS parametric amplifier, we used an original scheme with a wedge fused silica sample. Numerical simulations have been performed using a system of equations of nonlinear-optical interaction of laser radiation under conditions of diffraction, wave nonstationarity, and material dispersion in fused silica. The analytic study is based on the interference model of formation of conical emission by supercontinuum sources moving in a filament.

  2. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  3. Stretched Polymers in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

    2011-03-01

    We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched random environments.

  4. Modulating Protein Activity through Polymer Conjugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Caitlin Gayle

    2015-01-01

    the   polymer  backbone,  but  100  mM  carbonate  /  carbonate   /   bicarbonate  (pH  10)  buffer  partially   degraded  the  polymer  polymer  2  in   either  D-­PBS  or  100  mM  carbonate  /  

  5. Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    carbonates. #12;Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes Project Summary Michael Webb RigidRESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes From the Resnick of Polymer Electrolytes Global Significance While progress of sustainable energy- harvesting techniques

  6. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wenz, Robert P. (Cottage Grove, MN); Weber, Michael F. (Shoreview, MN); Arudi, Ravindra L. (Woodbury, MN)

    1992-02-04

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  7. Nitinol-reinforced shape-memory polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Leo, Claudio V

    2010-01-01

    Reinforced shape-memory polymers have been developed from an acrylate based thermoset shape-memory polymer and nitinol wires. A rectangular shape-memory polymer measuring approximately 1 by 2 by 0.1 inches has a ten fold ...

  8. Nanostructure Control of Biologically Inspired Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    E. B. ; Wagener, K. B. Polymer 2008, 49, 2985-2995. Boz,T. ; Matyjaszewski, K. Polymer 2008, 49, 1567-1578. Kim,Flory, P. J. ; Jackson, J. B. Polymer 1963, 4, (2), 221-236.

  9. Polymer Composites in Construction: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosallam, AS; Bayraktar, A; Elmikawi, M; Pul, S; Adanur, S

    2015-01-01

    Pul S, Adanur S (2013) Polymer Composites in Construction:Pul S, Adanur S (2013) Polymer Composites in Construction:Mater Sci Eng 2(1), 25. Polymer Composites in Construction:

  10. Stress-tuned conductor-polymer composite for use in sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, James E; Read, Douglas H

    2013-10-22

    A method for making a composite polymeric material with electrical conductivity determined by stress-tuning of the conductor-polymer composite, and sensors made with the stress-tuned conductor-polymer composite made by this method. Stress tuning is achieved by mixing a miscible liquid into the polymer precursor solution or by absorbing into the precursor solution a soluble compound from vapor in contact with the polymer precursor solution. The conductor may or may not be ordered by application of a magnetic field. The composite is formed by polymerization with the stress-tuning agent in the polymer matrix. The stress-tuning agent is removed following polymerization to produce a conductor-polymer composite with a stress field that depends on the amount of stress-tuning agent employed.

  11. Formation mechanisms of precursors of radiation-induced color centers during fabrication of silica optical fiber preform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomashuk, A. L.; Zabezhailov, M. O.

    2011-04-15

    Samples in the form of transverse slices of rods and optical fiber preforms made from the high-hydroxyl KU-1 and low-hydroxyl KS-4V silica by the plasma outside deposition (POD) method are {gamma}-irradiated to a dose of {approx}1 MGy (SiO{sub 2}). Next, the radial dependences of the radiation-induced nonbridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) and E'-center (three-coordinated silicon) in the samples are constructed by measuring the amplitudes of their 4.8 and 5.8 eV absorption bands, respectively. Based on the analysis of these radial dependences and considering the temperature and duration of the preirradiation heat treatment of the rods and preforms at the POD-installation, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths of the above bands and the microscopic thermoinduced processes occurring during preform fabrication and producing precursors of the radiation-induced NBOHC and E'-center. These processes are found to be associated with the escape of either H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O from neighboring hydroxyl groups, and, therefore, can occur in high-hydroxyl silica only. It is concluded that enhancement of the radiation resistance of high-hydroxyl silica optical fibers requires decreasing the temperature and duration of the preform fabrication process, in particular, changing from the POD-technology to the low-temperature plasmachemical vapor deposition (PCVD) or surface PCVD (SPCVD)-technology.

  12. Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo; Yoder, Timothy Scott

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  13. Journal Title: Journal of polymer science. Part B, Polymer physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    composites. rigid rod polymer. mo- lecular modeling. poly (azomethine) · epoxy. glass/epoxy composite. Such composites would find * To whom correspondence should be addressed. Journal of Polymer Science: Part B molecular composite. Since heat conduction oc- curs more efficiently intramolecularly (through bonds) than

  14. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Approaches to Basic Questions in Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Approaches to Basic Questions in Biology" Prof. Dennis E. Discher, biology is filled with remarkable polymeric structures that motivate mimicry with goals of both clarifying and exploiting biological principles. Filamentous viruses have inspired our development and computations of worm

  15. Controlling Molecular Ordering in Solution-State Conjugated Polymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Han, Youngkyu; Kumar, Rajeev; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-07-17

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in solution of conjugated polymers holds great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution,more »we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.« less

  16. Compatibilization/Compounding Evaluation of Recovered Polymers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CompatibilizationCompounding Evaluation of Recovered Polymers CompatibilizationCompounding Evaluation of Recovered Polymers Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  17. Partially fluorinated cyclic ionic polymers and membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhen-Yu

    2013-04-09

    Ionic polymers are made from selected partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic. The polymers are formed into membranes.

  18. Performance Enhancement of Cathodes with Conductive Polymers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhancement of Cathodes with Conductive Polymers Performance Enhancement of Cathodes with Conductive Polymers Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega"...

  19. Nanocellulose in Polymer Composites and Biomedical: Research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanocellulose in Polymer Composites and Biomedical: Research and Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanocellulose in Polymer Composites and Biomedical:...

  20. Solid electrolyte material manufacturable by polymer processing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Solid electrolyte material manufacturable by polymer processing methods Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solid electrolyte material manufacturable by polymer...

  1. Polymers in a vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Deutsch

    2007-06-13

    In a variety of situations, isolated polymer molecules are found in a vacuum and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum conservation is shown to significantly alter the average size of a chain and its conservation is only broken slowly by thermal radiation. The time autocorrelation for monomer position oscillates with a characteristic time proportional to chain length. The oscillations and damping are analyzed in detail. Short range repulsive interactions suppress oscillations and speed up relaxation but stretched chains still show damped oscillatory time correlations.

  2. Conducting polymer ultracapacitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Steven Z. (Latham, NY); Davey, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A sealed ultracapacitor assembly is formed with first and second electrodes of first and second conducting polymers electrodeposited on porous carbon paper substrates, where the first and second electrodes each define first and second exterior surfaces and first and second opposing surfaces. First and second current collector plates are bonded to the first and second exterior surfaces, respectively. A porous membrane separates the first and second opposing surfaces, with a liquid electrolyte impregnating the insulating membrane. A gasket formed of a thermoplastic material surrounds the first and second electrodes and seals between the first and second current collector plates for containing the liquid electrolyte.

  3. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  4. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA); Gross, Mark E. (Pasco, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  5. 3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duh, Kevin

    3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science Advanced Polymer Science 4. Photo-Functional Elements at the Center of Advanced Technology Photonic Device Science 5. Research on Functional Information Elements supporting the Next-generation Information Society Information Device Science EL 6. Energy Electronic

  6. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Even, Jr., William R. (4254 Drake Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

    2000-01-01

    A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

  7. U-Pb Ages of Secondary Silica at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Implications for the Paleohydrology of the Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.A. Neymark; Y. Amelin; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman

    2001-08-20

    U, Th, and Pb isotopes were analyzed in layers of opal and chalcedony from individual millimeter- to centimeter-thick calcite and silica coatings at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, a site that is being evaluated for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. These calcite and silica coatings on fractures and in lithophysal cavities in Miocene-age tuffs in the unsaturated zone (UZ) precipitated from descending water and record a long history of percolation through the UZ. Opal and chalcedony have high concentrations of U (10 to 780 ppm) and low concentrations of common Pb as indicated by large values of {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb (up to 53,806), thus making them suitable for U-Pb age determinations. Interpretations of U-Pb isotopes in opal samples at Yucca Mountain are complicated by the incorporation of excess {sup 234}U at the time of mineral formation, resulting in reverse discordance of U-Pb ages. However, the {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages are much less affected by deviation from initial secular equilibrium and provide reliable ages of most silica deposits between 0.6 and 9.8 Ma. For chalcedony subsamples showing normal age discordance, these ages may represent minimum times of deposition. Typically, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages are consistent with the microstratigraphy in the mineral coating samples, such that the youngest ages are for subsamples from outer layers, intermediate ages are from inner layers, and oldest ages are from innermost layers. {sup 234}U and {sup 230}Th in most silica layers deeper in the coatings are in secular equilibrium with {sup 238}U, which is consistent with their old age and closed system behavior during the past 0.5 m.y. U-Pb ages for subsamples of silica layers from different microstratigraphic positions in individual calcite and silica coating samples collected from lithophysal cavities in the welded part of the Topopah Spring Tuff yield slow long-term average depositional rates of 1 to 5 mm/m.y. These data imply that the deeper parts of the UZ at Yucca Mountain maintained long-term hydrologic stability over the past 10 m.y. despite significant climate variations. U-Pb ages for subsamples of silica layers from different microstratigraphic positions in individual calcite and silica coating samples collected from fractures in the welded part of the overlying Tiva Canyon Tuff indicate larger long-term average depositional rates up to 23 mm/m.y. and an absence of recently deposited materials (ages of outermost layers are 3-5 Ma). These differences between the characteristics of the coatings for samples from the shallower and deeper parts of the UZ may indicate that the nonwelded tuffs (PTn), located between the welded parts of the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs, play an important role in moderating UZ flow.

  8. Oilfield flooding polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Fred D. (Socorro, NM); Hatch, Melvin J. (Socorro, NM); Shepitka, Joel S. (Socorro, NM); Donaruma, Lorraine G. (Syosset, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A monomer, polymers containing the monomer, and the use of the polymer in oilfield flooding is disclosed. The subject monomer is represented by the general formula: ##STR1## wherein: n is an integer from 0 to about 4; m is an integer from 0 to about 6; a is an integer equal to at least 1 except where m is equal to 0, a must equal 0 and where m is equal to 1, a must equal 0 or 1; p is an integer from 2 to about 10; b is an integer equal to at least 1 and is of sufficient magnitude that the ratio b/p is at least 0.2; and q is an integer from 0 to 2. The number of hydroxy groups in the monomer is believed to be critical, and therefore the sum of (a+b) divided by the sum (m+p) should be at least 0.2. The moieties linked to the acrylic nitrogen can be joined to provide a ringed structure.

  9. Formation and applications of nanoparticles in silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibers are the basis for applications that have grown considerably in recent years (telecommunications, sensors, fiber lasers, etc). Despite undeniable successes, it is necessary to develop new generations of amplifying optical fibers that will overcome some limitations typical of silica glass. In this sense, the amplifying Transparent Glass Ceramics (TGC), and particularly the fibers based on this technology, open new perspectives that combine the mechanical and chemical properties of a glass host with the augmented spectroscopic properties of embedded nanoparticles. This paper is an opportunity to make a state of the art on silica-based optical fibers containing nanoparticles of various types, particularly rare-earth-doped oxide nanoparticles, and on the methods for making such fibers. In the first section of this article, we will review basics on standard optical fibers and on nanoparticle-doped fibers. In the second section we will recall some fabrication methods used for standard optical fibers, ...

  10. Method for dissolution and stabilization of silica-rich fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for dissolving silica-rich fibers such as borosilicate fibers, fiberglass and asbestos to stabilize them for disposal. The method comprises (1) immersing the fibers in hot, five-weight-percent sodium hydroxide solution until the concentration of dissolved silica reaches equilibrium and a only a residue is left (about 48 hours), then immersing the residue in hot, five-weight-percent nitric acid until the residue dissolves (about 96 hours). After adjusting the pH of the dissolved fibers to be caustic, the solution can then be added to a waste vitrification stream for safe disposal. The method is useful in disposing contaminated HEME and HEPA filters. 1 fig.

  11. Silica aerogels modified by functional and nonfunctional organic groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, U.; Huesing, N.; Schwertfeger, F. [Universitaet Wien (Austria)

    1996-12-31

    Organically substituted silica aerogels were prepared from RSi(OR`){sub 3}/Si(OR`){sub 4} mixtures, followed by supercritical drying. The typical microstructure and the resulting physical properties of silica aerogels are retained, if the portion of R-Si units is below 10-20%. However, new properties are supplemented, such as hydrophobicity (which makes the aerogels insensitive towards moisture), a higher compliance, and the possibility to incorporate functional organic groups. Controlled pyrolysis of the organically substituted aerogels allows to coat the inner surface of the aerogels with nanometer-sized carbon structures. This results in a very efficient infrared opacification and improved heat insulation properties at high temperatures. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Chemoradiotherapeutic wrinkled mesoporous silica nanoparticles for use in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munaweera, Imalka; Balkus, Kenneth J. Jr., E-mail: Balkus@utdallas.edu, E-mail: Anthony.DiPasqua@unthsc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Shi, Yi; Di Pasqua, Anthony J., E-mail: Balkus@utdallas.edu, E-mail: Anthony.DiPasqua@unthsc.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy have been widely reported. Engineering of vehicles for the simultaneous delivery of chemo- and radiotherapeutics increases the effectiveness of the therapy and reduces the dosage of each individual drug required to produce an observable therapeutic response. We here developed a novel chemoradiotherapeutic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid coated/uncoated platinum drug loaded, holmium-containing, wrinkled mesoporous silica nanoparticle. The materials were characterized with TEM, FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR, energy dispersive x-ray, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and zeta potential measurements. In vitro platinum drug release from both lipid coated and uncoated chemoradiotherapeutic wrinkled mesoporous silica are reported. Various kinetic models were used to analyze the release kinetics. The radioactivity of the chemoradiotherapeutic nanocarriers was measured after neutron-activation.

