Sample records for determination scale resistant

  1. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  2. Resident Microbiota of the Gypsy Moth Midgut Harbors Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    for them. Significantly, antibiotic-resistant human pathogens are carried by flies and cockroachesResident Microbiota of the Gypsy Moth Midgut Harbors Antibiotic Resistance Determinants Heather K the significance of insects as environmental reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We characterized

  3. Chemical resistance determination test scheme and rating system development for industrial glove evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornils, William Joseph

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHEMICAL RESISTANCE DETERMINATION TEST SCHEME AND RATING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL GLOVE EVALUATION A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH CORNILS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene CHEMICAL RESISTANCE DETERMINATION TEST SCHEME AND RATING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL GLOVE EVALUATION A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH CORNILS Approved...

  4. Determination of total dietary fiber and resistant starch in processed corn and rice products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corujo Martinez, Juan Ignacio

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER AND RESISTANT STARCH IN PROCESSED CORN AND RICE PRODUCTS A Thesis by JUAN IGNACIO CORUJO MARTINEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree 'of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER AND RESISTANT STARCH IN PROCESSED CORN AND RICE PRODUCTS A Thesis by JUAN IGNACIO CORUJO MARTINEZ Approved...

  5. Field test of a new method for determining soil formation thermal conductivity and borehole resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Beck, J.V.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of determining soil thermal properties from in-situ tests has been developed. Based on a one-dimensional numerical heat transfer model, the method uses parameter estimation techniques to determine soil thermal conductivity and borehole resistance from field-collected data. This paper presents the results of analysis of data from three tests performed in Lincoln, Nebraska, in order to validate the method. The one-dimensional method was found to agree well with line source and cylindrical source thermal conductivity estimates derived from the same data sets. The method was also able to measure the resistance of the three borehole heat exchangers. The measured resistances lie within the expected range of resistances for the given grouting materials. A further benefit of the method is its relative insensitivity to changes in power input caused by short-term voltage fluctuations.

  6. Trace contaminant determination in fish scale by laser ablation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, I.; Coutant, C.C.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation on rings of fish scale has been used to analyze the historical accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in striped bass in the Watts Bar Reservoir. Rings on a fish scale grow in a pattern that forms a record of the fish`s chemical intake. In conjunction with the migration patterns of fish monitored by ecologists, relative PCB concentrations in the seasonal rings of fish scale can be used to study the PCB distribution in the reservoir. In this study, a tightly-focused laser beam from a XeCl excimer laser was used to ablate and ionize a small portion of a fish scale placed in a vacuum chamber. The ions were identified and quantified by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Studies of this type can provide valuable information for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) off-site clean-up efforts as well as identifying the impacts of other sources to local aquatic populations.

  7. Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    method known as rattling. The rattling process generates dust. This research investigated the chemical composition of that aerosol and measured the solubility of pipe scale from three oilfield formations. Using standard in-vitro dissolution...

  8. System and method for determining stator winding resistance in an AC motor using motor drives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G; Zhang, Pinjia

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining the stator winding resistance of AC motors is provided. The system includes an AC motor drive having an input connectable to an AC source and an output connectable to an input terminal of an AC motor, a pulse width modulation (PWM) converter having switches therein to control current flow and terminal voltages in the AC motor, and a control system connected to the PWM converter. The control system generates a command signal to cause the PWM converter to control an output of the AC motor drive corresponding to an input to the AC motor, selectively generates a modified command signal to cause the PWM converter to inject a DC signal into the output of the AC motor drive, and determines a stator winding resistance of the AC motor based on the DC signal of at least one of the voltage and current.

  9. System and method for determining stator winding resistance in an AC motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin (Kenosha, WI); Habetler, Thomas G. (Snellville, GA); Zhang, Pinjia (Atlanta, GA); Theisen, Peter J. (West Bend, WI)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining stator winding resistance in an AC motor is disclosed. The system includes a circuit having an input connectable to an AC source and an output connectable to an input terminal of an AC motor. The circuit includes at least one contactor and at least one switch to control current flow and terminal voltages in the AC motor. The system also includes a controller connected to the circuit and configured to modify a switching time of the at least one switch to create a DC component in an output of the system corresponding to an input to the AC motor and determine a stator winding resistance of the AC motor based on the injected DC component of the voltage and current.

  10. How Well Can We Really Determine the Scale of Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogan Özsoy; Kuver Sinha; Scott Watson

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A detection of primordial B-modes has been heralded not only as a smoking gun for the existence of inflation, but also as a way to establish the scale at which inflation took place. In this paper we critically reinvestigate the connection between a detection of primordial gravity waves and the scale of inflation. We consider whether the presence of additional fields and non-adiabaticity during inflation may have provided an additional source of primordial B-modes competitive with those of the quasi-de Sitter vacuum. In particular, we examine whether the additional sources could provide the dominant signal, which could lead to a misinterpretation of the scale of inflation. In light of constraints on the level of non-Gaussianity coming from Planck we find that only hidden sectors with strictly gravitationally strength couplings provide a feasible mechanism. The required model building is somewhat elaborate, and so we discuss possible UV completions in the context of Type IIB orientifold compactifications with RR axions. We find that an embedding is possible and that dangerous sinusoidal corrections can be suppressed through the compactification geometry. Our main result is that even when additional sources of primordial gravity waves are competitive with the inflaton, a positive B-mode detection would still be a relatively good indicator of the scale of inflation. This conclusion will be strengthened by future constraints on both non-Gaussianity and CMB polarization.

  11. Determining Identifiable Parameterizations for Large-scale Physical Models in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    /Novem (Dutch Government). ISAPP (Integrated Systems Approach to Petroleum Production) is a joint project as applied in the field of petroleum reservoir engineering. Starting from a large-scale, physics-based model models in petroleum reservoir engineering. Petroleum reservoir engineering is concerned with maximizing

  12. Efficiency determination of resistive plate chambers for fast quasi-monoenergetic neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Röder; Z. Elekes; T. Aumann; D. Bemmerer; K. Boretzky; C. Caesar; T. E. Cowan; J. Hehner; M. Heil; M. Kempe; V. Maroussov; O. Nusair; A. V. Prokofiev; R. Reifarth; M. Sobiella; D. Stach; A. Wagner; D. Yakorev; A. Zilges; K. Zuber

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite detectors made of stainless steel converters and multigap resistive plate chambers have been irradiated with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a peak energy of 175MeV. The neutron detection efficiency has been determined using two different methods. The data are in agreement with the output of Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations are then extended to study the response of a hypothetical array made of these detectors to energetic neutrons from a radioactive ion beam experiment.

  13. Testing a scale pulsed modulator for an IEC neutron source into a resistive load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wheat, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1/10th scaled prototype pulse modulator for an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) neutron source has been designed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The scaled prototype modulator is based on a solid-state Marx architecture and has an output voltage of 13 kV and an output current of 10 A. The modulator has a variable pulse width between 50 {micro}s and 1 ms with < 5% droop at all pulse widths. The modulator operates with a duty factor up to 5% and has a maximum pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz. The use of a solid-state Marx modulator in this application has several potential benefits. These benefits include variable pulse width and amplitude, inherent switch overcurrent and transient overvoltage protection, and increased efficiency over DC supplies used in this application. Several new features were incorporated into this design including inductorless charging, fully snubberless operation, and stage fusing. The scaled prototype modulator has been tested using a 1 k{Omega} resistive load. Test results are given. Short (50 {micro}s) and long (1 ms) pulses are demonstrated as well as high duty factor operation (1 kHz rep rate at a 50 {micro}s pulse width for a 5% duty factor). Pulse agility of the modulator is demonstrated through turning the individual Marx stages on and off in sequence producing ramp, pyramid, and reverse pyramid waveforms.

  14. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

  15. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III

    1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

  16. Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    are ionized in the plasma. Figure 7. Schematic diagram of the RF coil used to produce an inductively coupled plasma. (Taylor 2001) After being focused by the ion lens, a charged metallic cylinder, the ions are separated by their mass... of ICP-MS for detection and quantification of 234U, 238U, 99Tc, 237Np, actinides, and fission products (Morrow 1998). In addition to these papers, numerous others indicate the viability of ICP-MS use in the determination of radionuclides, in which...

  17. Determination of the Jet Energy Scale at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bhatti; F. Canelli; B. Heinemann; J. Adelman; D. Ambrose; J. -F. Arguin; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; H. Budd; Y. S. Chung; K. Chung; B. Cooper; C. Currat; M. D'Onofrio; T. Dorigo; R. Erbacher; R. Field; G. Flanagan; A. Gibson; K. Hatakeyama; F. Happacher; D. Hoffman; G. Introzzi; S. Kuhlmann; S. Kwang; S. Jun; G. Latino; A. Malkus; M. Mattson; A. Mehta; P. A. Movilla-Fernandez; L. Nodulman; M. Paulini; J. Proudfoot; F. Ptohos; S. Sabik; W. Sakumoto; P. Savard; M. Shochet; P. Sinervo; V. Tiwari; A. Wicklund; G. Yun

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A precise determination of the energy scale of jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider is described. Jets are used in many analyses to estimate the energies of partons resulting from the underlying physics process. Several correction factors are developed to estimate the original parton energy from the observed jet energy in the calorimeter. The jet energy response is compared between data and Monte Carlo simulation for various physics processes, and systematic uncertainties on the jet energy scale are determined. For jets with transverse momenta above 50 GeV the jet energy scale is determined with a 3% systematic uncertainty.

  18. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity.

  19. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III

    1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation are disclosed for different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity. 13 figs.

  20. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

  1. PILOT-SCALE FIELD VALIDATION OF THE LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLASER DR; RUCKER DF; CROOK N; LOKE MH

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Field validation for the long electrode electrical resistivity tomography (LE-ERT) method was attempted in order to demonstrate the performance of the technique in imaging a simple buried target. The experiment was an approximately 1/17 scale mock-up of a region encompassing a buried nuclear waste tank on the Hanford site. The target of focus was constructed by manually forming a simulated plume within the vadose zone using a tank waste simulant. The LE-ERT results were compared to ERT using conventional point electrodes on the surface and buried within the survey domain. Using a pole-pole array, both point and long electrode imaging techniques identified the lateral extents of the pre-formed plume with reasonable fidelity, but the LE-ERT was handicapped in reconstructing the vertical boundaries. The pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays were also tested with the LE-ERT method and were shown to have the least favorable target properties, including the position of the reconstructed plume relative to the known plume and the intensity of false positive targets. The poor performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays was attributed to an inexhaustive and non-optimal coverage of data at key electrodes, as well as an increased noise for electrode combinations with high geometric factors. However, when comparing the model resolution matrix among the different acquisition strategies, the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays using long electrodes were shown to have significantly higher average and maximum values than any pole-pole array. The model resolution describes how well the inversion model resolves the subsurface. Given the model resolution performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays, it may be worth investing in tools to understand the optimum subset of randomly distributed electrode pairs to produce maximum performance from the inversion model.

  2. Electrolyte Stability Determines Scaling Limits for Solid-State 3D Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Electrolyte Stability Determines Scaling Limits for Solid-State 3D Li Ion Batteries Dmitry Ruzmetov, all-solid-state Li ion batteries (LIBs) with high specific capacity and small footprint are highly, into the nanometer regime, can lead to rapid self-discharge of the battery even when the electrolyte layer

  3. The decline of the strong force Scaling violations and determination of s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The decline of the strong force Scaling violations and determination of #11; s from jet production can be naively visualised as a rubber band stretched between them. As the rubber band is stretched, i; s . Thus, the rate for 1 #12; quark and gluon production is directly sensitive to the value of #11

  4. alpha(s) Determinations from Jets and Scaling Violations at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is given on recent alpha(s) determinations from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations. These are based on measurements of jet cross sections, event shape variables, as well as on the observed scaling violation of the structure function F_2. A HERA average on alpha(s)(m_Z) is presented, in comparison with world mean values.

  5. Spatial and temporal scale issues in determining biomass burning regimes in Bolivia and Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial and temporal scale issues in determining biomass burning regimes in Bolivia and Peru A. V and Bolivia to analyse the spatial distribution of burning and its intra- and inter-annual variability Santa Cruz, Bolivia and in north-west Peru). Particular attention was paid to biomass burning in high

  6. A multi-scale iterative approach for finite element modeling of thermal contact resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn, 1980-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface topography has long been considered a key factor in the performance of many contact applications including thermal contact resistance. However, essentially all analytical and numerical models of thermal contact ...

  7. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  8. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  9. Creating Direct-write Gray-scale Photomasks with Bimetallic Thin Film Thermal Resists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    that the dots merge to create an exposure intensity that replicates the corresponding gray-scale and 3D energy, resulting alloyed layers appear to become oxides, causing a change of absorption at 365nm from >3 and photoresist strip. Just as in halftone printing, the beam blocking consists of chrome dots whose area varies

  10. Modeling temporal variations of electrical resistivity associated with pore pressure change in a kilometer-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (hautot@univ-brest.fr) [1] From 1995 to 1998 the natural electric field was monitored with an array of 20 role of fluids in the distortion of the induced electric fields. Electromagnetic methods could provide in a kilometer-scale natural system Sophie Hautot School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

  11. Summary To determine the effects of lifting time and stor-age on water-stress resistance of nursery-grown white spruce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    results in reduced water- stress resistance because of a lack of reserves for osmotic adjustment and newSummary To determine the effects of lifting time and stor- age on water-stress resistance in January 1992. The seedlings were placed in nutrient solution and subjected to ­1.1 or ­2.7 MPa water

  12. SCALE RESISTANT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL BINARY CYCLE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAYS, LANCE G

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required process conditions for the TGH demonstration. Operation of the TGH with and without the ABS system will demonstrate an increase in geothermal resource productivity for the VPC from 1 MW/(million lb) of brine to 1.75 MW/(million lb) of brine, a 75% increase.

  13. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Destefan, Dennis E. (Broomfield, CO); Stompro, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  14. ISO test method to determine sustained-load-cracking resistance of aluminium cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak as well as rupture types of failures related to sustained-load-cracking (SLC) have been observed in high-pressure gas cylinders fabricated from certain aluminium alloy. The stable crack growth mechanism observed primarily in the cylinder neck and shoulder area have been identified as the SLC mechanism occurring at room temperature without any environmental effect. The International Organization for standardization (ISO) Sub-Committee 3, Working Group 16 has developed a test method to measure the SLC resistance using fracture mechanics specimens along with an acceptance criterion for aluminium cylinders. The technical rationale for the proposed test method and the physical significance of the acceptance criterion to the cylinder performance in terms of critical stress-crack size relationship is presented. Application of the developed test method for characterizing new aluminium alloy for manufacturing cylinders is demonstrated. SLC characteristics of several aluminium cylinders as well as on-board cylinders for natural gas vehicles assessed by the authors are discussed.

  15. Determination of formation water resistivity using shale properties in geopressured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dusenbery, Richard Allen

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 2 Riddle Oil Company, during the drilling of its Saldana well, No. 2 ran several logging surveys. Upon the determination of dry hole the logs were used in the Wells of Opportunity Program for the OOE. Shale Method: The calculated formation... Oil and Minerals Prairie Cana Well Rl Lear Petroleum Keolemay '. ll Martin Exploration 2-Crown Zellerbach Shale. R w . 1277 onm-m . 049 ohm-m . 122 ohm-m . 078 ohm-m Method 12, 000 ppm 39, 000 ppm 15, 800 ppm 27, 000 ppm Lab R w . 13 ohm...

  16. Standard Practice for Determining Resistance of Solar Collector Covers to Hail by Impact With Propelled Ice Balls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for determining the ability of cover plates for flat-plate solar collectors to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. This practice is not intended to apply to photovoltaic cells or arrays. 1.2 This practice defines two types of test specimens, describes methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This practice does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice-ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this practice. 1.4 The size of ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified in this practice. This practice can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 The categories of solar collector cover plat...

