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1

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elastic-wave stimulation of oil produc- tion: A review ofCapillary-induced resonance of oil blobs in capillary tubesCapillary-induced resonance of oil blobs in porous media:

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Methods for Determination of Seismic Fragilities: Seismic Fragilities Using Scenario Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) is an increasingly important means of assessing the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The standard approach for incorporating the seismic hazard into an SPRA is to use the uniform hazard spectra (UHS), which is computed independently at each spectral frequency, resulting in an equal probability of exceeding the ground motion at any frequency. As a result, the UHS may not be representative of an actual earthquake spectrum, and is a potential source of con...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-11-01 for SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 for SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 1 for SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-11-01 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is proposing to upgrade a portion of the existing Stanford Positron-Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR) to meet seismic standards. The proposed work includes : 1) the replacement of concrete roof blocks, placement of footings and new concrete walls, and installation of seismic connections at the old Beam Line 4; 2) the replacement of existing concrete roof blocks with precast roof blocks, placement of new footings, and installation of seismic anchors and connections at the northeast section of the

8

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Multicomponent seismic monitoring of the effective stimulated volume associated with hydraulic fracture stimulations in a shale reservoir, Pouce Coupe field, Alberta, Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Reservoir Characterization Project in conjunction with Talisman Energy Inc., have been investigating a time-lapse data set acquired during hydraulic fracture stimulations of two horizontal (more)

Steinhoff, Christopher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. Performed a theoretical and numerical study to examine which subsurface features the surface seismic method actually resolves.

Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study was performed at West Coalinga Field in California.

Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Use of data and judgment in determining seismic hazard and fragilities  

SciTech Connect

Data and judgment have been combined to provide a description of the seismic hazard at nuclear power plant sites and to develop fragility descriptions of equipment. In both cases, available data was insufficient to adequately describe the situation and had to be supplemented by expert opinion. This paper describes how this was done. Both methods involved the use of questionaires and peer review panels but in different ways. The results have been used both in NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program and the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program.

Cummings, G.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2013 CX-009857: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B3.7 Date: 01142013 Location(s): Texas...

17

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Seismic CD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEISMIC CD Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Background Resource Findings and Recovery Timeline Oil Program ADIS Overview Gas Program ADIS Overview SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT...

19

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. Throughout the project, however, we learned that this strategy was impractical because the different data and model are complementary instead of competitive. For the complex Coalinga field, we found that a thorough understanding of the reservoir evolution through geologic times provides the necessary framework which ultimately allows integration of the different data and techniques.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Program on Technology Innovation: Use of CAV in Determining Effects of Small Magnitude Earthquakes on Seismic Hazard Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides the technical basis for establishing the appropriate distribution of low magnitude earthquakes for use in probabilistic seismic hazard computations for nuclear power plant applications. Current seismic hazard methods generally utilize a lower bound body wave magnitude cut-off value of 5.0 (approximate moment magnitude of 4.6) to integrate the probabilistic seismic hazard. This lower bound magnitude cut-off level was a conservatively defined value based on several past EPRI research st...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

22

Determination of Heterogeneity by High-Resolution Seismic Reservoir Characterization in the Heavy Oil Temblor Reservoir of Coalinga Field, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research focuses on analysis and subsurface imaging of siliciclastics rocks on steam-affected 3D poststack seismic data, merged from different vintages, from the Temblor Formation (more)

Mahapatra, Sailendra Nath

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Induced seismicity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

Segall, P.

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Position paper: Seismic design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

Farnworth, S.K.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Fracture Characterization Technologies Project Description The proposed program will focus on predicting characteristics of fractures and their orientation prior to drilling new wells. It will also focus on determining the location of the fractures, spacing and orientation during drilling, as well as characterizing open fractures after stimulation to help identify the location of fluid flow pathway within the EGS reservoir. These systems are created by passively injecting cold water, and stimulating the permeation of the injected water through existing fractures into hot wet and hot dry rocks by thermo-elastic cooling shrinkage. The stimulated, existing fractures thus enhance the permeability of the hot rock formations, hence enabling better circulation of water for the purpose of producing the geothermal resource. The main focus of the project will be on developing better understanding of the mechanisms for the stimulation of existing fractures, and to use the information for better exploitation of the high temperature geothermal resources located in the northwest portion of the Geysers field and similar fields.

28

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plotted quantity is the speci?c oil volume that we de?nequantity ? int , which is the volume of ?uid that passes from pores initially occupied by oil

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Seismic sources  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

32

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

33

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

34

Seismic Regionalization In Northeast Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize seismicity in support of nuclear explosion monitoring for the continental regions of northeast Russia, we have been analyzing information obtained from regional seismic network operators. Our goal is to merge catalog, bulletin, waveform, and other ground truth data from several regional networks into a comprehensive data set that we will use for various seismic research projects. To date we have compiled a bulletin from published and unpublished event data of about 200,000 events and over 150,000 arrival times. We have also determined that the Russian regional network catalogs are contaminated with mining-explosion events. Hence, one of our primary efforts is to identify mining events when possible and move them into a separate bulletin from the natural earthquakes. We have extended our preliminary analysis of explosion contamination of Russian seismicity catalogs using temporal analysis into the Irkutsk and Chita districts and the Buryat Republic. Based on analysis of epicenters and origin times reported in Material po Seismichnost' Sibiri for 1970 -- 1993, it is likely that considerable explosion contamination occurs in the gold (Bodaibo, northern Irkutsk Region, and in the Chita region), mica (Vitim, northern Irkutsk Region), and other mining areas (Bushulei, Nerchinsk, and Petrovsk in the Buryat and Chita areas). Explosion contamination is also observed in northernmost Mongolia in the mining and industrial district near Darkhan. Explosions associated with the construction of the Baikal-Amur Mainline Railroad are likely, as was observed in the Amur district; however, the amount of natural seismicity dominates the activity and makes it impossible to resolve the railroad separately. In conjunction with the Magadan Seismic Network operators,...

Kevin Mackey Kazuya; Kazuya Fujita; Lee K. Steck; Hans E. Hartse

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Seismic signal location program for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's dry hot rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During hydraulic fracturing, seismic signals produced as the fracture grows may be used to determine orientation, size, and shape of the fracture. This seismic signal location program has been written to utilize such signals, along with an experimentally determined seismic velocity model to help determine the fracture orientation, size, and shape.

Kintzinger, P.R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

CX-006496: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Phase 3: Michigan 3-Dimensional Seismic Data Collection...

37

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

38

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian...

39

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

IPEEE Seismic Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes results of the seismic portion of the Individual Plant Examination for External Events (IPEEE) conducted for each U.S. nuclear plant. Utilities can use trends developed from these results -- together with their individual plant-specific results -- to address future seismic issues on a risk-informed basis.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Seismic Fragility Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Seismic Fragility Applications Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for performing fragility analysis as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA). These cost-effective and practical procedures and the resulting SPRA can support risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications. To download a pdf file of the product description for this report, click here.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 29, 2013 January 29, 2013 CX-009851: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Methods to Prohibit and Remediate Loss of Annular Isolation in Shale Gas Wells CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 01/29/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory January 22, 2013 CX-009854: Categorical Exclusion Determination Induced Seismicity/Fluid Injection: Development of Strategies to Manage Fluid Disposal in Shale Plays CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/22/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory January 14, 2013 CX-009857: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B3.7 Date: 01/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

44

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Ileana Tibuleac, Leiph Preston (2008) Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=425638" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

45

Guideline for the Seismic Technical Evaluation of Replacement Items for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques for reasonably assuring that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements. Meeting such requirements is necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. The guideline also offers a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

48

Seismic Ruggedness of Relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relay GERS (Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectra) provide utilities with generic seismic capability for more than 100 electrical relays most commonly used in nuclear power plants. The data can be used directly for the assessment of relays in the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, "Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Plants" and for the Individual Plant Evaluation for External Events (IPEEE) for resolution of USNRC severe accident policy issues.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

CX-009857: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Seismic Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B3.7 Date: 01/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

50

CX-009858: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Seismic Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B3.7 Date: 01/14/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

51

Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

1999-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microsoft Word - CX-2010 Control House Seismic Upgrades_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and non-structural seismic upgrades, and perform minor architectural work at each substation. Findings: BPA has determined that the proposed action complies with Section...

54

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Develop Seismic Equipment List (SEL) * Perform seismic screening - Perform DOEEH-0545 seismic walkdowns - Perform structural and anchorage seismic analysis to DOEEH-...

55

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the direction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies EGS Program is installing, operating, and/or interfacing seismic arrays at multiple Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites. The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality

60

ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

Bob A. Hardage

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

62

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Seismic scaling laws revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at fast speed Local energy balance Gc U Dc slip friction i n i Es = U Gc #12; Main result: Energy Mo= DSL3 D S L Moment Seismic energy ES=¿ D S L3 Es Mo Energy moment ratio #12; Thus Es ~ 105 Mo ~ U Summary of Observed Radiated Energy vs Moment log Mo=1.5 Mw9.6 Beroza et al, 2001 #12

Madariaga, Raúl

64

CX-007493: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-007493: Categorical Exclusion Determination GoM Miocene Carbon Dioxide Site Characterization Mega Transect: High-Resolution 3-dimensional Seismic...

65

CX-011015: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011015: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of...

66

CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of...

67

CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of...

68

CX-011016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011016: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of...

69

CX-011014: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011014: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of...

70

CX-009517: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-009517: Categorical Exclusion Determination Snohomish Substation Control House Expansion & Seismic Retrofit CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 11082012...

71

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

72

Seismic analysis of lattice towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the absence of specific guidelines for the seismic analysis of self-supporting telecommunication towers, designers may be tempted to apply simplified building code approaches to (more)

Khedr, Mohamed Abdel Halim.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

75

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored.

76

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

77

Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non-nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized. Some key documents for understanding Japanese seismic design criteria are also listed with brief descriptions. The paper highlights the design criteria to determine the seismic demand and component capacity in comparison with US criteria, the background studies which have led to the current Japanese design criteria, and a survey of current research activities. More detailed technical descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.

Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Crosswell Seismic Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Seismic Tomography Citation Schlumberger. Crosswell Seismic...

80

Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Mat Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of building types including high-rise residential towers, healthcare, and ... bearing pressure for transient loads (wind or seismic ... Tower Seismic Force ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Category: NEPA Resources What links...

82

Effect of Sensation Seeking and Perfectionism on Stimulant Use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Stimulant use is quickly becoming a widespread problem in the United States, especially on college campuses. Determining the risk factors for stimulant use may help (more)

Scurlock, Carissa J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Data Mining for Seismic Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic exploration plays an important role in petroleum industry. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional data analysis ways in oil and gas industry. Traditional methods in petroleum engineering are knowledge-driven ... Keywords: seismic exploration, data mining, cluster analysis

Zhongbin Ouyang; Jing He; Keliang Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24: Categorical Exclusion Determination 24: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs - Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/29/2010 Location(s): Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Pennsylvania State University would develop computation models to describe the stimulation and projection phases of Enhanced Geothermal System reservoirs and complete analysis relevant to current and future demonstration projects. The study would develop coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models capable of accommodating (i) static and dynamic rupture and failure in discontinuous

85

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Induced Seismicity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Induced Seismicity Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

87

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The

88

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

Micromachined silicon seismic transducers  

SciTech Connect

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at Occidental Permian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

guide. The wave guide would allow energy to travel farthera potential wave guide. The directly propagating energy must

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred close to the Willow Creek coal mine in the Book Cliffs area on February 5, 1998 (UTC date), just prior to the start of this project; a magnitude 4.2 shock on March 7,2000 (UTC date), in the same area as the February 5 event; and a magnitude 4.3 shock that occurred on January 30,2000 (UTC and local date), associated with a panel collapse at the Solvay trona mine in southwestern Wyoming. This is the same mine in which an earlier collapse event of magnitude 5.2 occurred in February 1995, attracting considerable attention from the CTBT community.

Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

97

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the sites seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Definition: Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Active Seismic Techniques Active seismic techniques study the behavior of artificially-generated elastic waves in the subsurface. A seismic wave or pulse is generated at the surface by an active seismic source which can be a vibration, mechanical impact, or near-surface explosion.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave fields are recorded by a seismometer,

100

Azimuthal variation of radiation of seismic energy from cast blasts  

SciTech Connect

As part of a series of seismic experiments designed to improve the understanding of the impact of mining blasts on verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a sixteen station network of three-component seismic sensors were deployed around a large cast shot in the Black Thunder Mine. The seismic stations were placed, where possible, at a range of 2.5 kilometers with a constant inter-station spacing of 22.5 degrees. All of the data were recorded with the seismometers oriented such that the radial component pointed to the middle point of the approximately 2 kilometer long shot. High quality data were recorded at each station. Data were scaled to a range of 2.5 kilometers and the sum of the absolute value of the vertical, radial, and transverse channels computed. These observations were used to construct radiation patterns of the seismic energy propagating from the cast shot. It is obvious that cast shots do not radiate seismic energy isotropically. Most of the vertical motion occurs behind the highwall while radial and transverse components of motion are enhanced in directions parallel to the highwall. These findings have implications for local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and possibly for regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic observations of cast blasting. Locally, it could be argued that peak particle velocities could be scaled not only by range but also by azimuthal direction from the shot. This result implies that long term planning of pit orientation relative to sensitive structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local radiation pattern may be important in determining the magnitude of large scale cast blasts. Improving the transparency of mining operations to international seismic monitoring systems may be possible with similar considerations.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Martin, R.L. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analysis of seismic sloshing of reactor tanks considering submerged components and seismic isolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the seismic sloshing response of a large pool-type reactor tank with several deck-mounted components is presented. The main objective of the study is to investigate the effects of internal components on the sloshing response and to determine the sloshing loads on the components. The study shows that the presence of internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequencies of a tank with internal components are considerably higher than those of a tank without internals. The higher sloshing frequencies reduce the sloshing wave height on the free surface but the dynamic pressures of the fluid are increased. The effects of seismic isolation on sloshing response are also presented.

Ma, D.C.; Chang, Y.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

103

New York Canyon Stimulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "????No Go"??? decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

Raemy, B. Principal Investigator, TGP Development Company, LLC

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

563: Categorical Exclusion Determination 563: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office Temple University would utilize DOE and cost share funds to develop an integrated set of tools to monitor the evolution of permeability and fluid flow within an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) during both the stimulation and production phases to infer the location, geometry and pore pressure distribution within the subsurface fracture network. CX-007563.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

105

Spatial Orientation And Distribution Of Reservoir Fractures From Scattered Seismic Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expanded details and additional results are presented using a new method (Willis et al, 2003) for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method ...

Vetri, Laura

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In December 1997 LBNL obtained a VSP in well 46-28 to determine the seismic reflectivity in the area and to obtain velocity information for the design and potential processing of the proposed 3-D seismic survey Feighner et al. (1998). Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. References M. Feighner, R. Gritto, T. M. Daley, H. Keers, E. L. Majer (1999)

107

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

108

CYCLIC CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) Cyclic CO 2 stimulation is a single-well operation that is developing as a method of rapidly producing oil....

109

Seismic reconnaissance of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active seismic methods using high-explosive sources and nondestructive energy sources were used to determine seismic velocities, signal detectability, and subsurface geologic structure in the vicinity of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area. Positions of several faults have been determined. A synthetic seismogram has been created that shows good agreement with recorded reflection records taken near exploratory borehole GT-2.

Kintzinger, P.R.; West, F.G.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

FAST Simulation of Seismic Wind Turbine Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent additions to the computer simulation code FAST that allow a user to consider seismic loads.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Nuclear Renaissance & the NRC Seismic Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing and New Reactor Licensing Offices ... Seismic Isolation Small Modular Reactors SSI modeling of NPPs under non-traditional loads ...