  13. Molecular engineering of porous silica using aryl templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Shea, Kenneth J. (Irvine, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A process for manipulating the porosity of silica using a series of organic template groups covalently incorporated into the silicate matrix. The templates in the bridged polysilsesquioxanes are selectively removed from the material by oxidation with oxygen plasma or other means, leaving engineered voids or pores. The size of these pores is dependent upon the length or size of the template or spacer. The size of the templates is measured in terms of Si-Si distances which range from about 0.67 nm to 1.08 nm. Changes introduced by the loss of the templates result in a narrow range of micropores (i.e. <2 nm). Both aryl and alkyl template groups are used as spacers. Novel microporous silica materials useful as molecular seives, dessicants, and catalyst supports are produced.

  14. Molecular engineering of porous silica using aryl templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Shea, K.J.

    1994-06-14

    A process is described for manipulating the porosity of silica using a series of organic template groups covalently incorporated into the silicate matrix. The templates in the bridged polysilsesquioxanes are selectively removed from the material by oxidation with oxygen plasma or other means, leaving engineered voids or pores. The size of these pores is dependent upon the length or size of the template or spacer. The size of the templates is measured in terms of Si-Si distances which range from about 0.67 nm to 1.08 nm. Changes introduced by the loss of the templates result in a narrow range of micropores (i.e. <2 nm). Both aryl and alkyl template groups are used as spacers. Novel microporous silica materials useful as molecular sieves, desiccants, and catalyst supports are produced. 3 figs.

  15. Drag reducing polymers as simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shieh, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine if drag reducing polymers can be simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices. Specifically, three different blood pumps, known as a left ventricle ...

  16. A molecular dynamics investigation of the unusual concentration dependencies of Fick diffusivities in silica mesopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Rajamani; van Baten, Jasper M

    2011-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine the self-diffusivitiy, D{sub i,self}, the Maxwell–Stefan diffusivity, Ð{sub i}, and the Fick diffusivity, D{sub i}, for methane (C1), ethane (C2), propane (C3), n-butane (nC4), n-pentane (nC5), n-hexane (nC6), n-heptane (nC7), and cyclohexane (cC6) in cylindrical silica mesopores for a range of pore concentrations. The MD simulations show that zero-loading diffusivity Ð{sub i}(0) is consistently lower, by up to a factor of 20, than the values anticipated by the classical Knudsen formula. The concentration dependence of the Fick diffusivity, D{sub i} is found to be unusually complex, and displays a strong minimum in some cases; this characteristic can be traced to molecular clustering.

  17. Design and optimization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Design and optimization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells M. Grujicic* , K optimization algorithm to determine an optimum design of the fuel cell with respect to the operation difference has the largest effect on the predicted polarization curve of the fuel cell. However, the optimal

  18. Inhibition of Hotspot Formation in Polymer Bonded Explosives Using an Interface Matching Low Density Polymer Coating at the Polymer-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Inhibition of Hotspot Formation in Polymer Bonded Explosives Using an Interface Matching Low Density Polymer Coating at the Polymer- Explosive Interface Qi An, William A. Goddard, III,*, Sergey V/s) on a prototype polymer bonded explosive (PBX) consisting of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) bonded

  19. Process for manufacturing hollow fused-silica insulator cylinder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Krogh, Michael L. (Lee's Summit, MO); Davis, Steven C. (Lee's Summit, MO); Decker, Derek E. (Discovery Bay, CA); Rosenblum, Ben Z. (Overland Park, KS); Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A method for building hollow insulator cylinders that can have each end closed off with a high voltage electrode to contain a vacuum. A series of fused-silica round flat plates are fabricated with a large central hole and equal inside and outside diameters. The thickness of each is related to the electron orbit diameter of electrons that escape the material surface, loop, and return back. Electrons in such electron orbits can support avalanche mechanisms that result in surface flashover. For example, the thickness of each of the fused-silica round flat plates is about 0.5 millimeter. In general, the thinner the better. Metal, such as gold, is deposited onto each top and bottom surface of the fused-silica round flat plates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Eutectic metals can also be used with one alloy constituent on the top and the other on the bottom. The CVD, or a separate diffusion step, can be used to defuse the deposited metal deep into each fused-silica round flat plate. The conductive layer may also be applied by ion implantation or gas diffusion into the surface. The resulting structure may then be fused together into an insulator stack. The coated plates are aligned and then stacked, head-to-toe. Such stack is heated and pressed together enough to cause the metal interfaces to fuse, e.g., by welding, brazing or eutectic bonding. Such fusing is preferably complete enough to maintain a vacuum within the inner core of the assembled structure. A hollow cylinder structure results that can be used as a core liner in a dielectric wall accelerator and as a vacuum envelope for a vacuum tube device where the voltage gradients exceed 150 kV/cm.

  20. Silica diagenesis in Santa Cruz mudstone, Late Miocene, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Sabbagh, D.

    1987-05-01

    The silica-rich upper Miocene Santa Cruz Mudstone is similar to the Miocene Monterey Formation. Previous studies have suggested the Santa Cruz Mudstone was not buried deeply nor had it undergone extensive diagenesis. Because opaline diagenesis is temperature dependent, the author examined the silica diagenesis of the Santa Cruz Mudstone using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods to study its burial history. In a series of samples from Santa Cruz to Davenport, California (over 16 km), opal-CT is the dominant silica phase present and clay minerals are notably absent. The d(101)-spacing values of opal-CT range from 4.11 A (Santa Cruz area) to 4.06 A (north of Santa Cruz), exhibiting the complete range of d(101)-spacing values found in opal-CT zones. Scanning electron micrographs of crystalline microtextures show rosettes of opal-CT (lepispheres) in cavities of samples with medium to high d(101)-spacing values. The morphology of lepisphere crystallites grades from bladed to spiny with decreasing d(101)-spacing values, reflecting an internal crystal ordering with increased diagenesis. Further diagenetic changes occurred in a sample with 4.06 A d(101)-spacing where incipient quartz crystals signal the initial conversion of opal-CT to microcrystalline quartz. Silica diagenesis demonstrates that burial temperatures surpassed the range of opal-A to opal-CT conversion and approached conversion temperatures (55/sup 0/C to 110/sup 0/C) of opal-CT to microcrystalline quartz. The conversion occurred when the Santa Cruz Mudstone was buried over 1900 m (depth calculated from a geohistory diagram). This burial temperature brings the Santa Cruz Mudstone within the oil generation window, and could account for the presence of hydrocarbons in the unit.

  1. Optical emission from erbium-doped silica nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliman, R. G.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Kim, T.-H.; Sekhar, P. K.; Bhansali, S.

    2008-05-15

    Infrared optical emission from erbium-doped silica nanowires is shown to have property characteristic of the material nanostructure and to provide the basis for the fabrication of integrated photonic devices and biosensors. Silica nanowires of approximately 150 nm diameter were grown on a silicon wafer by metal-induced growth using a thin (20 nm) sputter-deposited palladium layer as a catalyst. The resulting wires were then ion implanted with 110 keV ErO{sup -} ions and annealed at 900 deg. C to optically activate the erbium. These wires exhibited photoluminescence emission at 1.54 {mu}m, characteristic of the {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}-{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition in erbium; however, comparison to similarly implanted fused silica layers revealed stronger thermal quenching and longer luminescence lifetimes in the nanowire samples. The former is attributed to an increase in defect-induced quenching partly due to the large surface-volume ratio of the nanowires, while the latter is attributed to a reduction in the optical density of states associated with the nanostructure morphology. Details of this behavior are discussed together with the implications for potential device applications.

  2. Silica aerogel: An intrinsically low dielectric constant material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1995-04-01

    Silica aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphologies in wavelength of visible which both the pores and particles have sizes less than the wavelength of visible light. This fine nanostructure modifies the normal transport mechanisms within aerogels and endows them with a variety of exceptional physical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. The intrinsically low dielectric properties of silica aerogels are the direct result of the extremely high achievable porosities, which are controllable over a range from 75% to more than 99.8 %, and which result in measured dielectric constants from 2.0 to less than 1.01. This paper discusses the synthesis of silica aerogels, processing them as thin films, and characterizing their dielectric properties. Existing data and other physical characteristics of bulk aerogels (e.g., thermal stablity, thermal expansion, moisture adsorption, modulus, dielectric strength, etc.), which are useful for evaluating them as potential dielectrics for microelectronics, are also given.

  3. Polymer adsorption near the surface of a polymer solution : a universal behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    699 Polymer adsorption near the surface of a polymer solution : a universal behaviour J. des5 , pour 0 03B5 1. Abstract.2014 A universal property of good solutions of long polymers near. Introduction. The free surface of a polymer solution may attract the polymer which forms an adsorbed layer

  4. ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics. Prof. Rama Bansil Class will be assumed. The course will not emphasize synthetic polymer chemistry. Practical applications of polymers of classes TEXT BOOKS Main Text Book: Required: Polymer Chemistry, 2nd Edition, Hiemenz and Lodge, CRC Press

  5. Polymer Thermodynamics and Chain Structure Polymers display some similarities and some differences with nano-aggregates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Polymer Thermodynamics and Chain Structure Polymers display some similarities and some differences with nano-aggregates. Both materials are composed of basic units, Kuhn units for polymers which are rod an aggregate in nanomaterials and a polymer coil in Polymer Science. The mass-fractal or minimum dimension

  6. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gennett, Thomas (Denver, CO); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Landi, Brian J. (Rochester, NY); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  7. APA International Conference on Polymers : Vision & Innovations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    the scientific community working in the field of polymer science and technology. This conference on polymersAssociation (APA) is a professional society dedicated to the science of polymers at the international level and to formulate the action plan to face the challenges ahead. The conference would be dedicated to polymer science

  8. Disentanglementand Reptation During Dissolution of Rubbery Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    Disentanglementand Reptation During Dissolution of Rubbery Polymers BALAJI NARASIMHAN and NIKOLAOS-1283 SYNOPSIS The dissolution mechanism of rubbery polymers was analyzed by dividing the penetrant concentration penetration into the rubbery polymer was assumed to be Fickian. The mode of mobility of the polymer chains

  9. Kac polymers Paolo Butt`a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procacci, Aldo

    Kac polymers Paolo Butt`a Aldo Procacci Benedetto Scoppola Abstract We show how a polymer in two- sidered on the appropriate scale. Key words: Polymers, Kac potentials, phase transition. Running title: Kac polymers Dedicated to a Marzio Cassandro's birthday. 1 Introduction In the last two decades

  10. Non-strinking siloxane polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Cross-linked polymers formed by ring-opening polymerization of a precursor monomer of the general formula R[CH.sub.2 CH(Si(CH.sub.3).sub.2).sub.2 O].sub.2, where R is a phenyl group or an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms. A cross-linked polymer is synthesized by mixing the monomer with a co-monomer of the general formula CH.sub.2 CHR.sup.2 (SiMe.sub.2).sub.2 O in the presence of an anionic base to form a cross-linked polymer of recurring units of the general formula R(Me.sub.2 SiOCH.sub.2 CHSiMe.sub.2).sub.2 [CH.sub.2 CHR.sup.2 (SiMe.sub.2).sub.2 O].sub.n, where R.sup.2 is hydrogen, phenyl, ethyl, propyl or butyl. If the precursor monomer is a liquid, the polymer can be directly synthesized in the presence of an anionic base to a cross-linked polymer containing recurring units of the general formula R(Me.sub.2 SiOCH.sub.2 CHSiMe.sub.2).sub.2. The polymers have approximately less than 1% porosity and are thermally stable at temperatures up to approximately 500.degree. C. The conversion to the cross-linked polymer occurs by ring opening polymerization and results in shrinkage of less than approximately 5% by volume.

  11. Thermally Activated Processes in Polymer Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; D. Drosdoff; A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava

    2005-12-03

    A derivation is given for the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann thermal activation law for the glassy state of a bulk polymer. Our microscopic considerations involve the entropy of closed polymer molecular chains (i.e. polymer closed strings). For thin film polymer glasses, one obtains open polymer strings in that the boundary surfaces serve as possible string endpoint locations. The Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann thermal activation law thereby holds true for a bulk polymer glass but is modified in the neighborhood of the boundaries of thin film polymers.