  17. Determination of solid fractiontemperature relation and latent heat using full scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    on five such corrosion resistant alloys: superaustenitic stainless steel CN3MN, duplex stainless steels CD available. The alloys selected consist of three stainless steels (super- austenitic CN3MN and duplexes CD3MN, Latent heat, Stainless steels, Nickel based alloys Introduction Casting simulation is routinely used

  18. Determination of Interfacial Adhesion Strength between Oxide Scale and Substrate for Metallic SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in SOFC operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  19. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

  20. Accurate determination of energy scales in few-electron double quantum dots D. Taubert,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    methods to determine the gate voltage to energy conversion accurately in the different regimes of dot-lead tunnel couplings and demonstrate strong variations of the conversion factors. Our concepts can easily involves a conversion of the applied gate voltages to energy differences between the electronic states

  1. Determination of the effect of harmonics on pipe-type power cable AC/DC resistance ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, J.A.; Degeneff, R.C. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)); McKernan, T.M.; Halleran, T.M. (Consolidated Edison Co. of NY, Inc., New York (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a closed form expression to compute the AC/CD resistance ratio of HPFF (High Pressure Fluid Filled) pipe-type cable in the presence of harmonics. Industry currently computes this factor, which is a significant part in assessing the current carrying capacity of a system, with the assumption that the currents are purely sinusoidal at 60 Hz. However, as levels of harmonics increase on power systems, concern for the effect of harmonics on system ampacities rises, and that effect has already been discussed for distribution systems. This paper develops a closed form hybrid of the resistance ratio equations presented by Neher and McGrath, and compares the results with measured data at 60 Hz. At present there is no measured data available for the resistance ratio at higher frequencies, so a two dimensional finite element model is developed to view the effect of frequency on the resistance ratio. A discussion is given on the effect of a specific harmonics scenario on the resistance ratio of a given system, and results are presented for some example systems. The paper also discusses the validity and characteristics of each method.

  2. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  3. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing by generating constant current flow in portion of casing and using at least two voltage measurement electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from within the cased well are described. The multiple electrode apparatus has a minimum of two spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage a first portion of the interior of the cased well and that provide at least first voltage information. Current control means are used to control the magnitude of any selected current that flows along a second portion of the interior of the casing to be equal to a predetermined selected constant. The first portion of the interior of the cased well is spaced apart from the second portion of the interior of the cased well. The first voltage information and the predetermined selected constant value of any selected current flowing along the casing are used in part to determine a magnitude related to the formation resistivity adjacent to the first portion of the interior of the cased well. Methods and apparatus having a plurality of voltage measurement electrodes are disclosed that provide voltage related information in the presence of constant currents flowing along the casing which is used to provide formation resistivity.

  4. Andromeda: A mission to determine the gamma-ray burst distance scale F.A. Harrison, W.R. Cook, T.A. Prince, S.M. Schindler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prince, Thomas A.

    Andromeda: A mission to determine the gamma-ray burst distance scale F.A. Harrison, W.R. Cook, T was submitted to the STEDI program, and will also be proposed as a NASA Small Explorer. Keywords: bursts, gamma-rays, small missions 1 SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES 1.1 Gamma-ray Bursts Gamma-ray bursts GRBs were discovered

  5. Unification of Dynamical Determination and Bare Minimal Phenomenological Constraints in No-Scale F-SU(5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the construction of the viable parameter space of No-Scale F-SU(5), a model built on the F-lipped SU(5)xU(1)_X gauge group, supplemented by a pair of F-theory derived vector-like multiplets at the TeV scale, and the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity. Employing an updated numerical algorithm and a substantially upgraded computational engine, we significantly enhance the scope, detail and accuracy of our prior study. We sequentially apply a set of "bare-minimal" phenomenological constraints, consisting of i) the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity, ii) consistent radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, iii) precision LEP constraints on the light supersymmetric mass content, iv) the world average top-quark mass, and v) a light neutralino satisfying the 7-year WMAP cold dark matter relic density measurement. The overlap of the viable parameter space with key rare-process limits on the branching ratio for b to s gamma and the muon anomalous magnetic moment is identified as the "golden strip" of F-SU(5). A cross check for top-down theoretical consistency is provided by application of the "Super No-Scale" condition, which dynamically selects a pair of undetermined model parameters in a manner that is virtually identical to the corresponding phenomenological (driven primarily by the relic density) selection. The predicted vector-like particles are candidates for production at the future LHC, which is furthermore sensitive to a distinctive signal of ultra-high multiplicity hadronic jets. The lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass is predicted to be 120+3.5-1 GeV, with an additional 3-4 GeV upward shift possible from radiative loops in the vector-like multiplets. The predominantly bino flavored lightest neutralino is suitable for direct detection by the Xenon collaboration.

  6. Determination of energy scales in few-electron double quantum dots D. Taubert, D. Schuh, W. Wegscheider, and S. Ludwig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    gate volt- ages to energy differences between the electronic states. The conversion factors devices. We have developed methods to determine the gate voltage to energy conversion accurately in the different regimes of dot-lead tunnel couplings and demonstrate strong variations of the conversion factors

  7. Effects of QCD radiation on inclusive variables for determining the scale of new physics at hadron colliders.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Webber, Bryan R

    Xiv:hep-ph/0612249]. [17] H. C. Cheng, J. F. Gunion, Z. Han, G. Marandella and B. McElrath, “Mass Determination in SUSY-like Events with Missing Energy,” JHEP 0712, 076 (2007) [arXiv:0707.0030 [hep-ph

  8. Determination of Landau Fermi-liquid parameters of strongly interacting fermions by means of a nonlinear scaling transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji-sheng Chen

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonlinear transformation approach is formulated for the correlated fermions' thermodynamics through a medium-scaling effective action. An auxiliary implicit variable-effective chemical potential is introduced to characterize the non-Gaussian fluctuations physics. By incorporating the nonlocal correlation effects, the achieved grand partition function is made of coupled highly nonlinear parametric equations. Analytically, the low temperature expansions for the strongly interacting unitary Fermi gas are performed for the adiabatic compressibility-sound speed and specific heat with the Sommerfeld lemma. The expressions for the Landau Fermi-Liquid parameters $F_0^s$ and $F_1^s$ of the strongly interacting fermion system are obtained. As a universal constant, the effective fermion mass ratio is $m^*/m={10/9}$ at unitarity.

  9. DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) At Mt Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2008 - 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determination of groundwater flux patterns Notes Researchers measured DC resistivity and produced 12 resistivity...

  10. Corrosion behavior and interfacial resistivity of bipolar plate materials under molten carbonate fuel cell cathode conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeler, A.C.; Kaun, T.D.; Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A material is needed for bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) that combines the low oxide resistivity of 316L stainless steel (SS) with the low corrosion rate of the type 310 SS. The authors tested a group of materials that included Nitronic 50 SS and a newly developed high-temperature nickel-rich alloy, having chromium contents ranging from 16 to 31 wt %. Their results indicate that chromium content is the primary determinant of oxide scale composition and resistivity. In the MCFC cathode compartment, all tested alloys formed a duplex structure with an inner Cr-rich layer and an outer Fe-rich one. The composition of the inner Cr-rich layer was determined by the chromium content of the base alloy and has a controlling effect on scale resistivity. Oxide scale resistivity was measured for three electrolyte compositions: Li/K, Li/Na, and newly developed (Li, Na, Ca, Ba) carbonates. Changes in the physical/mechanical properties (spallation/cracking) in the oxide scale of 316L SS provided an understanding of its resistivity fluctuations over time.

  11. Resistivity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, Michael R. (Austin, TX); Bruce, Victoria J. (Austin, TX); Ring, Rosalinda M. (Austin, TX); Cole, Edward Jr. I. (Albuquerque, NM); Hawkins, Charles F. (Albuquerque, NM); Tangyungong, Paiboon (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    According to an example embodiment of the present invention a semiconductor die having a resistive electrical connection is analyzed. Heat is directed to the die as the die is undergoing a state-changing operation to cause a failure due to suspect circuitry. The die is monitored, and a circuit path that electrically changes in response to the heat is detected and used to detect that a particular portion therein of the circuit is resistive. In this manner, the detection and localization of a semiconductor die defect that includes a resistive portion of a circuit path is enhanced.

  12. DETERMINATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL PROPERTIES OF STRIPA GRANITE FROM TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN THE FULL-SCALE HEATER EXPERIMENTS: METHOD AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffry, J.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical Properties of Granite:Stripa, Sweden. TerraTekStorage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P. A. Witherspoon, P.Discontinuities in the Strira Granite -- Time-Scale Heater

  13. Methodology to determine the technical performance and value proposition for grid-scale energy storage systems : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Loose, Verne William; Donnelly, Matthew K. [Montana Tech of The University of Montana, Butte, MT; Trudnowski, Daniel J. [Montana Tech of The University of Montana, Butte, MT

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the amount of renewable generation increases, the inherent variability of wind and photovoltaic systems must be addressed in order to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of the nation's electricity grid. Grid-scale energy storage systems are uniquely suited to address the variability of renewable generation and to provide other valuable grid services. The goal of this report is to quantify the technical performance required to provide di erent grid bene ts and to specify the proper techniques for estimating the value of grid-scale energy storage systems.

  14. A survey of anthracnose resistant sorghum germplasm lines to identify additional resistance genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiltse, Curtis Craig

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Discussion. . Conclusion 12 . . . 14 . . . 14 . . . 17 . . . . 20 . . . . 21 25 vn CHAPTER Page IV INHERITANCE OF DIFFERENT SOURCES OF RESISTANCE. . . 27 Introduction Materials and Methods Plant Materials Collerornchum gramimcola Inoculation... must be characterized Once characterized, the new resistance genes can be pyramided or used as needed. This experiment was designed to determine if different 14 sources of genetic resistance exist among 13 resistant sorghum germplasm lines released...

  15. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  16. The tale of a modern animal plague: Tracing the evolutionary history and determining the time-scale for foot and mouth disease virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, Damien C. [Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: dtully@tcd.ie; Fares, Mario A. [Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: faresm@tcd.ie

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite significant advances made in the understanding of its epidemiology, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is among the most unexpected agricultural devastating plagues. While the disease manifests itself as seven immunologically distinct strains their origin, population dynamics, migration patterns and divergence times remain unknown. Herein we have assembled a comprehensive data set of gene sequences representing the global diversity of the disease and inferred the time-scale and evolutionary history for FMDV. Serotype-specific rates of evolution and divergence times were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent framework. We report that an ancient precursor FMDV gave rise to two major diversification events spanning a relatively short interval of time. This radiation event is estimated to have taken place towards the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century giving us the present circulating Euro-Asiatic and South African viral strains. Furthermore our results hint that Europe acted as a possible hub for the disease from where it successfully dispersed elsewhere via exploration and trading routes.

  17. Resistive hydrogen sensing element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

  18. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  19. CX-011393: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-011393: Categorical Exclusion Determination Build and Test of a Novel, Commercial-Scale Wave Energy Direct Drive Rotary Power Take-Off Under...

  20. CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Evaporator Scale Sample CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08102010 Location(s): Aiken,...

  1. 6 College of Science Quarterly Resistance is ... inevitable.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    children. As the disease and carrier mosquitoes build up resistances to the cur- rent crop of antimalarial, and affiliate with the Fralin LIfe Science Institute. #12;7AUGUST 2014 resistances build up within diseases, started to be used on a large scale in the 1850s and by 1933 was limited by the League of Na- tions

  2. High-temperature quenching of electrical resistance in graphene interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assuming a current density j=3.9 MA/cm2 and a resistivity =2.2 cm. The self- heating problem is aggravated scale structures.3,4 One of the approaches to mitigate the self-heating prob- lem is to incorporateHigh-temperature quenching of electrical resistance in graphene interconnects Q. Shao, G. Liu, D

  3. CX-002474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Full Scale Testing Characterization, System Optimization, Demonstration of Grid Connected Wind Turbines and Wind Powered Water Desalination...

  4. Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

  5. PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    TOTAL SCORE: ADD INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT SCORES TO DETERMINE THE TOTAL PAIN SCORE. TOTAL THE 5 CATEGORIES FOR TOTAL PAIN SCORE. MAXIMUM SCORE = 10/10. Reference: Merkel SJ, et al. The FLACC: A Behavioral Pain Scale or groan. Low level speech with a negative or disapproving quality. Repeated troubled calling out. Loud

  6. Baseline tetracycline and tetracycline resistance levels in perennial, wadeable streams of Kansas and Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everhart, Robert Christopher

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance are emerging contaminants. Tetracyclines are common antibiotics with a well known mode of action and multiple resistance determinants. Water column samples were collected from 22 streams ...

  7. Using moisture transport properties of rice seed components for identifying fissure resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Audrey Elizabeth

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diffusion model. Fissure resistance was determined based on the relative fissure response of the four rice varieties. Fissure responses of the four rice varieties were compared to identify fissure resistance by exposing 50 kernels of paddy and brown rice...

  8. Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

    1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

  9. From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology* Caroline Gauthier proposes to study the resistance of stakeholders, by exploring the nanotech field. Nanotechnology is today in the resistance context. Keywords. Nanotechnology; Resistance Bio. Caroline Gauthier is currently Professor

  10. Correspondences DDT resistance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckling, Angus

    Magazine R587 Correspondences DDT resistance in flies carries no cost Caroline McCart1, Angus to carry a cost in the absence of pesticide and consequently not to spread to fixation [1,2]. However, DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster (DDT-R) is approaching fixation globally, long after withdrawl of DDT

  11. How to calibrate the jet energy scale?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatakeyama, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Top quarks dominantly decay into b-quark jets and W bosons, and the W bosons often decay into jets, thus the precise determination of the jet energy scale is crucial in measurements of many top quark properties. I present the strategies used by the CDF and D0 collaborations to determine the jet energy scale. The various cross checks performed to verify the determined jet energy scale and evaluate its systematic uncertainty are also discussed.

  12. Nigrostriatal Dopmaine Function and Insulin Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jill Kathleen

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    in Parkinson's disease. We used the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD to analyze glucose tolerance and peripheral insulin resistance following dopamine (DA) depletion. Finally, we combined a high fat diet and low dose 6-OHDA model to determine...

  13. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hof, Peter J. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  14. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  15. Hyper-resistivity and electron thermal conductivity due to destroyed magnetic surfaces in axisymmetric plasma equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weening, R. H. [Department of Radiologic Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University, 901 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107-5233 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to model the effects of small-scale current-driven magnetic fluctuations in a mean-field theoretical description of a large-scale plasma magnetic field B(x,t), a space and time dependent hyper-resistivity {Lambda}(x,t) can be incorporated into the Ohm's law for the parallel electric field E Dot-Operator B. Using Boozer coordinates, a theoretical method is presented that allows for a determination of the hyper-resistivity {Lambda}({psi}) functional dependence on the toroidal magnetic flux {psi} for arbitrary experimental steady-state Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric plasma equilibria, if values are given for the parallel plasma resistivity {eta}({psi}) and the local distribution of any auxiliary plasma current. Heat transport in regions of plasma magnetic surfaces destroyed by resistive tearing modes can then be modeled by an electron thermal conductivity k{sub e}({psi})=({epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}/e{sup 2}){Lambda}({psi}), where e and m{sub e} are the electron charge and mass, respectively, while {epsilon}{sub 0} is the permittivity of free space. An important result obtained for axisymmetric plasma equilibria is that the {psi}{psi}-component of the metric tensor of Boozer coordinates is given by the relation g{sup {psi}{psi}}({psi}){identical_to}{nabla}{psi} Dot-Operator {nabla}{psi}=[{mu}{sub 0}G({psi})][{mu}{sub 0}I({psi})]/{iota}({psi}), with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space, G({psi}) the poloidal current outside a magnetic surface, I({psi}) the toroidal current inside a magnetic surface, and {iota}({psi}) the rotational transform.

  16. Imazethapyr: red rice control and resistance, and environmental fate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Luis Antonio de

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imazethapyr was recently approved for use in rice, but limited information is available regarding its efficacy, environmental fate or potential red rice resistance. Therefore, experiments were conducted to 1) determine the effect of flooding time...

  17. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David [U.S. Geological Survey; Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines; Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State; Binley, Andrew [Lancaster University; Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  18. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  19. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through...

  20. Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in...

  1. Freeze resistant buoy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, David E [Knoxville, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A freeze resistant buoy system includes a tail-tube buoy having a thermally insulated section disposed predominantly above a waterline, and a thermo-siphon disposed predominantly below the waterline.

  2. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  3. Measuring sheet resistance of CIGS solar cell's window layer by spatially resolved electroluminescence imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1/12 Measuring sheet resistance of CIGS solar cell's window layer by spatially resolved model to simulate the behavior of CIGS solar cells based on the spread sheet resistance effect on the determination of the window layer sheet resistance in CIGS solar cells, but our approach could be transferred

  4. Evolution of Drug-resistant Viral Populations during Interruption of Antiretroviral Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Guenter

    1 Evolution of Drug-resistant Viral Populations during Interruption of Antiretroviral Therapy Running title: Evolution and fitness of drug-resistant viruses Dongning Wang1 , Charles B. Hicks2 , Neela antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption allows determination of the evolution of3 drug-resistant viruses

  5. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of River Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operations Office July 3, 2014 CX-012329: Categorical Exclusion Determination PNNL Projects Involving Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and...