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

CX-001057: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

057: Categorical Exclusion Determination 057: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001057: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterizing Fractures in Geyser's Geothermal Field by Micro-Seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The University of Southern California is proposing a project to predict characteristics of fractures and their orientation prior to drilling new wells. The project will also focus on determining the location of the fractures, fracture spacing and orientation during drilling as well as characterizing open fractures after stimulation to help the location of fluid flow pathways within the Enhanced Geothermal System reservoir.

116

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

118

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

119

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

120

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

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121

Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

123

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Analyze seismic data to develop reservoir models that characterize the geothermal system Notes Large-amplitude, secondary arrivals are modeled as scattering anomalies. Polarization and ray tracing methods determine the orientation and location of the scattering body. Two models are proposed for the scatterer: (1) a point scatterer located anywhere in a one-dimensional (1-D), layered velocity model; and (2) a dipping interface between two homogeneous half

124

Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect

Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Neotectonics and seismicity of the Clearlake region in northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, topographic, and seismic methods were used to locate faults in the vicinity of Clearlake in northern California. The geological method, which seeks faults as discontinuities in the lithotope, found faults in the Tertiary-Cretaceous rocks east of Burns Valley. The topographic method, which is used to produce Fault Evaluation Reports, found a very active fault zone, the Konocti Bay fault zone, south of Highlands arm. It also found some active faults north of Highlands arm, in the eastern part of Burns Valley and on the lakeshore near Oak Park. The seismic method is the most enduring of the three methods but is limited by location accuracy; the results improve as monitoring continues because of increases in the density of events and improvements in the crustal velocity model. The seismic method identified faulting along the valley at Borax Lake and possibly also on a line running northeast from the city of Clearlake. The latter may be associated with the Burns Valley fault or with the line of scoria domes which runs parallel to it. Seismic observations over longer periods at higher resolution will be required in order to determine the location of active faults near the city. 47 refs., 13 figs.

Burns, K.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method  

SciTech Connect

Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

129

Statistical Physics Approaches to Seismicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This entry in the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science, Springer present a summary of some of the concepts and calculational tools that have been developed in attempts to apply statistical physics approaches to seismology. We summarize the leading theoretical physical models of the space-time organization of earthquakes. We present a general discussion and several examples of the new metrics proposed by statistical physicists, underlining their strengths and weaknesses. The entry concludes by briefly outlining future directions. The presentation is organized as follows. I Glossary II Definition and Importance of the Subject III Introduction IV Concepts and Calculational Tools IV.1 Renormalization, Scaling and the Role of Small Earthquakes in Models of Triggered Seismicity IV.2 Universality IV.3 Intermittent Periodicity and Chaos IV.4 Turbulence IV.5 Self-Organized Criticality V Competing mechanisms and models V.1 Roots of complexity in seismicity: dynamics or heterogeneity? V.2 Critical earthquakes ...

Sornette, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

CYCLIC STEAM STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CYCLIC STEAM STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) This method is sometimes applied to heavy-oil reservoirs to boost recovery during the primary production...

136

Probabilistic economic evaluation of substation seismic upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology for deciding whether or not to implement seismic design modifications at Southern California Edison's (SCE) Substation facilities. The method considers the potential for substation capability loss resulting from earthquake damage, cost of seismic modification made today, the cost of damage restoration after that modification is made, the cost of doing nothing now, and the site specific earthquake probability. Based on these findings, recommendations for seismic modifications of substation facilities could be made.

Ong, T.L.; Ensign, R.L.; Martin, D.F.; Richter, H.L. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND INDUCED SEISMICITY IN KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For some time the public has asked questions about seismic activity related to hydraulic fracturing and other oil-field related activities. In particular, there is concern that the energy that goes into the subsurface during hydraulic fracturing is sufficient to cause felt earthquakes. The following is a response to those questions. 1) Seismic activity that is related to human activities is generally referred to as induced seismicity or triggered seismicity. Induced seismicity is defined as seismic events attributable to human activities (National Research Council, 2012). The term triggered seismicity is also used to describe situations in which human activities could potentially trigger large and potentially damaging earthquakes (Shemeta et al., 2012). The following discussion uses only the term induced seismicity to refer to seismic activity in which human activity plays a role. 2) Because it uses energy to fracture rocks to release oil or natural gas, hydraulic fracturing does create microseismic events (of a magnitude less than 2.0). Felt earthquake activity (generally greater than a magnitude 3.0) resulting from hydraulic fracturing has been confirmed from only one location in the world (National Research Council, 2012). In the

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

140

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tentative Framework for Development of Advanced Seismic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3-30 4. Conceptual Reformulation of Seismic Design Parameters ..... ... 4-5 4.4.1 Maximum Considered Earthquake Basis for the RM Factor ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Seismic-fragility tests of new and accelerated-aged Class 1E battery cells  

SciTech Connect

The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. Prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the complementary approach, namely, the seismic-fragility response of accelerated-aged batteries. Of particular interest is the degree to which such approaches accurately reproduce the actual failure modes and thresholds. In these tests the significant aging effects observed, in terms of seismic survivability, were: embrittlement of cell cases, positive bus material and positive plate grids; and excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates. The IEEE Standard 535 accelerated aging method successfully reproduced seismically significant aging effects in new cells but accelerated grid embrittlement an estimated five years beyond the conditional age of other components.

Bonzon, L.L.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Imbibition well stimulation via neural network design  

SciTech Connect

A method for stimulation of hydrocarbon production via imbibition by utilization of surfactants. The method includes use of fuzzy logic and neural network architecture constructs to determine surfactant use.

Weiss, William (Socorro, NM)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

145

Category:Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Passive Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Passive Seismic Techniques,...

146

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and...

147

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

148

CX-003918: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003918: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets and Stimulating Energy Efficiency...

149

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

150

Critical assessment of seismic and geomechanics literature related to a high-level nuclear waste underground repository  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive literature assessment has been conducted to determine the nature and scope of technical information available to characterize the seismic performance of an underground repository and associated facilities. Significant deficiencies were identified in current practices for prediction of seismic response of underground excavations in jointed rock. Conventional analytical methods are based on a continuum representation of the host rock mass. Field observations and laboratory experiments indicate that, in jointed rock, the behavior of the joints controls the overall performance of underground excavations. Further, under repetitive seismic loading, shear displacement develops progressively at block boundaries. Field observations correlating seismicity and groundwater conditions have provided significant information on hydrological response to seismic events. However, lack of a comprehensive model of geohydrological response to seismicity has limited the transportability conclusions from field observations. Based on the literature study, matters requiring further research in relation to the Yucca Mountain repository are identified. The report focuses on understanding seismic processes in fractured tuff, and provides a basis for work on the geohydrologic response of a seismically disturbed rock mass. 220 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

Kana, D.D.; Vanzant, B.W.; Nair, P.K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Brady, B.H.G. [ITASCA Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (USA)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fast History Matching of Time-Lapse Seismic and Production-Data for High Resolution Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic data have been established as a valuable source of information for the construction of reservoir simulation models, most commonly for determination of the modeled geologic structure, and also for population of static petrophysical properties (e.g. porosity, permeability). More recently, the availability of repeated seismic surveys over the time scale of years (i.e., 4D seismic) has shown promising results for the qualitative determination of changes in fluid phase distributions and pressure required for determination of areas of bypassed oil, swept volumes and pressure maintenance mechanisms. Quantitatively, and currently the state of the art in reservoir model characterization, 4D seismic data have proven distinctively useful for the calibration of geologic spatial variability which ultimately contributes to the improvement of reservoir development and management strategies. Among the limited variety of techniques for the integration of dynamic seismic data into reservoir models, streamline-based techniques have been demonstrated as one of the more efficient approaches as a result of their analytical sensitivity formulations. Although streamline techniques have been used in the past to integrate time-lapse seismic attributes, the applications were limited to the simplified modeling scenarios of two-phase fluid flow and invariant streamline geometry throughout the production schedule. This research builds upon and advances existing approaches to streamline-based seismic data integration for the inclusion of both production and seismic data under varying field conditions. The proposed approach integrates data from reservoirs under active reservoir management and the corresponding simulation models can be constrained using highly detailed or realistic schedules. Fundamentally, a new derivation of seismic sensitivities is proposed that is able to represent a complex reservoir evolution between consecutive seismic surveys. The approach is further extended to manage compositional reservoir simulation with dissolution effects and gravity-convective-driven flows which, in particular, are typical of CO2 transport behavior following injection into deep saline aquifers. As a final component of this research, the benefits of dynamic data integration on the determination of swept and drained volumes by injection and production, respectively, are investigated. Several synthetic and field reservoir modeling scenarios are used for an extensive demonstration of the efficacy and practical feasibility of the proposed developments.

Rey Amaya, Alvaro

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Seismic Studies of Substation Equipment: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE Standard 693, Recommended Practice for Seismic Design of Substations, is used by electric power utilities to qualify substation equipment for seismic movements. Deficiencies exist in the present standard, and information is unavailable for dynamic response that may be used to better analyze equipment and permit equipment evaluation in case of limited configuration changes, such as insulator substitution.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

Apparatus and method for detecting seismic waves  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an apparatus for transducing seismic signals and a method for placing said apparatus for detecting seismic signals. The apparatus comprises at least one geophone preferably embedded in a polymeric material contained in a tubular member. A lower portion of the tubular member preferably contains ballast. The tubular member is preferably cemented into a borehole.

O' Brien, T.T.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRCs) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The components fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRCs ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra. (Based on WSRC-TR-93-102)  

SciTech Connect

In the past, single enveloping response spectra have been used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for seismic design and qualification purposes. This practice of generating simulated ground motions for use in design and qualification from a single spectrum now appears to be justified only when the total site seismic risk is the result of a single earthquake source or if site geology shapes the frequency content of the ground motion. If the data suggest that the occurrence of several earthquakes contribute to the seismic hazard, it is necessary to (1) determine the various frequency content, amplitude, and duration of each event, and (2) investigate the response spectrum developed for each (i.e., a large, distant earthquake or a moderate, close event). These two tasks were performed at SRS to characterize the seismic ground motion as input to a liquefaction study. This was accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the potential sources of earthquake-generated ground motion, which control the hazard at the site. For the liquefaction study, an evaluation was then made of the seismic ground motion in terms of the response spectra for each of the events.

Stephenson, D.E.; Lee, R.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kimball, J.K. [USDOE, Germantown, MD (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

EFFECTS OF SEISMIC VIBRATIONS ON THE EXPERIMENTAL GAS-COOLED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The effects of seismic vibrations on the dynamic behavior of a composite system were analyzed. The equations of motion were derived and soIved with special emphasis on determining the resulting stresses. The method of analysis thus developed was applied to the composite structure consisting of the core, pressure vessel, and supporting skirt of the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor (EGCR). A system with three degrees of freedom was considered in order to determine the effects of an earthquake of the maximum intensity expected in the area surrounding Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The system of equations of motion was solved both numerically and analytically, and the resonant frequencies were determined. The seismic effect was shown to be small when the frequency of the seismic disturbance coincided with a natural frequency of the system. In particular, the shear stresses in the graphite core were shown to be negligible. (auth)

Witt, F.J.; Carver, D.R.; Maxwell, R.L.

1962-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2009, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded nearly 3000 triggers on the seismometer system, which included over 1700 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 370 regional and teleseismic events. There were 1648 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. Recording of the Wooded Island events began in January with over 250 events per month through June 2009. The frequency of events decreased starting in July 2009 to approximately 10-15 events per month through September 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with 47 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.3 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The highest-magnitude event (3.0Mc) occurred on May 13, 2009 within the Wooded Island swarm at depth 1.8 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 1613 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 17 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 1630 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 18 earthquakes were classified as random events. The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data was presented. Classical approach to travel time tomography assumes straight line of seismic rays between sources and receives points and isotropy of geological ... Keywords: inverse problem, master-slave paradigm, seismic anisotropy, seismic tomography

Maciej Dwornik; Anna Pi?ta

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Caucasus Seismic Information Network: Data and Analysis Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geology and tectonics of the Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) are highly variable. Consequently, generating a structural model and characterizing seismic wave propagation in the region require data from local seismic networks. As of eight years ago, there was only one broadband digital station operating in the region an IRIS station at Garni, Armenia and few analog stations. The Caucasus Seismic Information Network (CauSIN) project is part of a nulti-national effort to build a knowledge base of seismicity and tectonics in the region. During this project, three major tasks were completed: 1) collection of seismic data, both in event catalogus and phase arrival time picks; 2) development of a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the region obtained through crustal tomography; 3) advances in geological and tectonic models of the region. The first two tasks are interrelated. A large suite of historical and recent seismic data were collected for the Caucasus. These data were mainly analog prior to 2000, and more recently, in Georgia and Azerbaijan, the data are digital. Based on the most reliable data from regional networks, a crustal model was developed using 3-D tomographic inversion. The results of the inversion are presented, and the supporting seismic data are reported. The third task was carried out on several fronts. Geologically, the goal of obtaining an integrated geological map of the Caucasus on a scale of 1:500,000 was initiated. The map for Georgia has been completed. This map serves as a guide for the final incorporation of the data from Armenia and Azerbaijan. Description of the geological units across borders has been worked out and formation boundaries across borders have been agreed upon. Currently, Armenia and Azerbaijan are working with scientists in Georgia to complete this task. The successful integration of the geologic data also required addressing and mapping active faults throughout the greater Caucasus. Each of the major faults in the region were identified and the probability of motion were assessed. Using field data and seismicity, the relative activity on each of these faults was determined. Furthermore, the sense of motion along the faults was refined using GPS, fault plane solutions, and detailed field studies. During the course of the integration of the active fault data, the existence of the proposed strike slip Borjomi-Kazbeki fault was brought into question. Although it had been incorporated in many active tectonic models over the past decade, field geologists and geophysicists in Georgia questioned its existence. Detailed field studies were carried out to determine the existence of the fault and estimate the slip along it; and it was found that the fault zone did not exist. Therefore, the convergence rate in the greater Caucasus must be reinterpreted in terms of thrust mechanisms, instead of strike-slip on the Borjomi-Kazbeki fault zone.

Randolph Martin; Mary Krasovec; Spring Romer; Timothy O'Connor; Emanuel G. Bombolakis; Youshun Sun; Nafi Toksoz

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine extent of low velocity body Notes An area showing approximately 0.2-s excess travel time that migrates with changing source azimuth, suggesting that the area is the 'delay shadow' produced by a deep, low-velocity body. Inversion of the relative residual data for three-dimensional velocity structure determines the lateral variations in velocity to a depth of 22.5 km beneath the array. An intense low-velocity body, which coincides with the surface expressions of late Pleistocene rhyolitic volcanism, high heat flow, and hydrothermal activity,

167

Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

Bernreuter, D.L.

1981-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

Three-dimensional seismic imaging of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The source interval was 100 feet while the source line spacing was 400 feet. The sources were comprised of 4 vibrator trucks arranged in a box array. Seismic processing involved, among other steps, the picking of over 700,000 of the possible one million traces to determine first arrival travel times, normal moveout correction, 3-D stack, deconvolution, time migration, and depth conversion. The final data set represents a 3-D cube of the subsurface structure in the reservoir. Additionally, the travel times were used to perform tomographic inversions for velocity estimates to support the findings of the surface seismic imaging. The results suggest the presence of at least one dominant fault responsible for the migration of fluids in the reservoir. Furthermore, it is suggested that this feature might be part of a fault system that includes a graben structure.

Feighner, M.; Gritto, R.; Daley, T.M.; Keers, H.; Majer, E.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

CX-009363: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009363: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration CX(s) Applied:...

170

CX-009456: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009456: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1...

171

CX-009455: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009455: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1...

172

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell ...  

Tom Daley and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have invented a seismic source that can be operated while fluid is being injected or withdrawn from an aquifer or oil well.