  12. Thermodynamics of tubelike flexible polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Vogel; Thomas Neuhaus; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2009-07-17

    In this work we present the general phase behavior of short tubelike flexible polymers. The geometric thickness constraint is implemented through the concept of the global radius of curvature. We use sophisticated Monte Carlo sampling methods to simulate small bead-stick polymer models with Lennard-Jones interaction among non-bonded monomers. We analyze energetic fluctuations and structural quantities to classify conformational pseudophases. We find that the tube thickness influences the thermodynamic behavior of simple tubelike polymers significantly, i.e., for given temperature, the formation of secondary structures strongly depends on the tube thickness.

  13. Preparation of silica stabilized biological templates for the production of metal and layered nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Culver, James N; Royston, Elizabeth; Brown, Adam; Harris, Michael

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to a system and method providing for increased silica growth on a bio-template, wherein the bio-template is pretreated with aniline to produce a uniform silica attractive surface and yielding a significant silica layers of at least 10 nm, and more preferably at least 20 nm in thickness, thereby providing for a high degree of stability to the bio-template.

  14. Extensional rheology of shear-thickening fumed silica nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    polyethylene oxide solution Sunilkumar Khandavalli and Jonathan P. Rothsteina) Mechanical and Industrial rheology of fumed silica nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous polyethylene oxide (PEO) solution

  15. Synthesis of Mesocellular Silica Foams with Tunable Window and Cell Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    Polystyrene microspheres coated with cationic surfactants are easily prepared by micro- emulsion templates. These silica foams resemble dense aerogels. Introduction Because of their greatly enhanced pore

  16. Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-12-01

    We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

  17. Covalent functionalization of metal oxide and carbon nanostructures with polyoctasilsesquioxane (POSS) and their incorporation in polymer composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomathi, A.; Gopalakrishnan, K.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2010-12-15

    Polyoctasilsesquioxane (POSS) has been employed to covalently functionalize nanostructures of TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as well as carbon nanotubes, nanodiamond and graphene to enable their dispersion in polar solvents. Covalent functionalization of these nanostructures with POSS has been established by electron microscopy, EDAX analysis and infrared spectroscopy. On heating the POSS-functionalized nanostructures, silica-coated nanostructures are obtained. POSS-functionalized nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and graphite were utilized to prepare polymer-nanostructure composites based on PVA and nylon-6,6.

  18. Characterization of macro-length conducting polymers and the development of a conducting polymer rotary motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bryan D. (Bryan David), 1981-

    2005-01-01

    Conducting polymers are a subset of materials within the electroactive polymer class that exhibit active mechanical deformations. These deformations induce stresses and strains that allow for conducting polymers to be used ...

  19. Constitutive modeling of active polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Therkelsen, Scott V. (Scott Vincent), 1980-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis develops a three-dimensional constitutive model of active polymeric materials, including changes in material volume and properties due to actuation. Active polymers reversibly change shape, volume and/or material ...

  20. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  1. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  2. A conjugated polymer plastic gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We present a gel route to process highly oriented conjugated polymer films and fibers. The incorporation of hexafluoroisopropanol, a strong and stable dipolar group, to the polythiophene backbone enhances the solubility ...

  3. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  4. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  5. Polymer Bose--Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Castellanos; G. Chacon-Acosta

    2013-01-22

    In this work we analyze a non--interacting one dimensional polymer Bose--Einstein condensate in an harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose--Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for $\\lambda^{2}$ up to $ \\lesssim 10 ^{-16}$m$^2$. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  6. Polyphosphazine-based polymer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Avci, Recep; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2010-05-25

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  7. Exploring Polymer and Liposomal Carriers for Optimized Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    1459–1467. Fox, M. E. Dendritic polymers for the delivery ofiii Chapter 1: Introduction to Polymer and Liposome Drugbioavailability. Conclusions Polymers and liposomes can be

  8. Optimizing Morphology of Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells A dissertation submittedBulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells by Jing Gao Doctorheterojunction polymer solar cells is profoundly influenced

  9. Polymers and Coatings:Materials Science & Technology, MST-7:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polymer sample Applied Polymer Research scintillator Characterization and Forensics aerogels Fundamental Polymer Research hipjoint Surface Science and Coatings white light Target...

  10. Coordination polymers and building blocks based on ditopic heteroscorpionate ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santillan, Guillermo A.

    2009-01-01

    of Silver (I) Coordination Polymers formed through hydrogenBlocks for Coordination Polymers” Inorg. Chem. *One of theof Silver(I) Coordination Polymers Formed through Hydrogen

  11. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Polymer and Composite Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    oxidation of selected polymers using an atmospheric pressuremorphological modification of polymers under a helium-oxygenand dicyclopentadiene polymer, Submitted to Carbon for

  12. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Recent Developments in Polymer MEMS. Advanced Materials,using thin silicon/polymer bimorph membranes. Sensors andof cantilever arrays reveal polymer film expansion and

  13. High cation transport polymer electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL)

    2007-06-05

    A solid state ion conducting electrolyte and a battery incorporating same. The electrolyte includes a polymer matrix with an alkali metal salt dissolved therein, the salt having an anion with a long or branched chain having not less than 5 carbon or silicon atoms therein. The polymer is preferably a polyether and the salt anion is preferably an alkyl or silyl moiety of from 5 to about 150 carbon/silicon atoms.

  14. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  15. High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles and Polymers Enabled by Vapor Permeable Polymer Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demko, Michael Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Stress in a Solvent-Cast Thermoplastic Coating. Journal ofcrosslinker, or a thermoplastic polymer which is raisedlidify the liquefied thermoplastic polymer (thermal NIL). 82

  16. Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

    2013-06-18

    Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

  17. Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

    2012-03-19

    Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

  18. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akka?, Ay?e; Ba?yi?it, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  19. The adiabatic adsorption-desorption characteristics of silica gel beds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, James Marshall

    1979-01-01

    -desorpt1on characteristics of silica gel beds are i nvest1gated . The mathematical equations that descry 1 be desiccant bed behav1or are formulated and solved numer1cally us1ng f1nite difference methods. The equat1ons are derived such that both... of the finite d1fference program. The functional relationships are sufficiently accurate for most design purposes, and are r ead1 ly adaptable for use 1 n parametric studies of desiccant air condi t1 on1ng systems . DEDICATION Dedicated to My Parents...

  20. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  1. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditons. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  2. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Bernalillo, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  3. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  4. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  5. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1999-05-11

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  6. Optical and radiographical characterization of silica aerogel for Cherenkov radiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Yoshikiyo Hatakeyama; Hideyuki Kawai; Takeshi Morita; Keiko Nishikawa

    2012-07-17

    We present optical and X-ray radiographical characterization of silica aerogels with refractive index from 1.05 to 1.07 for a Cherenkov radiator. A novel pin-drying method enables us to produce highly transparent hydrophobic aerogels with high refractive index by shrinking wet-gels. In order to investigate the uniformity in the density (i.e., refractive index) of an individual aerogel monolith, we use the laser Fraunhofer method, an X-ray absorption technique, and Cherenkov imaging by a ring imaging Cherenkov detector in a beam test. We observed an increase in density at the edge of the aerogel tiles, produced by pin-drying.

  7. Optical and radiographical characterization of silica aerogel for Cherenkov radiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Yoshikiyo; Kawai, Hideyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    We present optical and X-ray radiographical characterization of silica aerogels with refractive index from 1.05 to 1.07 for a Cherenkov radiator. A novel pin-drying method enables us to produce highly transparent hydrophobic aerogels with high refractive index by shrinking wet-gels. In order to investigate the uniformity in the density (i.e., refractive index) of an individual aerogel monolith, we use the laser Fraunhofer method, an X-ray absorption technique, and Cherenkov imaging by a ring imaging Cherenkov detector in a beam test. We observed an increase in density at the edge of the aerogel tiles, produced by pin-drying.

  8. Patterning of silica microsphere monolayers with focused femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Wenjian; Piestun, Rafael

    2006-03-13

    We demonstrate the patterning of monolayer silica microsphere lattices with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses. We selectively removed microspheres from a lattice and characterized the effect on the lattice and the substrate. The proposed physical mechanism for the patterning process is laser-induced breakdown followed by ablation of material. We show that a microsphere focuses radiation in its interior and in the near field. This effect plays an important role in the patterning process by enhancing resolution and accuracy and by reducing the pulse energy threshold for damage. Microsphere patterning could create controlled defects within self-assembled opal photonic crystals.

  9. Probing the adhesion of submicron thin films fabricated on a polymer substrate via nano-transfer printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    Probing the adhesion of submicron thin films fabricated on a polymer substrate via nano- transfer.1088/0960-1317/22/9/095002 Probing the adhesion of submicron thin films fabricated on a polymer substrate via nano-transfer printing/095002 Abstract Determining the interfacial adhesion of ultrathin functional films in micro

  10. RECYCLING OF LATEX BASED PAINT AS POLYMER FEEDSTOCK MATERIALS Jennifer K. Lynch, Thomas J. Nosker, Robert Hamill, Richard L. Lehman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECYCLING OF LATEX BASED PAINT AS POLYMER FEEDSTOCK MATERIALS Jennifer K. Lynch, Thomas J. Nosker investigates the recycling of used latex paints into non-paint products. Waste latex paint was collected, dried mechanical properties and thermal properties of paint/HDPE and paint/PMMA polymer blends were determined

  11. Biodegradation of polymer coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.R.; Walch, M.; Jones-Meehan, J.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional paint removal methods include chemical stripping with VOCs blasting with plastic media, and delamination with high pressure water. These methods have many limitations, in that they are labor intensive, pose human health risks, are relatively expensive and pose significant waste disposal problems. However, polymeric coatings are known to contain structural components, such as ester, amide and urea linkages, that can be degraded biologically. The authors are working to develop a stable, enzyme-based, non-toxic paint stripping strategy that will be environmentally safe and cost effective. The specific objectives are to identify and characterize microbial systems capable of degrading polymeric coatings, to develop a quantitative degradation assay and to optimize activity levels for subsequent purification and concentration of the biological products required for rapid degradation of coatings. A water-dispersed colloid of an ester-based polyurethane polymer has been used in solid growth medium to screen about 100 different bacteria for microbial degradation activity. Those with demonstrable activity have been grown in the presence of epoxy-polyamide paint- and polyester polyurethane paint-coated aluminum coupons. The authors have demonstrated delamination under certain conditions and have developed a spectrophotometric method for quantitating degradation activity as a function of dye release.

  12. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  13. Preparation of silica aerogels with improved mechanical properties and extremely low thermal conductivities through modified sol-gel process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Yanjia

    2010-01-01

    Reported silica aerogels have a thermal conductivity as low as 15 mW/mK. The fragility of silica aerogels, however, makes them impractical for structural applications. The purpose of the study is to improve the ductility ...

  14. Sedimentology and geochemistry of Archean silica granules Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 1XX, no. XX/XX 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Sedimentology and geochemistry of Archean silica granules Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 1XX, no. XX/XX 1 Sedimentology and geochemistry of Archean silica granules Elizabeth J.T. Stefurak1

  15. The size and polydispersity of silica nanoparticles under simulated hot spring conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    of silica in active geothermal systems is a well-known process leading to the silicification was induced by a pH change, yet in natural systems (e.g. geothermal pools) silica polymerization-through geothermal simu- lator system where polymerization was induced by rapid cooling. Changes in [SiO2], IS

  16. Integrated Optical Orbital Angular Momentum Multiplexing Device using 3-D Waveguides and a Silica PLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    PLC Binbin Guan,1 Ryan P. Scott,1 Nicolas K. Fontaine,2 Tiehui Su,1 Carlo Ferrari,3 Mark Cappuzzo,3 on a silica planar lightwave circuit (PLC) coupled to a 3-D photonic circuit that efficiently generates planar lightwave circuit (PLC) with a silica 3-D PIC that supports up to 15 OAM modes, both TE and TM

  17. DENSIFICATION AS THE ONLY MECHANISM AT STAKE DURING INDENTATION OF SILICA GLASS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    DENSIFICATION AS THE ONLY MECHANISM AT STAKE DURING INDENTATION OF SILICA GLASS? Vincent Keryvin1 mariette.nivard@univ-rennes1.fr, f jean-christophe.sangleboeuf@univ-rennes1.fr Keywords: Indentation; Glass; Densification; Plasticity; Imprint; Modeling; Finite-Element Analysis; Fused quartz Abstract. Silica glass

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Metal Clusters Supported on Graphene and Silica Thin Film 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zihao

    2012-10-19

    reveal that the geometric and/or electronic structure of graphene can be adjusted correspondingly. In the study of the silica thin film system, the structure of silica was carefully investigated and our STM images favor for the [SiO4] cluster model...