  7. CX-008476: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-008476: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.15,...

  8. Mesoscale transport properties induced by near critical resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence in toroidal geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín-Solís, José Ramón

    Mesoscale transport properties induced by near critical resistive pressure diffusive equation for mesoscale tracer-particle transport. The indices of the fractional derivates a mesoscale regime. That is, for time scales above the fluctuation scales reaching to the trans- port scales

  9. Step-edge-induced resistance anisotropy in quasi-free-standing bilayer chemical vapor deposition graphene on SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciuk, Tymoteusz [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Cakmakyapan, Semih; Ozbay, Ekmel [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Department of Physics, Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Bilkent, Ankara (Turkey); Caban, Piotr; Grodecki, Kacper; Pasternak, Iwona; Strupinski, Wlodek, E-mail: wlodek.strupinski@itme.edu.pl [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Krajewska, Aleksandra [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Szmidt, Jan [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport properties of quasi-free-standing (QFS) bilayer graphene on SiC depend on a range of scattering mechanisms. Most of them are isotropic in nature. However, the SiC substrate morphology marked by a distinctive pattern of the terraces gives rise to an anisotropy in graphene's sheet resistance, which may be considered an additional scattering mechanism. At a technological level, the growth-preceding in situ etching of the SiC surface promotes step bunching which results in macro steps ~10 nm in height. In this report, we study the qualitative and quantitative effects of SiC steps edges on the resistance of epitaxial graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. We experimentally determine the value of step edge resistivity in hydrogen-intercalated QFS-bilayer graphene to be ~190 ??m for step height hS = 10 nm and provide proof that it cannot originate from mechanical deformation of graphene but is likely to arise from lowered carrier concentration in the step area. Our results are confronted with the previously reported values of the step edge resistivity in monolayer graphene over SiC atomic steps. In our analysis, we focus on large-scale, statistical properties to foster the scalable technology of industrial graphene for electronics and sensor applications.

  10. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  11. Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

  12. CX-010707: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010707: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor, Small-and Pilot-Scale Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.24, B3.4, B3.6,...

  13. CX-008514: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008514: Categorical Exclusion Determination Corrosion and Scale at Extreme Temperature and Pressure CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07...

  14. Appropriate Loads for Peak-Power During Resisted Sprinting on a Non-Motorized Treadmill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Matthew J.; Fry, Andrew C.; Lane, Michael T.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the load which allows the highest peak power for resisted sprinting on a non-motorized treadmill and to determine if other variables are related to individual differences. Thirty ...

  15. Research-scale melter test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

  16. Vital Stats SPLIT RESISTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    6 TONS) That's as much as one female African elephant! 25 T SPLITAN ENGINEERING MARVEL W hile the Magnet Lab has developed 14 previous world- record resistive magnets over the years, the new 25 T Split magnet is not simply the next in line. This world-unique magnet system required a complete rethinking

  17. Variable nonlinear resistances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, James Edgar

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VARIETAL". NONLINEAR RESIS'IANCES A Thes1s JA'. 4ES EDGAR HOWARD as to style and content by Head Department January 1955 LIBRARY A 4 IS COLLEGE PF TEXAS VARIABLE NONLINEAR RESISTANCES A Thesis By JAMES EDGAR HOWARD Submitted...

  18. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjwech, Rungroj

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and spread footings. Both known to unknown foundations were investigated. The geotechnical test site is used as an experimental site for 2D and 3D ERI. The data acquisition is carried out along 2D profile with a linear array in the dipole-dipole configuration...

  19. Magnetic reconnection mediated by hyper-resistive plasmoid instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A. [Center for Integrated Computation and Analysis of Reconnection and Turbulence, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Max Planck-Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Center for Integrated Computation and Analysis of Reconnection and Turbulence, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Max Planck-Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Forbes, Terry G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)] [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection mediated by the hyper-resistive plasmoid instability is studied with both linear analysis and nonlinear simulations. The linear growth rate is found to scale as S{sub H}{sup 1/6} with respect to the hyper-resistive Lundquist number S{sub H}?L{sup 3}V{sub A}/?{sub H}, where L is the system size, V{sub A} is the Alfvén velocity, and ?{sub H} is the hyper-resistivity. In the nonlinear regime, reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of S{sub H}, the number of plasmoids scales as S{sub H}{sup 1/2}, and the secondary current sheet length and width both scale as S{sub H}{sup ?1/2}. These scalings are consistent with a heuristic argument assuming secondary current sheets are close to marginal stability. The distribution of plasmoids as a function of the enclosed flux ? is found to obey a ?{sup ?1} power law over an extended range, followed by a rapid fall off for large plasmoids. These results are compared with those from resistive magnetohydrodynamic studies.

  20. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  1. Degenerate resistive switching and ultrahigh density storage in resistive memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohn, Andrew J., E-mail: drewlohn@gmail.com; Mickel, Patrick R., E-mail: prmicke@sandia.gov; James, Conrad D.; Marinella, Matthew J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in tantalum oxide resistive memories, activation power provides a multi-level variable for information storage that can be set and read separately from the resistance. These two state variables (resistance and activation power) can be precisely controlled in two steps: (1) the possible activation power states are selected by partially reducing resistance, then (2) a subsequent partial increase in resistance specifies the resistance state and the final activation power state. We show that these states can be precisely written and read electrically, making this approach potentially amenable for ultra-high density memories. We provide a theoretical explanation for information storage and retrieval from activation power and experimentally demonstrate information storage in a third dimension related to the change in activation power with resistance.

  2. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

    1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  3. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  4. Earworm resistance in maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ming-Hung

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'ths effectiveness of the systemic insecticide/ Thimet, as a control for cora earworm. (2) To evaluate the effects of husk extension and tightness of husk on damage caused by earwors4 (3) To evaluate the field corn hybrids for earworm resistance snd.... Some cultural methods were able to reduce the in)ury caused by Che corn earworm to some degree. Damage wss lessened if sna smpgoyed good agronomic practices such as fall plowiug, fertilizing, rotation of crops, and planted adapted hybrids. Barber...

  5. Mixed planting of sorghum midge (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) resistant and susceptible sorghums to enhance and assess nonpreference resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez Mass, Nora Cecilia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    varieties at the same level of insect population. " Smith (1989) defined insect resistant plants as those composed of the genetically inherited qualities that result in a plant of one hybrid or species being less damaged than a susceptible plant which.... In a similar approach Horber (1980) defined susceptibility and high susceptibility. The level of plant resistance to insects is genetically determined. Also, there are commonly limitations in the opportunities and abilities to elevate the level...

  6. Electrical contact resistance degradation of a hot-switched simulated metal MEMS contact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical contact resistance testing was performed by hot-switching a simulated gold-platinum metal microelectromechanical systems contact. The experimental objective was to determine the sensitivity of the contact resistance degradation to current level and environment. The contact resistance increased sharply after 100 hot-switched cycles in air. Hot-switching at a reduced current and in nitrogen atmosphere curtailed contact resistance degradation by several orders of magnitude. The mechanism responsible for the resistance degradation was found to be arc-induced decomposition of adsorbed surface contaminants.

  7. Abrasion resistant composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  8. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  9. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  10. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  11. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  12. A diallel analysis of six components of partial resistance to Leptosphaeria nodorum in seedlings of six winter wheats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, Hans Henning

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in progenies of parents with moderate levels of resistance. Similar results were obtained by Eyal et al. (1976) who tested the symptom response in seedlings of wheat lines and segregating F2 populations. The heritability etimates for the resistance... analysis, Mullaney et al. (1982) studied the gene effects on two components of resistance (necrosis and infection frequency) in crosses between one susceptible and two resistant spring wheats. Reciprocal crosses were included to determine maternal...

  13. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  14. Field examples of electrical resistivity changes during steamflooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansure, A.J. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Meldau, R.F.; Weyland, H.V.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential part of using electrical geodiagnostic techniques to map thermal recovery processes is understanding the relationship between the process and the formation resistivity. This paper shows how the relationship used to interpret electrical well logs can be used to understand steamflood resistivity changes. Examples are presented of data from steamfloods in fields with different reservoir characteristics. Included is a typical heavy-oil steamflood (Kern River field) and a steamflood where fresh water is used for the steam generator feedwater (Elk Hills field). Because of differences in reservoir characteristics, changes in resistivity vary from reservoir to reservoir. The information presented include well logs taken before and after steamflooding and petrophysical measurements sufficient to determine the factors that controlled the resistivity changes in each field.

  15. PLANT RESISTANCE Variation in Tolerance and Resistance to the Leafhopper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    PLANT RESISTANCE Variation in Tolerance and Resistance to the Leafhopper Empoasca fabae (Hemiptera) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is an emerging pest of potato and insecticide applications to control this insect, Empoasca fabae (Harris) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a sap-feeding insect that attacks a variety of plants

  16. Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the field data to accurately model potential reservoirs andreservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM datathe reservoir target can be determined from seismic data or

  17. CX-011193: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination for Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B3.6, B3.10, B3.12, B3.15, B5.1, B5.15 Date: 08/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  18. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin (Kenosha, WI); Habetler, Thomas G. (Snellville, GA)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  19. Inheritance of greenbug resistance in oats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfaye, Tebebe Selassie

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the greenbug. Greenbug reactions of the parents, FI, and FZ generations were determined by artificial infestation in an insectary. High greenbug populations were utilized to provide a severe "test" for greenbug resistance. Susceptible genotypes usually were... or variety' Greenbug damage rating' C. I. 1579 C. I. 1580 C. I. 2712 C. I. 3223 P. I. 251580 P. I. 251896 P. I. 251898 P. I. 258612 P. I. 258637 P. I. 258644 TX64023-162R" 72C1025' Coker 75-12 Coker 42Ze 72C3034 79GH110 79GH269 79GH308 79GM...

  20. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  1. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fronk, Matthew Howard (Honeoye Falls, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY); Hulett, Jay S. (Rochester, NY); Brady, Brian K. (North Chili, NY); Cunningham, Kevin M. (Romeo, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  2. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  3. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical The measurement of water content in soils has been performed through different non- destructive techniques authors also determined the water content from the measurement of the soil's electrical resistivity

  4. Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part I. Material Variations and Process Modifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part I. Material Variations and Process to determine their effects on the acceptable range of resistance spot welding conditions for galvanized steel upsloping and downsloping of the weld current, preheat current, postheat current, electrode tip geometry

  5. CX-008478: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-008478: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.3...

  6. CX-008477: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-008477: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7,...

  7. CX-008474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-008474: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B3.6,...

  8. CX-008475: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-008475: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7,...

  9. CX-100012: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Build and Test of a Novel, Commercial-Scale Wave Energy Direct0Drive Rotary Power Take-Off Under Realistic Open-Ocean Conditions CX(s)...

  10. CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09232010 Location(s): Aiken, South...

  11. Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

  12. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Restorations Following Endodontic Access Preparation; An In Vitro Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bompolaki, Despoina

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of endodontic access preparation on the fracture resistance and microstructural integrity of monolithic pressed and monolithic milled lithium disilicate complete coverage restorations...

  13. Identification of the Flow Resistance Coefficient and Validation of a Building Air Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Z.; Lian, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental parameter that characterizes the hydraulic state of a water pipeline and largely determines the efficiency of the water-transport process is the hydraulic resistance coefficient (HRC). The actual values of the HRC may be different...

  14. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Resistance Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sets federal efficiency...

  15. Sulphidation resistance of composite boiler tube materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Eng, Philip [FPInnovations; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lab-based testing program was undertaken to generate data to better define the sulphidation resistance of composite tubes installed in the lower-furnace section of black liquor recovery boilers. All composite tube cladding alloys tested were observed to have an acceptable corrosion rate at normal operating temperatures (up to 400 C) in the synthetic lower-furnace gaseous environment tested (1% H{sub 2}S-99% N{sub 2}). This acceptable corrosion resistance is due to the expected formation of a relatively protective chromium-rich inner sulphide scale. An increase in temperature up to 560 C was found to significantly increase the corrosion rate. Of the various alloys tested, Alloy HR11N exhibited the lowest corrosion rate at each of the three temperatures tested. Moreover, the corrosion rate was found not to be strongly dependent on the fabrication route (weld overlay versus co-extruded). To minimize corrosion, operating conditions that promote prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures in the lower-furnace section of black liquor recovery boilers should be avoided, regardless of the type of composite tube installed.

  16. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  17. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  18. Corrosion resistance of concrete reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward-Waller, Elizabeth, 1982-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the mechanism of corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete and epoxy coated reinforcing bars as corrosion resistant alternatives. Several case studies explore the durability ...

  19. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency nonintrusively

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin (Kenosha, WI); Habetler, Thomas G. (Snellville, GA); Harley, Ronald G. (Lawrenceville, GA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for nonintrusively determining electric motor efficiency includes a processor programed to, while the motor is in operation, determine a plurality of stator input currents, electrical input data, a rotor speed, a value of stator resistance, and an efficiency of the motor based on the determined rotor speed, the value of stator resistance, the plurality of stator input currents, and the electrical input data. The determination of the rotor speed is based on one of the input power and the plurality of stator input currents. The determination of the value of the stator resistance is based on at least one of a horsepower rating and a combination of the plurality of stator input currents and the electrical input data. The electrical input data includes at least one of an input power and a plurality of stator input voltages.

  20. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. Robot calibration without scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ives, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methods. Scaling is a common way of improving the condition number for a matrix. Researchers in other fields have developed specific methods of scaling matrices to improve the condition number. However, robotics researchers have not specifically addressed...

  3. Effects of microstructure on native oxide scale development and electrical characteristics of eutectic CuCu6La alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    , and the characteristics of the native oxide scales lead to contact resistances orders of magnitude higher than thoseEffects of microstructure on native oxide scale development and electrical characteristics atomic force microscopy techniques have been used to study the microstructure, oxide scale development

  4. Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Russel, A. M.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by an Ames-led project team under a 4-year DOE-ITP sponsored project titled, 'Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency.' The Report serves as the project deliverable for the CPS agreement number 15015. The purpose of this project was to develop and commercialize a family of lightweight, bulk composite materials that are highly resistant to degradation by erosive and abrasive wear. These materials, based on AlMgB{sub 14}, are projected to save over 30 TBtu of energy per year when fully implemented in industrial applications, with the associated environmental benefits of eliminating the burning of 1.5 M tons/yr of coal and averting the release of 4.2 M tons/yr of CO{sub 2} into the air. This program targeted applications in the mining, drilling, machining, and dry erosion applications as key platforms for initial commercialization, which includes some of the most severe wear conditions in industry. Production-scale manufacturing of this technology has begun through a start-up company, NewTech Ceramics (NTC). This project included providing technical support to NTC in order to facilitate cost-effective mass production of the wear-resistant boride components. Resolution of issues related to processing scale-up, reduction in energy intensity during processing, and improving the quality and performance of the composites, without adding to the cost of processing were among the primary technical focus areas of this program. Compositional refinements were also investigated in order to achieve the maximum wear resistance. In addition, synthesis of large-scale, single-phase AlMgB{sub 14} powder was conducted for use as PVD sputtering targets for nanocoating applications.

  5. Fourier-based magnetic induction tomography for mapping resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puwal, Steffan; Roth, Bradley J. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic induction tomography is used as an experimental tool for mapping the passive electromagnetic properties of conductors, with the potential for imaging biological tissues. Our numerical approach to solving the inverse problem is to obtain a Fourier expansion of the resistivity and the stream functions of the magnetic fields and eddy current density. Thus, we are able to solve the inverse problem of determining the resistivity from the applied and measured magnetic fields for a two-dimensional conducting plane. When we add noise to the measured magnetic field, we find the fidelity of the measured to the true resistivity is quite robust for increasing levels of noise and increasing distances of the applied and measured field coils from the conducting plane, when properly filtered. We conclude that Fourier methods provide a reliable alternative for solving the inverse problem.