173

Seismic design verification of LMFBR structures  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an assessment of the seismic design verification procedures currently used for nuclear power plant structures, a comparison of dynamic test methods available, and conclusions and recommendations for future LMFB structures.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

175

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Towards a bayesian seismotectonic zoning for use in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA)  

SciTech Connect

The mathematical representation of seismic sources is an important part of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. It reflects the association of the seismicity with the tectonically-active geological structures evidenced by seismotectonic studies. Given that most active faults are not characterized well enough, seismic sources are generally defined as areal zones, delimited with finite boundary polygons, within which the geological features of active tectonics and the seismicity are deemed homogeneous (e.g., focal depth, seismicity rate, and maximum magnitude). Besides the lack of data (e.g., narrow range of recorded magnitudes), the application of this representation generates different problems: 1) a large sensitivity of resulting hazard maps on the location of zone boundaries, while these boundaries are set by expert decision; 2) the zoning can not represent any variation in faulting mechanism; 3) the seismicity rates are distributed throughout the zones and we lose the location of the determinant information used for their calculation. We propose an exploratory study for an alternative procedure in area source modeling. First, different data (e.g., geomorphology, geology, fault orientations) will be combined by using automated spatial partitioning (investigation of both supervised and unsupervised methods) in order to obtain several information classes, which may be defined as areal source zones. Then, a given hypocenter belonging to a given ''zone'', from now on called seismicity model, will be expressed by a probability computed from the 2D (spatial) probability density function (pdf) for the active tectonic model used as an a priori and updated with specific data from seismicity catalogs (e.g., focal mechanism) or other new data sources (e.g., geomorphology, subsurface exploration). This hypocenter will thus be allowed to contribute to several models, with weights given by the value of the pdf for each model. The annual rate of occurrence, for a given model, will be calculated by the weighted average of the different hypocenter contributions contained in this model. Future applications will couple the seismicity models to Ground Motion Prediction Equations. In consequence, the results will provide the full spectrum of variability in the hazard and will highlight zones badly constrained and deserving to be more studied.

Le Goff, Boris; Fitzenz, Delphine [CGE, University of Evora (Portugal); Beauval, Celine [LGIT-IRD (France)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provides. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder of an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping. 4 figs.

Hardee, H.C.

1990-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

182

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

183

SEISMIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS SELECTION METHODOLOGY FOR THE SLUDGE TREATMENT & M-91 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

In complying with direction from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) (07-KBC-0055, 'Direction Associated with Implementation of DOE-STD-1189 for the Sludge Treatment Project,' and 08-SED-0063, 'RL Action on the Safety Design Strategy (SDS) for Obtaining Additional Solid Waste Processing Capabilities (M-91 Project) and Use of Draft DOE-STD-I 189-YR'), it has been determined that the seismic design requirements currently in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) will be modified by DOE-STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process (March 2007 draft), for these two key PHMC projects. Seismic design requirements for other PHMC facilities and projects will remain unchanged. Considering the current early Critical Decision (CD) phases of both the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and the Solid Waste Processing Facilities (M-91) Project and a strong intent to avoid potentially costly re-work of both engineering and nuclear safety analyses, this document describes how Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) will maintain compliance with the PHMC by considering both the current seismic standards referenced by DOE 0 420.1 B, Facility Safety, and draft DOE-STD-1189 (i.e., ASCE/SEI 43-05, Seismic Design Criteria for Structures, Systems, and Components in Nuclear Facilities, and ANSI!ANS 2.26-2004, Categorization of Nuclear Facility Structures, Systems and Components for Seismic Design, as modified by draft DOE-STD-1189) to choose the criteria that will result in the most conservative seismic design categorization and engineering design. Following the process described in this document will result in a conservative seismic design categorization and design products. This approach is expected to resolve discrepancies between the existing and new requirements and reduce the risk that project designs and analyses will require revision when the draft DOE-STD-1189 is finalized.

RYAN GW

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

CX-009162: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Categorical Exclusion Determination 62: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009162: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a Low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signature of a Geothermal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/11/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office Board of Regents, NSHE, obo University of Nevada, Reno would utilize DOE and cost share funds to research cost-effective characterization of geothermal reservoir properties from which drilling targets would be identified by utilizing existing and newly acquired seismic survey data to test and validate a cost-effective, non-invasive, seismic exploration method based on seismic interferometry. CX-009162.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000267: Categorical Exclusion Determination

185

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. The review includes all natural phenomena hazards with the exception of seismic/earthquake hazards, which are being addressed under a separate effort. It was determined that existing non-seismic NPH assessments are consistent with current design methodology and site specific data.

Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.; Sullivan, Robin S.

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

Risk management considerations for seismic upgrading of an older facility for short-term residue stabilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building 707 and its addition, Building 707A, were selected, after the production mission of Rocky Flats was terminated a few years ago, to stabilize many of the plutonium residues remaining at the site by 2002. The facility had undergone substantial safety improvements to its safety systems and conduct of operations for resumption of plutonium operations in the early 1990s and appeared ideally suited for this new mission to support accelerated Site closure. During development of a new authorization basis, a seismic evaluation was performed. This evaluation addressed an unanalyzed expansion joint and suspect connection details for the precast concrete tilt-up construction and concluded that the seismic capacity of the facility is less than half of that determined by previous analysis. Further, potential seismic interaction was identified between a collapsing Building 707 and the seismically upgraded Building 707A, possibly causing the partial collapse of the latter. Both the operating contractor and the Department of Energy sought a sound technical basis for deciding how to proceed. This paper addresses the risks of the as-is facility and possible benefits of upgrades to support a decision on whether to upgrade the seismic capacity of Building 707, accept the risk of the as-is facility for its short remaining mission, or relocate critical stabilization missions. The paper also addresses the Department of Energy`s policy on natural phenomena.

Additon, S.L.; Peregoy, W.L. [TENERA Rocky Flats, LLC, Golden, CO (United States); Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Seismic structural fragility investigation for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Project I); SONGS-1 AFWS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the seismic capacities of several of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS-1) structures was conducted to determine input to the overall probabilistic methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Seismic structural fragilities to be used as input consist of median seismic capacities and their variabilities due to randomness and uncertainty. Potential failure modes were identified for each of the SONGS-1 structures included in this study by establishing the seismic load-paths and comparing expected load distributions to available capacities for the elements of each load-path. Particular attention was given to possible weak links and details. The more likely failure modes were screened for more detailed investigation.

Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and its application to the Coso and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurements of temporal changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and assume that any differences in the structural results arise from real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural

190

Seismic and magneto-telluric imaging for geothermal exploration at Jemez pueblo in New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow geothermal reservoir in the Pueblo of Jemez in New Mexico may indicate a commercial-scale geothermal energy potential in the area. To explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, seismic surveys are conducted along three lines for the purpose of imaging complex subsurface structures near the Indian Springs fault zone. A 3-D magneto-telluric (MT) survey is also carried out in the same area. Seismic and MT imaging can provide complementary information to reveal detailed geologic formation properties around the fault zones. The high-resolution seismic images will be used together with MT images, geologic mapping, and hydrogeochemistry, to explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, and to determine whether a conunercial-scale geothermal resource exists for power generation or direct use applications after drilling and well testing.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albrecht, Michael [LOS ALAMOS GEOTHERMAL

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic, videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.

Martin, R.L.; Gross, D. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

194

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR5741 Proceedings, Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced Concrete Frames Gaithersburg, MD ...

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

198

Seismic Qualification Case Study for a New Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews and compares methods used for the seismic qualification of safety related equipment at nuclear power plants and examines an alternative, hybrid approach. The report investigates the costs and lead times for each seismic qualification approach and also discusses the seismic capacity definitions that result from the application of each qualification approach. The report includes a case study that applies the new approach to the seismic qualification of an inverter.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

200

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Seismic hazard analysis overview and executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Specific Spectra Project (SSSP) described in this report was a multi-year study funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The main objective of this project was to provide assistance to the NRC by developing estimates of the seismic hazard at the nine oldest nuclear power plant sites east of the Rocky Mountains which were included in the SEP. This volume gives brief overview of the SEP and the SSSP including a discussion of the formal elicitation of expert opinion used to obtain a subjective representation of parameters that affect seismic hazard and the development of the seismic hazard at the nine SEP facilities.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Minichino, C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

205

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure such as a building, bridge, or power plant such that it is isolated from seismic vibratory ground motion. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure by an isolation system which will not allow large dynamic loads to be transmitted to the supported structure due to seismic motions which have damaging energy at frequencies at or near the natural frequency of the structure and the overall structural systems. 4 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Heliostat Stimulator operator's manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heliostat Stimulator is a portable test tool, housed in a suitcase, which can be used to perform the following functions: (1) acceptance testing of newly manufactured Heliostat Controllers (HC) and Heliostat Field Controllers (HFC); (2) aid in the installation and alignment of Heliostats; and (3) provide diagnostic troubleshooting capability in the event of Heliostat failure in the field.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA OF DOE-STD-1189-2008 APPENDIX A [FULL PAPER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the approach taken by two Fluor Hanford projects for implementing of the seismic design criteria from DOE-STD-1189-2008, Appendix A. The existing seismic design criteria and the new seismic design criteria is described, and an assessment of the primary differences provided. The gaps within the new system of seismic design criteria, which necessitate conduct of portions of work to the existing technical standards pending availability of applicable industry standards, is discussed. Two Hanford Site projects currently in the Control Decision (CD)-1 phase of design have developed an approach to implementation of the new criteria. Calculations have been performed to determine the seismic design category for one project, based on information available in early CD-1. The potential effects of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Appendix A seismic design criteria on the process of project alternatives analysis is discussed. Present of this work is expected to benefit others in the DOE Complex that may be implementing DOE-STD-1189-2008.

OMBERG SK

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Using seismic tomography to characterize fracture systems induced by hydraulic fracturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing have been studied by many investigators to characterize fracture systems created by the fracturing process and to better understand the locations of energy resources in the earth`s subsurface. The pattern of the locations often contains a great deal of information about the fracture system stimulated during the hydraulic fracturing. Seismic tomography has found applications in many areas for characterizing the subsurface of the earth. It is well known that fractures in rock influence both the P and S velocities of the rock. The influence of the fractures is a function of the geometry of the fractures, the apertures and number of fractures, and the presence of fluids in the fractures. In addition, the temporal evolution of the created fracture system can be inferred from the temporal changes in seismic velocity and the pattern of microearthquake locations. Seismic tomography has been used to infer the spatial location of a fracture system in a reservoir that was created by hydraulic fracturing.

Fehler, M.; Rutledge, J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

211

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

RISC-3 Seismic Assessment Guidelines: Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for establishing reasonable confidence that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear plants, categorized as RISC-3 under the 10 CFR 50.69 Risk Informed Safety Categorization Process, will perform their required functions under design basis seismic conditions.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "SPRA Implementation Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs). These cost-effective and practical procedures for SPRA support a variety of purposes, including risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Gas stimulation studies at LASL  

SciTech Connect

The studies include: (a) Dynamic Rock Response. Hugoniots, dynamic spall strengths, wave profiles on shock and release, and ultrasonic elastic constants have been determined as functions of material density and bedding orientation for Devonian shales. These data form the basis of predictive explosive stimulation technology. (b) Explosively Driven Jets. Weapons-developed shaped charges using heavy metal liners are being investigated for downhole use in order to produce a horizontal manifold system leading to a central borehole. Applications of the paths produced by these devices include intersection of the natural fracture patterns, explosive or chemical emplacement, or producing hydrofractures displaced from the borehole. (c) Laser Pyrolysis. Pulsed laser heating results in a rapid deposition of precise quantities of thermal energy into selected shale volumes. Such laser-induced pyrolysis forms the basis for a rapid assay technique which can be used at the wellhead or as a downhole logging tool. (d) Computer Simulation. A computational technique using a hybrid (analog and digital) computer is being developed with the ultimate objective of simulating proposed extraction technologies to establish optimum economic stimulation methods.

Carter, W.J.; Olinger, B.W.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Seismic studies of a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, 850 microearthquakes, ranging in magnitudes from -3 to 0, were located reliably using arrival times recorded at a set of 5 downhole geophone stations. A subset of these events were located using an upgraded hodogram technique. The seismicity defines a tabular zone with horizontal extent of 900 m, vertical extent of 800 m, and thickness of 150 m. This zone strikes N340/sup 0/E, and dips 75/sup 0/ to the east; its position indicates that no hydraulic connection between the two predrilled wells could be achieved by the fracturing. The distribution of locations obtained from arrival times shows good agreement with those derived from hodograms. Well constrained fault plane solutions were determined for 26 of the larger microearthquakes observed at a surface seismic net. Most solutions display one nearly vertical nodal plane that strikes close to N - S, and a T axis that trends roughly E - W, in agreement with regional indicators of the least principal stress direction. 9 refs., 6 figs.

House, L.; Keppler, H.; Kaieda, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

217

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009363: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration CX(s) Applied:...

220

Definition: Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

techniques utilize vibrations from natural earthquakes or rupture processes (due to hydraulic stimulation) as a source for structural imaging of the subsurface.1 References ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Baker, W.E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

5h Other Seismic Stakeholder InteractionsGlenn Kelly- Appendix 5 Seismic.wpd Page 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decommissioning plants. During the course of the workshop, presentations by the NRC and the industry concluded that spent fuel pools possess substantial capability beyond their design basis to with stand seismic events but that variations in seismic capacity existed due to plant specific designs and locations. The consensus was that the risk was low enough that precise quantification was not necessary to support exemption requests but that this needed to be confirmed on a plant specific basis with deterministic criteria. It was recommended that a simple spent fuel pool (SFP) vulnerability check list be developed to provide additional assurance that no beyond-design-basis seismic structural vulnerabilities exist at decommissioning plants. Enclosed for your review is the "Seismic Screening Criteria For Assessing Potential Pool Vulnerabilities At Decommissioning Plants." Please contact me at (202) 739-8110 or by e-mail (apn@.nei.org) if you have any questions or if a meeting should be scheduled to discuss the enclosed seismic checklist.

Glenn Kelly Aee Attached; George Hubbard; Aee Attached; Glenn Kelly; Alan Nelson; Alan Nelson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

224

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

225

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Seismic responses of unanchored electrode storage fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Two anchored electrode storage fixtures will be installed in the process cell of the Integral Fast Reactor`s Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-W in Idaho. In addition to the concerns for structural integrity, the potential for uplifting and tipping of the fixtures during the design basis earthquake must also be examined. In the analysis, a response-spectrum method was employed to investigate tipping, while a static approach was used for the structural-integrity evaluations. The results show that the combined stresses from seismic and other loads are within the allowables permitted by the design codes. The overall vertical seismic reaction forces at the leveling pads are compressive, implying that the fixtures will remain in contact with the floor. No uplifting or tipping of the fixture will occur during the design basis earthquake.

Ting-shu Wu; Blomquist, C.A.; Haupt, H.J.; Herceg, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves.

228

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

229

Use of experience data for DOE seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

As dictated by DOE Order 5480.28, seismic evaluations of essential systems and components at DOE facilities will be conducted over the next several years. For many of these systems and components, few, if any, seismic requirements applied to the original design, procurement, installation, and maintenance process. Thus the verification of the seismic adequacy of existing systems and components presents a difficult challenge. DOE has undertaken development of the criteria and procedures for these seismic evaluations that will maximize safety benefits in a timely and cost effective manner. As demonstrated in previous applications at DOE facilities and by the experience from the commercial nuclear power industry, use of experience data for these evaluations is the only viable option for most existing systems and components. This paper describes seismic experience data, the needs at DOE facilities, the precedent of application at nuclear power plants and DOE facilities, and the program being put in place for the seismic verification task ahead for DOE.