  19. Stress dependent activation entropy for dynamic fatigue of pristine silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Stress dependent activation entropy for dynamic fatigue of pristine silica optical fibers Y. S Subcritical crack growth in fused silica is treated as a stress assisted chemical reaction between water the stress reduces the energy barrier of the activated complex by affecting both the activation enthalpy

  20. Multicomponent Transport of Sulfate in a Goethite-Silica Sand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Multicomponent Transport of Sulfate in a Goethite-Silica Sand System at Variable pH and Ionic sand column. The agreement between the experiments and the predictions is very good, especially of a goethite-coated silica sand column, which is similar to systems used in our earlier work (1, 2

  1. Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers J Available online 30 March 2006 Abstract The mechanical and optical properties of dual-coated optical fibers with silica nanoparticles added to the secondary (outer) coating have been investigated. Incorporation

  2. Friction and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Silica and CNT Nanofluids in a Tube Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Friction and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Silica and CNT Nanofluids in a Tube Flow MILIVOJE M@niu.edu * www.kostic.niu.edu Abstract: - An apparatus for exploring friction and heat transfer characteristics flow. Initial turbulent friction and heat transfer measurements for silica and carbon nanotube (CNT

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of brittle fracture in vitreous silica: Review and recent progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    Molecular dynamics studies of brittle fracture in vitreous silica: Review and recent progress, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Abstract The dynamics of brittle fracture in vitreous silica has been a subject surrounding the voids. Ó 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Fracture in brittle materials

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of atomic-level brittle fracture mechanisms in amorphous silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    Molecular dynamics simulations of atomic-level brittle fracture mechanisms in amorphous silica Abstract We have examined the atomic dynamics of the brittle fracture process in amorphous silica using the change in local coordina- tion of atoms. Introduction The brittle fracture process has been a subject

  5. Helicoidal precipitation patterns in silica and agarose gels Shibi Thomas a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rácz, Zoltán

    Helicoidal precipitation patterns in silica and agarose gels Shibi Thomas a , George Varghese b patterns grown in agarose and silica gels were studied using reaction­diffusion­precipitation processes a complex interplay among the unstable precipitation modes, the motion of the reaction front, and the noise

  6. Test Method Extensional viscosity of a thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    Test Method Extensional viscosity of a thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer measured by thread the extensional viscosity of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer: disintegration of liquid crystalline polymer liquid crystalline polymer (TLCP) 1. Introduction The structure and orientation of thermotropic liquid

  7. Characterization of zirconia- and niobia-silica mixture coatings produced by ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Tolenis, Tomas; Mazule, Lina; Mirauskas, Julius; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Mangote, Benoit; Fu Xinghai; Zerrad, Myriam; Gallais, Laurent; Commandre, Mireille; Kicas, Simonas; Drazdys, Ramutis

    2011-03-20

    ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} mixture coatings as well as those of pure zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), niobia (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) deposited by ion-beam sputtering were investigated. Refractive-index dispersions, bandgaps, and volumetric fractions of materials in mixed coatings were analyzed from spectrophotometric data. Optical scattering, surface roughness, nanostructure, and optical resistance were also studied. Zirconia-silica mixtures experience the transition from crystalline to amorphous phase by increasing the content of SiO{sub 2}. This also results in reduced surface roughness. All niobia and silica coatings and their mixtures were amorphous. The obtained laser-induced damage thresholds in the subpicosecond range also correlates with respect to the silica content in both zirconia- and niobia-silica mixtures.

  8. The LHCb RICH silica aerogel performance with LHC data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perego, D L

    2010-01-01

    In the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, powerful charged particle identification is performed by Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technology. In order to cover the full geometric acceptance and the wide momentum range (1-100 GeV/c), two detectors with three Cherenkov radiators have been designed and installed. In the medium (10-40 GeV/c) and high (30-100 GeV/c) momentum range, gas radiators are used (C4F10 and CF4 respectively). In the low momentum range (1 to a few GeV/c) pion/kaon/proton separation will be done with photons produced in solid silica aerogel. A set of 16 tiles, with the large transverse dimensions ever (20x20 cm$^2$) and nominal refractive index 1.03 have been produced. The tiles have excellent optical properties and homogeneity of refractive index within the tile of ~1%. The first data collected at LHC are used to understand the behaviour of the RICH: preliminary results will be presented and discussed on the performance of silica aerogel and of the gas radiators C4F10 and CF4.

  9. Dynamic behavior of interfacila water at the silica surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Cole, David R [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics properties of water at the silica-liquid interface at ambient temperature. Three different degrees of hydroxylation of a crystalline silica surface were used. To assess the water dynamic properties we calculated the residence probability and in-plane mean square displacement as a function of distance from the surface. The data indicate that water molecules at the fully hydroxylated surface remain longer, on average, in the interfacial region than in the other cases. By assessing the dynamics of molecular dipole moment and hydrogen-hydrogen vector an anisotropic reorientation was discovered for interfacial water in contact with any of the surfaces considered. However, the features of the anisotropic reorientation observed for water molecules depend strongly on the relative orientation of interfacial water molecules and their interactions with surface hydroxyl groups. On the partially hydroxylated surface, where water molecules with hydrogen-down and hydrogen-up orientation are both found, those water molecules associated with surface hydroxyl groups remain at the adsorbed locations longer and reorient slower than the other water molecules. A number of equilibrium properties, including density profiles, hydrogen bond networks, charge densities, and dipole moment densities are also reported to explain the dynamics results.

  10. Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Study of Silica Aerogels and Adsorbed Molecular Jiangquan Zhang and D. Grischkowsky*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Study of Silica Aerogels and Adsorbed Molecular Vapors Jiangquan time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) study of hydrophobic and hydrophilic silica aerogels, and the adsorption of several molecular vapors in the hydrophilic silica aerogel. The hydrophobic and hydrophilic

  11. Polymer Welding: Strength Through Entanglements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting Ge; Flint Pierce; Dvora Perahia; Gary S. Grest; Mark O. Robbins

    2012-11-29

    Large-scale simulations of thermal welding of polymers are performed to investigate the rise of mechanical strength at the polymer-polymer interface with the welding time. The welding process is in the core of integrating polymeric elements into devices as well as in thermal induced healing of polymers; processes that require development of interfacial strength equal to that of the bulk. Our simulations show that the interfacial strength saturates at the bulk shear strength much before polymers diffuse by their radius of gyration. Along with the strength increase, the dominant failure mode changes from chain pullout at the interface to chain scission as in the bulk. Formation of sufficient entanglements across the interface, which we track using a Primitive Path Analysis is required to arrest catastrophic chain pullout at the interface. The bulk response is not fully recovered until the density of entanglements at the interface reaches the bulk value. Moreover, the increase of interfacial strength before saturation is proportional to the number of interfacial entanglements between chains from opposite sides.

  12. Compressive Strength of Gamma-Irradiated Polymer Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    ­5]. Several silica sands have been used in the foundry industry: (a) Type 6/16 [particle size distribution 2 concrete (PC) was developed by using differ- ent concentrations of silica sand as aggregate and corrosion resistance. Let us first make a survey of PCs used so far. Silica sand, gravel, or fly ash

  13. Chemical Engineering 3Q03 Introduction to Polymer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    27247 grahal5@mcmaster.ca Textbook: Polymer Science & Technology, 2nd edition by Joel R. Fried1 Chemical Engineering 3Q03 Introduction to Polymer Science Term II 2013 Instructor: Dr. Emily Objectives: -Introduce polymer science for advanced polymer courses (Polymer Processing, Polymer Reaction

  14. Solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, T.F.

    1992-07-01

    A transport model for polymer electrolytes is presented, based on concentrated solution theory and irreversible thermodynamics. Thermodynamic driving forces are developed, transport properties are identified and experiments devised. Transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane is determined using a concentration cell. It is 1.4 for a membrane equilibrated with saturated water vapor at 25{degrees}C, decreases slowly as the membrane is dehydrated, and falls sharply toward zero as the water content approaches zero. The relation between transference number, transport number, and electroosmotic drag coefficient is presented, and their relevance to water-management is discussed. A mathematical model of transport in a solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cell is presented. A two-dimensional membrane-electrode assembly is considered. Water management, thermal management, and utilization of fuel are examined in detail. The membrane separators of these fuel cells require sorbed water to maintain conductivity; therefore it is necessary to manage the water content in membranes to ensure efficient operation. Water and thermal management are interrelated. Rate of heat removal is shown to be a critical parameter in the operation of these fuel cells. Current-voltage curves are presented for operation on air and reformed methanol. Equations for convective diffusion to a rotating disk are solved numerically for a consolute point between the bulk concentration and the surface. A singular-perturbation expansion is presented for the condition where the bulk concentration is nearly equal to the consolute-point composition. Results are compared to Levich's solution and analysis.

  15. Holographically Directed Assembly of Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    V. Braun*, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute, Frederick Seitz, and clays.10 Other groups have as- sembled zirconia,11 13 titania,12,14,15 doped LaPO4,16 silica,17

  16. Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films profiling of polymer films and multilayers using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Deuterium substitution has traditionally been used in depth profiling of polymers but can affect the phase behavior

  17. ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics. Prof. Rama Bansil Class: Blackboard.bu.edu ME/MS/BE 504 PY 744 A1 POLYMERS AND SOFT MATERIALS (FALL 2012) (12FALLENGME504_A1) E with thermodynamics and statistical mechanics will be assumed. Practical applications of polymers will be discussed

  18. Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Non-bulk Polymer Interphases in Nanotube-reinforced Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Non-bulk Polymer Interphases in Nanotube-reinforced Polymers polymer composite materials with outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. A hurdle to nanoscale interactions between the embedded NTs and adjacent polymer chains. This interphase region

  19. Confining multiple polymers between sticky walls: a directed walk model of two polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rechnitzer, Andrew

    Confining multiple polymers between sticky walls: a directed walk model of two polymers Thomas Wong 30, 2014 Abstract We study a model of two polymers confined to a slit with sticky walls. More on the square lattice. We compare the infinite slit limit, in which the length of the polymer (thermodynamic

  20. Nanoimprint Lithography for Functional Polymer Patterning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Dehu

    2012-02-14

    controlling the electrical and photophysical properties of conjugated polymers by nanoimprint. Systematic investigation of polymer chain configuration by Raman spectroscopy is carried out to understand how nanoimprint process parameters, such as mold pattern...

  1. Lubrication by charged polymers , Suzanne Giasson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    .............................................................. Lubrication by charged polymers Uri lubricants between sliding charged surfaces8 . Here we show that brushes of charged polymers (polyelectro- lytes) attached to surfaces rubbing across an aqueous medium result in superior lubrication compared

  2. Dynamics of Polymers in Flowing Colloidal Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hsieh

    Using hydrodynamic simulations we examine the behavior of single polymers in a confined colloidal suspension under flow. We study the conformations of both, collapsed and noncollapsed polymers. Our results show that the ...

  3. The challenges of organic polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saif Addin, Burhan K. (Burhan Khalid)

    2011-01-01

    The technical and commercial prospects of polymer solar cells were evaluated. Polymer solar cells are an attractive approach to fabricate and deploy roll-to-roll processed solar cells that are reasonably efficient (total ...

  4. Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacFadden, K.O.

    1998-06-30

    A polymer bonded sheet product is described suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance. 1 fig.

  5. Modeling and optimization of Interpenetrating polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    to design new materials ­ Key characteristic : Tough & flexible · High value material Huge market industry 3 Bone implantScaffol d Automotive parts Full network Semi- network Polymer A Polymer B Fig. 1 IPN

  6. Quantitative Modeling of Polymer Scratch Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mohammad Motaher

    2013-12-02

    and pressure dependent behavior of polymers, and the surface condition of the interacting surfaces also add to the complexity. In order to gain in-depth understanding of polymer scratch behavior; this dissertation focuses on numerical analysis and experimental...

  7. Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD)

    1998-01-01

    A polymer bonded sheet product suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance.

  8. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  9. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  10. Configurations of polymers attached to probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bubis, Roy

    We study polymers attached to spherical (circular) or paraboloidal (parabolic) probes in three (two) dimensions. Both self-avoiding and random walks are examined numerically. The behavior of a polymer of size R[subscript ...

  11. Two-photon induced fluorescence and other optical effects in irradiated and doped fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, S.D.

    1986-07-01

    The objective of this program was to assess and identify irradiation techniques which could be used to modify the optical charactistics of doped fused silica. Primary emphasis was placed on determining if gamma ray or neutron bombardment of the glass would enhance certain Raman and nonlinear optical effects. In particular, the effect of irradiation on optical two photon induced fluorescence was studied in detail. The maximum radiation exposures used were 10/sup 6/ rads (Si) of gamma rays and neutron fluences of 1 x 10/sup 14/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/. The optical measurements were made at room temperature between one and four months after irradiation. The maximum input light intensity was 10/sup 9/ watts/cm/sup 2/ at a near infrared (1.06 ..mu..) input wavelength which was chosen to lie in a transparent spectral region of the glass. Under these experimental conditions a careful search revealed no detectable two-photon induced fluorescence in the region from 550 to 900 nm. The upper limit for the photon efficiency of this process was determined to be less than 1 x 10/sup -10/%. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  13. Silica–silica Polyimide Buffered Optical Fibre Irradiation and Strength Experiment at Cryogenic Temperatures for 355 nm Pulsed Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takala, E; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Bremer, J; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    A controlled UV-light delivery system is envisioned to be built in order to study the stability properties of superconducting strands. The application requires a wave guide from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Hydrogen loaded and unloaded polyimide buffered silica–silica 100 microm core fibres were tested at cryogenic temperatures. A thermal stress test was done at 1.9 K and at 4.2 K which shows that the minimal mechanical bending radius for the fibre can be 10 mm for testing (transmission was not measured). The cryogenic transmission loss was measured for one fibre to assess the magnitude of the transmission decrease due to microbending that takes place during cooldown. UV-irradiation degradation measurements were done for bent fibres at 4.2 K with a deuterium lamp and 355 nm pulsed lasers. The irradiation tests show that the fibres have transmission degradation only for wavelengths smaller than 330 nm due to the two photon absorption. The test demonstrates that the fibres are suitable for the ...