  6. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  7. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  8. Journal of Crystal Growth 267 (2004) 3541 Low-resistance n-type polycrystalline InAs grown by molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    contacts to the extrinsic base placed over dielectric spacer layers have been successfully employed]. As the emitter dimensions of III­V HBTs also scale towards deep sub-micron dimensions, a similar emitter contact and resistance may be preserved as emitter junction regions are scaled towards deep sub-micron dimensions

  9. Physical model of the contact resistivity of metal-graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaves, Ferney A., E-mail: ferneyalveiro.chaves@uab.cat; Jiménez, David [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Escola d'Enginyeria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cummings, Aron W. [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Roche, Stephan [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08070 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    While graphene-based technology shows great promise for a variety of electronic applications, including radio-frequency devices, the resistance of the metal-graphene contact is a technological bottleneck for the realization of viable graphene electronics. One of the most important factors in determining the resistance of a metal-graphene junction is the contact resistivity. Despite the large number of experimental works that exist in the literature measuring the contact resistivity, a simple model of it is still lacking. In this paper, we present a comprehensive physical model for the contact resistivity of these junctions, based on the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian method. This model unveils the role played by different electrical and physical parameters in determining the specific contact resistivity, such as the chemical potential of interaction, the work metal-graphene function difference, and the insulator thickness between the metal and graphene. In addition, our model reveals that the contact resistivity is strongly dependent on the bias voltage across the metal-graphene junction. This model is applicable to a wide variety of graphene-based electronic devices and thus is useful for understanding how to optimize the contact resistance in these systems.

  10. Object Searchingin Scale-Space Guang-Rong Ji, Bao-Liang Lu*, Xia Chen, & Jian Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bao-Liang

    an object searching method for meso-scale eddy detection in the ocean remote sensing images. The method is determined by the analysis scale and the slope of the corner's boundary. The meso-scale eddy detection

  11. Silica Scaling Removal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sidestreams of cooling tower water by providing a substrate for the deposition and adsorption of silica. The removal of the silica prevents scaling deposition on heat transfer...

  12. Pore Scale Micromodels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of EMSL's Subsurface Flow and Transport Laboratory (SFTL) with a focus on coupled (multiphase) flow, diffusion, and reactions processes at the microscopic scale (m to cm) that...

  13. Thermodynamics and scale relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

  14. Solar Compartment Design Methods, Performance Analysis and Thermal Data for Solar Composting Latrines: A Full Scale Experimental Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rendall, Joseph D.

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . Pathogen resistance to disinfection or inactivation in latrines is multifaceted. The full-scale solar composting compartment studies at the University of Kansas have advanced the knowledge about feces composting in solar compartments based on climate...

  15. Development of Submerged Entry Nozzles that Resist Clogging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Jeffrey D. Smith; Kent D. Peasle

    2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion formation and the associated clogging of SENs is a major problem for the steel industry leading to decreased strand speed, premature changing of SENs or strand termination and the associated reductions in productivity, consistency, and steel quality. A program to evaluate potentially clog resistance materials was initiated at the University of Missouri-Rolla. The main objective of the research effort was to identify combinations of steelmaking and refractory practices that would yield improved accretion resistance for tundish nozzles and submerged entry nozzles. A number of tasks were identified during the initial kick-off meeting and each was completed with two exceptions, the thermal shock validation and the industrial trials. Not completing these two tasks related to not having access to industrial scale production facilities. Though much of the results and information generated in the project is of proprietary nature.

  16. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Schneibel, Joachim H. (Knoxville, TN); Pint, Bruce A. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  17. Transition physics and scaling overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlstrom, T.N.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of recent experimental progress towards understanding H-mode transition physics and scaling. Terminology and techniques for studying H-mode are reviewed and discussed. The model of shear E x B flow stabilization of edge fluctuations at the L-H transition is gaining wide acceptance and is further supported by observations of edge rotation on a number of new devices. Observations of poloidal asymmetries of edge fluctuations and dephasing of density and potential fluctuations after the transition pose interesting challenges for understanding H-mode physics. Dedicated scans to determine the scaling of the power threshold have now been performed on many machines. A dear B{sub t} dependence is universally observed but dependence on the line averaged density is complicated. Other dependencies are also reported. Studies of the effect of neutrals and error fields on the power threshold are under investigation. The ITER threshold database has matured and offers guidance to the power threshold scaling issues relevant to next-step devices.

  18. Hubble's Law and the Distance Scale Landmarks in our understanding of cosmic distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Shantanu

    find distances to celestial objects? Build up distance scale from direct measurements to nearby objectsHubble's Law and the Distance Scale Landmarks in our understanding of cosmic distances: (1) Triangulation to determine the scale and dynamics of the solar system (Kepler) (2) Parallax to determine

  19. Engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from an engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration test. The electrostatic enclosure is part of an overall in-depth contamination control strategy for transuranic (TRU) waste recovery operations. TRU contaminants include small particles of plutonium compounds associated with defense-related waste recovery operations. Demonstration test items consisted of an outer Perma-con enclosure, an inner tent enclosure, and a ventilation system test section for testing electrostatic curtain devices. Three interchangeable test fixtures that could remove plutonium from the contaminated dust were tested in the test section. These were an electret filter, a CRT as an electrostatic field source, and an electrically charged parallel plate separator. Enclosure materials tested included polyethylene, anti-static construction fabric, and stainless steel. The soil size distribution was determined using an eight stage cascade impactor. Photographs of particles containing plutonium were obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM also provided a second method of getting the size distribution. The amount of plutonium removed from the aerosol by the electrostatic devices was determined by radiochemistry from input and output aerosol samplers. The inner and outer enclosures performed adequately for plutonium handling operations and could be used for full scale operations.

  20. Ecological differentiation in xylem cavitation resistance is associated with stem and leaf structural traitspce_2231 137..148

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    Ecological differentiation in xylem cavitation resistance is associated with stem and leaf ABSTRACT Cavitation resistance is a critical determinant of drought tolerance in tropical tree species how vulnerability to cavitation (P50) related to dry season leaf water poten- tials and stem and leaf

  1. THE EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCE SCALE WITHOUT CEPHEIDS. IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hislop, Lachlan; Mould, Jeremy [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Vic 3010 (Australia); Schmidt, Brian; Bessell, Michael S.; Da Costa, Gary; Francis, Paul; Keller, Stefan; Tisserand, Patrick; Rapoport, Sharon; Casey, Andy, E-mail: jmould@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cepheid period-luminosity relation is the primary distance indicator used in most determinations of the Hubble constant. The tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) is an alternative basis. Using the new Australian National University (ANU) SkyMapper Telescope, we calibrate the Tully-Fisher relation in the I band. We find that the TRGB and Cepheid distance scales are consistent.

  2. Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

  3. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

  4. New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial Buildings New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial Buildings New Air and Water-Resistive...

  5. Mechanism of acquired temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFaline-Figueroa, José L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of brain cancer. After aggressive treatment, therapy resistant tumors inevitably recur. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such resistance remain unclear. ...

  6. Flow resistance for microfluidic logic operations Tor Vestad and David W. M. Marra)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munakata, Toshinori

    Flow resistance for microfluidic logic operations Tor Vestad and David W. M. Marra) Chemical for the actuation of both one- and two-input microfluidic "logical gates". By taking advantage of system of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.1764592] As microfluidic processes are scaled down to smaller and smaller length

  7. Solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    length scales of 2 m, i.e., to less than the critical crack size for failure. Confinement of the damage of magnitude, making these ``designed'' composites as resistant to fatigue dam- age as high-strength steels failure can ensue along a single shear plane with essentially zero macroscopic ductility (6, 7

  8. Thermal and mechanical properties of EPDM/PP + thermal shock-resistant ceramic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    the polymer matrix. The brittleness, B, decreases upon surface modification of the ceramic. The highest valueThermal and mechanical properties of EPDM/PP + thermal shock-resistant ceramic composites Witold-scale ceramic powder. To overcome the difficulty of particles dispersion and adhe- sion, the filler was modified

  9. Improving the phase stability and oxidation resistance of B-NiAl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brammer, Travis

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature alloys are essential to many industries that require a stable material to perform in harsh oxidative environments. Many of these alloys are suited for specific applications such as jet engine turbine blades where most other materials would either melt or oxidize and crumble (1). These alloys must have a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, good creep resistance, and decent fracture toughness to be successfully used in such environments. The discovery of Ni based superalloys in the 1940s revolutionized the high temperature alloy industry and there has been continued development of these alloys since their advent (2). These materials are capable of operating in oxidative environments in the presence of combustion gases, water vapor and at temperatures around 1050 C. Demands for increased f uel efficiency, however, has highlighted the need for materials that can be used under similar atmospheres and at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. The current Ni based superalloys are restricted to lower temperatures due to the presence of a number of low melting phases that result in softening of the alloys above 1000 C. Therefore, recent research has been aimed at exploring and developing newer alloy systems that can meet the escalating requirements. This thesis comprises a part of such an effort. The motivation of this work is to develop a novel high temperature alloy system that shows improved performance at higher temperatures than the currently employed alloys. The desired alloy should be in accordance with the requirements established in the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) FutureGen program having an operating temperature around 1300 C. Alloys based on NiAl offer significant potential payoffs as structural materials in gas turbine applications due to a unique range of physical and mechanical properties. Alloying additions to NiAl could be used to further improve the pertinent properties that currently limit this system from replacing Ni based superalloys. Modifications to NiAl were explored to increase the phase stability and oxidation resistance which would allow these alloys to be used at even higher temperatures yielding greater efficiencies. The extended Miedema model was an effective tool that screened all of the potential phase space for ternary substitutions to NiAl and found the few potential systems worth further investigation. After production of the alloys it was determined that Ir, Rh, and Pd were the top candidates for substitution on Ni site up to 12 at%. The melting temperature of NiAl could be increased as much as 150 C with 12 at% Ir and 130 C with 12 at% Rh substitution. Pall adium on the other hand decreased the melting temperature by 50 C at the 12 at% substitution level. The grain size was found to have a profound influence on the oxidation resistance. Both Ir and Rh substitutions resulted in finer grain sizes compared to Pd substitutions or base NiAl. The grain size increased drastically during high temperature annealing with the PGM substitutions hindering grain growth only slightly. However, the addition of 0.05 at% Hf limited the grain growth dramatically during high temperature annealing. NiAl inherently has respectable oxidation resistance up to 1100 C. It was found through experimental testing that both Ir and Rh substitutions improve the oxidation resistance of NiAl at ultra-high temperatures with Ir performing the best. Both PGM substitutions decreased the growth rate as well as forming a more adherent oxide scale. Pd substitutions appeared to have a negligible effect to the oxidation resistance of NiAl. Hafnium addition of 0.05 at% was found to decrease the oxidation rate as well as increase the scale adherence. The combination of both Ir substitution (6-9 at%) and Hf addition (0.05 at%) produced the alloy with the best oxidation resistance. Although improvements in phase stability and oxidation resistance have been made to the NiAl system, more development and testing are still needed. Two major issues yet to be resolved are the low fracture toughn

  10. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS [Marine Biological Laboratoryj WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL A, Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner CORROSION RESISTANCE were tagged with nickel and Type 304 stainless steel pins to compare the corrosion resistance

  11. CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS Prepared For: California Energy ANALYSIS REPORT (FAR) CORROSION RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS EISG AWARDEE Chemat://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Corrosion Resistant Coating for Carbonate Fuel Cell Components EISG Grant # 00-05 Awardee

  12. Resin injected bolted connections: A step towards achieving slip-resistant joints in FRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Toby

    of resin ­ slip not more than 0 150.15 mm. 2. Static creep test · Test for determination of design bearing resistance of the resin ­ creep should be less than 0.3 mm during lifetime. 3. Fatigue test B i i t f t t i d t t bli h 4 · Bearing resistance from creep test is used to establish bearing stress ranges. · If total

  13. Evaluation and mechanisms of sorghum resistance to biotype C greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Curtis A

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Mr, N. M. Randolph Dr. G. L. Teetes Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of host plant resistance of 4 resistant sorghum lines, SA 7536-1, KS 30, IS 809, and PI 264453..., and 2 susceptible lines, Tx 7000 nd 1 2595, to th greenbug, ~shi his graminum (Rond 1). Labe a- tory studies indicated that 3 of the sorghum lines, SA 7536-1, KS 30 and IS 809, were highly non-preferred by greenbugs when given a choice of resistant...

  14. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraby, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); DiBattista, M. [Qualcomm Technologies Incorporated, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  15. Increasing proliferation resistance of sodium fast reactor fuel cycle through use of a nuclear resonance fluorescence detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David Ballin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proliferation resistance of a reprocessing facility can be improved by using a novel detection system that utilizes the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) phenomenon to determine the isotopic composition of materials ...

  16. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF DENTAL ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belma Muhamedagi?; Bosna I Hercegovina; Lejla Muhamedagi?; Bosna I Hercegovina

    Metals and metallic alloys are unavoidable materials in everyday dental use for the making of fillings, cast cores and post systems, individual crowns, implantants ’ suprastructures, dentures and orthodontic devices. They still belong to the vital materials in dentistry. Applied alloys in a mouth are exposed to the influence of chemical, biological, mechanical, thermal and electrical forces which can have a negative impact on a very therapeutic work or surrounding tissue. Electrochemical corrosion is the most important damaging factor of dental works. The corrosive resistance of metal is its important characteristic during implantation into a mouth. Therefore precious alloys are the most suitable for dental use. However, due to economic reasons, nonprecious alloys are frequently used, while corrosive resistant precious metals have been used less frequently. Based on studying different literature, the purpose of this work was to give and overview of the existing dental metals and alloys in contexts with their anticorrosive characteristics.

  17. Concurrent Validity of the "Working with Others Scale" of the ICIS Employment Interview System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassidy, Martha Ward

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Concurrent Validity of the "Working with Others Scale" of the ICIS Employment Interview System Martha W. Cassidy ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine if the Working with Others Scale from the American ...

  18. Corrosion resistance evaluation of 22Cr duplex stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopliku, A. [AGIP S.p.A., Milan (Italy); Bell, D. [AGIP UK, London (United Kingdom); Barteri, M. [C.S.M., Rome (Italy); Fowler, C. [CAPCIS, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the alternatives for the materials to be used for the construction of two flowlines 22Cr duplex stainless steel was taken into consideration. Corrosion resistance of the welds when exposed to the produced sour fluids was considered as the most critical point, so a program of corrosion testing on the 22Cr duplex stainless steel welds was developed. Three different welding procedures were used and tested in two different laboratories; specimens belonging to one of the welding procedures were also tested after a pre-strain to assess the effect of the deformation induced in the pipe by the wrapping in a reel. Tests were performed in an environment simulating the expected flowlines internal service conditions. Several testing procedures were used. Pitting test according to ASTM G48 Standard were carried out in order to rank welds and exposure tests in simulated field conditions were performed to assess stress corrosion and localized corrosion resistance. Test results showed that all the welds passed the tests and were applicable as corrosion resistant in the service environment. A ranking of the weld procedure based on their corrosion resistance has been determined.

  19. Determining physical properties of the cell cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saha; M. Nishikawa; M. Behrndt; C. -P. Heisenberg; F. Jülicher; S. W. Grill

    2015-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Actin and myosin assemble into a thin layer of a highly dynamic network underneath the membrane of eukaryotic cells. This network generates the forces that drive cell and tissue-scale morphogenetic processes. The effective material properties of this active network determine large-scale deformations and other morphogenetic events. For example,the characteristic time of stress relaxation (the Maxwell time)in the actomyosin sets the time scale of large-scale deformation of the cortex. Similarly, the characteristic length of stress propagation (the hydrodynamic length) sets the length scale of slow deformations, and a large hydrodynamic length is a prerequisite for long-ranged cortical flows. Here we introduce a method to determine physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer (in vivo). For this we investigate the relaxation dynamics of the cortex in response to laser ablation in the one-cell-stage {\\it C. elegans} embryo and in the gastrulating zebrafish embryo. These responses can be interpreted using a coarse grained physical description of the cortex in terms of a two dimensional thin film of an active viscoelastic gel. To determine the Maxwell time, the hydrodynamic length and the ratio of active stress and per-area friction, we evaluated the response to laser ablation in two different ways: by quantifying flow and density fields as a function of space and time, and by determining the time evolution of the shape of the ablated region. Importantly, both methods provide best fit physical parameters that are in close agreement with each other and that are similar to previous estimates in the two systems. We provide an accurate and robust means for measuring physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer.It can be useful for investigations of actomyosin mechanics at the cellular-scale, but also for providing insights in the active mechanics processes that govern tissue-scale morphogenesis.

  20. Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra N.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine...

  1. Large scale disease prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

  2. Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  3. The Improbability scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, David J.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Improbability Scale (IS) is proposed as a way of communicating to the general public the improbability (and by implication, the probability) of events predicted as the result of scientific research. Through the use of the Improbability Scale, the public will be able to evaluate more easily the relative risks of predicted events and draw proper conclusions when asked to support governmental and public policy decisions arising from that research.