Barlow, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Budnitz, R. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Industry Approach to Seismic Severe Accident Policy Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utilities with industry recommended guidelines for cost-effective seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20. Guidance is provided on application of seismic probabilistic risk assessment and seismic margin methods for full-, focused-, and reduced-scope evaluations. It provides strategies for coordinating these evaluations with similar reviews needed for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms October 2011 Keywords: Global seismicity Declustered catalogue Earthquake energy distribution Plate tectonics In this paper, we analyse the distributions of number of events (N) and seismic energy (E

Doglioni, Carlo

235

Geothermal well stimulation program: opening remarks  

SciTech Connect

The history of well stimulation and the development of the geothermal well stimulation program are reviewed briefly. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

237

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

238

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

239

Microsoft Word - Calpine EGS_Seismic Eval Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Environmental Impacts of Induced Seismicity at the Calpine Enhanced Geothermal System Project, The Geysers, California prepared for RMT, Inc. 4 West Fourth Avenue,...

240

APPENDIX J: STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH DOE SEISMICITY PROTOCOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compliance with the "Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems". Calpine Corporation and other Geysers geothermal operators have long been...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

242

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

243

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and...

244

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

245

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

246

Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2% in 50 years. Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: Southern California Earthquake Center...

247

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

248

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

249

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

250

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

251

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Seismic Technology Adapted to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ...

252

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

253

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

254

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

255

Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures. Awardees (Company Institution) OSKI Energy, LLC Awardee Website http:www.oskienergy.com Partner 1 Optim, Inc Partner 2...

256

Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design Guidelines Program Plan for New and Existing Buildings FEMA-445 / August 2006 ...

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Seismic Design of Steel Special Concentrically Braced Frame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. 8 ... Dr. John (Jay) L. Harris, III, managed the project to produce this Technical Brief for EL. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation  

SciTech Connect

Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a ??sub-porosity? within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The ??sub-porosity? may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in the report and the full details of the research and approach are contained in the publications found in the Attachment section of this report. A list of presentation and publications of all work associated with this grant is also provided.

Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. [Purdue University

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95: Categorical Exclusion Determination 95: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 08/18/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Hi-Q is proposing to develop surface seismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) methods and adapt them to the unique conditions encountered in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Phase I was previously approved by GFO-09-040 on January 8, 2009. This review is for Phase II (tasks 4 through 6), which consists of extensive field testing with seismic surveys, gravity surveys, and a near offset VSP. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003495.pdf More Documents & Publications

262

CX-010397: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

97: Categorical Exclusion Determination 97: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010397: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Monitoring for Seismic Hazards Analyses CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 05/13/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Analysis (PSHA) Phase I - Data Collection and Evaluation project is being conducted by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations office (DOE-ID) and INL Management. Earthquake data will be collected at seismic stations located near INL facility areas for at least two years using seismometers and for the long-term using accelerometers. CX-010397.pdf More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Idaho Site, March 2013

263

CX-005113: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

113: Categorical Exclusion Determination 113: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005113: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 01/24/2011 Location(s): California Office(s): Stanford Linear Accelerator Site Office The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is proposing to upgrade a portion of the existing Stanford Positron-Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR) to meet seismic standards. The proposed work includes : 1) the replacement of concrete roof blocks, placement of footings and new concrete walls, and installation of seismic connections at the old Beam Line 4; 2) the replacement of existing concrete roof blocks with precast roof blocks, placement of new footings, and installation of seismic anchors and

264

Identification of MHF (massive hydraulic fracturing) fracture planes and flow paths: A correlation of well log data with patterns in locations of induced seismicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the critical steps in developing a hot dry rock geothermal system is the creation of flow paths through the rock between two wellbores. To date, circulation systems have only been created by drilling one wellbore, hydraulically fracturing the well (which induces microearthquakes), locating the microearthquakes and then drilling a second wellbore through the zone of seismicity. A technique for analyzing the pattern of seismicity to determine where fracture planes are located in the seismically active region has recently been developed. This allows us to distinguish portions of the seismically active volume which are most likely to contain significant flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the seismic method are confirmed by borehole temperature and caliper logs which indicate where permeable fractures and/or zones of weakness intersect the wellbores. A geometric model based on these planes and well log data has enhanced our understanding of the reservoir flow paths created by fracturing and is consistent with results obtained during production testing of the reservoir.

Dreesen, D.; Malzahn, M.; Fehler, M.; Dash, Z.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Effects of Heterogeneities on Seismic Wave Propagation in the Climax Stock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty requires the ability to detect low-yield (less than 150kton) nuclear events. This kind of monitoring can only be done seismically on a regional scale (within 2000km). At this level, it is difficult to distinguish between low-yield nuclear events and non-nuclear events of similar magnitude. In order to confidently identify a nuclear event, a more detailed understanding of nuclear seismic sources is needed. In particular, it is important to know the effects of local geology on the seismic signal. This study focuses on P-wave velocity in heterogeneous granitoid. The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is currently performing low-yield tests with chemical explosives at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The exact test site was chosen to be in the Climax Stock, a cretaceous granodiorite and quartz-monzonite pluton located in Area 15 of the NNSS. It has been used in the past for the Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests, which provided legacy data that can be used to simulate wave propagation. The Climax Stock was originally chosen as the site of the SPE partly because of its assumed homogeneity. It has since been discovered that the area of the stock where the SPE tests are being performed contains a perched water table. In addition, the stock is known to contain an extensive network of faults, joints, and fractures, but the exact effect of these structural features on seismic wave velocity is not fully understood. The SPE tests are designed to seismically capture the explosion phenomena from the near- to the far-field transition of the seismic waveform. In the first SPE experiment, 100kg of chemical explosives were set off at a depth of 55m. The blast was recorded with an array of sensors and diagnostics, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment, Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, and infrasound sensors. The focus of this study is two-fold: (1) the geophone array that was focused over the SPE shot and (2) a high-resolution seismic profile that was recently acquired at the field site. The geophone array was placed radially around the SPE shot in five directions with 100m spacing and out to a distance of 2 km. The high-resolution profile was about 475m in length with station and shot spacing of 5m using a 7000lb mini-vibe as a source. In both data sets, the first arrivals will be used to develop velocity models. For the geophone array, 1-D P-wave velocity models will be developed to determine an average apparent velocity of the Climax Stock. The high-resolution data will be used to develop a 2-D P-wave velocity model along the seismic profile. This is in an effort to elucidate the water table in more detail and provide additional information on the near-surface structure. These results will be used in the overall modeling effort to fully characterize the test bed and develop a physics-based model to simulate seismic energy from the SPE events.

Hagan Webb, C., Snelson, C. M., White, R., Emmitt, R., Barker, D., Abbott, R., Bonal, N.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as minor with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Knowledge Assisted Visualization: Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present novel techniques for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas exploration. We describe the existing procedure for oil and gas search which consists of manually extracting information ... Keywords: 2D textures, 3D textures, Illustrative visualization, Knowledge-assisted visualization, Rapid interpretation, Seismic interpretation

Daniel Patel; yvind Sture; Helwig Hauser; Christopher Giertsen; M. Eduard Grller

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack ... Keywords: Feed-forward neural network, Matlab, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

Emilson Pereira Leite; Alexandre Campane Vidal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

Yoshida, Nozomu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajo 1-13-1, Miyagi (Japan)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle Heimgartner, James B. Scott, Weston Thelen, Christopher R. Lopez, John N. Louie (2005) Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Refraction_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Heimgartner,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=401382

275

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401371

276

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401360"

277

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down

278

The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution  

SciTech Connect

Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nonlinear acoustic/seismic waves in earthquake processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear dynamics induced by seismic sources and seismic waves are common in Earth. Observations range from seismic strong ground motion (the most damaging aspect of earthquakes), intense near-source effects, and distant nonlinear effects from the source that have important consequences. The distant effects include dynamic earthquake triggering-one of the most fascinating topics in seismology today-which may be elastically nonlinearly driven. Dynamic earthquake triggering is the phenomenon whereby seismic waves generated from one earthquake trigger slip events on a nearby or distant fault. Dynamic triggering may take place at distances thousands of kilometers from the triggering earthquake, and includes triggering of the entire spectrum of slip behaviors currently identified. These include triggered earthquakes and triggered slow, silent-slip during which little seismic energy is radiated. It appears that the elasticity of the fault gouge-the granular material located between the fault blocks-is key to the triggering phenomenon.

Johnson, Paul A. [Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

282

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Application of the Neo-Deterministic Seismic Microzonation Procedure in Bulgaria and Validation of the Seismic Input Against Eurocode 8  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake record and the Code for design and construction in seismic regions in Bulgaria have shown that the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria is exposed to a high seismic risk due to local shallow and regional strong intermediate-depth seismic sources. The available strong motion database is quite limited, and therefore not representative at all of the real hazard. The application of the neo-deterministic seismic hazard assessment procedure for two main Bulgarian cities has been capable to supply a significant database of synthetic strong motions for the target sites, applicable for earthquake engineering purposes. The main advantage of the applied deterministic procedure is the possibility to take simultaneously and correctly into consideration the contribution to the earthquake ground motion at the target sites of the seismic source and of the seismic wave propagation in the crossed media. We discuss in this study the result of some recent applications of the neo-deterministic seismic microzonation procedure to the cities of Sofia and Russe. The validation of the theoretically modeled seismic input against Eurocode 8 and the few available records at these sites is discussed.

Ivanka, Paskaleva [CLSMEE--BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Mihaela, Kouteva [CLSMEE-BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Franco, Vaccari [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Panza, Giuliano F. [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs). The bases of the analytical work presented herein are two ANSYS{reg_sign} finite element models that were developed to represent a bounding-case tank. The TaLA model includes the effects of temperature on material properties, creep, concrete cracking, and various waste and annulus pressure-loading conditions. The seismic model considers the interaction of the tanks with the surrounding soil including a range of soil properties, and the effects of the waste contents during a seismic event. The structural evaluations completed with the representative tank models do not reveal any structural deficiencies with the integrity of the DSTs. The analyses represent 60 years of use, which extends well beyond the current date. In addition, the temperature loads imposed on the model are significantly more severe than any service to date or proposed for the future. Bounding material properties were also selected to provide the most severe combinations. While the focus of the analyses was a bounding-case tank, it was necessary during various evaluations to conduct tank-specific analyses. The primary tank buckling evaluation was carried out on a tank-specific basis because of the sensitivity to waste height, specific gravity, tank wall thickness, and primary tank vapor space vacuum limit. For this analysis, the occurrence of maximum tank vacuum was classified as a service level C, emergency load condition. The only area of potential concern in the analysis was with the buckling evaluation of the AP tank, which showed the current limit on demand of l2-inch water gauge vacuum to exceed the allowable of 10.4 inches. This determination was based on analysis at the design waste temperature of 350 F and the full 60-year corrosion allowance on the tank wall of 0.060 inch. However, analysis at a more realistic temperature of 250 F or corrosion allowance of 0.025 inch results in an acceptable demand/capacity ratio according to the ASME code criteria. Thus, buckling of the primary tank is judged to be unlikely for the current lack of corrosion in the tanks, and the expectation that the maximum waste temperature will not exceed 210 F. The reinforced concrete structure was evaluated as specified by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) code requirements for nuclear safety-related structures (ACI-349). The demand was demonstrated to be lower than the capacity at all locations. Revision 1 is being issued to document changes to the anchor bolt evaluation. RPP-RPT-32237 Rev. 1, Hanford Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Seismic Project-Increased Liquid Level Analysis for 241AP Tank Farms, described changes to the anchor bolt modeling and evaluation which were implemented in response to the independent reviewer's comments. Similar changes have been made in the bounding tank analysis and are documented in RPP-RPT-28968 Rev. 1. The conclusions of the previous releases of this report remain unchanged.

MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Seismic imaging of the Medicine Lake Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50 km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. The USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. This experiment had two purposes: To produce high-quality velocity and attenuation images of the young magma body presumed to be the source for the young volcanic features, and to collect a dataset that can be used to develop and test seismic imaging methods that may be useful for understanding other geothermal systems. Eight large explosions were detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano, a distance chosen to produce strong upward traveling signals through the area of interest. The data were inverted using Aki's method to produce three-dimensional velocity and attenuation images of the sub-surface. Preliminary interpretation shows low velocity and attenuation on the flanks of the volcano, and coincident high attenuation values and low velocities (-20%) from 3 to 5 km beneath the center of the caldera. This zone may be a region of partial melt which fed the youngest eruptions.

Zucca, J.J.; Evans, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CX-004401: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-004401: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11082010 Location(s): Waynesburg,...

292

CX-005226: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Field Testing and Diagnostics of Radial-Jet Well-Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery from Marginal Reserves Date: 02112011 Location(s): The Woodlands, Texas...

293

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oklahoma | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10182010 Location(s): Tulsa, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil...

294

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description Historically, areas where the Earth surface is covered by an exposed high-velocity rock layer have been locations where conventional, single-component, seismic P-waves have failed to provide usable geological information. The research will use new seismic sources that emphasize shear waves and new seismic data-acquisition technology based on cable-free data recording to acquire seismic research data across two sites covered with surface-exposed highvelocity rocks. Research tasks will involve acquiring, processing, and interpreting both conventional seismic data and multicomponent seismic data. Scientists at BEG will analyze well logs, cores, and reservoir test data to construct geological models of the targeted geology across each study site.

295

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

N Reactor Seismic Task Force analysis and fix summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (SEP) and the Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program (ASEP) were established to implement recommendations made earlier by study groups assessing the safety of N Reactor. The recommendations which dealt with seismic issues were assigned to Safety Enhancement Programs, Defense Reactor Programs for implementation. A Seismic Task Force was assembled to perform the analyses, design the modifications, direct the performance of the work and provide program management of the effort to seismically qualify the facility. This document identifies the reports published by the task force to resolve each of the seismic issues raised by safety assessments. The reports, in turn, provide a list of recommended fixes (Fixes are potential problems, not resolved in the engineering analyses, which require repair, cleanup or modifications to hardware to establish seismic qualification). The purpose of this report is to provide a guide to seismic fixes implemented by the Seismic Task Force. This information is provided in the form of a ``fix log`` which lists fixes according to the report which recommended them and identifies the work authorization (WA), engineering documentation (Design Change, Field Change Notice or Engineering Change Notice) and acceptance dates for each fix. 5 refs., 6 tabs.

Rainey, T.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

De Paoli, Rosa Grazia [Department of Landscape Planning, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

3D seismic interpretation, reservoir characteristics and petroleum prospects for South Marsh Island OCS Blocks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Marsh OCS Blocks, located approximately 150 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, contain a 100-million-barrel oil field. In recent years, exploration in this area has focused on plays in Pleistocene salt-related rollover structures with reservoirs of fluvial-deltaic sandstones and proven high oil-producing potential. After more than twenty years of exploration, exploitation and producing, this area remains an attractive target for exploration with its potentially high-quality reservoirs that have not been drilled. The I, K and L reservoirs of the Pleistocene have contributed to the majority of the production of over 100 million barrels of oil and near 200 billion cubic feet of natural gas. More than 90 well penetrations in these sands show great stratigraphic diversity within short distances, making the ability to accurately determine whether sand lenses have been adequately produced or bypassed essential for production opportunities for operators. New 3D seismic processing and interpretation techniques have been applied to interpret 3D seismic data with significantly improved accuracy. This has led to a renewed interest in the South Marsh area in an attempt to identify new plays and prospects. An interactive 3D-seismic interpretation has been carried out for the entire area. The objectives of this study are to conduct 3D seismic interpretation, to build a depositional environment model that encompasses the different sedimentary facies and sequence stratigraphic framework by using the prestack time migrated 3D volume and existing well control, to study rock properties using seismic modeling and well data to explain seismic attribute response, and to study the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Three horizons were mapped from well, seismic, and petrophysical data for the I, K and L formation tops respectively. Structure styles were well-defined by the 3D seismic interpretation. Well correlation has been completed for I, K and L formations throughout the study area. Reservoirs were studied vertically and horizontally. Reservoir types and properties were identified. One prospect related to the proven play of fault-bounded anticline structures was identified within the area. The plays involve the stratigraphic pinch out of basal transgressive sands deposited in the flank of the structure.