  14. Determining the Preston constants of low-dielectric-constant polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the manufacture of integrated circuits (ICs) is the Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) process. In order to effectively use CMP, the removal rates of the materials used in ICs must be known. The removal ...

  15. Using Theory to Model Polymer Properties There are two general themes to this research: (1) polymer degradation that occurs when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the polymer with nanoinclusions of carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets and other structures. PolymerUsing Theory to Model Polymer Properties There are two general themes to this research: (1) polymer degradation that occurs when polymers are exposed to low earth orbit conditions, and (2) polymer mechanical

  16. Intermolecular Adhesion in Conjugated Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy D. Schmit; Alex J. Levine

    2006-10-25

    Conjugated polymers are observed to aggregate in solution. To account for this observation we propose a inter-chain binding mechanism based on the intermolecular tunneling of the delocalized $\\pi$-electrons occurring at points where the polymers cross. This tunneling mechanism predicts specific bound structures of chain that depend on whether they are semiconducting or metallic. Semiconducting chains should form polyacene-like states exhibiting binding at every other site, while (doped) metallic chains can bind at each site. We also show that solitons co-localize with the intermolecular binding sites thereby strengthening the binding effect and investigate the conformational statistics of the resulting bimolecular aggregates.

  17. Polymer / Elastomer and Composite Material Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymer / Elastomer and Composite Material Science KEVIN L. SIMMONS Pacific Northwest National in the hydrogen system Automotive vs infrastructure Hydrogen use conditions Polymer/elastomer and composites and piping Material issues Polymers/Elastomers Composites Questions 2 #12;Main Points to Remember 1

  18. Nordic Polymer Days 2006 Copenhagen, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Nordic Polymer Days 2006 Copenhagen, Denmark Polyacrylamide nanosensor embedded Scharff-Poulsen, c Hong Gu, d Wolf B. Fromme, b Iver Jakobsen, a Kristoffer Almdal a The Danish Polymer-linked polymer in nanometer scale, have several advantages over direct loading of cells with fluorescent probes

  19. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1998-01-01

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

  20. North Dakota State University Postoc Biobased Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    North Dakota State University Postoc ­ Biobased Polymers A postdoctoral position is available in the area of synthesis and characterization of novel biobased thermosetting polymer systems for coatings will include the synthesis of monomers and polymers, preparation of coatings, thermosets, etc., preparation

  1. Selfattractive random polymers Remco van der Hofstad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klenke, Achim

    Self­attractive random polymers Remco van der Hofstad Stieltjes Institute of Mathematics Delft polymer of finite length in Zd . Its law is that of a finite simple random walk path in Zd receiving that for > the attraction dominates the repulsion, i.e., with high probability the polymer is contained in a finite box

  2. Polymers in a Vacuum J. M. Deutsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutsch, Josh

    Polymers in a Vacuum J. M. Deutsch Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz polymer molecules are found in a vacuum, and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum The properties of polymer chains have been investigated extensively over the past 50 years [1], but the vast

  3. Morphology and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Morphology and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers R. J. KLINE AND M. D. McGEHEE Department charge transport and morphology is key to increasing the charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymers to provide insight into how the charge carriers move through a conjugated polymer film and provide a model

  4. Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization Z. Bayindir, Y. Sun polymer cantilevers. Atomic force microscopy has been used to characterize the mechanical properties orders of magnitude smaller than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk polymer.6 If correct

  5. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  6. SEC data for polymer 1-6: UV-vis spectra for polymer 1-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Results SEC data for polymer 1-6: UV-vis spectra for polymer 1-6: UPS data for polymer 1-6 (Eg estimated from UV-vis): Energy levels in a photovoltaic device with 5 and PCBM: Low band gap polymers for organic solar cells Eva Bundgaard a,b and Frederik C. Krebs a a Polymer Solar Cell Initiative, The Danish

  7. Improved Mobility Control for Carbon Dioxide (CO{sub 2}) Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Silica-Polymer-Initiator (SPI) Gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Kenneth

    2014-01-31

    SPI gels are multi-component silicate based gels for improving (areal and vertical) conformance in oilfield enhanced recovery operations, including water-floods and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) floods, as well as other applications. SPI mixtures are like-water when pumped, but form light up to very thick, paste-like gels in contact with CO{sub 2}. When formed they are 3 to 10 times stronger than any gelled polyacrylamide gel now available, however, they are not as strong as cement or epoxy, allowing them to be washed / jetted out of the wellbore without drilling. This DOE funded project allowed 8 SPI field treatments to be performed in 6 wells (5 injection wells and 1 production well) in 2 different fields with different operators, in 2 different basins (Gulf Coast and Permian) and in 2 different rock types (sandstone and dolomite). Field A was in a central Mississippi sandstone that injected CO{sub 2} as an immiscible process. Field B was in the west Texas San Andres dolomite formation with a mature water-alternating-gas miscible CO{sub 2} flood. Field A treatments are now over 1 year old while Field B treatments have only 4 months data available under variable WAG conditions. Both fields had other operational events and well work occurring before/ during / after the treatments making definitive evaluation difficult. Laboratory static beaker and dynamic sand pack tests were performed with Ottawa sand and both fields’ core material, brines and crude oils to improve SPI chemistry, optimize SPI formulations, ensure SPI mix compatibility with field rocks and fluids, optimize SPI treatment field treatment volumes and methods, and ensure that strong gels set in the reservoir. Field quality control procedures were designed and utilized. Pre-treatment well (surface) injectivities ranged from 0.39 to 7.9 MMCF/psi. The SPI treatment volumes ranged from 20.7 cubic meters (m{sup 3}, 5460 gallons/ 130 bbls) to 691 m{sup 3} (182,658 gallons/ 4349 bbls). Various size and types of chemical/ water buffers before and after the SPI mix ensured that pre-gelled SPI mix got out into the formation before setting into a gel. SPI gels were found to be 3 to 10 times stronger than any commercially available cross-linked polyacrylamide gels based on Penetrometer and Bulk Gel Shear Testing. Because of SPI’s unique chemistry with CO{sub 2}, both laboratory and later field tests demonstrated that multiple, smaller volume SPI treatments maybe more effective than one single large SPI treatment. CO{sub 2} injectivities in injection well in both fields were reduced by 33 to 70% indicating that injected CO{sub 2} is now going into new zones. This reduction has lasted 1+ year in Field A. Oil production increased and CO{sub 2} production decreased in 5 Field A production wells, offsets to Well #1 injector, for a total of about 2,250 m{sup 3} (600,000 gallons/ 14,250 bbls) of incremental oil production- a $140 / SPI bbl return. Treated marginal production well, Field A Well #2, immediately began showing increased oil production totaling 238 m{sup 3} (63,000 gallons/ 1500 BBLs) over 1 year and an immediate 81% reduced gas-oil ratio.

  8. Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to silica diagenesis: The opal-A to opal-CT transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, S.B.; Freund, H.; Huang, W.L.; Clouse, J.A.; Isaacs, C.M.

    1995-10-02

    An important goal in silica diagenesis research is to understand the kinetics of opal transformation from noncrystalline opal-A to the disordered silica polymorph opal-CT. Because the conventional technique for monitoring the transformation, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), is applicable only to phases with long-range order, the authors used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to monitor the transformation. They applied this technique, combined with XRD and TEM, to experimental run products and natural opals from the Monterey Formation and from siliceous deposits in the western Pacific Ocean. Using a ratio of two infrared absorption intensities ({omega} = I{sub 472 cm{sup {minus}1}}/I{sub 500 cm{sup {minus}1}}), the relative proportions of opal-A and opal-CT can be determined. The progress of the transformation is marked by changes in slope of {omega} vs. depth or time when a sufficient stratigraphic profile is available. There are three stages in the opal-A to opal-CT reaction: (1) opal-A dissolution; (2) opal-CT precipitation, whose end point is marked by completion of opal-A dissolution; and (3) opal-CT ordering, during which tridymite stacking is eliminated in favor of crystobalite stacking.

  9. Encapsulated in silica: genome, proteome and physiology of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw, Jimmy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mountain, Bruce W [NEW ZEALAND; Feng, Lu [NANKAI UNIV; Omelchenko, Marina V [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Hou, Shaobin [UNIV OF HAWAII; Saito, Jennifer A [UNIV OF HAWAII; Stott, Matthew B [NEW ZEALAND; Li, Dan [NANKAI UNIV; Zhao, Guang [NANKAI UNIV; Wu, Junli [NANKAI UNIV; Galperin, Michael Y [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Koonin, Eugene V [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Makarova, Kira S [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Wolf, Yuri I [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Rigden, Daniel J [UNIV OF LIVERPOOL; Dunfield, Peter F [UNIV OF CALGARY; Wang, Lei [NANKAI UNIV; Alam, Maqsudul [UNIV OF HAWAII

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Anoxybacillus have been found in diverse thermophilic habitats, such as geothermal hot springs and manure, and in processed foods such as gelatin and milk powder. Anoxybacillus flavithermus is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium found in super-saturated silica solutions and in opaline silica sinter. The ability of A. flavithermus to grow in super-saturated silica solutions makes it an ideal subject to study the processes of sinter formation, which might be similar to the biomineralization processes that occurred at the dawn of life. We report here the complete genome sequence of A. flavithermus strain WK1, isolated from the waste water drain at the Wairakei geothermal power station in New Zealand. It consists of a single chromosome of 2,846,746 base pairs and is predicted to encode 2,863 proteins. In silico genome analysis identified several enzymes that could be involved in silica adaptation and biofilm formation, and their predicted functions were experimentally validated in vitro. Proteomic analysis confirmed the regulation of biofilm-related proteins and crucial enzymes for the synthesis of long-chain polyamines as constituents of silica nanospheres. Microbial fossils preserved in silica and silica sinters are excellent objects for studying ancient life, a new paleobiological frontier. An integrated analysis of the A. flavithermus genome and proteome provides the first glimpse of metabolic adaptation during silicification and sinter formation. Comparative genome analysis suggests an extensive gene loss in the Anoxybacillus/Geobacillus branch after its divergence from other bacilli.

  10. The Packing of Granular Polymer Chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Cheng, Xiang; Rivers, Mark L.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.; UC

    2009-12-01

    Rigid particles pack into structures, such as sand dunes on the beach, whose overall stability is determined by the average number of contacts between particles. However, when packing spatially extended objects with flexible shapes, additional concepts must be invoked to understand the stability of the resulting structure. Here, we examine the disordered packing of chains constructed out of flexibly connected hard spheres. Using x-ray tomography, we find that long chains pack into a low-density structure whose mechanical rigidity is mainly provided by the backbone. On compaction, randomly oriented, semi-rigid loops form along the chain, and the packing of chains can be understood as the jamming of these elements. Finally, we uncover close similarities between the packing of chains and the glass transition in polymers.

  11. Interfacial Widths of Conjugated Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NCSU; UC Berkeley; UCSB; Advanced Light Source; Garcia, Andres; Yan, Hongping; Sohn, Karen E.; Hexemer, Alexander; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kramer, Edward J.; Ade, Harald

    2009-08-13

    The interfaces of conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) bilayers cast from differential solvents are shown by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) to be very smooth and sharp. The chemical interdiffusion due to casting is limited to less than 0.6 nm, and the interface created is thus nearly 'molecularly' sharp. These results demonstrate for the first time and with high precision that the nonpolar MEH-PPV layer is not much disturbed by casting the CPE layer from a polar solvent. A baseline is established for understanding the role of interfacial structure in determining the performance of CPE-based polymer light-emitting diodes. More broadly, we anticipate further applications of RSoXR as an important tool in achieving a deeper understanding of other multilayer organic optoelectronic devices, including multilayer photovoltaic devices.

  12. Electronically conductive polymer composites and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, L.S.

    1993-01-01

    Composites of electronically conductive polymers with insulating host materials are investigated. A template synthesis method was developed for the production of electronically conductive polymer microstructures. In template synthesis the pores of a porous host membrane act as templates for the polymerization of a conductive polymer. The template synthetic method can be used to form either solid microfibrils or hollow microtubules. The electrochemical properties of conductive polymers produced via the template synthesis method are superior to those of conventionally synthesized conductive polymers. Electronically conductive polymers are used to impart conductivity to non-conductive materials. Two different approaches are used. First, thin film composites of conductive polymers with fluoropolymers are made by the polymerization of conductive polymers onto fluoropolymer films. Modification of the fluoropolymer surface prior to conductive polymer polymerization is necessary to obtain good adhesion between the two materials. The difference in adhesion of the conductive polymer to the modified and unmodified fluoropolymer surfaces can be used to pattern the conductive polymer coating. Patterning of the conductive polymer coating can alternatively be done via UV laser ablation of the conductive polymer. The second method by which conductive polymers were used to impart conductivity to an insulating polymer was via the formation of a graft copolymer. In this approach, heterocyclic monomers grafted to an insulating polyphosphazene backbone were polymerized to yield semiconductive materials. Finally the measurement of electrolyte concentration in polypyrrole and the effects of hydroxide anion on the electrochemical and electrical properties of polypyrrole are described. It is shown that treatment of polypyrrole with hydroxide anion increases the potential window over which polypyrrole is a good electronic conductor.