  4. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  5. Sulphide stress cracking resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel for OCTG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoppio, L.; Barteri, M. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Rome (Italy); Cumino, G. [Dalmine Tubi Industriali S.r.l., Bergamo (Italy)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermartensitic stainless steels, recently made available as oil country tubular goods (OCTG), have been developed as a valuable cost effective alternative to duplex stainless steel for high CO{sub 2}, medium/high chlorides, and very low H{sub 2}S environments. Experimental tests were carried out to determine the localized corrosion and the sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of supermartensitic steel UNS S41425 to be used as OCTG in slightly sour oil and gas wells and to compare its performance with standard L80 API grade UNS S42000 13% Cr steel, considered as a reference. Supermartensitic steels with yield range as per L80, C95, P110, API5CT, were developed and corrosion and mechanical properties were determined. The influence of different chloride contents (NaCl 10 {divided_by} 50 g/l), hydrogen sulfide partial pressure (0.1 {divided_by} 100 kPa) and pH (2.7 {divided_by} 4.5) has been investigated in order to simulate production service conditions. Modified NACE constant load test and slow strain rate (SSR) test were performed. SSR gave the most severe evaluation for the SSC resistance. In the SSR test supermartensitic steel is deeply influenced by the chloride concentration. Supermartensitic steel corrosion resistance is by far superior to that of 13% Cr.

  6. Helmet Streamers with Triple Structures: Simulations of resistive dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wiegelmann; K. Schindler; T. Neukirch

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations of the solar corona with the LASCO coronagraph on board of the SOHO spacecraft have revealed the occurrence of triple helmet streamers even during solar minimum, which occasionally go unstable and give rise to large coronal mass ejections. There are also indications that the slow solar wind is either a combination of a quasi-stationary flow and a highly fluctuating component or may even be caused completely by many small eruptions or instabilities. As a first step we recently presented an analytical method to calculate simple two-dimensional stationary models of triple helmet streamer configurations. In the present contribution we use the equations of time- dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamics to investigate the stability and the dynamical behaviour of these configurations. We particularly focus on the possible differences between the dynamics of single isolated streamers and triple streamers and on the way in which magnetic reconnection initiates both small scale and large scale dynamical behaviour of the streamers. Our results indicate that small eruptions at the helmet streamer cusp may incessantly accelerate small amounts of plasma without significant changes of the equilibrium configuration and might thus contribute to the non-stationary slow solar wind. On larger time and length scales, large coronal eruptions can occur as a consequence of large scale magnetic reconnection events inside the streamer configuration. Our results also show that triple streamers are usually more stable than a single streamer.

  7. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

  8. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  9. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Abrasion resistant track shoe grouser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Keith D; Diekevers, Mark S; Afdahl, Curt D; Steiner, Kevin L; Barnes, Christopher A

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A track shoe for a track-type vehicle. The track shoe includes a base plate and a grouser projecting away from the base plate. A capping surface structure of substantially horseshoe shaped cross-section is disposed across a distal portion of the grouser. The capping surface structure covers portions of a distal edge surface and adjacent lateral surfaces. The capping surface structure is formed from an material characterized by enhanced wear resistance relative to portions of the grouser underlying the capping surface structure.

  11. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parent, Yves O. (Golden, CO); Magrini, Kim (Golden, CO); Landin, Steven M. (Conifer, CO); Ritland, Marcus A. (Palm Beach Shores, FL)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  12. Temperature Resistant Optimal Ratchet Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Manchein; Alan Celestino; Marcus W Beims

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable periodic structures containing optimal ratchet transport, recently found in the parameter space dissipation versus ratchet parameter [PRL 106, 234101 (2011)], are shown to be resistant to reasonable temperatures, reinforcing the expectation that they are essential to explain the optimal ratchet transport in nature. Critical temperatures for their destruction, valid from the overdamping to close to the conservative limits, are obtained numerically and shown to be connected to the current efficiency, given here analytically. Results are demonstrated for a discrete ratchet model and generalized to the Langevin equation with an additional external oscillating force.

  13. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  14. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  15. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  16. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance technical barriers, making plutonium diversion more difficult by not isolating plutonium or/and coexistence of fission products with plutonium.

  17. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the parent aluminum skin must experience significant yield strains before any damage to the doubler will occur.

  18. Agent Interaction and State Determination in SCADA Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Agent Interaction and State Determination in SCADA Systems Thomas Richard McEvoy2 and Stephen D to continue to operate in a compromised state. Finally, the scale and complex- ity of SCADA systems makes

  19. IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ALUMINA REFRACTORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial objective of this project was to do a literature search to define the problems of refractory selection in the metals and glass industries. The problems fall into three categories: Economic--What do the major problems cost the industries financially? Operational--How do the major problems affect production efficiency and impact the environment? and Scientific--What are the chemical and physical mechanisms that cause the problems to occur? This report presents a summary of these problems. It was used to determine the areas in which the EERC can provide the most assistance through bench-scale and laboratory testing. The final objective of this project was to design and build a bench-scale high-temperature controlled atmosphere dynamic corrosion application furnace (CADCAF). The furnace will be used to evaluate refractory test samples in the presence of flowing corrodents for extended periods, to temperatures of 1600 C under controlled atmospheres. Corrodents will include molten slag, steel, and glass. This test should prove useful for the glass and steel industries when faced with the decision of choosing the best refractory for flowing corrodent conditions.

  20. Mathematics Achievement Scale Score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Croatia 490 New Zealand 486 Spain 482 Romania 482 Poland 481 Turkey 469 Azerbaijan 463 Chile 462 Thailand Romania 505 Spain 505 Poland 505 TIMSS Scale Centerpoint 500 New Zealand 497 Kazakhstan 495 Norway 494 Kazakhstan 487 Sweden 484 Ukraine 479 Norway 475 Armenia 467 Romania 458 United Arab Emirates 456 Turkey 452

  1. Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Chena Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings Activity Date 1979 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geophysical studies through the University of Alaska...

  2. Magnetotelluric Transect of Long Valley Caldera: Resistivity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MT line. Our MT data set reveals numerous resistivity structures which illuminate the evolution and present state of the Long Valley system. Many of these have been quantified...

  3. Enhanced Resistance to Control Potato Tuberworm by Combining Engineered Resistance, Avidin, and Natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Enhanced Resistance to Control Potato Tuberworm by Combining Engineered Resistance, Avidin & Edward J. Grafius Published online: 15 November 2008 # Potato Association of America 2008 Abstract Potato tuberworm, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), is a destructive insect pest of potato, Solanum tuberosum (L

  4. Development and Validation of a One-Dimensional Co-Electrolysis Model for Use in Large-Scale Process Modeling Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; C. M. Stoots

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional chemical equilibrium model has been developed for analysis of simultaneous high-temperature electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (coelectrolysis) for the direct production of syngas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. For adiabatic or specified-heat-transfer conditions, the electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. Alternately, for isothermal operation, it allows for determination of outlet composition, mean Nernst potential, operating voltage, electrolyzer power, and the isothermal heat requirement for specified inlet gas flow rates, operating temperature, current density and area-specific resistance. This model has been developed for incorporation into a system-analysis code from which the overall performance of large-scale coelectrolysis plants can be evaluated. The one-dimensional co-electrolysis model has been validated by comparison with results obtained from a 3-D computational fluid dynamics model and by comparison with experimental results.

  5. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

  6. A new formula to compute apparent resistivities from marine magnetometric resistivity data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    A new formula to compute apparent resistivities from marine magnetometric resistivity data Jiuping formulas to compute the apparent resistiv- ity have their own limitations and are invalid for a deep-sea experiment. In this paper, we derive an apparent-resistivity formula based upon the magnetic field resulting

  7. Conformal Scaling Gauge Symmetry and Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the conformal scaling gauge symmetry as a fundamental symmetry of nature in the presence of gravity, a scalar field is required and used to describe the scale behavior of universe. In order for the scalar field to be a physical field, a gauge field is necessary to be introduced. A gauge invariant potential action is constructed by adopting the scalar field and a real Wilson-like line element of the gauge field. Of particular, the conformal scaling gauge symmetry can be broken down explicitly via fixing gauge to match the Einstein-Hilbert action of gravity. As a nontrivial background field solution of pure gauge has a minimal energy in gauge interactions, the evolution of universe is then dominated at earlier time by the potential energy of background field characterized by a scalar field. Since the background field of pure gauge leads to an exponential potential model of a scalar field, the universe is driven by a power-law inflation with the scale factor $a(t) \\sim t^p$. The power-law index $p$ is determined by a basic gauge fixing parameter $g_F$ via $p = 16\\pi g_F^2[1 + 3/(4\\pi g_F^2) ]$. For the gauge fixing scale being the Planck mass, we are led to a predictive model with $g_F=1$ and $p\\simeq 62$.

  8. Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

  9. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  10. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derkacy, J.A.

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

  11. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  12. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  13. Supergranulation Scale Connection Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Stein; A. Nordlund; D. Georgobiani; D. Benson; W. Schaffenberger

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of realistic simulations of solar surface convection on the scale of supergranules (96 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep) are presented. The simulations cover only 10% of the geometric depth of the solar convection zone, but half its pressure scale heights. They include the hydrogen, first and most of the second helium ionization zones. The horizontal velocity spectrum is a power law and the horizontal size of the dominant convective cells increases with increasing depth. Convection is driven by buoyancy work which is largest close to the surface, but significant over the entire domain. Close to the surface buoyancy driving is balanced by the divergence of the kinetic energy flux, but deeper down it is balanced by dissipation. The damping length of the turbulent kinetic energy is 4 pressure scale heights. The mass mixing length is 1.8 scale heights. Two thirds of the area is upflowing fluid except very close to the surface. The internal (ionization) energy flux is the largest contributor to the convective flux for temperatures less than 40,000 K and the thermal energy flux is the largest contributor at higher temperatures. This data set is useful for validating local helioseismic inversion methods. Sixteen hours of data are available as four hour averages, with two hour cadence, at steinr.msu.edu/~bob/96averages, as idl save files. The variables stored are the density, temperature, sound speed, and three velocity components. In addition, the three velocity components at 200 km above mean continuum optical depth unity are available at 30 sec. cadence.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of grain boundary thermal resistance in UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tianyi Chen; Di Chen; Bulent H. Sencer; Lin Shao

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have calculated Kaptiza resistance of UO2 with or without radiation damage. For coincident site lattice boundaries of different configurations, the boundary thermal resistance of unirradiated UO2 can be well described by a parameter-reduced formula by using boundary energies as variables. We extended the study to defect-loaded UO2 by introducing damage cascades in close vicinity to the boundaries. Following cascade annealing and defect migrations towards grain boundaries, the boundary energy increases and so does Kaptiza resistance. The correlations between these two still follow the same formula extracted from the unirradiated UO2. The finding will benefit multi-scale modeling of UO2 thermal properties under extreme radiation conditions by combining effects from boundary configurations and damage levels.

  15. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sixta, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600--1,600 C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900 C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800 C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  16. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

  17. Bench-scale testing of fluidized-bed sorbents -- ZT-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc oxide-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluidized-bed reactor. Specific objectives of this study are the following: {sm_bullet} Investigating various manufacturing methods to produce fluidizable zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents in a particle size range of 50 to 400 {mu}m; Characterizating and screening the formulations for chemical reactivity, attrition resistance, and structural properties; Testing selected formulations in an HTHP bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor to obtain an unbiased ranking of the promising sorbents; Investigating the effect of various process variables, such as temperature, nature of coal gas, gas velocity, and chemical composition of the sorbent, on the performance of the sorbent; Life-cycle testing of the superior zinc ferrite and zinc titanate formulations under HTHP conditions to determine their long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength; Addressing various reactor design issues; Generating a database on sorbent properties and performance (e.g., rates of reaction, attrition rate) to be used in the design and scaleup of future commercial hot-gas desulfurization systems; Transferring sorbent manufacturing technology to the private sector; Producing large batches (in tonnage quantities) of the sorbent to demonstrate commercial feasibility of the preparation method; and Coordinate testing of superior formulations in pilot plants with real and/or simulated coal gas.

  18. APPROACH TO HEALTH MONITORING OFAN AIRCRAFT STRUCTURE WITH RESISTIVE LADDER SENSORS DURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    APPROACH TO HEALTH MONITORING OFAN AIRCRAFT STRUCTURE WITH RESISTIVE LADDER SENSORS DURING FULL ladder sensors for health monitoring of an aircraft structure. Cracks forming can affect significantly and its size determination is one of the basic aims for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system

  19. Yield learning with line width, sample size and bridge resistance variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Wajid

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observed the effects of certain noise sources such as line width variation, sample size and bridge resistance on yield learning, and determined how to account for them. In this research we will show that since line width variation is not random on a few...

  20. Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

  1. The San Jose Scale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conradi, Albert F.

    1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for controlling the scale. The most important spray mixtures in use are lime-sulphur salt, lime-sulphur, whale oil soap, kero? sene, crude petroleum, Kero-water, and kerosene or crude oil emulsions. All these preparations are mainly winter sprays, being applied... applied while cold, however, it clogs the apparatus and causes considerable inconven? ience in getting it on the tree. It is more expensive than the Lime- Sulphur wash. i I o . B I 3 I 2 In some States coal oil or kerosene has been experimented...

  2. The San Jose Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conradi, Albert F.

    1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of which caused a violent cooking. After the lime had been slaked the salt was added ^ and the entire mixture violently boiled for 45 minutes, when it became a dark amber color. It was applied while hot. This ap? plication was made to peach trees... for controlling the scale. The most important spray mixtures in use are lime-sulphur salt, lime-sulphur, whale oil soap, kero? sene, crude petroleum, Kero-water, and kerosene or crude oil emulsions. All these preparations are mainly winter sprays, being applied...

  3. Megawatt Electrolysis Scale Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19, 2004MW Electrolysis Scale Up E

  4. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  5. Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 coating - a new criticality-controlled material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. Modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in various relevant environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  6. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel...

  7. Test Procedure for UV Weathering Resistance of Backsheet | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Test Procedure for UV Weathering Resistance of Backsheet Test Procedure for UV Weathering Resistance of Backsheet Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27...

  8. adult plant resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 39 THE ASCORBIC ACID CONTENT OF STEM RUST SUSCEPTIBLE AND RESISTANT WHEATS Breeding new varieties of wheat resistant... to the stem rust fungus, Puccinia...

  9. antimicrobial resistance mechanisms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Myers, Cullen Lucan 2013-01-01 31 Original article Mechanisms of resistance to acrolein Physics Websites Summary: Original article Mechanisms of resistance to acrolein in...

  10. ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance Print Thursday, 25 July 2013 13:44 In the...

  11. New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization...

  12. Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of Titanium Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of Titanium 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency &...

  13. how many doses can you miss before resistance emerges?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Adherence to antiretroviral HIV drugs: how many doses can you miss before resistance emerges? Abstract. The emergence of drug resistance is one of the ...

  14. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbine Engines Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbine Engines...

  15. High PID Resistant Cross-Linked Encapsulnt Based on Polyolefin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    are some concern about thermal creep resistance We have developed new polyolefin encapsulant "SOLAR ASCE TM" , which is based on high electrical resistivity polyolefin...

  16. Comparative Study on the Sulfur Tolerance and Carbon Resistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Sulfur Tolerance and Carbon Resistance of Supported Noble Metal Catalysts in Steam Reforming of Liquid Comparative Study on the Sulfur Tolerance and Carbon Resistance of...

  17. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY); Davis, Mary S. (Wading River, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  18. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

    1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  19. Effects of pavement surface characteristics and textures on skid resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomita, Hisao

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the relationship between the rate of decrea e in skid number caused by an increase in the sl idding speed and the total void 'area at the tire tread- pavemsnt interface, and (2) to determine the relationships between skid numbers and small-scale pa. vemcnt... textures combined with macro- texture parameters. Tire-pavement friction characteristics under various operating modes of the tire, field methods of measuring friction coefficients, nnd methods of measuring surface textures from the literature search...

  20. CX-010631: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory Pursue materials development of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant refractory alloys to establish time dependent creep resistance as a...

  1. CX-010630: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory Pursue materials development of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant refractory alloys to establish time dependent creep resistance as a...

  2. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  3. Impact Resistance of Stitched Composites and Metacomposites ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact Resistance of Stitched Composites and Metacomposites Apr 07 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Dr. K. T. Tan, Assistant Professor, Dept of Mechanical Engrng, University of Akron,...

  4. Genomic analysis of hepatic insulin resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raab, R. Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Type II Diabetes mellitus is a genetically complex disease characterized by insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, which results in simultaneous hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Because of the prevalence of type II ...

  5. P-Glycoprotein Structure and Chemotherapy Resistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The protein, called P-glycoprotein, or P-gp for short, is one of the main reasons cancer cells are resistant to chemotherapy drugs. Understanding its structure may help...