Duan, Ling

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Structural analysis of an LMFBR shield assembly duct under thermo-mechanical and seismic loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the stress analysis performed to assess structural adequacy of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) core removable shield assemblies. Removable shield assemblies are located in the peripheral region of the core (between blanket assemblies and the fixed radial shield), and are subjected to severe cross-sectional thermal gradients and seismic loads requiring a relatively complex duct load pad design. For cost-effectiveness, the analysis was conducted in two stages. First, an elasto-plastic seismic stress analysis was performed using a detailed nonlinear finite element model (with gaps) of the load pad configuration. Next, in order to determine the total strain accumulation and the creep-fatigue damage the maximum seismic stresses combined with the ''worst'' thermal stresses from a single assembly model were used to perform a simplified inelastic analysis using two sets of material properties to bound the changing material conditions during reactor operation. This work demonstrated the necessity and applicability of the two simplified analysis techniques in elevated temperature structural design, i.e., the treatment of time-dependent degradation of material properties due to temperature and nuclear irradiation, and the use of time-independent finite element stress analysis results to perform a simplified creep-fatigue analysis.

Malik, S.N.; Sazawal, V.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Effect of Corrosion on the Seismic Response of a Single-Bent, Reinforced Concrete Bridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of corrosion on a single-bent, reinforced concrete (RC) bridge subject to seismic loading is the primary focus of this research. This work attempts to determine the effects of decreasing rebar diameter and concrete cover spalling on the strength and stiffness of the RC bridge. The application of these results to the field of historic preservation will also be explored. Through the use of static and dynamic analyses, this research shows that the effects of corrosion only have a slight influence on the seismic fragility of the RC bridge. The loss of three inches of concrete cover from the bridge column is shown to have a greater effect on the strength and stiffness of the bridge than decreasing the rebar diameter by 10%. The deformation capacity and demand both increase for bridges with reduced reinforcing steel and concrete cover; however, the capacity increases to a greater degree than the demand. The seismic fragility of the bridge based on deformation criteria is greatest for the pristine structure, and it decreases as the level of damage increases. Future work should include verifying the hysteretic behavior by accounting for reinforcement slip caused by a loss of bond.

Harvat, Jessica

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Independent Analysis of Seismicity and Rock fall Scenarios for the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is located in the somewhat seismically active Basin and Range province. Future seismic activity is identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US National Academy of Sciences as a key scenario for safety assessment of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of its on-going program of conducting independent analyses of scientific and technical issues that could be important to the licensing of the Yucca Mountain repository, EPRI has conducted an analysis of the combined scenarios of seismic activity and stability of emplacement drifts with respect to the long-term repository safety. In this paper we present the results of 3D finite element simulations of both static and dynamic loading of a degraded waste package. For the static case, the expected maximum static load is determined by utilizing relationships between cave height and the bulking factor. A static load representing 30 meters of broken rock was simulated using the finite element model. For the dynamic case, block size and velocity data from the most recent Drift Degradation AMR are used. Based on this, a rock block with a volume of 3.11 m{sup 3} and with an impact velocity of 4.81 m/s was simulated using the finite element model. In both cases, the results indicate that the waste package remains intact. (authors)

Apted, M.J. [Monitor Scientific, 3900 S. Wadsworth Blvd., Denver, CO 80235 (United States); Kemeny, J.M. [University of Arizona, Dept. Mining and Geological Engineering, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Martin, C.D. [University of Alberta, Dept. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2 (Canada); James, R.J. [Anatech Corp., 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear stimulation of gas fields  

SciTech Connect

From National Technical Canadian Gas Association; Calgary, Alberta, Canada (17 Oct 1973). The technical bases of the emerging technology of nuclear stimulation of natural gas fields, the potential of this method for increasing the gas supply of the US, and public issues related to this technology are discussed. A technical appendix is provided with information on: reservoir producing characteristics; explosive design, availability, and cost; firing and space of explosives; economic parameters; and tabulated statistics on past and current projects on nuclear stimulation. (LCL)

Randolph, P.L.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 04/26/2011 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Hi-Q is proposing to develop surface seismic and Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) methods and adapt them to the unique conditions encountered in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Phase III (Tasks 7 through 9) of the program would consist of the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of extensive multi offset VSP. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005708.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002924: Categorical Exclusion Determination

307

CX-001413: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1413: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1413: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001413: Categorical Exclusion Determination Control House Seismic Upgrades - Allston, Keeler, Ostrander, and Marion Substations CX(s) Applied: B1.16, B1.3 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Columbia, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to first remove and dispose of any asbestos and lead-based paint within seismic strengthening project area at each of its substations listed in the project title. BPA will then construct both structural and non-structural seismic upgrades, and perform minor architectural work at each substation. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001413.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005411: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002433: Categorical Exclusion Determination

308

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Shevenell & De Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=401374" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

309

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Review of seismicity and ground motion studies related to development of seismic design at SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC response spectra developed in Reg. Guide 1.60 is being used in the studies related to restarting of the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. Because it envelopes all the other site specific spectra which have been developed for SRS, it provides significant conservatism in the design and analysis of the reactor systems for ground motions of this value or with these probability levels. This spectral shape is also the shape used for the design of the recently licensed Vogtle Nuclear Station, located south of the Savannah River from the SRS. This report provides a summary of the data base used to develop the design basis earthquake. This includes the seismicity, rates of occurrence, magnitudes, and attenuation relationships. A summary is provided for the studies performed and methodologies used to establish the design basis earthquake for SRS. The ground motion response spectra developed from the various studies are also summarized. The seismic hazard and PGA`s developed for other critical facilities in the region are discussed, and the SRS seismic instrumentation is presented. The programs for resolving outstanding issues are discussed and conclusions are presented.

Stephenson, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Acree, J.R. [Westinghouse Environmental and Geotechnical Services, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Structural reliability analysis and seismic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a reliability analysis method for safety evaluation of nuclear structures. By utilizing this method, it is possible to estimate the limit state probability in the lifetime of structures and to generate analytically the fragility curves for PRA studies. The earthquake ground acceleration, in this approach, is represented by a segment of stationary Gaussian process with a zero mean and a Kanai-Tajimi Spectrum. All possible seismic hazard at a site represented by a hazard curve is also taken into consideration. Furthermore, the limit state of a structure is analytically defined and the corresponding limit state surface is then established. Finally, the fragility curve is generated and the limit state probability is evaluated. In this paper, using a realistic reinforced concrete containment as an example, results of the reliability analysis of the containment subjected to dead load, live load and ground earthquake acceleration are presented and a fragility curve for PRA studies is also constructed.

Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Shinozuka, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Seismic Monitoring Of Blasting Activity In Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two significant mining regions in Russia lie near Novosibirsk and at the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly. A small percentage of events from these areas trigger the International Monitoring System (IMS). We have studied IMS recordings of events from these areas with the main goal of better understanding how these blasts are detonated and how these events will be most effectively monitored using IMS data. We have collected ground-truth information on the mining blasts and crustal structure in the area to facilitate modeling of the events. We have focused on sifting out from further consideration routine mining events and identifying detonation anomalies. We define master traces to represent tight clusters of mining events and to be used to identify anomalous events. We have examined recordings of events from eight significant event clusters in the 500-km-long Kuzbass/Abakan mining trend near Novosibirsk. The recordings were made by the IMS station ZAL. We see significant variations in the P onset and early coda between different events in clusters. We have found strong evidence of a detonation anomaly in just one of the events (out of 178 examined). Differences in the onset wave trains are attributed largely to differences in the firing patterns. Time independent spectral modulations have been observed in seismic signals produced by delay-fired mining events in mining regions throughout the world. The Novosibirsk trend is no exception to this rule. Delay-fired events in many mining regions, such as Kuzbass/Abakan, are also commonly associated with enhanced long-period (2- to 8-s) surface waves. The mine blasts in Russian mining regions appear, seismically, to resemble large blasts recorded in other regions (such as Wyoming). Techniques found to be effective in Wyoming, reviewed by...

Michael Hedlin University; Michael A. H. Hedlin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Tomographic imaging of rock conditions ahead of mining using the shearer as a seismic source - A feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roof falls due to poor rock conditions in a coal longwall panel may threaten miner's life and cause significant interruption to mine production. There has been a requirement for technologies that are capable of imaging the rock conditions in longwall coal mining, ahead of the working face and without any interruption to production. A feasibility study was carried out to investigate the characteristics of seismic signals generated by the continuous coal cutter (shearer) and recorded by geophone arrays deployed ahead of the working face, for the purpose of seismic tomographic imaging of roof strata condition before mining. Two experiments were conducted at a coal mine using two arrays of geophones. The experiments have demonstrated that the longwall shearer generates strong and low-frequency (similar to 40 Hz) seismic energy that can be adequately detected by geophones deployed in shallow boreholes along the roadways as far as 300 m from the face. Using noise filtering and signal cross correlation techniques, the seismic arrival times associated with the shearer cutting can be reliably determined. It has proved the concept that velocity variations ahead of the face can be mapped out using tomographic techniques while mining is in progress.

Luo, X.; King, A.; Van de Werken, M. [CSIRO, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Experience Based Seismic Verification Guidelines for Overhead Crane Systems: Volume I - Seismic Review Procedure; Volume II - Performance of Overhead Cranes in Strong Motion Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic capability verification of overhead cranes systems at nuclear power plants. The report summarizes seismic experience data from strong-motion earthquakes for these systems and identifies the characteristics of systems that could lead to failure or unacceptable behavior in an earthquake. The seismic experience data show that overhead crane systems exhibit extremely good performance under strong-motion seismic loading, w...

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital

316

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal with CCS Sector. This law

317

Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic monitoring is a technique to seismically image an area utilizing earthquakes originating from distances greater than 1,000 km from the measurement site.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A teleseism is the tremor caused by an earthquake that is very far away. According to the USGS, the term, teleseismic refers to earthquakes that occur more than 1000 km from the measurement site. Often teleseismic events can be picked up only by seismometers that are in low background noise locations; whereas, in general, a tremor of a magnitude 5.3 earthquake can be seen anywhere in the world with modern seismic

318

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

319

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

320

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

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321

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

322

State of Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment - Summary E.L Majer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the

323

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

324

The retrofitting of existing buildings for seismic criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the process for retrofitting a building for seismic criteria. It explains the need for a new, performance-based design code to provide a range of acceptable building behavior. It then outlines the ...

Besing, Christa, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hypercube performance for 2-D seismic finite-difference modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave-equation seismic modeling in two space dimensions is computationally intensive, often requiring hours of supercomputer CPU time to run typical geological models with 500 500 grids and 100 sources. This paper analyzes the performance of ACOUS2D, ...

L. J. Baker

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation of Horizontal Seismic Hazard of Shahrekord, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents probabilistic horizontal seismic hazard assessment of Shahrekord, Iran. It displays the probabilistic estimate of Peak Ground Horizontal Acceleration (PGHA) for the return period of 75, 225, 475 and 2475 years. The output of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is based on peak ground acceleration (PGA), which is the most common criterion in designing of buildings. A catalogue of seismic events that includes both historical and instrumental events was developed and covers the period from 840 to 2007. The seismic sources that affect the hazard in Shahrekord were identified within the radius of 150 km and the recurrence relationships of these sources were generated. Finally four maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Shahrekord in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines for different hazard levels by using SEISRISK III software.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Iran University of Science and Technology--Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehkordi, M. Raeisi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamali, M. Koohi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The...

328

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity are diffuse and appear unsuitable for defining the areal extent of the reservoir. However, from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these regions a general discriminant was constructed that combines several physical parameters for identifying the presence of a geothermal system.

Hadley, D.M.; Cavit, D.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF A HIGH- TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR)" Kennedy, R.P. e.t. all. 1975 * NUREGCR-6957, CORRELATION OF ANALYSIS OF JNES SEISMIC WALL PRESSURE DATA FOR ABWR MODEL...

330

Effects of Recent Environmental Changes on Global Seismicity and Volcanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A covariation of recent global environmental changes and seismicity on Earth is demonstrated. Presently, rising concern about anthropogenic activities and their consequences on the cryosphere and environment have always overlooked changes related ...

Evgeny A. Podolskiy

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW 0.385 GW 3.85e-4 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 4 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 9 Geothermal Areas within the Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

332

Applicaiton of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Farhang Ostadan (BNI) & Raman Venkata (DOE-WTP-WED) Presented by Lisa Anderson (BNI) US DOE NPH Workshop October...

333

Design of innovative dynamic systems for seismic response mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rocking wall systems consist of shear walls, laterally connected to a building, that are moment-released in their strong plane. Their purpose is to mitigate seismic structural response by constraining a building primarily ...

Seymour, Douglas (Douglas Benjamin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, BRAZED AND GROOVED PIPE JOINTS Brent Gutierrez, PhD, PE George Antaki, PE, F.ASME DOE NPH Conference October 25-26, 2011 Motivation * Understand the...

335

Third Quater Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, 16 local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. The largest event (magnitude 2.0) occurred on April 16, 2007 and was located 4 km southwest of the 400 Area in the Columbia River basalts at a depth of approximately 3 km. Stratigraphically, 7 earthquakes occurred in the Columbia River basalts (approximately 0-5 km depth), 1 earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km depth), and 8 earthquakes in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km depth). Geographically, 8 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, and 8 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford SMA network was triggered on the 300 Area and the 400 Area SMA by the 2.0 Mc seismic event that occurred on April 16, 2007. The maximum vertical acceleration was 0.07 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.05% g at the 300 Area SMA, 13.5 km from the event. At the 400 Area SMA, only 5.2 km from the event, the maximum vertical acceleration was 0.25 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.23% g. These are the first recordings of a small local earthquake on the SMA network. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 8 times larger than the peak accelerations observed at the 400 Area and no action was required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Seismic tests for solar models with tachocline mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have computed accurate 1-D solar models including both a macroscopic mixing process in the solar tachocline as well as up-to-date microscopic physical ingredients. Using sound speed and density profiles inferred through primary inversion of the solar oscillation frequencies coupled with the equation of thermal equilibrium, we have extracted the temperature and hydrogen abundance profiles. These inferred quantities place strong constraints on our theoretical models in terms of the extent and strength of our macroscopic mixing, on the photospheric heavy elements abundance, on the nuclear reaction rates such as $S_{11}$ and $S_{34}$ and on the efficiency of the microscopic diffusion. We find a good overall agreement between the seismic Sun and our models if we introduce a macroscopic mixing in the tachocline and allow for variation within their uncertainties of the main physical ingredients. From our study we deduce that the solar hydrogen abundance at the solar age is $X_{\\rm inv}=0.732\\pm 0.001$ and that based on the $^9$Be photospheric depletion, the maximum extent of mixing in the tachocline is 5% of the solar radius. The nuclear reaction rate for the fundamental $pp$ reaction is found to be $S_{11}(0)=4.06\\pm 0.07$ $10^{-25}$ MeV barns, i.e., 1.5% higher than the present theoretical determination. The predicted solar neutrino fluxes are discussed in the light of the new SNO/SuperKamiokande results.

A. S. Brun; H. M. Antia; S. M. Chitre; J. -P. Zahn

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

A new look at 3D seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

New ways are being developed to quickly extract and more thoroughly analyze the information contained in the 3D seismic data. These interpretation techniques were used to evaluate a 3D survey at Fortescue field (Gippsland basin, Australia) before starting a 13-well infill drilling program in 1994. Oil was discovered in the top of the LaTrobe (TOL) group at Fortescue field. Following appraisal drilling and platform installation, production started in 1983. To mitigate recent production decline and develop remaining reserves, a 13-well infill drilling program was proposed in 1993. Fortescue field is a west-southwest dipping monocline with oil trapped stratigraphically beneath an erosional unconformity in 13 separate elastic reservoirs. The reservoirs dip approximately 2{degree} more steeply than the overlying erosional truncation surface, causing older sections to progressively subcrop in an easterly direction. The 13 proposed infill wells relied completely or partially on oil being trapped structurally updip from existing completions. To effectively capture these reserves, wells were targeted to intersect reservoirs along the low-angle sand truncation face. The ability to identify and map the top and base reservoir edges along the subcrop surface was critical for well success. The goal of this study was to quickly and accurately identify nine reservoir subcrop edges, determine the remaining reserves updip from existing completions, and identify the geological risk associated with each proposed well.