  13. Sealed, nozzle-mix burners for silica deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Meryle D. M.; Brown, John T.; Misra, Mahendra K.

    2003-07-08

    Burners (40) for producing fused silica boules are provided. The burners employ a tube-in-tube (301-306) design with flats (56, 50) on some of the tubes (305, 301) being used to limit the cross-sectional area of certain passages (206, 202) within the burner and/or to atomize a silicon-containing, liquid source material, such as OMCTS. To avoid the possibility of flashback, the burner has separate passages for fuel (205) and oxygen (204, 206), i.e., the burner employs nozzle mixing, rather than premixing, of the fuel and oxygen. The burners are installed in burner holes (26) formed in the crown (20) of a furnace and form a seal with those holes so that ambient air cannot be entrained into the furnace through the holes. An external air cooled jacket (60) can be used to hold the temperature of the burner below a prescribed upper limit, e.g., 400.degree. C.

  14. Influence of lithium hydroxide on alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.; Degrugilliers, P.

    2010-04-15

    Several papers show that the use of lithium limits the development of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of lithium's role on the alteration mechanism of ASR. The approach used is a chemical method which allowed a quantitative measurement of the specific degree of reaction of ASR. The chemical concrete sub-system used, called model reactor, is composed of the main ASR reagents: reactive aggregate, portlandite and alkaline solution. Different reaction degrees are measured and compared for different alkaline solutions: NaOH, KOH and LiOH. Alteration by ASR is observed with the same reaction degrees in the presence of NaOH and KOH, accompanied by the consumption of hydroxyl concentration. On the other hand with LiOH, ASR is very limited. Reaction degree values evolve little and the hydroxyl concentration remains about stable. These observations demonstrate that lithium ions have an inhibitor role on ASR.

  15. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, D.V.; Cash, D.L.

    1984-11-21

    A solid thermoplastic polymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infustant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  16. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Cash, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer. A solid thermoplastic lymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infusant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  17. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, Mahmoud (Sante Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  18. Enhanced photophysics of conjugated polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Liaohai (Darien, IL)

    2007-06-12

    A particulate fluorescent conjugated polymer surfactant complex and method of making and using same. The particles are between about 15 and about 50 nm and when formed from a lipsome surfactant have a charge density similar to DNA and are strongly absorbed by cancer cells.

  19. Polymer representations and geometric quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Campiglia

    2011-11-02

    Polymer representations of the Weyl algebra of linear systems provide the simplest analogues of the representation used in loop quantum gravity. The construction of these representations is algebraic, based on the Gelfand-Naimark-Segal construction. Is it possible to understand these representations from a Geometric Quantization point of view? We address this question for the case of a two dimensional phase space.

  20. Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith James Stanger

    2003-05-31

    The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-{alpha}-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by {sup 31}P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]{sub 4}, [Rh(COD){sub 2}]{sup +}BF{sub 4}{sup -}, [Rh(COD)Cl]{sub 2}, and RhCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, adsorbed on SiO{sub 2} are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H{sub 2} at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO{sub 2} are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh{sub 3}) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

  1. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwoodmore »species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.« less

  2. Mesoporous Silica-Supported Amidozirconium-Catalyzed Carbonyl Hydroboration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eedugurala, Naresh; Wang, Zhuoran; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas; Kandel, Kapil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-11-04

    The hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones using a silica-supported zirconium catalyst is reported. Reaction of Zr(NMe2)4 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) provides the catalytic material Zr(NMe2)n@MSN. Exhaustive characterization of Zr(NMe2)n@MSN with solid-state (SS)NMR and infrared spectroscopy, as well as through reactivity studies, suggests its surface structure is primarily ?SiOZr(NMe2)3. The presence of these nitrogen-containing zirconium sites is supported by 15N NMR spectroscopy, including natural abundance 15N NMR measurements using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) SSNMR. The Zr(NMe2)n@MSN material reacts with pinacolborane (HBpin) to provide Me2NBpin and the material ZrH/Bpin@MSN that is composed of interacting surface-bonded zirconium hydride and surface-bonded borane ?SiOBpinmore »moieties in an approximately 1:1 ratio, as well as zirconium sites coordinated by dimethylamine. The ZrH/Bpin@MSN is characterized by 1H/2H and 11B SSNMR and infrared spectroscopy and through its reactivity with D2. The zirconium hydride material or the zirconium amide precursor Zr(NMe2)n@MSN catalyzes the selective hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones with HBpin in the presence of functional groups that are often reduced under hydroboration conditions or are sensitive to metal hydrides, including olefins, alkynes, nitro groups, halides, and ethers. Remarkably, this catalytic material may be recycled without loss of activity at least eight times, and air-exposed materials are catalytically active. These supported zirconium centers are robust catalytic sites for carbonyl reduction and that surface-supported, catalytically reactive zirconium hydride may be generated from zirconium-amide or zirconium alkoxide sites.« less

  3. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  4. Sol-gel silica films embedding NIR- emitting Yb-quinolinolate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figus, Cristiana, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Quochi, Francesco, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Piana, Giacomo; Saba, Michele; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Cagliari, SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042, Monserrato-Cagliari (Italy); Artizzu, Flavia [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Cagliari and Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, University of Cagliari, SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042, Monserrato-Cagliari (Italy); Mercuri, Maria Laura; Serpe, Angela; Deplano, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, University of Cagliari, SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042, Monserrato-Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    Sol-gel silica thin films embedding an ytterbium quinolinolato complex (YbClQ{sub 4}) have been obtained using different alkoxides. Homogeneous, crack- and defect-free thin films of optical quality have been successfully deposited on glass substrate by dip-coating. The silica thin films have been characterized by time-resolved photoluminescence. The luminescence properties of the YbClQ{sub 4} are preserved in silica films prepared through an optimized sol-gel approach. The excited state lifetime of the lanthanide is comparable to those observed in bulk and longer than the corresponding ones in solution.

  5. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  6. Active Polymers Confer Fast Reorganization Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Swanson; Ned S. Wingreen

    2011-10-02

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime and mean length, MFPT ~ , by analogy to 1-d Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT ~ ^{1/2}. Since to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long, yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify active polymers' greater energy cost. PACS numbers: 87.10.Ed, 87.16.ad, 87.16.Ln

  7. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  8. The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dirk, Shawn M.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2010-10-01

    The lubrication of silicon surfaces with alcohol vapors has recently been demonstrated. With a sufficient concentration of pentanol vapor present, sliding of a silica ball on an oxidized silicon wafer can proceed with no measurable wear. The initial results of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analysis of wear surfaces revealed a reaction product having thickness on the order of a monolayer, and with an ion spectrum that included fragments having molecular weights of 200 or more that occurred only inside the wear tracks. The parent alcohol molecule pentanol, has molecular weight of 88amu, suggesting that reactions of adsorbed alcohols on the wearing surfaces allowed polymerization of the alcohols to form higher molecular weight species. In addition to pin-on-disk studies, lubrication of silicon surfaces with pentanol vapors has also been demonstrated using MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices. Recent investigations of the reaction mechanisms of the alcohol molecules with the oxidized silicon surfaces have shown that wearless sliding requires a concentration of the alcohol vapor that is dependent upon the contact stress during sliding, with higher stress requiring a greater concentration of alcohol. Different vapor precursors including those with acid functionality, olefins, and methyl termination also produce polymeric reaction products, and can lubricate the silica surfaces. Doping the operating environment with oxygen was found to quench the formation of the polymeric reaction product, and demonstrates that polymer formation is not necessary for wearless sliding.

  9. Polymer compositions, polymer films and methods and precursors for forming same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R; Peterson, Eric S; Orme, Christopher J

    2013-09-24

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  10. Crowding of Polymer Coils and Demixing in Nanoparticle-Polymer Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Lu; Alan R. Denton

    2011-06-24

    The Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij (AOV) model of colloid-polymer mixtures idealizes nonadsorbing polymers as effective spheres that are fixed in size and impenetrable to hard particles. Real polymer coils, however, are intrinsically polydisperse in size (radius of gyration) and may be penetrated by smaller particles. Crowding by nanoparticles can affect the size distribution of polymer coils, thereby modifying effective depletion interactions and thermodynamic stability. To analyse the influence of crowding on polymer conformations and demixing phase behaviour, we adapt the AOV model to mixtures of nanoparticles and ideal, penetrable polymer coils that can vary in size. We perform Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations, including trial nanoparticle-polymer overlaps and variations in radius of gyration. Results are compared with predictions of free-volume theory. Simulation and theory consistently predict that ideal polymers are compressed by nanoparticles and that compressibility and penetrability stabilise nanoparticle-polymer mixtures.

  11. The dynamics of silica deposition in fractures: Oxygen isotope ratios in hydrothermal silica from Yellowstone drill core Y-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1988-01-01

    The delta/sup 18/O values of 22 samples of hydrothermal chalcedony and quartz from Y-13 drill core range from /minus/7.5 to /minus/1.3/per thousand/. Most samples could not be in mineral-water isotopic equilibrium under present conditions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in quartz indicate precipitation at or above temperatures measured during drilling. Most silica appears to have precipitated from water enriched in /sup 18/O relative to present thermal water. Inferred /sup 18/O enrichments are too large in many cases to be explained by boiling and steam separation. The apparent /sup 18/O enrichment in thermal water may represent a transient dynamic effect that occurs when new fractures open, as disequilibrium increases and the local system is temporarily perturbed. This interpretation is consistent with the observed sequence of mineral deposition and delta/sup 18/O within individual fractures. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Dynamics of femtosecond laser absorption of fused silica in the ablation regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebugle, M., E-mail: lebugle@lp3.univ-mrs.fr; Sanner, N.; Varkentina, N.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the ultrafast absorption dynamics of fused silica irradiated by a single 500?fs laser pulse in the context of micromachining applications. A 60-fs-resolution pump-probe experiment that measures the reflectivity and transmissivity of the target under excitation is developed to reveal the evolution of plasma absorption. Above the ablation threshold, an overcritical plasma with highly non-equilibrium conditions is evidenced in a thin layer at the surface. The maximum electron density is reached at a delay of 0.5?ps after the peak of the pump pulse, which is a strong indication of the occurrence of electronic avalanche. The results are further analyzed to determine the actual feedback of the evolution of the optical properties of the material on the pump pulse. We introduce an important new quantity, namely, the duration of absorption of the laser by the created plasma, corresponding to the actual timespan of laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung. Our results indicate an increasing contribution of plasma absorption to the total material absorption upon raising the excitation fluence above the ablation threshold. The role of transient optical properties during the energy deposition stage is characterized and our results emphasize the necessity to take it into account for better understanding and control of femtosecond laser-dielectrics interaction.

  13. Structural Assessment of D-Regions Affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction/Delayed Ettringite Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shih-Hsiang 1979-

    2012-11-12

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) and Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) on D-regions in reinforced concrete (RC) bridge bents. Four large-scale RC specimens...

  14. Petrography study of two siliceous limestones submitted to alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monnin, Y. . E-mail: monnin@ensm-douai.fr; Degrugilliers, P.; Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.

    2006-08-15

    This study presents the contribution of petrography to the comprehension of the alkali-silica reaction mechanism applied to two siliceous limestones. A petrography study was made on the two aggregates before reaction to define their relative proportions and types of reactive silica and to observe their distribution in the microstructure. Then a model reactor, constituted by the reactive siliceous limestone aggregate, portlandite and NaOH, was used to measure the swelling due to reaction of the silica with alkalis and the free expansion of the aggregates. The volume evolution between both aggregates was very different and could be explained by the preliminary petrographic study. It appears that the swelling of the aggregates is conditioned by the microstructure of the carbonated matrix, the quantity and the distribution of the reactive silica.

  15. Effects of water on chemomechanical instabilities in amorphous silica : nanoscale experiments and molecular simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Emílio César Cavalcante Melo da

    2007-01-01

    We elucidate the tensile failure mechanism of amorphous silica and the effects of water on the process, combining: (a) atomic force microscope (AFM) bending tests, (b) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and (c) molecular ...

  16. Study of the Behavior of a Commercial Scale Inhibitor on Silica Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaca Bustamante, Victor

    2010-12-14

    squeeze lifetimes in order to minimize the number of treatments, thus reducing the cost. The objective of this thesis is to study the adsorption of the commercial scale inhibitor SI onto silica sand. By investigating this intrinsic phenomenon, an optimized...

  17. Method for inhibiting silica precipitation and scaling in geothermal flow systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrar, Jackson E. (Castro Valley, CA); Lorensen, Lyman E. (Orinda, CA); Locke, Frank E. (Lafayette, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method for inhibiting silica scaling and precipitation in geothermal flow systems by on-line injection of low concentrations of cationic nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly polymeric imines, polymeric amines, and quaternary ammonium compounds.