  6. High Temperature Oxidation Resistance and Surface Electrical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Filtered Arc Cr-Al-N Abstract: The requirements for low cost and high-tempurater corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks...

  7. Engineered Surfaces to Resist Corrosion and Wear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    MATS4007 Engineered Surfaces to Resist Corrosion and Wear Course Outline Session 2, 2014 School.................................................................................................4 Part III Corrosion and Control) LG07 Lecturer 28 Jul 1 Introduction to friction and wear JH Introduction to corrosion SC 4 Aug 2

  8. Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werthmüller, Dieter

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

  9. EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    : Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

  10. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  11. Study of genetics of resistance to organophosphates in the house fly (Musca domestica L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tsing Cheng

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Br. F. W. Plapp, Jr. In the house fly, Musca domestics L. , the phenotypes aristapedia (ar), tubby wing (:;tv, ) and carnation eye (car) are controlled by recce"ive allcles of genes located on chromosome II. Resistance tn parathion is also... controlled by a chromosome II gene. Three double-mutant strains ar;car, stw;car and ar;stw were developed and the relative genetic map positions oi ar, stw and car were determined. The linkage relationsnips of *he parathion resistance locus in relation...

  12. Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

  13. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

  14. Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard Brian (Athens, GA); Summers, Anne O. (Athens, GA); Rugh, Clayton L. (Athens, GA)

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

  15. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and promoted the formation of more protective Cr-based scales. However, the Ce surface treatment was not effective in improving the resistance of P91. The results are discussed in terms of synergistic effects of constituent alloying elements.

  16. Transition from Large-Scale to Small-Scale Dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponty, Y. [Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, Nice cedex 04 (France); Plunian, F. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamo equations are solved numerically with a helical forcing corresponding to the Roberts flow. In the fully turbulent regime the flow behaves as a Roberts flow on long time scales, plus turbulent fluctuations at short time scales. The dynamo onset is controlled by the long time scales of the flow, in agreement with the former Karlsruhe experimental results. The is governed by a generalized {alpha} effect, which includes both the usual {alpha} effect and turbulent diffusion, plus all higher order effects. Beyond the onset we find that this generalized {alpha} effect scales as O(Rm{sup -1}), suggesting the takeover of small-scale dynamo action. This is confirmed by simulations in which dynamo occurs even if the large-scale field is artificially suppressed.

  17. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  18. Method and apparatus for determination of mechanical properties of functionally-graded materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giannakopoulos, Antonios E. (Somerville, MA); Suresh, Subra (Wellesley, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for the determination of mechanical properties of homogenous or functionally-graded materials from indentation testing are presented. The technique is applicable to indentation on the nano-scale through the macro-scale including the geological scale. The technique involves creating a predictive load/depth relationship for a sample, providing an experimental load/depth relationship, comparing the experimental data to the predictive data, and determining a physical characteristic from the comparison.

  19. Robust Growth Determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doppelhofer, Gernot; Weeks, Melvyn

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the robustness of determinants of economic growth in the presence of model uncertainty, parameter heterogeneity and outliers. The robust model averaging approach introduced in the paper uses a flexible and parsimonious...

  20. Inflation from Broken Scale Invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csaba Csaki; Nemanja Kaloper; Javi Serra; John Terning

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a model of inflation based on a low-energy effective theory of spontaneously broken global scale invariance. This provides a shift symmetry that protects the inflaton potential from quantum corrections. Since the underlying scale invariance is non-compact, arbitrarily large inflaton field displacements are readily allowed in the low-energy effective theory. A weak breaking of scale invariance by almost marginal operators provides a non-trivial inflaton minimum, which sets and stabilizes the final low-energy value of the Planck scale. The underlying scale invariance ensures that the slow-roll approximation remains valid over large inflaton displacements, and yields a scale invariant spectrum of perturbations as required by the CMB observations.

  1. Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Scaling of structural failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  3. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  4. Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.

  5. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  6. Scaling laws for slippage on superhydrophobic fractal surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottin-Bizonne, C; Bocquet, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the slippage on hierarchical fractal superhydrophobic surfaces, and find an unexpected rich behavior for hydrodynamic friction on these surfaces. We develop a scaling law approach for the effective slip length, which is validated by numerical resolution of the hydrodynamic equations. Our results demonstrate that slippage does strongly depend on the fractal dimension, and is found to be always smaller on fractal surfaces as compared to surfaces with regular patterns. This shows that in contrast to naive expectations, the value of effective contact angle is not sufficient to infer the amount of slippage on a fractal surface: depending on the underlying geometry of the roughness, strongly superhydrophobic surfaces may in some cases be fully inefficient in terms of drag reduction. Finally, our scaling analysis can be directly extended to the study of heat transfer at fractal surfaces, in order to estimate the Kapitsa surface resistance on patterned surfaces, as well as to the question of trapping of diff...

  7. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale insects on o rnamental plants B-6097 8-00 Mark A. Muegge and Michael Merchant* M any species of scale insects damage land- scape plants, shrubs and trees. Scale insects insert their mouthparts into plant tissues and suck out the sap. When... period. Most species never move again in their lives. Scale insects feed by inserting their hairlike mouth- parts into plant tissue and siphoning the plant?s sap. While feeding, many species excrete a sweet, sticky liquid referred to as ?honeydew...

  8. Isotopic Scaling in Nuclear Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Tsang; W. A. Friedman; C. K. Gelbke; W. G. Lynch; G. Verde; H. Xu

    2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A three parameter scaling relationship between isotopic distributions for elements with Z$\\leq 8$ has been observed that allows a simple description of the dependence of such distributions on the overall isospin of the system. This scaling law (termed iso-scaling) applies for a variety of reaction mechanisms that are dominated by phase space, including evaporation, multifragmentation and deeply inelastic scattering. The origins of this scaling behavior for the various reaction mechanisms are explained. For multifragmentation processes, the systematics is influenced by the density dependence of the asymmetry term of the equation of state.

  9. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin [Centre for Research in Photonics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon [Cyrium Technologies Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent [Centre de Recherche en Nanofabrication et en Nanocaracterisation CRN2, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  10. Jones et al. Canada's lithospheric resistivity Page 1 The electrical resistivity of Canada's lithosphere and correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Jones et al. Canada's lithospheric resistivity Page 1 The electrical resistivity of Canada and Jessica E. Spratt1,7 1: Geological Survey of Canada, 615 Booth St., Ottawa, ON, K1A 0E9, Canada. 2: Department of Geological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Email: ij

  11. PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato Tuberworm Lansing, MI 48824 J. Econ. Entomol. 97(4): 1425Ð1431 (2004) ABSTRACT Potato tuberworm, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), is the most serious insect pest of potatoes worldwide. The introduction of the Bacillus

  12. PLANT RESISTANCE Evaluation of Natural and Engineered Resistance Mechanisms in Potato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    PLANT RESISTANCE Evaluation of Natural and Engineered Resistance Mechanisms in Potato Against Colorado Potato Beetle in a No-Choice Field Study SUSANNAH G. COOPER,1 DAVID S. DOUCHES,1,2 JOSEPH J. COOMBS,1 AND EDWARD J. GRAFIUS3 J. Econ. Entomol. 100(2): 573Ð579 (2007) ABSTRACT The Colorado potato

  13. PLANT RESISTANCE A Test of Taxonomic Predictivity: Resistance to the Colorado Potato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spooner, David

    PLANT RESISTANCE A Test of Taxonomic Predictivity: Resistance to the Colorado Potato Beetle in Wild Relatives of Cultivated Potato S. H. JANSKY,1 R. SIMON,2 AND D. M. SPOONER3 J. Econ. Entomol. 102(1): 422Ð431 (2009) ABSTRACT Wild relatives of potato offer a tremendous germplasm resource for breeders

  14. Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

  15. Three-dimensional induced polarization data inversion for complex resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commer, M.; Newman, G.A.; Williams, K.H.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The conductive and capacitive material properties of the subsurface can be quantified through the frequency-dependent complex resistivity. However, the routine three-dimensional (3D) interpretation of voluminous induced polarization (IP) data sets still poses a challenge due to large computational demands and solution nonuniqueness. We have developed a flexible methodology for 3D (spectral) IP data inversion. Our inversion algorithm is adapted from a frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) inversion method primarily developed for large-scale hydrocarbon and geothermal energy exploration purposes. The method has proven to be efficient by implementing the nonlinear conjugate gradient method with hierarchical parallelism and by using an optimal finite-difference forward modeling mesh design scheme. The method allows for a large range of survey scales, providing a tool for both exploration and environmental applications. We experimented with an image focusing technique to improve the poor depth resolution of surface data sets with small survey spreads. The algorithm's underlying forward modeling operator properly accounts for EM coupling effects; thus, traditionally used EM coupling correction procedures are not needed. The methodology was applied to both synthetic and field data. We tested the benefit of directly inverting EM coupling contaminated data using a synthetic large-scale exploration data set. Afterward, we further tested the monitoring capability of our method by inverting time-lapse data from an environmental remediation experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Similar trends observed in both our solution and another 2D inversion were in accordance with previous findings about the IP effects due to subsurface microbial activity.

  16. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  17. Mechanical analysis and simulation of in-motion vehicle scales. Final report/project accomplishments summary, CRADA Number 95-KCP-1013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, B.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanical analysis and simulation was conducted on a weigh-in-motion vehicle scale used to weight motor trucks traveling at speeds of 2 to 45 mph. The objective of this project was to develop a detailed understanding of weigh-in-motion vehicle scale operation and system response to dynamic loading. AlliedSignal FM and T worked together with Cardinal Scale Manufacturing Company as a design team to determine the scale structure`s resonant frequency, determine a relationship between static and dynamic weights, determine variables that have significant influence on the accuracy of the scale, and design an algorithm that can be used to optimize the performance and simulate the operation of the scale. This project provided a detailed understanding of the weigh-in-motion scale operation and system response to dynamic loading. Weigh-in-motion scale engineers will use this knowledge to improve current scales and design new, improved scales. The project was completed as scheduled.

  18. CX-012401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Computational Design and Performance Prediction of Creep-Resistant Ferritic Superalloys CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41884 Location(s): TennesseeOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-009033: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiation Resistant Electrical Insulation Materials for Nuclear Reactors Using Novel Nanocomposite Dielectrics – Oak Ridge National Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/09/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  20. SOLAR WIND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS TURBULENCE: ANOMALOUS SCALING AND ROLE OF INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salem, C.; Bale, S. D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mangeney, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F-92195 Meudon (France); Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Rende (Italy)], E-mail: salem@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a study of the scaling properties and intermittency of solar wind MHD turbulence based on the use of wavelet transforms. More specifically, we use the Haar Wavelet transform on simultaneous 3 s resolution particle and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft, to investigate anomalous scaling and intermittency effects of both magnetic field and solar wind velocity fluctuations in the inertial range. For this purpose, we calculated spectra, structure functions, and probability distribution functions. We show that this powerful wavelet technique allows for a systematic elimination of intermittency effects on spectra and structure functions and thus for a clear determination of the actual scaling properties in the inertial range. The scaling of the magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations are found to be fundamentally different. Moreover, when the most intermittent structures superposed to the standard fluctuations are removed, simple statistics are recovered. The magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations exhibit a well-defined, although different, monofractal behavior, following a Kolmogorov -5/3 scaling and a Iroshnikov-Kraichnan -3/2 scaling, respectively. The multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence appear to be determined by the presence of those most intermittent structures. Finally, our wavelet technique also allows for a direct and systematic identification of the most active, singular structures responsible for the intermittency in the solar wind.

  1. Determination of soil moisture by using resistance blocks with gravimetric comparisons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Paul Burton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ttu8ng of application of irrigation water~ 8oourate soil mc8s'hem ~4ormation is susen~4 to ohtsin optimum orop pro8uotion, Swenson sn8 ~n (5) worhkng on tho Texas Sigh plains obteins8 percent, greater yisM from grain soxghum rsosiving V S inches... a ~ e o o ~ ~ ~ ~ a a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e o EXSCUBBXCE CE EESULTS e a a ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ a ~ e a a ~ a ~ EuinfeD sn8 Xrrigoiian ~ o ~ o e ~ o a ~ o o a e ~ a o Celibro49. on Cares for the Surfeoe SaLL - Ymtho8 "SI". . . CslibroQ. on Curves for the Suh...

  2. A comparison of various methods used for crack resistance curve determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cayard, Michael Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    values for the compact tension and bend bar specimen configurations were calculated using the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) handbook and poor correlation was observed between the EPRI predictions and actual test values. It was concluded... was found to underpredict the experimental load-displacement curve when using the EPRI equations based on plane strain, and overpredict the experimental load-displacement curve when using the EPRI equations based on plane stress. OEOI CAT I ON To my...

  3. An electrical resistance method for determining the fiber length distribution of cotton lint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartstack, Albert W

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . ~. . . o ~ o . i e ~ e Specimen Clamp Vise ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page ~ ~ ~ 14 5 16 Instrumentation for %ms u'ing and Recotrd&g the Length of Cotton Fibers. . . . ~ IB 5. Ezpcrimsntal Setup for Nsasuring the Length Distribution... the difference 'n fiber length was cl earil reer, o?sibbs for inferior processing arid yarn quality, Abided et al (5) nake this statement conci ming length: A review of the previous work done on the relationship between the fiber-properties and the spinrdng...

  4. A determination of thermal surface resistance of interior walls in intermittently heated buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, John Edmund

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?I. 0' ILDlUG G(, NDITION"' G C . ;DIIIOIID ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ou&Xs' Y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ LIT?'"w&FUIm CIT''D ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ M LIST 07 FIOUBES 1, I Model wall with smooth surfaoe 8 ~ II tlodel wall with painted surfaoe... ~ ~ C 5. III Lfodel wall faoing interior and exterior room walls ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page 4. IV Looation of heater with respeot to the mode 1 wall e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21 5. Graph I iiverage unit surfaoe oonduotanoe fox smooth surfaoe...

  5. Determination of soil moisture by using resistance blocks with gravimetric comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Paul Burton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BKW . G$'= LXHBTM o. a. ~ . o ~ ~ ~ - ~ o ~ ~ . o. ~ . e' . ~ . ', ~ Ths E888 fox Aoouretoe Soil RQieteore Control ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ~ ~ Pmo88uros 888:Devices us88. ' tIo V~osure;;Soil-Xixietxxre. . . Gh JeotituGS Of the EeseorOh ~ e ~ a ~ ~ o a ~ e...

  6. The Price of Synchrony: Resistive Losses due to Phase Synchronization in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassam Bamieh; Dennice F. Gayme

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the total resistive losses incurred in returning a power network of identical generators to a synchronous state following a transient stability event or in maintaining this state in the presence of persistent stochastic disturbances. We formulate this cost as the input-output $H^2$ norm of a linear dynamical system with distributed disturbances. We derive an expression for the total resistive losses that scales with the size of the network as well as properties of the generators and power lines, but is independent of the network topology. This topologically invariant scaling of what we term the price of synchrony is in contrast to typical power system stability notions like rate of convergence or the region of attraction for rotor-angle stability. Our result indicates that highly connected power networks, whilst desirable for higher phase synchrony, do not offer an advantage in terms of the total resistive power losses needed to achieve this synchrony. Furthermore, if power flow is the mechanism used to achieve synchrony in highly-distributed-generation networks, the cost increases unboundedly with the number of generators.

  7. Improvements of the Variable Thermal Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Székely, V; Kollar, E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat mounting unit with electronically variable thermal resistance [1] has been presented in the last year [2]. The design was based on a Peltier cell and the appropriate control electronics and software. The device is devoted especially to the thermal characterization of packages, e.g. in dual cold plate arrangements. Although this design meets the requirements of the static measurement we are intended to improve its parameters as the settling time and dynamic thermal impedance and the range of realized thermal resistance. The new design applies the heat flux sensor developed by our team as well [3], making easier the control of the device. This development allows even the realization of negative thermal resistances.

  8. Improvements of the Variable Thermal Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Szekely; S. Torok; E. Kollar

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat mounting unit with electronically variable thermal resistance [1] has been presented in the last year [2]. The design was based on a Peltier cell and the appropriate control electronics and software. The device is devoted especially to the thermal characterization of packages, e.g. in dual cold plate arrangements. Although this design meets the requirements of the static measurement we are intended to improve its parameters as the settling time and dynamic thermal impedance and the range of realized thermal resistance. The new design applies the heat flux sensor developed by our team as well [3], making easier the control of the device. This development allows even the realization of negative thermal resistances.