Vinson, T.E.; Standley, P.; Jager, G.; Kidd, G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Seismicity related to geothermal development in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A ten-station seismic network was operated in and around the Dixie Valley area from January 1980 to November 1981; three of these stations are still in operation. Data from the Dixie Valley network were analyzed through 30 Jun 1981, and results of analysis were compared with analysis of somewhat larger events for the period 1970-1979. The seismic cycle in the Western Great Basic, the geologic structural setting, and the instrumentation are also described.

Ryall, A.S.; Vetter, U.R.

1982-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Seismic review of vault for MFTF upgrade project  

SciTech Connect

This letter report was prepared in accordance with the scope of work for the preconceptual seismic evaluation of the (..cap alpha.. + T) Tandem Mirror Fusion Machine concrete vault. The scope of the work was developed with the assistance of the Bechtel site representative Dr. Sunil Ghose. The report contains comments and preconceptual recommendations on wall upgrading for an 150-ton crane installation, concrete vault seismic capability for (..cap alpha.. + T) conditions, and recommendations for future work.

Franklin, H.A.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Virginia Regional Seismic Network. Final report (1986--1992)  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Virginia Regional Seismic Network was one of the few fully calibrated digital seismic networks in the United States. Continued operation has resulted in the archival of signals from 2,000+ local, regional and teleseismic sources. Seismotectonic studies of the central Virginia seismic zone showed the activity in the western part to be related to a large antiformal structure while seismicity in the eastern portion is associated spatially with dike swarms. The eastern Tennessee seismic zone extends over a 300x50 km area and is the result of a compressive stress field acting at the intersection between two large crustal blocks. Hydroseismicity, which proposes a significant role for meteoric water in intraplate seismogenesis, found support in the observation of common cyclicities between streamflow and earthquake strain data. Seismic hazard studies have provided the following results: (1) Damage areas in the eastern United States are three to five times larger than those observed in the west. (2) Judged solely on the basis of cataloged earthquake recurrence rates, the next major shock in the southeast region will probably occur outside the Charleston, South Carolina area. (3) Investigations yielded necessary hazard parameters (for example, maximum magnitudes) for several sites in the southeast. Basic to these investigations was the development and maintenance of several seismological data bases.

Bollinger, G.A.; Sibol, M.S.; Chapman, M.C.; Snoke, J.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US). Seismological Observatory

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Seismic design and evaluation criteria based on target performance goals  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy utilizes deterministic seismic design/evaluation criteria developed to achieve probabilistic performance goals. These seismic design and evaluation criteria are intended to apply equally to the design of new facilities and to the evaluation of existing facilities. In addition, the criteria are intended to cover design and evaluation of buildings, equipment, piping, and other structures. Four separate sets of seismic design/evaluation criteria have been presented each with a different performance goal. In all these criteria, earthquake loading is selected from seismic hazard curves on a probabilistic basis but seismic response evaluation methods and acceptable behavior limits are deterministic approaches with which design engineers are familiar. For analytical evaluations, conservatism has been introduced through the use of conservative inelastic demand-capacity ratios combined with ductile detailing requirements, through the use of minimum specified material strengths and conservative code capacity equations, and through the use of a seismic scale factor. For evaluation by testing or by experience data, conservatism has been introduced through the use of an increase scale factor which is applied to the prescribed design/evaluation input motion.

Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kennedy, R.P. [Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Active and passive seismic imaging of a hydraulic fracture in diatomite  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a comprehensive set of experiments including remote- and treatment-well microseismic monitoring, interwell shear-wave shadowing, and surface tiltmeter arrays, that was used to monitor the growth of a hydraulic fracture in the Belridge diatomite. To obtain accurate measurements, and extensive subsurface network of geophones was cemented spanning the diatomite formation in three closely spaced observation wells around the well to be fracture treated. Data analysis indicates that the minifracture and main hydraulic fracture stimulations resulted in a nearly vertical fracture zone (striking N26{degrees}E) vertically segregated into two separate elements, the uppermost of which grew 60 ft above the perforated interval. The interwell seismic effects are consistent with a side process zone of reduced shear velocity, which remote-well microseismic data independently suggest may be as wide as 40 ft. The experiments indicate complicated processes occurring during hydraulic fracturing that have significant implications for stimulation, waterflooding, in fill drilling, and EOR. These processes are neither well understood nor included in current hydraulic fracture models.

Vinegar, H.J.; Wills, P.B.; De Martini, D.C. (Shell Development Co. (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012) 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2011 - 2012 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Map hydraulic structure within the field from seismic data Notes 2011: 16 years of seismicity were analyzed to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated since the 1980's. 2012: 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field were relocated using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for

345

Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of mud volcanism, mechanisms of formation, types of eruptions and their relationship to the hydrocarbon systems provides important information about subsurface conditions and geological processes within the South Caspian Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each determined mud volcano is constructed. Analysis of different parameters from this database shows that there is a high concentration of mud volcanoes at the southern part of the study area. It is coincides with the distribution of the subsurface structures within the basin. Mud volcanoes with low relief (several tens of meters) are mainly concentrated in the northeast. Conversely, mud volcanoes with large vertical relief (greater than 200 m) are clustered in the southwest part of the basin. Mud volcano development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud flows reveals to the actual activity of the mud volcanoes and it gives valuable information about possible mechanism of mud volcanism within the South Caspian Basin. Previous studies of the onshore mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan and the results from current work conclude that mud volcano formation within the South Caspian Basin is mainly controlled by tectonic forces and overpressured sediments. Mud volcano activity is not always related to the Maykop organic reach shale succession. It can occur at shallow depths by pressure breakthrough from any stratigraphic zone.

Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of seismic sources is often based on a combination of geologic and tectonic considerations and patterns of observed seismicity; hence, a historical earthquake catalogue is important. A historical catalogue of earthquakes of approximate magnitude (M) 2.5 and greater for the time period 1850 through 1992 was compiled for the INEL region. The primary data source used was the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) catalogue for the time period from about 1800 through 1985 (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1988). A large number of felt earthquakes, especially prior to the 1970`s, which were below the threshold of completeness established in the DNAG catalogue (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1991), were taken from the state catalogues compiled by Stover and colleagues at the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) and combined with the DNAG catalogue for the INEL region. The state catalogues were those of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. NEIC`s Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) and the state catalogues compiled by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) were also used to supplement the pre-1986 time period. A few events reanalyzed by Jim Zollweg (Boise State University, written communication, 1994) were also modified in the catalogue. In the case of duplicate events, the DNAG entry was preferred over the Stover et al. entry for the period 1850 through 1985. A few events from Berg and Baker (1963) were also added to the catalogue. This information was and will be used in determining the seismic risk of buildings and facilities located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

CX-006965: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Categorical Exclusion Determination 65: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006965: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provide Design to Install a Seismic Switch to Shut Down Both Supply Fans and Both Room Exhaust Fans During a Seismic Event CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 09/16/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, National Energy Technology Laboratory As a result of the upgrade of the HB-Line Documented Safety Analysis/Technical Safety Requirements to DOE-STD-3009, several events require protection to prevent a radiological release. Consolidated Hazards Analysis Process (CHAP) for the HB-Line Documented Safety Basis Upgrade (U), U-CHA-H-00003, includes two specific events HB-7-001, Earthquake with subsequent fire and post seismic hydrogen explosions in process vessels and

348

Seismic response analyses for reactor facilities at Savannah River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactor facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were designed during the 1950's. The original seismic criteria defining the input ground motion was 0.1 G with UBC (uniform building code) provisions used to evaluate structural seismic loads. Later ground motion criteria have defined the free field seismic motion with a 0.2 G ZPA (free field acceleration) and various spectral shapes. The spectral shapes have included the Housner spectra, a site specific spectra, and the US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) Reg. Guide 1.60 shape. The development of these free field seismic criteria are discussed in the paper. The more recent seismic analyses have been of the following type: fixed base response spectra, frequency independent lumped parameter soil/structure interaction (SSI), frequency dependent lumped parameter SSI, and current state of the art analyses using computer codes such as SASSI. The results from these computations consist of structural loads and floor response spectra (used for piping and equipment qualification). These results are compared in the paper and the methods used to validate the results are discussed. 14 refs., 11 figs.

Miller, C.A. Costantino, C.J. (City Univ. of New York, NY (USA)); Xu, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Seismic Hazard Assessment of Tehran Based on Arias Intensity  

SciTech Connect

In this paper probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of Tehran for Arias intensity parameter is done. Tehran is capital and most populated city of Iran. From economical, political and social points of view, Tehran is the most significant city of Iran. Since in the previous centuries, catastrophic earthquakes have occurred in Tehran and its vicinity, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of this city for Arias intensity parameter is useful. Iso-intensity contour lines maps of Tehran on the basis of different attenuation relationships for different earthquake periods are plotted. Maps of iso-intensity points in the Tehran region are presented using proportional attenuation relationships for rock and soil beds for 2 hazard levels of 10% and 2% in 50 years. Seismicity parameters on the basis of historical and instrumental earthquakes for a time period that initiate from 4th century BC and ends in the present time are calculated using Tow methods. For calculation of seismicity parameters, the earthquake catalogue with a radius of 200 km around Tehran has been used. SEISRISKIII Software has been employed. Effects of different parameters such as seismicity parameters, length of fault rupture relationships and attenuation relationships are considered using Logic Tree.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Center of Excellence for Fundamental Studies in Structural Engineering, College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoodi, H. [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

351

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

352

Seismic Hazard Characterization at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS): Status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Seismic Hazard Characterization project for the Savannah River Site (SRS-SHC) is to develop estimates of the seismic hazard for several locations within the SRS. Given the differences in the geology and geotechnical characteristics at each location, the estimates of the seismic hazard are to allow for the specific local conditions at each site. Characterization of seismic hazard is a critical factor for the design of new facilities as well as for the review and potential retrofit of existing facilities at SRS. The scope of the SRS seismic hazard characterization reported in this document is limited to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The goal of the project is to provide seismic hazard estimates based on a state-of-the-art method which is consistent with developments and findings of several ongoing studies which are deemed to bring improvements in the state of the seismic hazard analyses.

Savy, J.B.

1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Induced seismicity analysis for reservoir characterization at a petroleum field in Oman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the analysis and interpretation of passive seismic data collected in a 20-month monitoring period. The investigation is divided into four studies, each focusing on a different aspect of the seismic ...

Sze, Edmond Kin-Man

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electron- and photon-stimulated desorption as hydrogen probes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent results from electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) are presented along with even more recently demonstrated photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) which show that these techniques are powerful and insightful probes of atomic and molecular species on surfaces and specifically are very sensitive to hydrogen. As such they are valuable complements to the burgeoning array of electronic probes of surfaces. More importantly, they open the way for a direct study of hydrogen and its singularly important role in surface chemistry. While these techniques are primarily surface probes, it is demonstrated that ion-milling techniques can be used to determine near surface hydrogen profiles.

Knotek, M.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

VSP [Vertical Seismic Profiling] and cross hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years LBL has been carrying out experiments at various fractured rock sites to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media. These experiments have been utilizing high frequency (1000 to 10000 Hz.) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Three component sources and receivers are used to map fracture density, and orientation. The goal of the experiments has been to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters, if possible, in order to provide a more accurate description of a starting model for hydrological characterization. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of the Yucca Mountain site for the storage of nuclear waste. In addition to these controlled experiments multicomponent VSP work has been carried out at several sites to determine fracture characteristics. The results to date indicate that both P-wave and S-wave can be used to map the location of fractures. In addition, fractures that are open and conductive are much more visible to seismic waves that non-conductive fractures. The results of these tests indicate direct use in an unsaturated environment. 12 refs., 10 figs.

Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Myer, L.R.; Karasaki, K.; Daley, T.M.; Long, J.C.S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Combined seismic and hydraulic method of modeling flow in fractured low permeability rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modeling flow of ground water in hard rocks where a network of fractures provides the dominant flow paths is a major problem. This paper summarizes a program of investigations currently underway in this laboratory to characterize the geometry of fractured rocks and develop methods of handling flow in such systems. Numerical models have been developed to investigate flow behavior in two- and three-dimensional fracture networks. The results demonstrate the insights that can be gained from modeling studies of fractured rocks. A key problem is gathering the necessary data on fracture geometry. Investigations have been started to determine how vertical seismic profiling (VSP) might be improved and applied to this problem. A VSP experiment in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, where fracture orientation is known, produced shear wave splitting and velocity anisotropy in agreement with theory. The results suggest the potential application of 3-component, multi-source VSP data in determining fracture orientation and average spacing. We believe a combination of seismic and hydraulic methods can greatly enhance an understanding of fluid flow and transport in low permeability rock systems where fractures provide the dominant paths. 40 refs, 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Long, J.C.S.; Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DOE Geothermal well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective stimulation treatment requires the interaction of four separate items: frac fluids, proppants, equipment, and planned and properly engineered schedules. While there are good fluid systems and proppants, only judicious combinations and a well thought out schedule which uses all of these materials and available equipment to best advantage is an optimum stimulation treatment. Generally, high flow rates and convective cooling can be used either with conventional (planar) fracturing or with a dendritic fracturing technique. Many of todays fluid systems have been tested to above 400/sup 0/F. Some fluids have survived quite well. Current tests on proppants have shown temperature sensitivities in sand; however, there are resin coated materials and sintered bauxite which are not temperature sensitive. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.; Campbell, D.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Program on Technology Innovation: Effect of Seismic Wave Incoherence on Foundation and Building Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task S2.1 of the New Plant Seismic Issues Resolution Programa joint effort of EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE)entails a research program into the effect of seismic wave incoherence on foundation and building response. The tasks objective is to systematically study seismic wave incoherence effects on structures/foundations similar to those being considered for advanced reactor designs. Seismic wave incoherence occurs because of horizontal spatial variation of both horizontal and vertical ground mot...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Project Plan: Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan outlines the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities (CEUS SSC) Project, which will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986. The objective of the CEUS SSC project is to develop an up-to-date assessment of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) SSC for CEUS. Input to a PSHA consists of both seismic source and ground motion characterization. These two components ...

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

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361

A Natural Seismic Isolating System: The Buried Mangrove Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Belleplaine test site, located in the island of Guadeloupe (French Lesser Antilles) includes a three-accelerometer vertical array, designed for liquefac- tion studies. The seismic response of the soil column at the test site is computed using three methods: the spectral ratio method using the vertical array data, a numerical method using the geotechnical properties of the soil column, and an operative fre- quency domain decomposition (FDD) modal analysis method. The Belleplaine test site is characterized by a mangrove layer overlaid by a stiff sandy deposit. This con- figuration is widely found at the border coast of the Caribbean region, which is exposed to high seismic hazard. We show that the buried mangrove layer plays the role of an isolation system equivalent to those usually employed in earthquake engineering aimed at reducing the seismic shear forces by reducing the internal stress within the structure. In our case, the flexibility of the mangrove layer reduces the distortion and the stress in the...