  18. Method for inhibiting silica precipitation and scaling in geothermal flow systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrar, J.E.; Lorensen, L.E.; Locke, F.E.

    1980-06-13

    A method for inhibiting silica scaling and precipitation in geothermal flow systems by on-line injection of low concentrations of cationic nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly polymeric imines, polymeric amines, and quaternary ammonium compounds is described.

  19. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm Butler, Simon; Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin

    2014-03-15

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids.

  20. Generalized Entropy Theory of Glass Formation in Polymer Melts with Specific Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Sheng Xu; Karl F. Freed

    2015-03-21

    Chemical structure has been long recognized to greatly influence polymer glass formation, but a general molecular theory that predicts how chemical structure determines the properties of glass-forming polymers has been slow to develop. While the generalized entropy theory (GET) explains the influence of various molecular details on polymer glass formation, the application of the GET has heretofore been limited to the use of the simplest polymer model in which all united atom groups within the monomers of a species interact with a common monomer averaged van der Waals energy. However, energetic heterogeneities are ubiquitous within the monomers of real polymers, and their implications for polymer glass formation remain to be investigated theoretically. This paper uses an extension of the GET to explore the influence of energetic heterogeneities within monomers upon the nature of polymer glass formation. The present paper focuses on establishing general trends for the variation of characteristic properties of glass formation, such as the isobaric fragility parameter $m_P$ and the glass transition temperature $T_g$, with molecular details, such as the specific interactions and chain stiffness. Our computations confirm that the previously used model with monomer averaged interactions correctly captures general trends in the variation of $m_P$ and $T_g$ with various molecular parameters. More importantly, adjustment of the energetic heterogeneities within monomers alone are shown to provide an efficient mechanism for tailoring the properties of glass-forming polymers. The variations of polymer properties along iso-fragility and iso-$T_g$ lines are illustrated as important design tools for exhibiting the combined influence of specific interactions and chain stiffness.

  1. Mathematical modeling of silica deposition in Tongonan-I reinjection wells, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malate, R.C.M.; O`Sullivan, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Mathematical models of silica deposition are derived using the method of characteristics for the problem of variable rate injection into a well producing radially symmetric flow. Solutions are developed using the first order rate equation of silica deposition suggested by Rimstidt and Barnes (1980). The changes in porosity and permeability resulting from deposition are included in the models. The models developed are successfully applied in simulating the changes in injection capacity in some of the reinjection wells in Tongonan geothermal field, Philippines.

  2. Biogenic silica standing stock and export in the Santa Barbara Channel ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Biogenic silica standing stock and export in the Santa Barbara Channel ecosystem Jeffrey W. Krause-water biogenic silica (bSiO2) and deep-water bSiO2 export in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) allow variations for the surface bSiO2 dataset and accounts for ~65% of the variance. bSiO2 export is also highly

  3. Luminescent studies of fluorescent chromophore-doped silica aerogels for flat panel display applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glauser, S.A.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Lee, H.W.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The remarkable optical and electronic properties of doped and undoped silica aerogels establish their utility as unique, mulitfunctional host materials for fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for display and imaging applications. We present results on the photoluminescence, absorption, and photoluminescence excitation spectra of undoped silica aerogels and aerogels doped with Er{sup 3+}, rhodamine 6G (R6G), and fluorescein. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  4. On the mechanical quality factors of cryogenic test masses from fused silica and crystalline quartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anja Schroeter; Ronny Nawrodt; Roman Schnabel; Stuart Reid; Iain Martin; Sheila Rowan; Christian Schwarz; Torsten Koettig; Ralf Neubert; Matthias Thürk; Wolfgang Vodel; Andreas Tünnermann; Karsten Danzmann; Paul Seidel

    2007-09-27

    Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors (IGWDs) are operated at room temperature with test masses made from fused silica. Fused silica shows very low absorption at the laser wavelength of 1064 nm. It is also well suited to realize low thermal noise floors in the detector signal band since it offers low mechanical loss, i. e. high quality factors (Q factors) at room temperature. However, for a further reduction of thermal noise, cooling the test masses to cryogenic temperatures may prove an interesting technique. Here we compare the results of Q factor measurements at cryogenic temperatures of acoustic eigenmodes of test masses from fused silica and its crystalline counterpart. Our results show that the mechanical loss of fused silica increases with lower temperature and reaches a maximum at 30 K for frequencies of slightly above 10 kHz. The losses of crystalline quartz generally show lower values and even fall below the room temperature values of fused silica below 10 K. Our results show that in comparison to fused silica, crystalline quartz has a considerably narrower and lower dissipation peak on cooling and thus has more promise as a test mass material for IGDWs operated at cryogenic temperatures. The origin of the different Q factor versus temperature behavior of the two materials is discussed.

  5. Controllable synthesis of hollow mesoporous silica spheres and application as support of nano-gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Weihua Shangguan, Junnan; Jiang, Wei; Zhong, Qin

    2014-07-01

    Hollow silica spheres with mesoporous structure were synthesized by sol–gel/emulsion method. In the process, the surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used to stabilize the oil droplet and also used as structure direct agent. The diameter of the hollow silica spheres, ranging from 895 nm to 157 nm, can be controlled by changing the ratio of ethanol to water and the concentration of the surfactant as well. The shell thickness of the spheres decreased when the ratio of ethanol to water decreased. The proposed mechanism of the formation of silica spheres could elucidate the experimental results well. Furthermore, the resultant hollow mesoporous silica spheres were then employed as support of nano-gold which was used to catalyze the isomerization reaction of propylene oxide to produce allyl alcohol. - Graphical abstract: It is the schematic mechanism for the formation of hollow mesoporous silica spheres. - Highlights: • The formation mechanism of the hollow spheres is proposed. • The isomerization of propylene oxide can be catalyzed by the nano-gold/SiO{sub 2}. • The hollow silica spheres can be prepared controllably.

  6. Ris-PhD-18(EN) Patterning Biomolecules on Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-PhD-18(EN) Patterning Biomolecules on Polymer Surfaces for Applications in Life Sciences Susan on Polymer Surfaces for Applications in Life Sciences. Department: Danish Polymer Centre, Risø National: Danish Polymer Centre, Risø National Laboratory. Centre for Nanostructured polymer surfaces for medical

  7. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  8. Solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, T.F.

    1992-07-01

    A transport model for polymer electrolytes is presented, based on concentrated solution theory and irreversible thermodynamics. Thermodynamic driving forces are developed, transport properties are identified and experiments devised. Transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane is determined using a concentration cell. It is 1.4 for a membrane equilibrated with saturated water vapor at 25{degrees}C, decreases slowly as the membrane is dehydrated, and falls sharply toward zero as the water content approaches zero. The relation between transference number, transport number, and electroosmotic drag coefficient is presented, and their relevance to water-management is discussed. A mathematical model of transport in a solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cell is presented. A two-dimensional membrane-electrode assembly is considered. Water management, thermal management, and utilization of fuel are examined in detail. The membrane separators of these fuel cells require sorbed water to maintain conductivity; therefore it is necessary to manage the water content in membranes to ensure efficient operation. Water and thermal management are interrelated. Rate of heat removal is shown to be a critical parameter in the operation of these fuel cells. Current-voltage curves are presented for operation on air and reformed methanol. Equations for convective diffusion to a rotating disk are solved numerically for a consolute point between the bulk concentration and the surface. A singular-perturbation expansion is presented for the condition where the bulk concentration is nearly equal to the consolute-point composition. Results are compared to Levich`s solution and analysis.

  9. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  10. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  12. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  13. Unbiased charge oscillations in DNA monomer-polymers and dimer-polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambropoulos, Konstantinos; Morphis, Andreas; Kaklamanis, Konstantinos; Theodorakou, Marina; Simserides, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    We call {\\it monomer} a B-DNA base-pair and examine, analytically and numerically, electron or hole oscillations in monomer- and dimer-polymers, i.e., periodic sequences with repetition unit made of one or two monomers. We employ a tight-binding (TB) approach at the base-pair level to readily determine the spatiotemporal evolution of a single extra carrier along a $N$ base-pair polymer. We study HOMO and LUMO eigenspectra as well as the mean over time probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer. We use the pure mean transfer rate $k$ to evaluate the easiness of charge transfer. The inverse decay length $\\beta$ for exponential fits $k(d)$, where $d$ is the charge transfer distance, and the exponent $\\eta$ for power law fits $k(N)$ are computed; generally power law fits are better. We illustrate that increasing the number of different parameters involved in the TB description, the fall of $k(d)$ or $k(N)$ becomes steeper and show the range covered by $\\beta$ and $\\eta$. Finally, both for the time-...

  14. Characterization of ?-carrageenan and its derivative based green polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jumaah, Fatihah Najirah; Mobaraka, Nadhratun Naiim; Ahmad, Azizan; Ramli, Nazaruddin [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The new types of green polymer electrolytes based on ?-carrageenan derivative have been prepared. ?-carrageenan act as precursor was reacted with monochloroacetic acid to produce carboxymethyl ?-carrageenan. The powders were characterized by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to confirm the substitution of targeted functional group in ?-carrageenan. The green polymer electrolyte based on ?-carrageenan and carboxymethyl ?-carrageenan was prepared by solution-casting technique. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to determine the ionic conductivity. The ionic conductivity ?-carrageenan film were higher than carboxymethyl ?-carrageenan which 4.87 ×10{sup ?6} S cm{sup ?1} and 2.19 ×10{sup ?8} S cm{sup ?1}, respectively.

  15. Reactivity of Metal Ions Bound to Water-Soluble Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkins, J.G.; Lin, M.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Robison, T.W.; Smith, B.F.; Gohdes, J.W.; McDonald, J.G.

    1999-06-29

    The intent of this work is to determine the effectiveness of catalysts covalently bound to polymers and to understand the consequences of supporting the catalysts on catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Rhodium phosphine complexes with functional groups for coupling to polymers were prepared. These catalyst precursors were characterized using standard techniques including IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. Studies on the modified catalysts showed that they were still active hydrogenation catalysts. However, tethering of the catalysts to polyamines gave systems with low hydrogenation activity. Analogous biphasic systems were also explored. Phosphine ligands with a surfactant-like structure have been synthesized and used to prepare catalytically active complexes of palladium. The palladium complexes were utilized in Heck-type coupling reactions (e.g. coupling of iodobenzene and ethyl acrylate to produce ethyl cinnamate) under vigorously stirred biphasic reaction conditions, and were found to offer superior performance over a standard water-soluble palladium catalyst under analogous conditions.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer Composites Containing Aligned Conducting Polymers and Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manda, Swathi

    2014-04-21

    in effective net direction within domains, and the monomers were electro-polymerized to obtain aligned polymer chains. This aligned structure renders better anisotropic electrical conductivity along the polymer chain direction. A non percolated dispersion...

  17. Effect of polymer chemistry on globular protein–polymer block copolymer self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Dongsook

    Bioconjugates of the model red fluorescent protein mCherry and synthetic polymer blocks with different hydrogen bonding functionalities show that the chemistry of the polymer block has a large effect on both ordering ...

  18. Outline Directed polymers Log-gamma polymer KPZ equation Fluctuation exponents for certain 1+1 dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seppäläinen, Timo

    Outline Directed polymers Log-gamma polymer KPZ equation Fluctuation exponents for certain 1+1 dimensional directed polymers Timo Sepp¨al¨ainen Department of Mathematics University of Wisconsin-Madison MSRI December 2010 Fluctuation exponents for polymers 1/36 #12;Outline Directed polymers Log

  19. Photoinitiated grafting of porous polymer monoliths and thermoplastic polymers for microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Svec, Frantisek (Alameda, CA); Rohr, Thomas (Leiden, NL)

    2008-10-07

    A microfluidic device preferably made of a thermoplastic polymer that includes a channel or a multiplicity of channels whose surfaces are modified by photografting. The device further includes a porous polymer monolith prepared via UV initiated polymerization within the channel, and functionalization of the pore surface of the monolith using photografting. Processes for making such surface modifications of thermoplastic polymers and porous polymer monoliths are set forth.

  20. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

    1992-03-31

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

  1. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, M.; Clark, E.; Lascola, R.