  9. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

  10. Role of oxygen vacancies in resistive switching in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jinho; Kwon, Deok-Hwang; Park, Hongwoo; Kim, M., E-mail: mkim@snu.ac.kr [Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, C. U. [Department of Physics, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin, Kyungki 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen vacancies at the metal/oxide interface, driven by an electric field, have been considered responsible for the switching to the low-resistance state. We studied the electrical properties, along with microscopic observations, of the Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (001) single-crystal system. Electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed highly accumulated oxygen vacancies at the interface in the high-resistance state, contrasting to common explanation. Higher resistance state by more oxygen vacancies was further confirmed in Pt/H{sub 2}-annealed SrTiO{sub 3}. These results suggest the presence of an interfacial state which dominantly determined the resistivity by changing the barrier height at the interface.

  11. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J S; Haslam, J; Lian, T; Day, S; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peters, W; Bayles, R; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, A; Grave, O; Aprigliano, L; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, B

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative thermal phase stability, microstructure, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Some alloy additions are known to promote glass formation and to lower the critical cooling rate [F. Guo, S. J. Poon, Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13) 2575-2577, 2003]. Other elements are known to enhance the corrosion resistance of conventional stainless steels and nickel-based alloys [A. I. Asphahani, Materials Performance, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 33-43, 1980] and have been found to provide similar benefits to iron-based amorphous metals. Many of these materials can be cast as relatively thick ingots, or applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. A wide variety of thermal spray processes have been developed by industry, and can be used to apply these new materials as coatings. Any of these can be used for the deposition of the formulations discussed here, with varying degrees of residual porosity and crystalline structure. Thick protective coatings have now been made that are fully dense and completely amorphous in the as-sprayed condition. An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Project will be given, with particular emphasis on the corrosion resistance of several different types of iron-based amorphous metals in various environments of interest. The salt fog test has been used to compare the performance of various wrought alloys, melt-spun ribbons, arc-melted drop-cast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings for their susceptibility to corrosion in marine environments. Electrochemical tests have also been performed in seawater. Spontaneous breakdown of the passive film and localized corrosion require that the open-circuit corrosion potential exceed the critical potential. The resistance to localized corrosion is seawater has been quantified through measurement of the open-circuit corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), the breakdown potential (E{sub crit}) and the repassivation potential (E{sub rp}). The greater the difference between the open-circuit corrosion potential and the repassivation potential ({Delta}E), the more resistant a material is to modes of localized corrosion such as pitting and crevice corrosion. Cyclic polarization (CP) was used as a means of measuring the critical potential (E{sub crit}) relative to the open-circuit corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). Linear polarization (LP) has been used to determine the corrosion current (i{sub corr}) and the corresponding corrosion rate. Other aspects of the materials will also be discussed, as well as potential applications.

  12. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  13. Implicit Scaling in Ecological Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    - sion, and abstruse structures, such as communities and ecosystems. The diversity of organisms and eco. It was our supposition that the often unrecognized relation- ship between organism/concept and scale should- ination, we hope to raise ecologists' awareness of scale-dependent rela- tionships among organisms and eco

  14. Overview of Lead Scale Formation and Solubility J. Barry Maynard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Overview of Lead Scale Formation and Solubility J. Barry Maynard University of Cincinnati 2008 The response of lead source materials in premise and distribution systems to changes in water treatment. These determinations are particularly critical for lead compounds, of which there have been many reported. Knowledge

  15. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  16. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  17. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  18. Physical meaning of one-machine and multimachine tokamak scalings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N., E-mail: dnyn@nfi.kiae.ru; Danilov, A. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Lysenko, S. E. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation); Ongena, J. [Euratom-Belgium State Association, Laboratory for Plasma Physics (Belgium)] [Euratom-Belgium State Association, Laboratory for Plasma Physics (Belgium)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific features of energy confinement scalings constructed using different experimental databases for tokamak plasmas are considered. In the multimachine database, some pairs of engineering variables are collinear; e.g., the current I and the input power P both increase with increasing minor radius a. As a result, scalings derived from this database are reliable only for discharges in which such ratios as I/a{sup 2} or P/a{sup 2} are close to their values averaged over the database. The collinearity of variables allows one to exclude the normalized Debye radius d* from the scaling expressed in a nondimensional form. In one-machine databases, the dimensionless variables are functionally dependent, which allow one to cast a scaling without d*. In a database combined from two devices, the collinearity may be absent, so the Debye radius cannot generally be excluded from the scaling. It is shown that the experiments performed in support of the absence of d* in the two-machine scaling are unconvincing. Transformation expressions are given that allow one to compare experiments for the determination of scaling in any set of independent variables.

  19. Resistance heater for use in a glass melter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Routt, K.R.; Porter, M.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resistance heating element that includes: a resistance heating medium of a mixture of electrically conductive and insulative particles in powdered form mixed together in predetermined proportions to achieve a given resistivity; a hollow outer electrode surrounding the resistance heating medium; and an inner electrode coaxially disposed within said outer electrode. In its preferred embodiments, the electrically conductive powder is selected from the group consisting essentially of graphite, Inconel alloy, molybdenum, nichrome alloy and stainless steel, while the insulator powder is silicon dioxide or alumina. The resistance heating element, being resistant to damage from mechanical shock and corrosion at elevated temperatures, is used in a glass melter.

  20. Hydranet: network support for scaling of large scale servic es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Hamesh

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the explosive growth of demand for services on the Internet, the networking infrastructure (routers 7 protocols, servers) is under considerable stress. Mechanisms are needed for current and future IP services to scale in a client transparent...

  1. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Dorgan, Vincent E. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Estrada, David [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Wood, Joshua D. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Lyding, Joseph W [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; King, William P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Pop, Eric [Stanford University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with 50 nm spatial and 0.2K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8 150 X lm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  2. Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendra K. Verma

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [{\\it Verma et al.}, 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron's thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of {\\it Braginskii}. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity.

  3. Sufficient Conditions for Collision-Resistant Hashing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovsky, Rafail

    information retrieval (PIR) protocols and homomorphic one-way commitments. Keywords. Collision-resistant hash. A homomorphic encryption is a semantically secure encryption in which the plaintexts are taken from a group (single-server, sublinear-communication) one-round PIR protocol [15]. Since PIR is implied by homomorphic

  4. TRANSIENT THERMAL BEHAVIOR IN RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    temperature response during resistance spot welding was measured and discussed with various process parameters that the measurement of temperature profiles developed during the welding process is very important in this respect composition on galvanized steel, the temperature distribution during welding was monitored in a one

  5. Original article Mechanisms of resistance to acrolein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Mechanisms of resistance to acrolein in Drosophila melanogaster L.M. Sierra M Oviedo, Spain (received 29 November 1988; accepted 26 May 1989) Summary - The mechanisms of acrolein of acrolein entering the flies, and the other is an increase in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity; probably

  6. Evaluation of Radiation Resistance for Organic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    for organic materials used in atomic energy- related facilities J-PARC ITER Si-polymer Forming : fiber : "Radiation Resistivity of Polymeric Materials with Data Tables" (in Japanese) JAERI-Data/Code 2003 of Polymeric Materials with Data Tables" (in Japanese) JAERI-Data/Code 2003-015 C C H H H H n Polyethylene (PE

  7. Electrical resistivity mechanism in magnetorheological elastomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    polymer. Once the polymer is cured, this anisotropic structure is kept, giving to the composite new the conduction mechanism in such composite, the influence of pressure on the electrical resistivity of metal of the insulating polymer layer strongly adsorbed on the surface of particles. 1. Introduction Conductive polymer

  8. Cracking Resistance of Asphalt Rubber Mix Versus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    . crack length curve for KR #12;Load vs. CMOD 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Crack mouth opening, mm 0 500 1000 1500 non-linear fracture mechanics ·Compliance approach ·R-Curve approach #12;Conventional Fatigue Testing factor R-Curve approach Resistance to initiation & growth of cracks Evaluates fracture toughness

  9. Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristóbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Dunn, Jacob C.; Day, Jennifer M. W.; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    and by antibiotic resistance determinants. Environ Pollut 157: 2893–2902. 42. Mandujano S, Escobedo-Morales LA, Palacios-Silva R (2004) Movements of Alouatta Palliata among forest fragments in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. Neotrop Primates 12: 126–131. 43. Chaves OM, Stoner... , Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2 Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America, 3 Fundacio´n Lusara, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract There are a growing number of reports...

  10. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of all insect groups. Scale insects are generally small ( 1 /4 inch long or less) and often mimic various plant parts, such as bark and buds. Other species appear as small, white, waxy blotches or small bits of cotton on leaves and stems. The one... crawlers are pre- sent, they will fall onto the paper, where you can eas- ily see them moving about. Using natural enemies to control scales Many natural enemies?small parasitic wasps, lady- bird beetles and some fungi?can significantly reduce scale insect...

  11. Homogeneous isotropic turbulence in dilute polymers: scale by scale budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. De Angelis; C. M. Casciola; R. Benzi; R. Piva

    2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbulent energy cascade in dilute polymers solution is addressed here by considering a direct numerical simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence of a FENE-P fluid in a triply periodic box. On the basis of the DNS data, a scale by scale analysis is provided by using the proper extension to visco-elastic fluids of the Karman-Howarth equation for the velocity. For the microstructure, an equation, analogous to the Yaglom equation for scalars, is proposed for the free-energy density associated to the elastic behavior of the material. Two mechanisms of energy removal from the scale of the forcing are identified, namely the classical non-linear transfer term of the standard Navier-Stokes equations and the coupling between macroscopic velocity and microstructure. The latter, on average, drains kinetic energy to feed the dynamics of the microstructure. The cross-over scale between the two corresponding energy fluxes is identified, with the flux associated with the microstructure dominating at small separations to become sub-leading above the cross-over scale, which is the equivalent of the elastic limit scale defined by De Gennes-Tabor on the basis of phenomenological assumptions.

  12. Towards a Scalable Fully-Implicit Fully-coupled Resistive MHD Formulation with Stabilized FE Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadid, J N; Pawlowski, R P; Banks, J W; Chacon, L; Lin, P T; Tuminaro, R S

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an initial study that is intended to explore the development of a scalable fully-implicit stabilized unstructured finite element (FE) capability for low-Mach-number resistive MHD. The discussion considers the development of the stabilized FE formulation and the underlying fully-coupled preconditioned Newton-Krylov nonlinear iterative solver. To enable robust, scalable and efficient solution of the large-scale sparse linear systems generated by the Newton linearization, fully-coupled algebraic multilevel preconditioners are employed. Verification results demonstrate the expected order-of-acuracy for the stabilized FE discretization of a 2D vector potential form for the steady and transient solution of the resistive MHD system. In addition, this study puts forth a set of challenging prototype problems that include the solution of an MHD Faraday conduction pump, a hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Bernard linear stability calculation, and a magnetic island coalescence problem. Initial results that explore the scaling of the solution methods are presented on up to 4096 processors for problems with up to 64M unknowns on a CrayXT3/4. Additionally, a large-scale proof-of-capability calculation for 1 billion unknowns for the MHD Faraday pump problem on 24,000 cores is presented.

  13. Determinants of Meme Popularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, James P; Baños, Raquel A; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online social media have greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what are the fundamental mechanisms driving dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior and analytically show, using techniques from mathematical population genetics, that competition between memes for the limited resource of user attention leads to a type of self-organized criticality, with heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity: a few memes "go viral" but the majority become only moderately popular. The time-dependent solutions of the model are shown to fit empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, and to predict novel scaling features of the data. The presented framework, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  14. Empirical Force-Field Assessment: The Interplay Between Backbone Torsions and Noncovalent Term Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    Empirical Force-Field Assessment: The Interplay Between Backbone Torsions and Noncovalent Term report, which critically assessed the performance of several contemporary force fields in reproducing of modifying backbone torsions and the scaling of noncovalent interactions. Although these elements determine

  15. The use of electrical resistance in the plant stem to measure plant response to soil moisture tension and evaporative demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, James E.

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appreci- able. Should this be the case it was felt Chat diurnal fluctuations in plant stem hydrations could be determined with electrica3. resistance measurements. A further consideration of the problem suggested 'Cha'C no't only would avai3able soil...

  16. Bovine SLC11A1: genomic sequence variation and functional analysis in cattle naturally resistant and susceptible to bovine brucellosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schutta, Christopher John

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this study I set out to identify mutations in the genomic complement of the gene that may be associated with resistance or susceptibility to bovine brucellosis, and to determine if the microsatellite length polymorphism in the 3'UTR of bovine SLC11A1...

  17. Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon’s Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

  18. Sizing Up Allometric Scaling Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Van M.; Deeds, Eric J.; Fontana, Walter

    2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Metabolic rate, heart rate, lifespan, and many other physiological properties vary with body mass in systematic and interrelated ways. Present empirical data suggest that these scaling relationships take the form of power ...

  19. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  20. Molecular Ecology of Pyrethroid Knockdown Resistance in Culex pipiens pallens Mosquitoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with resistance to DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. Mol Genassociated with resistance to DDT and pyrethroids. InsectShort report: permethrin and DDT resistance in the malaria

  1. autonomous resistance mechanism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    McFaline-Figueroa, Jos L 2014-01-01 8 Original article Mechanisms of resistance to acrolein Physics Websites Summary: Original article Mechanisms of resistance to acrolein in...

  2. Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    had a highly variable resistivity in the range of 3000 to 34000 ohm-m. Beneath the top layer stretching down to about sea level the rock had a fairly uniform resistivity of...

  3. Effect of sodium monofluorophosphate treatment on microstructure and frost salt scaling durability of slag cement paste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copuroglu, O. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Micromechanics Laboratory (MICROLAB) (Netherlands)]. E-mail: o.copuroglu@citg.tudelft.nl; Fraaij, A.L.A. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Materials Science and Sustainable Construction (Netherlands); Bijen, J.M.J.M. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Materials Science and Sustainable Construction (Netherlands)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium-monofluorophosphate (Na-MFP) is currently in use as a surface applied corrosion inhibitor in the concrete industry. Its basic mechanism is to protect the passive layer of the reinforcement steel against disruption due to carbonation. Carbonation is known as the most detrimental environmental effect on blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) concrete with respect to frost salt scaling. In this paper the effect of Na-MFP on the microstructure and frost salt scaling resistance of carbonated BFSC paste is presented. The results of electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are discussed. It is found that the treatment modifies the microstructure and improves the resistance of carbonated BFSC paste against frost salt attack.

  4. Feedback stabilization of resistive shell modes in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Yu, E.P. [Institute for Fusion Studies, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1060 (United States)] [Institute for Fusion Studies, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1060 (United States)

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor relevant reversed field pinch (RFP) must be capable of operating successfully when surrounded by a close-fitting resistive shell whose L/R time is much {ital shorter} than the pulse length. Resonant modes are largely unaffected by the shell resistivity, provided that the plasma rotation is maintained against the breaking effect of nonaxisymmetric eddy currents induced in the shell. This may require an auxiliary momentum source, such as a neutral beam injector. Nonresonant modes are largely unaffected by plasma rotation, and are expected to manifest themselves as nonrotating {ital resistive shell modes} growing on the L/R time of the shell. A general RFP equilibrium is subject to many simultaneously unstable resistive shell modes; the only viable control mechanism for such modes in a RFP reactor is {ital active feedback}. It is demonstrated than an {ital N}-fold toroidally symmetric arrangement of feedback coils, combined with a strictly linear feedback algorithm, is capable of {ital simultaneously stabilizing} all intrinsically unstable resistive shell modes over a wide range of different RFP equilibria. The number of coils in the toroidal direction {ital N}, at any given poloidal angle, must be greater than, or equal to, the range of toroidal mode numbers of the unstable resistive shell modes. However, this range is largely determined by the aspect-ratio of the device. The optimum coil configuration corresponds to one in which each feedback coil slightly overlaps its immediate neighbors in the toroidal direction. The critical current which must be driven around each feedback coils is, at most, a few percent of the equilibrium toroidal plasma current. The feedback scheme is robust to small deviations from pure {ital N}-fold toroidal symmetry or a pure linear response of the feedback circuits. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. An empirical study of the economies of scale in AC transmission line construction costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldick, Ross

    1 An empirical study of the economies of scale in AC transmission line construction costs Krishnan data filed at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to empirically determine the cost of transmission projects completed between the years 1994 and 2000. We examine the economies of scale in the cost

  6. Confirmation of the seismic resistance of nuclear power plant equipment after assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaznovsky, P. S.; Kaznovsky, A. P.; Saakov, E. S.; Ryasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'Atomtehenergo' (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the natural frequencies and damping decrements of nuclear power plant equipment can only be determined experimentally and directly at the power generation units (reactors) of nuclear power plants under real disassembly conditions for the equipment, piping network, thermal insulation, etc. A computational experimental method is described in which the natural frequencies and damping decrements are determined in the field and the seismic resistance is reevaluated using these values. This method is the basis of the standards document 'Methods for confirming the dynamic characteristics of systems and components of the generating units of nuclear power plants which are important for safety' prepared and introduced in 2012.