Gueguen, Philippe; Foray, Pierre; Rousseau, Christophe; Maury, Julie; 10.1785/0120100129

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

363

Direct-Current Resistivity At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Central Nevada Seismic At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

364

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk (SAFER)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Analysis of Facilities Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Michael Salmon, LANL Larry, Goen, LANL Voice: 505-665-7244 Fax: 505-665-2897 salmon@lanl.gov 10/22/2008 p. 2, LA-UR 11-06024 Purpose * To discuss LANLs implementation of SAFER and lessons learned * Background * Results * Lessons learned 10/22/2008 p. 3, LA-UR 11-06024 SAFER Project * Project Mission - Conduct quantitative evaluation of seismic risk due to operations of Nuclear and High Hazard (DSA) Facilities at LANL operating under a Documented Safety Analysis/Safety Evaluation Report - and Non-nuclear (BOP) Facilities operating under E.O. 12941. 10/22/2008 p. 4, LA-UR 11-06024 Composition * SAFER comprised of two major efforts: - Non-nuclear Facilities termed "Balance of Plant" (BOP) Facilities

365

Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Authors Thomas M. Daley, Ernest L. Majer, Roland Gritto and Jerry M. Harris Conference 70th Annual International Meeting of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Expanded Abstracts; N/A; 2000/01/01 Published N/A, 2000 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Citation

366

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New

367

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401370"

368

Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden"

369

Effects of core barrel on vessel seismic loadings. [LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliability of reactor systems under seismic events is a major concern for the safety of the nuclear power plants. This paper deals with the effects of the core barrel on the seismic response of reactor tanks. The main emphases are the effects of core barrel on the free-surface wave height and the fluid coupling effects between the core barrel and primary tank. This study represents an initial step to investigate the effects of in-tank components, structures on the seismically-induced hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor tanks. To simplify the analysis, the tank used in the study is simulated by a two-dimensional model. Two parametric studies were carried out in which the wall flexibility and location of core barrel were used as parameters respectively.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Non-extensive statistical analysis of seismicity in the area of Javakheti, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of earthquake magnitudes in the Javakheti highlands was analyzed using a non-extensive statistical approach. The earthquakes occurring from 1960 to 2008 in this seismically active area of Southern Caucasus were investigated. The seismic ... Keywords: Dynamics, Energy density characteristic, Modified frequency-magnitude relationship, Non-extensivity parameter, Seismicity, Time series

T. Matcharashvili; T. Chelidze; Z. Javakhishvili; N. Jorjiashvili; U. Fra Paleo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Delivery Massager: A tool for propagating seismic inversion information into reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a new open-source program for transforming inversion data from the open-source Delivery seismic inversion software to industry-standard cornerpoint grid formats suitable for reservoir modelling and flow simulations. The seismic inversion ... Keywords: Bayesian, Cornerpoint grid, Downscaling, Geostatistics, Inversion, Open-source, Seismic, Shared earth model, Stochastic

James Gunning; Michael E. Glinsky; Chris White

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

Polly, David

373

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted that the CO{sub 2} injected into the reef would remain in the northern portion of the field. Two new wells, the State Charlton 4-30 and the Larsen 3-31, were drilled into the field in 2006 and 2008 respectively and supported this assessment. A second (or 'Monitor') 3D seismic survey was acquired during September 2007 over most of the field and duplicated the first (Base) survey, as much as possible. However, as the simulation and new well data available at that time indicated that the CO{sub 2} was concentrated in the northern portion of the field, the second seismic survey was not acquired over the extreme southern end of the area covered by the original (or Base) 3D survey. Basic processing was performed on the second 3D seismic survey and, finally, 4D processing methods were applied to both the Base and the Monitor surveys. In addition to this 3D data, a shear wave seismic data set was obtained at the same time. Interpretation of the 4D seismic data indicated that a significant amplitude change, not attributable to differences in acquisition or processing, existed at the locations within the reef predicted by the reservoir simulation. The reservoir simulation was based on the porosity distribution obtained from seismic attributes from the Base 3D survey. Using this validated reservoir simulation the location of oil within the reef at the time the Monitor survey was obtained and recommendations made for the drilling of additional EOR wells. The economic impact of this project has been estimated in terms of both enhanced oil recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. In the northern Michigan Basin alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. Potentially there is over 1 billion bbls of oil (original oil in place minus primary recovery) remains in the reefs in Michigan, much of which could be more efficiently mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

Brian Toelle

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

378

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Benchmark hydrogeophysical data from a physical seismic model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical fluid flow models are used regularly to predict and analyze porous media flow but require verification against natural systems. Seismic monitoring in a controlled laboratory setting at a nominal scale of 1:1000 in the acoustic frequency range ... Keywords: Gassmann, Hertz-Mindlin, Saturation, Sensors, Soil

Juan M. Lorenzo; David E. Smolkin; Christopher White; Shannon R. Chollett; Ting Sun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Long term study of the seismic environment at LIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO experiment aims to detect and study gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometry. A critical factor to the performance of the interferometers, and a major consideration in the design of possible future upgrades, is isolation of the interferometer optics from seismic noise. We present the results of a detailed program of measurements of the seismic environment surrounding the LIGO interferometers. We describe the experimental configuration used to collect the data, which was acquired over a 613 day period. The measurements focused on the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, in which the secondary microseismic peak and noise due to human activity in the vicinity of the detectors was found to be particularly critical to interferometer performance. We compare the statistical distribution of the data sets from the two interferometer sites, construct amplitude spectral densities of seismic noise amplitude fluctuations with periods of up to 3 months, and analyze the data for any long term trends in the amplitude of seismic noise in this critical frequency range.

E. J. Daw; J. A. Giaime; D. Lormand; M. Lubinski; J. Zweizig

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of seismic capacity of glovebox windows using deformation tests  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing emphasis on worker safety, gloveboxes are being relied upon in Safety Analyses to be a confinement boundary. Many of the accident scenarios result in a requirement that these gloveboxes be seismically qualified. Since there is currently no validated experience data category for gloveboxes, the qualification has generally been done by analysis. The weak link in assuring confinement integrity by analysis is in characterizing the glass and glass-to-glovebox seal in the analytical models. engineering judgement as to whether the windows will survive a seismic event based on total calculated deflection at the window. Most often the windows are assumed to lose their confinement capability during an earthquake. A quantitative basis is needed in order to evaluate the seismic capacity of these windows. A series of deformation tests are being performed at the Savannah River Site on glovebox mock-ups. This paper presents the results of the first two of these tests, including displacement profiles and leak rate data. Methods for using this data for evaluating the windows for seismic loads are proposed.

Hargett, S.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Seismic wave propagation in cracked porous media Tim Pointer,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pi plays an important role. There is much higher attenuation and dispersion for gas (which is more, as for PARTIAL ALIGN, there is no velocity dispersion; there is also increased P and SV attenuation as the gas in there is high attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Fluid £ow may be on either a wavelength scale

Edinburgh, University of

387

Seismic imaging for velocity and attenuation structure in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have applied the attenuation inversion technique developed by Evans and Zucca (1988) to a seismic tomographic data set taken at Newberry Volcano by Achauer et al. (1988). Our preliminary results suggest that the interpretation of the velocity data by Achauer et al. that a magma chamber is present 3 km beneath the caldera is not confirmed by the attenuation data.

Zucca, J.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Evans, J.R. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EVALUATION OF MODAL COMBINATION METHODS FOR SEISMIC RESPONSE SPECTRUM ANALYSIS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory Guide 1.92 ''Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'' was last revised in 1976. The objective of this project was to re-evaluate the current regulatory guidance for combining modal responses in response spectrum analysis, evaluate recent technical developments, and recommend revisions to the regulatory guidance. This paper describes the qualitative evaluation of modal response combination methods.

MORANTE,R.

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Intelligent seismic inversion workflow for high-resolution reservoir characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing a geological model is the first and a very important step during the reservoir simulation and modeling process. The geological model usually represents our best interpretation of the reservoir characteristics that extends beyond the well where ... Keywords: Buffalo Valley Field, Neural networks, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

E. Artun; S. Mohaghegh

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Physics-based seismic hazard analysis on petascale heterogeneous supercomputers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a highly scalable and efficient GPU-based finite-difference code (AWP) for earthquake simulation that implements high throughput, memory locality, communication reduction and communication/computation overlap and achieves linear scalability ... Keywords: CyberShake, GPU, SCEC, earthquake ground motions, hybrid heterogeneous, seismic hazard analysis, weak scaling

Y. Cui, E. Poyraz, K. B. Olsen, J. Zhou, K. Withers, S. Callaghan, J. Larkin, C. Guest, D. Choi, A. Chourasia, Z. Shi, S. M. Day, P. J. Maechling, T. H. Jordan

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

3-D seismic acquisition gains momentum in transition zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrocarbon-rich Gulf of Mexico continues to be an active seismic data acquisition arena, with seismic crews working at a rapid-fire pace to acquire 3-D databases on a regional scale. Lately, however, many contractors are looking shoreward to what will be the next active site for data acquisition and exploratory drilling--the coastal transition zone, which extends roughly five miles either side of the coastline. Diverse terrain causes acquisition efforts to shift frequently between land, water and marsh. Each environment carries its own unique acquisition requirements, which means a wide variety of equipment must be constantly available. Need for multiple permits from multiple sources lends itself to a formidable permitting maze, and environmental problems are prevailing in this sensitive wetlands area. With this in mind, Fairfield and Seismic Exchange, Inc., have teamed in a joint venture to produce the world`s largest non-exclusive 3-D seismic transition zone program. The project will build on Fairfield`s massive shallow water effort, which is nearly complete.

Lawrence, M.A. [Fairfield Industries Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Structural evaluation of the 2736Z Building for seismic loads  

SciTech Connect

The 2736Z building structure is evaluated for high-hazard loads. The 2736Z building is analyzed herein for normal and seismic loads and is found to successfully meet the guidelines of UCRL-15910 along with the related codes requirements.

Giller, R.A.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Knowledge Assisted Visualization Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploration. We describe the existing procedure for oil and gas search which consists of manually extracting for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas. Introduction Whether we like it or not the world is dependent on energy. Oil and gas accounts for around 64

394

Detection of Gas Hydrates in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon from Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate is a potential energy source that has recently been the subject of much academic and industrial research. The search for deep-water gas hydrate involves many challenges that are especially apparent in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, where the sub-seafloor is a complex structure of shallow salt diapirs and sheets underlying heavily deformed shallow sediments and surrounding diverse minibasins. Here, we consider the effect these structural factors have on gas hydrate occurrence in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon blocks of the Gulf of Mexico. This was accomplished by first mapping the salt and shallow deformation structures throughout the region using a 2D grid of seismic reflection data. In addition, major deep-rooted faults and shallow-rooted faults were mapped throughout the area. A shallow sediment deformation map was generated that defined areas of significant faulting. We then quantified the thermal impact of shallow salt to better estimate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) thickness. The predicted base of the GHSZ was compared to the seismic data, which showed evidence for bottom simulating reflectors and gas chimneys. These BSRs and gas chimneys were used to ground-truth the calculated depth of the base of GHSZ. Finally, the calculated GHSZ thickness was used to estimate the volume of the gas hydrate reservoir in the area after determining the most reasonable gas hydrate concentrations in sediments within the GHSZ. An estimate of 5.5 trillion cubic meters of pure hydrate methane in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon was obtained.

Murad, Idris

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Preclosure seismic hazards and their impact on site suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the preclosure seismic hazards and the influence of these hazards on determining the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a national high-level nuclear-waste repository. Geologic data, engineering analyses, and regulatory guidelines must be examined collectively to assess this suitability. An environmental assessment for Yucca Mountain, written in 1986, compiled and evaluated the existing tectonic data and presented arguments to satisfy, in part, the regulatory requirements that must be met if the Yucca Mountain site is to become a national waste repository. Analyses have been performed in the past five years that better quantify the local seismic hazards and the possibility that these hazards could lead to release of radionuclides to the environment. The results from these analyses increase the confidence in the ability of Yucca Mountain and the facilities that may be built there to function satisfactorily in their role as a waste repository. Uncertainties remain, however, primarily in the input parameters and boundary conditions for the models that were used to complete the analyses. These models must be validated and uncertainties reduced before Yucca Mountain can qualify as a viable high-level nuclear waste repository.

Gibson, J.D.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Seismic Response Of Masonry Plane Walls: A Numerical Study On Spandrel Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper reports the results of a numerical investigation on masonry walls subjected to in-plane seismic loads. This research aims to verify the formulae of shear and flexural strength of masonry spandrels which are given in the recent Italian Standards. Seismic pushover analyses have been carried out using finite element models of unreinforced walls and strengthened walls introducing reinforced concrete (RC) beams at the floor levels. Two typologies of walls have been considered distinguished for the height to length ratio h/l of the spandrels: a) short beams (h/l = 1.33) and b) slender beams (h/l = 0.5). Results obtained for the unreinforced and the strengthened walls are compared with equations for shear and flexural strength provided in Standards [1]. The numerical analyses show that the reliability of these equations is at least questionable especially for the prediction of the flexural strength. In the cases in which the axial force has not been determined by the structural analysis, Standards seems to overestimate the flexural strength of short spandrels both for the unreinforced and the strengthened wall.

Betti, Michele; Galano, Luciano; Vignoli, Andrea [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (DICeA) University of Florence, Via di S. Marta 3, I-50139, Florence (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Seismic design evaluation guidelines for buried piping for the DOE HLW Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic-foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly in contact with the soil or contained in a jacket. A standard analysis procedure is described along with the discussion of factors deemed to be significant for the design of the underground piping. The following key considerations are addressed: the design feature and safety requirements for the inner (core) pipe and the outer pipe; the effect of soil strain and wave passage; assimilation of the necessary seismic and soil data; inertial response calculation for the inner pipe; determination of support anchor movement loads; combination of design loads; and code comparison. Specifications and justifications of the key parameters used, stress components to be calculated and the allowable stress and strain limits for code evaluation are presented.

Lin, Chi-Wen [Consultant, Martinez, CA (United States); Antaki, G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bandyopadhyay, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bush, S.H. [Review & Synthesis Association, Richland, WA (United States); Costantino, C. [City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States); Kennedy, R. [RPK Structural Mechanics, Yorba Linda, CA (United States). Consultant

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

399

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This Summary Report is the first of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 2 is the Systems Analysis of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 3 documents the results of the fragility screening for the review. The three volumes demonstrate how the seismic margin review guidance (NUREG/CR-4482) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Seismic Design Margins Program can be applied. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Prassinos, P.G.; Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination seismic stimulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

The ''Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations'' project is investigating the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This project will involve the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) to try to observe the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through the reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, will be used to detect and map the movement of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in EOR projects such as Weyborne. The project is being conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in northern Michigan Basin which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that has completed its primary production. This field is now undergoing enhanced oil recovery using CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} flood was initiated the end of 2005 when the injection of small amounts of CO{sub 2} begin in the A1 Carbonate. This injection was conducted for 2 months before being temporarily halted in order for pressure measurements to be conducted. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution is proving to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model had to be developed. From this model, an accurate determination of porosity within the carbonate reservoir must be obtained. For this certain seismic attributes have been investigated. The study reservoirs in the Charlton 30/31 field range from 50 to 400 acres in size. The relatively small area to image makes 3-D seismic data acquisition reasonably cost effective. Permeability and porosity vary considerably throughout the reef, thus it is essential to perform significant reservoir characterization and modeling prior to implementing a CO{sub 2} flood to maximize recovery efficiency. Should this project prove successful, the same technique could be applied across a large spectrum of the industry. In Michigan alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. These reservoirs range in thickness from 200 to 400 ft and are at depths of 2000 to 5000 ft. Approximately 113 of these Niagaran oil fields have produced over 1 million bbls each and the total cumulative production is in excess of 300 million bbls and 1.4 Tcf. There could potentially be over 1 billion bbls of oil remaining in reefs in Michigan much of which could be mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

Brian E. Toelle

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mobilization of colloidal particles by low-frequency dynamic stress stimulation  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency (1 to 500 Hertz) elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of surface and well water. The decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after natural seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of low-frequency dynamic stress stimulations on the release of colloidal particles from an analog core representing an infinitesimal section along the propagation paths of an elastic wave. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads and loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that axial mechanical stress oscillations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the amplitude of the oscillations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical spikes in effluent microsphere concentration during stimulation. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent spikes coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data, and continue at a diminished level after stimulation. This behavior can be attributed to rearrangements of the beads in the column, resulting in possible changes to the void space and/or tortuosity of the packing. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping away portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between porous matrix grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles, perhaps due to circulation cells within the packing material.