    2009-12-16

    Effects of beta (tritium) and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of conducting polymer films are documented to determine their potential use as a sensing and surveillance device for the tritium facility. It was shown that surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma and tritium gas. In order to compare the results from the two radiation sources, an approximate dose equivalence was calculated. The materials were also sensitive to small radiation doses (<10{sup 5} rad), showing that there is a measurable response to relatively small total doses of tritium gas. Spectroscopy was also used to confirm the mechanism by which this sensing device would operate in order to calibrate this sensor for potential use. It was determined that one material (polyaniline) was very sensitive to oxidation while the other material (PEDOT-PSS) was not. However, polyaniline provided the best response as a sensing material, and it is suggested that an oxygen-impermeable, radiation-transparent coating be applied to this material for future device prototype fabrication. A great deal of interest has developed in recent years in the area of conducting polymers due to the high levels of conductivity that can be achieved, some comparable to that of metals [Gerard 2002]. Additionally, the desirable physical and chemical properties of a polymer are retained and can be exploited for various applications, including light emitting diodes (LED), anti-static packaging, electronic coatings, and sensors. The electron transfer mechanism is generally accepted as one of electron 'hopping' through delocalized electrons in the conjugated backbone, although other mechanisms have been proposed based on the type of polymer and dopant [Inzelt 2000, Gerard 2002]. The conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi) is of particular interest because there are extensive studies on the modulation of the conductivity by changing either the oxidation state of the main backbone chain, or by protonation of the imine groups [de Acevedo, 1999]. There are several types of radiation sensors commercially available, including ionization chambers, geiger counters, proportional counters, scintillators and solid state detectors. Each type has advantages, although many of these sensors require expensive electronics for signal amplification, are large and bulky, have limited battery life or require expensive materials for fabrication. A radiation sensor constructed of a polymeric material could be flexible, light, and the geometry designed to suit the application. Very simple and inexpensive electronics would be necessary to measure the change in conductivity with exposure to radiation and provide an alarm system when a set change of conductivity occurs in the sensor that corresponds to a predetermined radiation dose having been absorbed by the polymer. The advantages of using a polymeric sensor of this type rather than those currently in use are the flexibility of sensor geometry and relatively low cost. It is anticipated that these sensors can be made small enough for glovebox applications or have the ability to monitor the air tritium levels in places where a traditional monitor cannot be placed. There have been a few studies on the changes in conductivity of polyaniline specifically for radiation detection [de Acevedo, 1999; Lima Pacheco, 2003], but there have been no reports on the effects of tritium (beta radiation) on conducting polymers, such as polyaniline or polythiophene. The direct implementation of conducting polymers as radiation sensor materials has not yet been commercialized due to differing responses with total dose, dose rate, etc. Some have reported a large increase in the surface conductivity with radiation dose while others report a marked decrease in conductive properties; these differing observations may reflect the competing mechanisms of chain scission and cross-linking. However, it is clear that the radiation dose effects on conducting polymers must be fully understood before these materials can be used

  2. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-12-01

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

  3. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  4. Asphaltenes-based polymer nano-composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, III, Daniel E

    2013-12-17

    Inventive composite materials are provided. The composite is preferably a nano-composite, and comprises an asphaltene, or a mixture of asphaltenes, blended with a polymer. The polymer can be any polymer in need of altered properties, including those selected from the group consisting of epoxies, acrylics, urethanes, silicones, cyanoacrylates, vulcanized rubber, phenol-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde, urea-formaldehyde, imides, esters, cyanate esters, allyl resins.

  5. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  6. Engineering Polymer Informatics: Towards The Computer-Aided Design of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Nico; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The computer-aided design of polymers is one of the holy grails of modern chemical informatics and of significant interest for a number of communities in polymer science. The paper outlines a vision for the in silico design of polymers...

  7. A flow-induced phase inversion in immiscible polymer blends containing a liquid-crystalline polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2 , 3 with being the viscosity ratio of the blend components at the blending shear rate. Luciani etA flow-induced phase inversion in immiscible polymer blends containing a liquid-crystalline polymer0148-6055 00 01504-2 I. INTRODUCTION The increasing application of polymer blends for the elaboration

  8. Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and beryllium hydride polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkenheuer, Uwe

    Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and berylliumH and beryllium hydride Be2H4 . First, employing a Wannier-function-based approach, the systems are studiedH and the beryllium hydride polymer Be2H4 . As a simple, but due to its ionic character, non- trivial model polymer

  9. Dynamic Interfacial Tension Between a Thermotropic Liquid-Crystalline Polymer and a Flexible Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    289, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China 2 Department of Polymer Polymer Ruobing Yu,1,2 Wei Yu,2 Chixing Zhou,2 J. J. Feng3,4 1 School of Materials Science and EngineeringDynamic Interfacial Tension Between a Thermotropic Liquid-Crystalline Polymer and a Flexible

  10. Dynamic Interfacial Properties Between a Flexible-Chain Polymer and a Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    Dynamic Interfacial Properties Between a Flexible-Chain Polymer and a Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymer Investigated by an Ellipsoidal Drop Retraction Method Ruobing Yu,1 Wei Yu,1 Chixing Zhou,1 J. J. Feng2 1 Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai

  11. Conducting polymer actuator enhancement through microstructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Priam Vasudevan

    2007-01-01

    Electroactive conducting polymers, such as polypyrrole, polyaniline, and polythiophenes are currently studied as novel biologically inspired actuators. The actuation mechanisms in these materials are based on the diffusion ...

  12. Lithium uptake data of lithium imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-12-04

    Batch tests of lithium imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium from synthetic brines at T=45C. Initial selectivity data are included

  13. Morphologies of PDMS-containing diblock polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart-Sloan, Charlotte (Charlotte Roberta)

    2012-01-01

    The morphologies of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-containing diblock polymers are investigated as a function of volume fraction, segregation, processing procedure, and temperature. Strongly segregated polyisoprene-PDMS and ...

  14. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

    2011-01-07

    Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

  15. Dynamics in Polymer | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron scattering characterizes dynamics in polymer family Agatha Bardoel - December 01, 2012 Interior of BASIS. Research Contact: Christine Gerstl Understanding the interplay...

  16. Conjugated Amplifying Polymers for Optical Sensing Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochat, Sebastien

    Thanks to their unique optical and electrochemical properties, conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention over the last two decades and resulted in numerous technological innovations. In particular, their ...

  17. Phase Behavior in Asymmetric Polymer Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedoma, Alisyn Jenise

    2010-01-01

    Methods of X-ray and Neutron Scattering in Polymer Science;using small angle neutron scattering, was three times moreas small angle neutron scattering (SANS), directly measure

  18. California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nextval, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a Conducting Polymer Binder for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. With a focus on enabling smaller,...

  19. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harri Mökkönen; Timo Ikonen; Tapio Ala-Nissila; Hannes Jónsson

    2015-03-26

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  20. Nanostructured polymer composites for electronics and sensor applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI Nanostructured composites based on polymer matrix and carbon nanotubesNanostructured polymer composites for electronics and sensor applications Wednesday November 10 (CNT), metallic nanoparticles and polymer core-shell latex systems will play a critical role

  1. NANOCOMPOSITE BASED STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING APPROACHES FOR FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    NANOCOMPOSITE BASED STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING APPROACHES FOR FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMERS for Polymers and Composites, Denickestr. 15, 21073 Hamburg, Germany 2 Physics Department, Faculty of Science reinforced polymer (FRP) structures in many industrial branches. Different approaches for Structural Health

  2. Ris-PhD-Report Thermocleavable Conjugated Polymers -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-PhD-Report Thermocleavable Conjugated Polymers - Synthesis and photovoltaic applications Martin Helgesen Risø-PhD-54(EN) October 2009 #12;Thermocleavable Conjugated Polymers Synthesis, University of Copenhagen #12;Author: Martin Helgesen able Conjugated Polymers ­ Synthesis and photovoltaic

  3. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Trilayered Ceramic-Metal-Polymer MicrocantileversPolymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors byLin Spring 2010 Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal

  4. On healable polymers and fiber-reinforced composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Christian Eric

    2012-01-01

    of crack healing in polymers. J Appl Phys Wu DY, Meure S,Single component healable polymer [proposal]. Los Angeles,and valuable healable polymer samples. Outside of UCSD, Dr.

  5. Solution Self-Assembly of Sequence Specific Biomimetic Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murnen, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    from sequence-specific peptoid polymers. Nat. Mater. 2010, 9from sequence-specific peptoid polymers. Nat. Mater. 2010, 9in a folded nonbiological polymer. J. Am. Chem. Soc. Patch,

  6. Polymer dynamics in random flow with mean shear K. Turitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Polymer dynamics in random flow with mean shear K. Turitsyn Landau Institute for theoretical;Outline · Motivation: Elastic turbulence · Experimental setup · Flow and polymer models · Results: 1. Angular statistics 2. Polymer elongation distribution · Conclusion #12;Elastic Turbulence Elastic

  7. Polymer Science and Engineering Strategic Planning April 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Polymer Science and Engineering Strategic Planning April 2015 1 Polymer Science and Engineering Department Executive of polymers, and is typically rated among the top ten U.S. materials departments

  8. Conjugated Polymer Design and Engineering for Organic Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woo, Claire Hoi Kar

    2011-01-01

    G. ; Reynaers, H. Polymer, 1989, 30, 2164-2169. (41) Alamo,M. M. ; Janssen, R. A. J. Polymer 2009, 50, 4564-4570. (14)Conductive Molecules and Polymers, Volume 2, Conductive

  9. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites: Pursuing the Promise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites are made by combining a plastic polymer resin together with strong reinforcing fibers, which forms a new composite material with enhanced overall performance.

  10. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)Electrolysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on...

  11. Controlled Self Assembly of Conjugated Polymer Containing Block Copolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCulloch, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    in dye/polymer blend photovoltaic cells. Advanced MaterialsA. J. , Polymer Photovoltaic Cells - Enhanced Efficiencies2-Layer Organic Photovoltaic Cell. Applied Physics Letters

  12. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER...

  13. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8. Polymer Composites Research and Development FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer Composites Research and Development Lightweighting Materials...

  14. Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2.pdf More Documents & Publications Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite...

  15. Self-Assembly of Polymer Nano-Elements on Sapphire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self-Assembly of Polymer Nano-Elements on Sapphire Print Self-assembly of polymers promises to vastly improve the properties and manufacturing processes of nanostructured...

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Techniques (Presentation) Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray...

  17. Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.pdf More Documents & Publications Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer...

  18. Hybrid Polymer/Lipid Vesicles via Salt and Agitation Induced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Hybrid PolymerLipid Vesicles via Salt and Agitation Induced Fusion. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hybrid PolymerLipid Vesicles via Salt and...

  19. Haverford Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer August 1, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy...

  20. Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

    2010-01-01

    properties for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Space-chargePolymers for Organic Photovoltaics By David Fredric JoelPolymers for Organic Photovoltaics by David Fredric Joel

  1. Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector This presentation was...

  2. High Temperature Thin Film Polymer Dielectric Based Capacitors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Thin Film Polymer Dielectric Based Capacitors for HEV Power Electronic Systems High Temperature Thin Film Polymer Dielectric Based Capacitors for HEV Power Electronic...

  3. Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  4. On a Pioneering Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam Z.

    2013-01-01

    polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in, USPTO Editor, UnitedRenewable Energy, Office of Fuel Cell Technologies, of thePolymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Model Adam Z Weber Lawrence

  5. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    the fabrication of the MEMS sensors from the readout system,mechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramicmechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramic

  6. High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  7. Modeling Cold Start in a Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balliet, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    conditions used for fuel—cell simulations. 3.12 Values usedin Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells — II. Parametric Study,”of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells,” Electrochimica Acta, 53,

  8. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Teaching Old Biomaterials New Tricks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Teaching Old Biomaterials New Tricks: Engineering Crystallinity biomaterials are comprised of polymer networks. What are the "minimum physics" that we must build

  9. Atomizing apparatus for making polymer and metal powders and whiskers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Otaigbe, Joshua U. (Ames, IA); McAvoy, Jon M. (Moline, IL); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Mi, Jia (Pittsburgh, PA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA)

    2003-03-18

    Method for making polymer particulates, such as spherical powder and whiskers, by melting a polymer material under conditions to avoid thermal degradation of the polymer material, atomizing the melt using gas jet means in a manner to form atomized droplets, and cooling the droplets to form polymer particulates, which are collected for further processing. Atomization parameters can be controlled to produce polymer particulates with controlled particle shape, particle size, and particle size distribution. For example, atomization parameters can be controlled to produce spherical polymer powders, polymer whiskers, and combinations of spherical powders and whiskers. Atomizing apparatus also is provided for atoomizing polymer and metallic materials.

  10. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012...

  11. Scalable production of mechanically tunable block polymers from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scalable production of mechanically tunable block polymers from sugar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable production of mechanically tunable block polymers from...

  12. Polymer Exposure and Testing Facilities at the Savannah River...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - PEEK - Vespel (polyimide) * Next generation polymer development - Nanotube and graphene filled EPDM * Polymer sensor materials - PANi - PEDOT-PSS 9 EPDM * Examined filled...

  13. Self-Assembly of Polymer Nano-Elements on Sapphire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    overhead view (top) of cylindrical block-coploymer structures, consisting of a central polymer (blue) linked to a surrounding polymer (red). An atomic-force microscope image...

  14. Polymer Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08balsara.pdf More Documents & Publications Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced...

  15. Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing - RFI Part 2...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 More Documents & Publications Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing - RFI DE-FOA-0000980: Summary of...

  16. The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of...

  17. Flexible conductive polymer polarizer designed for a chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Flexible conductive polymer polarizer designed for a chemical tag. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flexible conductive polymer polarizer designed for a...

  18. Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing - RFI DE-FOA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    80 More Documents & Publications Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing - RFI Part 2 DE-FOA-0001056: Summary of...

  19. Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer Bilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer...

  20. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High elastic modulus polymer...