Beckham, Richard Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Amr, Abdel - Fattah I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peter, Roberts M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reem, Ibrahim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sowmitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Simulation of anisotropic wave propagation in Vertical Seismic Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of elastic anisotropy on seismic wave propagation is often neglected for the sake of simplicity. However, ignoring anisotropy may lead to significant errors in the processing of seismic data and ultimately in a poor image of the subsurface. This is especially true in wide-aperture Vertical Seismic Profiles where waves travel both vertically and horizontally. Anisotropy has been neglected in wavefront construction methods of seismic ray-tracing until Gibson (2000), who showed they are powerful tools to simulate seismic wave propagation in three-dimensional anisotropic subsurface models. The code is currently under development using a C++ object oriented programming approach because it provides high flexibility in the design of new components and facilitates debugging and maintenance of a complex algorithm. So far, the code was used to simulate propagation in homogeneous or simple heterogeneous anisotropic velocity models mainly designed for testing purposes. In particular, it has never been applied to simulate a field dataset. We propose here an analytical method involving little algebra and that allows the design of realistic heterogeneous anisotropic models using the C++ object oriented programming approach. The new model class can model smooth multi-layered subsurface with gradients or models with many dip variations. It has been used to model first arrival times of a wide-aperture VSP dataset from the Gulf of Mexico to estimate the amount of anisotropy. The proposed velocity model is transversely isotropic. The anisotropy is constant throughout the model and is defined via Thomsen's parameters. Values in the final model are epsilon = 0.055 and delta = -0.115. The model is compatible with the a priori knowledge of the local geology and reduces the RMS average time difference between measured and computed travel times by 51% in comparison to the initial isotropic model. These values are realistic and are similar to other measurements of anisotropy in the Gulf of Mexico.

Durussel, Vincent Bernard

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The European HDR project at Soultz sous forets: Stimulation of the second deep well and first circulation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By February 1995 the European HDR project at Soultz was operating 6 boreholes: 2 deep hydraulic test wells (GPK-1, 3590 m & GPK-2, 3876 m) and 4 seismic observation wells with depths between 1500 and 2200 m. In 1993 the first section of a deep underground exchanger had been created through massive stimulation (injection of some 45000 m of water). Between November 1994 until January 1995 a second deep well, GPK-2, was drilled at the periphery of this exchanger. A complex test programme involving the stimulation of GPK-2 (connecting it to the existing exchanger) and various circulation experiments with different production techniques (flash throttled and unthrottled, submersible pump) and varying injection rates was performed between June and August 1995.

Baumgartner, J.; Jung, R.; Gerard, A.; Baria, R.; Garnish, J.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis reported in Carpenter et al. (2006), the results of the two investigations will be compared to help determine if a more refined sub-model of the primary tank is necessary to capture the important fluid-structure interaction effects in the tank and if so, how to best utilize a refined sub-model of the primary tank. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with ANSYS. The response parameters of interest are total hydrodynamic reaction forces, impulsive and convective mode frequencies, waste pressures, and slosh heights. To a limited extent: tank stresses are also reported. The results of this study demonstrate that the ANSYS model has the capability to adequately predict global responses such as frequencies and overall reaction forces. Thus, the model is suitable for predicting the global response of the tank and contained waste. On the other hand, while the ANSYS model is capable of adequately predicting waste pressures and primary tank stresses in a large portion of the waste tank, the model does not accurately capture the convective behavior of the waste near the free surface, nor did the model give accurate predictions of slosh heights. Based on the ability of the ANSYS benchmark model to accurately predict frequencies and global reaction forces and on the results presented in Abatt, et al. (2006), the global ANSYS model described in Carpenter et al. (2006) is sufficient for the seismic evaluation of all tank components except for local areas of the primary tank. Due to the limitations of the ANSYS model in predicting the convective response of the waste, the evaluation of primary tank stresses near the waste free surface should be supplemented by results from an ANSYS sub-model of the primary tank that incorporates pressures from theoretical solutions or from Dytran solutions. However, the primary tank is expected to have low demand to capacity ratios in the upper wall. Moreover, due to the less than desired mesh resolution in the primary tank knuckle of the global ANSYS model, the evaluation of the primary tank stresses in the lo

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 CX-004402: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11082010 Location(s): Monroeville,...

408

CX-005230: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Testing and Diagnostics of Radial-Jet Well-Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Reserve from Marginal Reserves CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date:...

409

CX-005227: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Field Testing and Diagnostics of Radial-Jet Well-Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery from Marginal Reserves CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 02112011 Location(s):...

410

Stimulation Prediction Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rFlowandTransportSimulatorGeothermalLabCallProject" title"FRACSTIMI: An Integrated Fracture Stimulation and Reservoir Flow and Transport Simulator Geothermal Lab Call...

411

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Investigation of Stimulation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Stimulation-Response Relationships for Complex Fracture Systems in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin...

412

Biomimetic electrical stimulation for cardiac tissue engineering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A major challenge of tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the tissue being replaced. Electrical stimulation has been (more)

Tandon, Nina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Predicting Stimulation-Response Relationships for Engineered...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

will be created mainly by stimulation of a lower permeability target formation through hydraulic fracturing to create the subsurface heat exchanger component for an enhanced...

415

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

Michael Batzle

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

CX-006567: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67: Categorical Exclusion Determination 67: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006567: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda Lake, Churchill County, Nevada CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7 Date: 08/24/2011 Location(s): Churchill County, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Magma Energy Corporation (Magma) would demonstrate the potential geothermal resource at the Soda Lake geothermal area in Churchill County, Nevada. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006567.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001422: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004109: Categorical Exclusion Determination

417

Predicting the performance of local seismic networks using Matlab and Google Earth.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used Matlab and Google Earth to construct a prototype application for modeling the performance of local seismic networks for monitoring small, contained explosions. Published equations based on refraction experiments provide estimates of peak ground velocities as a function of event distance and charge weight. Matlab routines implement these relations to calculate the amplitudes across a network of stations from sources distributed over a geographic grid. The amplitudes are then compared to ambient noise levels at the stations, and scaled to determine the smallest yield that could be detected at each source location by a specified minimum number of stations. We use Google Earth as the primary user interface, both for positioning the stations of a hypothetical local network, and for displaying the resulting detection threshold contours.

Chael, Eric Paul

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Identification of factors that influence the stiffness of high-damping elastomer seismic isolation bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, high-damping elastomer, steel-laminated seismic isolation bearings have gained acceptance as a device for isolating large buildings and structures from earthquake damage. In the United States, architectural engineering firms custom design isolators for each project and ten have the isolators manufactured by one of less than a hand-full of manufactures. The stiffness of the bearing is the single most important design parameter that the molded bearing must meet because it determines the fundamental frequency of the isolation system. This paper reports on recent research that examined several factors that cause real and potential variations to the stiffness of the bearing. The resulting changes to the fundamental frequency of the isolated structure are quantified for each factor. The following were examined: (1) dimensional tolerances, (2) frequency effects, (3) temperature effects, (4) cyclical effects, and (5) aging effects. It was found that geometric variations barely affect the stiffness whereas temperature variations greatly affect the stiffness.

Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was established in 1999 based on an extensive probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996 by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. In subsequent years, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) staff questioned the some of the assumptions used in developing the seismic design basis, particularly the adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. Existing site-specific shear wave velocity data were considered insufficient to reliably use California earthquake response data to directly predict ground motions at the Hanford Site. To address this concern, the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed and executed a plan for acquiring site-specific soil data down to approximately 500 feet, and for reanalyzing the effects of deeper layers of sediments interbedded with basalt. New geophysical data were acquired, analyzed, and interpreted with respect to existing geologic information gathered from other Hanford-related projects in the WTP area. Existing data from deep boreholes were assembled and interpreted to produce a model of the deeper rock layers consisting of inter-layered basalts and sedimentary interbeds. These data were analyzed statistically to determine the variability of seismic velocities. The earthquake ground motion response was simulated on a large number of models resulting from a weighted logic tree approach that addressed the geologic and geophysical uncertainties. Weights in the logic tree were chosen by a working group based on the strength or weakness of the available data for each combination of logic tree parameters. Finally, interim design ground motion spectra were developed to envelope the remaining uncertainties. The results of this study demonstrate that the site-specific soil structure (Hanford and Ringold formations) beneath the WTP is thinner than was assumed in the 1996 Hanford Site-wide model. This thinness produces peaks in the response spectra (relative to those in 1996) near 2 Hz and 5 Hz. The soil geophysical properties, shear wave velocity, and nonlinear response to the earthquake ground motions are known sufficiently, and alternative interpretations consistent with this data did not have a strong influence on the results. The structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt), which are inter-layered with sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation), produces strong reductions in the earthquake ground motions that propagate through them to reach the surface. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. The Vs for the basalts, where Vp/Vs is well defined, still is limited by the quality and quantity of the Vp data. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was included in the logic trees that produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile (based on the logic tree) to produce conservative design spectra. This conservatism increased the seismic design basis by up to 40% compared to the 1999 values. Because of the sensitivity of the calculated response spectra to the velocity contrasts between the basalts and interbedded sediments, additional boreholes and direct Vs measurements through these layers are now being planned. The new measurements are expected to reduce the uncertainty in the site response that is caused by the lack of direct knowledge of the Vs contrasts within these layers. (authors)

Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, BRAZED AND GROOVED PIPE JOINTS Brent Gutierrez, PhD, PE George Antaki, PE, F.ASME DOE NPH Conference October 25-26, 2011 Motivation * Understand the behavior and failure mode of common joints under extreme lateral loads * Static and shake table tests conducted of pressurized - Threaded, - Brazed, - Mechanical joints Static Testing o Pressurized spool to 150 psi o Steady downward force applied while recording deflections o Grooved clamped mech. joints * 16 tests performed o Threaded joints * 4 tests o Brazed (copper) * 4 tests Grooved Couplings o Catalog items o ASTM A106 Grade B piping o ASTM A 536 couplings o Lateral deflections imposed well above manufacturer's angular installation tolerance

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421

Seismicity of the Coso Range, California | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Coso Range, California of the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity of the Coso Range, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 16-station seismographic network, approximately 40 km north-south by 30 km east-west, was installed in the Coso Range, California, in September 1975 as part of a geological and geophysical assessment of the geothermal resource potential of range. During the first 2 years of network operations, 4216 local earthquakes (0.5< or =m< or =3.9) defined zones of seismicity that strike radially outward from a Pleistocene rhyolite field located near the center of the Coso Range. Most earthquakes were located in zones showing a general northwest trend across the range.

422

Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, observations and modeling using satellite radar interferometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, observations and modeling using satellite radar interferometry Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data collected in the Coso geothermal area, eastern California, during 1993-1999 indicate ground subsidence over a approximately 50 km 2 region that approximately

423

Historical Information H. 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6 SeismicIGround Motion 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity Book 3 The Effects of the Rulison Event on Buildings and Other Surface Structures DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. I I .* ,a - . . > - . ~ - ..+<#z*:<~:<:~.:$:.y;.$3s, 3898 OFF THE EFFECTS OF THE RULISON EVENT ON BUILDINGS AND OTHER SURFACE STRUCTURES Lloyd A. Lee and Roger E. Skjei January 14, 1970 John A. Blume & Associates Research Division San Francisco, California ORDER FROM CFSTl AS-!&L~L-~~ This page intentionally left blank THE EFFECTS OF THE RULISON EVENT ON BUILDINGS AND 'OTHER SURFACE STRUCTURES Lloyd A . Lee and Roger E. S k j e i John A. Blume & A s s o c i a t e s Research D i v i s i o n

424

Fast full-wave seismic inversion using source encoding.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full Wavefield Seismic Inversion (FWI) estimates a subsurface elastic model by iteratively minimizing the difference between observed and simulated data. This process is extremely compute intensive, with a cost on the order of at least hundreds of prestack reverse time migrations. For time-domain and Krylov-based frequency-domain FWI, the cost of FWI is proportional to the number of seismic sources inverted. We have found that the cost of FWI can be significantly reduced by applying it to data processed by encoding and summing individual source gathers, and by changing the encoding functions between iterations. The encoding step forms a single gather from many input source gathers. This gather represents data that would have been acquired from a spatially distributed set of sources operating simultaneously with different source signatures. We demonstrate, using synthetic data, significant cost reduction by applying FWI to encoded simultaneous-source data.

Ho Cha, Young (ExxonMobil); Baumstein, Anatoly (ExxonMobil); Lee, Sunwoong (ExxonMobil); Hinkley, David (ExxonMobil); Anderson, John E. (ExxonMobil); Neelamani, Ramesh (ExxonMobil); Krebs, Jerome R. (ExxonMobil); Lacasse, Martin-Daniel (ExxonMobil)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 771 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2009. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter is a continuation of the swarm events observed during the January March 2009 time period and reported in the previous quarterly report (Rohay et al, 2009). The frequency of Wooded Island events has subsided with 16 events recorded during June 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (magnitude (Mc) less than 1.0) with 25 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.2 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Kerogen-rich shales using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy and ultrasonic wave propagation. We find that an increase in elastic modulus with increasing kerogen maturity can be directly related to the microstructural acoustic impedance changes. A positive relation is established between microstructural changes and velocity variations as functions of kerogen maturity. (2) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy. We show the effect of clay minerals in contact zones as load-bearing constituents of rocks (3) Elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic and for effects of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sediments (4) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pritchett, 2004) Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general

428

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

429

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow

430

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

431

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

432

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two distinct clusters of microearthquakes have been identified at The Geysers, possibly relating to two independent pressure sinks resulting from steam production described by Lipman, and others (1977). Unlike earthquakes in the Maacama-Rodgers Creek fault zone to the south and west, earthquakes at The Geysers are confined to depths of less than 5 km. The present level of seismicity at The Geysers appears to be higher than the preproduction level and is higher and more continuous than the seismicity in the surrounding region. Earthquakes in the steam production zone at The Geysers resemble earthquakes in the surrounding region with regard to focal plane solutions, source characteristics and magnitude distribution (b slope). Subtle differences in earthquake characteristics may be resolved by analysis of more extensive data now being gathered in the region.

Marks, S.M.; Ludwin, R.S.; Louie, K.B.; Bufe, C.G.

1983-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Megaregional seismic lines as indicators of oil and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way to quickly identify the most attractive plays in a given basin is through interpretation of regional seismic profiles in combination with adjacent well data and other geologic data. Such transects can provide insights into: (1) the location of economic basement, (2) maturation history and migration pathways, and (3) regional structure and stratigraphy and can thereby help understand present plays and recognize new plays. This poster session presents seismic data from the Megaregional Project and includes examples from the Magallanes, Oriente and Maranon basins. These foreland basins, located east of the Andes, underwent extension followed by a compression which resulted in east-vergent thrusting or high angle reverse faulting. Each basin includes productive plays although reserves depend largely on reservoir quality and size of structures. Future exploration in these basins will focus on deeper objectives and in the structurally complex areas near their western boundaries.

Bertagne, A.J.; Smith, N.G. [CGG American Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology August 12, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Technology International Inc. has developed a breakthrough borehole imaging system that stands on the cusp of commercialization. By pushing the limits of seismic-while-drilling technology, the patent-pending SeismicPULSER system provides more accurate geo-steering for the discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves, facilitating new field development and improving well economics. Drill-bit seismic-while-drilling techniques use a downhole acoustic source and receivers at the surface to create real-time images that allow

436

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in Mesozoic crystalline rocks that host a producing geothermal field. The reflection data were processed in two steps that incorporate new seismic imaging methods: (1) Pwave first arrivals in the seismic data were inverted for subsurface acoustic velocities using a non-linear simulated annealing approach; and (2) 2-D Velocity tomograms obtained from the inversions were