  7. SCALING SOLID RESUSPENSION AND SORPTION FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing 1.3 million gallon waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending Monosodium Titanate (MST), Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. In addition, SRNL will also be conducting pilot-scale tests to determine the mixing requirements for the strontium and actinide sorption. As part of this task, the results from the pilot-scale tests must be scaled up to a full-scale waste tank. This document describes the scaling approach. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scale model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX Program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). MST additions are through Riser E1, the proposed MST addition riser in Tank 41H. To determine the approach to scaling the results from the pilot-scale tank to Tank 41H, the authors took the following approach. They reviewed the technical literature for methods to scale mixing with jets and suspension of solid particles with jets, and the technical literature on mass transfer from a liquid to a solid particle to develop approaches to scaling the test data. SRNL assembled a team of internal experts to review the scaling approach and to identify alternative approaches that should be considered.

  8. Geology, resistivity, and hydrochemistry of the Ojo Caliente hot springs area, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stix, J.; Pearson, C.; Vuataz, F.; Goff, F.; East, J.; Hoffers, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal fluids of the Ojo Caliente area discharge from a northeast trending normal fault that juxtaposes Precambrian metarhyolite and Tertiary sediments. An electrical resistivity survey shows that the fluids emerge from the fault and flow as a plume of thermal water into cold aquifers east of the fault. Geochemistry of fluids indicates a maximum reservoir temperature at depth of 80/sup 0/C with no suggestion of high temperature isotopic exchange between water and reservoir rocks. From this data, it is believed that the Ojo Caliente system is suitable only for small-scale direct use geothermal applications.

  9. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus requires glycosylated wall teichoic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    -N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) residues to S. aureus WTAs. We report that methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is sensitized to -lactams for MRSA resistance. The -O-GlcNAc transferase identified here, TarS, is a unique target for antimicrobials that sensitize MRSA to -lactams. PBP2A | antibiotic resistance | beta lactam potentiation | murein | WTA

  10. Determining Pregnancy in Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, A. M. Jr.; Beverly, J. R.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This should not upset the pal- pator. An indication of rectum damage is a sand- paper or gritty feeling. In this case, the mucosa lining the rectum has been rubbed off in the palpation pro- cess. It is best to stop further palpation when this occurs. A... good land- mark, figure 2. After locating the cervix, the pal- pator can move forward to the uterus to determine pregnancy. The paunch, located directly forward and to the left, may feel like the end of a football and be rather soft and mushy...

  11. Adam-Gibbs model in the density scaling regime and its implications for the configurational entropy scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzbieta Masiewicz; Andrzej Grzybowski; Katarzyna Grzybowska; Sebastian Pawlus; Jürgen Pionteck; Marian Paluch

    2015-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    To solve a long-standing problem of condensed matter physics with determining a proper description of the thermodynamic evolution of the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition, we extend the well-known Adam-Gibbs model to describe the temperature-volume dependence of structural relaxation times, ${\\tau}_{\\alpha} (T,V)$. We employ the thermodynamic scaling idea reflected in the density scaling power law, ${\\tau}_{\\alpha}=f(T^{-1} V^{-\\gamma } ) $, recently acknowledged as a valid unifying concept in the glass transition physics, to discriminate between physically relevant and irrelevant attempts at formulating the temperature-volume representations of the Adam-Gibbs model. As a consequence, we determine a straightforward relation between the structural relaxation time ${\\tau}_{\\alpha}$ and the configurational entropy $S_c$, giving evidence that also $S_c (T,V)=g(T^{-1} V^{-\\gamma} )$ with the exponent {\\gamma} that enables to scale ${\\tau}_{\\alpha} (T,V)$. This important finding has meaningful implications for the linkage between thermodynamics and molecular dynamics near the glass transition, because it implies that ${\\tau}_{\\alpha}$ can be scaled with $S_c$.

  12. Genetics of drug resistance in malaria : identification of genes conferring chloroquine and artemisinin resistance in rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modrzynska, Katarzyna Kinga

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistance to antimalarial drugs continues to be a major obstacle in controlling and eradicating malaria. The identification of genetic markers of resistance is vital for disease management but they can be difficult to ...

  13. Occurrence, Prevalence, and Disinfection Potential of Tetracycline Resistance Genes and Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in a Subtropical Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Bailey Ann

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . The objective of this dissertation research was to gain a better understanding of anthropogenic influences on occurrence of tetracycline resistance and use of traditional disinfection methods for the reduction of tetracycline resistant bacteria and genes...

  14. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  15. Release Resistant Electrical Interconnections For Mems Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Garrett, Stephen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Cathleen A. (Corrales, NM)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A release resistant electrical interconnection comprising a gold-based electrical conductor compression bonded directly to a highly-doped polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS, IMEMS, or MOEMS device, without using any intermediate layers of aluminum, titanium, solder, or conductive adhesive disposed in-between the conductor and polysilicon pad. After the initial compression bond has been formed, subsequent heat treatment of the joint above 363 C creates a liquid eutectic phase at the bondline comprising gold plus approximately 3 wt % silicon, which, upon re-solidification, significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial bond. This type of electrical interconnection is resistant to chemical attack from acids used for releasing MEMS elements (HF, HCL), thereby enabling the use of a "package-first, release-second" sequence for fabricating MEMS devices. Likewise, the bond strength of an Au--Ge compression bond may be increased by forming a transient liquid eutectic phase comprising Au-12 wt % Ge.

  16. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  17. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braski, David N. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rowcliffe, Arthur F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  18. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  19. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  20. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  1. Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we focused on getting a bench-scale test system to expose alloy coupons to simulated gasifier environment. The test facility was designed to allow about 20 specimen coupons to be exposed simultaneously for an extend period to a simulated coal gas stream at temperatures up to 1000 C. The simulated gas stream contained about 26%H{sub 2}, 39%CO, 17%CO{sub 2}, 1.4% H{sub 2}S and balance steam. We successfully ran a 100+h test with coated and uncoated stainless steel coupons. The tested alloys include SS304, SS316, SS405, SS409, SS410, and IN800. The main finding is that Ti/Ta coating provides excellent protection to SS405 under conditions where uncoated austenitic and ferritic stainless steel alloy coupons are badly corroded. Cr coatings also appear to afford some protection against corrosion.

  2. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  3. Time scales in nuclear giant resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiss, W. D. [National Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, and Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Stellenbosch, 7602 Matieland (South Africa); Nazmitdinov, R. G. [Department de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, Post Office Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a general approach to characterise fluctuations of measured cross sections of nuclear giant resonances. Simulated cross sections are obtained from a particular, yet representative, self-energy that contains all information about fragmentations. Using a wavelet analysis, we demonstrate the extraction of time scales of cascading decays into configurations of different complexity of the resonance. We argue that the spreading widths of collective excitations in nuclei are determined by the number of fragmentations as seen in the power spectrum. An analytic treatment of the wavelet analysis using a Fourier expansion of the cross section confirms this principle. A simple rule for the relative lifetimes of states associated with hierarchies of different complexity is given.

  4. Bottom and Charm Mass Determinations with a Convergence Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehnadi, Bahman; Mateu, Vicent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new determinations of the MS-bar charm quark mass using relativistic QCD sum rules at O(alpha_s^3) from the moments of the vector and the pseudoscalar current correlators. We use available experimental measurements from e+e- collisions and lattice simulation results, respectively. Our analysis of the theoretical uncertainties is based on different implementations of the perturbative series and on independent variations of the renormalization scales for the mass and the strong coupling. Taking into account the resulting set of series to estimate perturbative uncertainties is crucial, since some ways to treat the perturbative expansion can exhibit extraordinarily small scale dependence when the two scales are set equal. As an additional refinement, we address the issue that double scale variation could overestimate the perturbative uncertainties. We supplement the analysis with a test that quantifies the convergence rate of each perturbative series by a single number. We find that this convergence te...

  5. Resistivity changes in carbon-implanted Teflon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW April 2004 Major: Nuclear Engineering RESISTIVITY CHANGES IN CARBON-IMPLANTED TEFLON A Senior Honors Thesis by MATTHEW R. JACKSON Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University... In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW Approved as to style and content by: Ron Hart (Fellows Advisor) April 2004 Edward A. Funkhouser (Executive Director) Major: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT...

  6. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

  7. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  8. Greenbug-resistance Studies with Small Grains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chada, H. L.; Atkins, I. M.; Gardenhire, J. H.; Weibl, D. E.

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insects. Such varieties may not be immune from attack, but insect populations increase on them more slowly; therefore, they are more readily controlled with chemicals when necessary. Greenbug-resistance studies were initiated at Substation No. 6.... Gardenhire and D. E. Weibel* HE GREENBUG (Toxoptera (Rond.)), among several aphids that attack small grains, is one of the most damaging insects of small- grain crops in the United States. Fifteen serious outbreaks have oc- curred since 1882, 10...

  9. Sensing of buried wastes through resistivity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Bollam Muralidhar

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrodes to simulate a two-dimensional electric field distribution with tap water as the medium. Model boreholes were introduced into the tank, incorporating regularly spaced linear electrodes, which were used for electrical transmission and reception... of the half- space based on the electrode configuration chosen. It should be possible to generate contours of contaminant concentration based on electrical resistivity values across an entire site from only a few bore holes, representing a major economy...

  10. Clothes That Care -- Flame Resistant Protection.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerbel, Claudia

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fabrics , how to care for FR clothing, how consumers can express opinions about flame-resistant gar ments and how consumers can avoid fires at home. Protection For . .. Certain groups are more likely to be involved in clothing fire accidents than... fr quently than in their proportional share of the population . People whose reflexes are slowed by drugs , alcohol , physical disability or mental illness are also susceptible to injury or death by fire be cause they cannot respond quickly...

  11. Magnetic reconnection with anomalous resistivity in two-and-a-half dimensions. I. Quasistationary case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.; Linde, Timur; Kulsrud, Russell M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Chicago, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO), Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO), Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper quasistationary, 'two-and-a-half-dimensional' magnetic reconnection is studied in the framework of incompressible resistive magnetohydrodynamics. A new theoretical approach for the calculation of the reconnection rate is presented. This approach is based on the local analytical derivations in a thin reconnection layer, and it is applicable to the case when resistivity is anomalous and is an arbitrary function of the electric current and the spatial coordinates. It is found that a quasistationary reconnection rate is fully determined by a particular functional form of the anomalous resistivity and by the local configuration of the magnetic field just outside the reconnection layer. It is also found that, in the special case of constant resistivity, reconnection is Sweet-Parker [Electromagnetic Phenomena, edited by B. Lehnert (Cambridge University Press, New York, 1958), p. 123; Astrophys. J., Suppl. 8, 177 (1963)] and not Petschek [AAS-NASA Symposium on Solar Flares NASA SP5 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C., 1964), p. 425].

  12. GLOBAL AND ADAPTIVE SCALING IN A SEPARABLE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    programs confirm that Adaptive Global Scaling subsumes former scaling ...... Then, the compact convex set B of symmetric matrices eigeinvalues of which.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: characterizing Scaled Wind Farm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility inflow Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  14. Measurement of volume resistivity/conductivity of metallic alloy in inhibited seawater by optical interferometry techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, K. [Materials Science Laboratory, Department of Advanced Systems KISR, P.O. Box 24885, SAFAT 13109 (Kuwait)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical interferometry techniques were used for the first time to measure the volume resistivity/conductivity of carbon steel samples in seawater with different concentrations of a corrosion inhibitor. In this investigation, the real-time holographic interferometry was carried out to measure the thickness of anodic dissolved layer or the total thickness, U{sub total}, of formed oxide layer of carbon steel samples during the alternating current (ac) impedance of the samples in blank seawater and in 5-20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model was derived in order to correlate between the ac impedance (resistance) and the surface (orthogonal) displacement of the surface of the samples in solutions. In other words, a proportionality constant [resistivity ({rho}) or conductivity ({sigma})= 1/{rho}] between the determined ac impedance [by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique] and the orthogonal displacement (by the optical interferometry techniques) was obtained. The value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample in the blank seawater was found similar to the value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample air, around 1 x 10{sup -5}{Omega} cm. On the contrary, the measured values of the resistivity of the carbon steel samples were 1.85 x 10{sup 7}, 3.35 x 10{sup 7}, and 1.7 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm in 5, 10, and 20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater solutions, respectively. Furthermore, the determined value range of {rho} of the formed oxide layers, from 1.7 x 10{sup 7} to 3.35 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm, is found in a reasonable agreement with the one found in literature for the Fe oxide-hydroxides, i.e., goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and for the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm. The {rho} value of the Fe oxide-hydroxides, 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm, was found slightly higher than the {rho} value range of the formed oxide layer of the present study. This is because the former value was determined by a dc method rather than by an electromagnetic method, i.e., holographic interferometry with applications of EIS, i.e., ac method. As a result, erroneous measurements were recorded due to the introduction of heat to Fe oxide-hydroxides.

  15. CX-011709: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Field Testing of the Electromagnetic/Resistivity and Magnetic System in U.S. CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/15/2014 Location(s): Nevada, Nevada, Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-100009: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development of an Abrasion-Resistant Antisoiling Coating for Front-Surface Reflectors Award Number: DE-EE0006696 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B3.15 Solar Energy Technologies Date: 08/28/2014 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-001110: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fracture Network and Fluid Flow Imaging for Engineered Geothermal Systems Applications from Multi-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity StructureCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 03/10/2010Location(s): UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. CX-009031: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Innovative Manufacturing Process for Improving the Erosion/Corrosion Resistance of Power Plant Components via Powder Metallurgy & Hot Isostatic Processing Methods – Electric Power Research Institute CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/20/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  20. CX-000446: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coupled Hydro-Chemo-Thermo-Mechanical Phenomena for Pore Scale Processes to Macro Scale ImplicationsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6Date: 11/24/2009Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. Scaling of the dynamics of flexible Lennard-Jones chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arno A. Veldhorst; Jeppe C. Dyre; Thomas B. Schrøder

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The isomorph theory provides an explanation for the so-called power law density scaling which has been observed in many molecular and polymeric glass formers, both experimentally and in simulations. Power law density scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being functions of $\\rho^{\\gamma_S}/T$, where $\\rho$ is density, $T$ is temperature, and $\\gamma_S$ is a material specific scaling exponent) is an approximation to a more general scaling predicted by the isomorph theory. Furthermore, the isomorph theory provides an explanation for Rosenfeld scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being functions of excess entropy) which has been observed in simulations of both molecular and polymeric systems. Doing molecular dynamics simulations of flexible Lennard-Jones chains (LJC) with rigid bonds, we here provide the first detailed test of the isomorph theory applied to flexible chain molecules. We confirm the existence of isomorphs, which are curves in the phase diagram along which the dynamics is invariant in the appropriate reduced units. This holds not only for the relaxation times but also for the full time dependence of the dynamics, including chain specific dynamics such as the end-to-end vector autocorrelation function and the relaxation of the Rouse modes. As predicted by the isomorph theory, jumps between different state points on the same isomorph happen instantaneously without any slow relaxation. Since the LJC is a simple coarse-grained model for alkanes and polymers, our results provide a possible explanation for why power-law density scaling is observed experimentally in alkanes and many polymeric systems. The theory provides an independent method of determining the scaling exponent, which is usually treated as a empirical scaling parameter.

  2. Inheritance of resistance to southern stem canker (Diaporthe phaseolorum f.s. meridionalis) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngeleka, Kadima

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    canker. Results from the study showed that resistance to stem canker in both Crockett and Dowling was inherited as a dominant character, while F2 phenotypic and F/3 genotypic ratios suggested that resistance in boih cull ivars was determined by single... with fungicides before planting (2, 3). -Crop rotation of at least two years can be helpful to control stem canker, pro- vided crops such as cotton, a potential host for the fungus, are avoided (3, 30). -Cultivar reaction can be used to limit damage by stem...

  3. Scaling Properties of Universal Tetramers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadizadeh, M. R.; Yamashita, M. T. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We evidence the existence of a universal correlation between the binding energies of successive four-boson bound states (tetramers), for large two-body scattering lengths (a), related to an additional scale not constrained by three-body Efimov physics. Relevant to ultracold atom experiments, the atom-trimer relaxation peaks for |a|{yields}{infinity} when the ratio between the tetramer and trimer energies is {approx_equal}4.6 and a new tetramer is formed. The new scale is also revealed for a<0 by the prediction of a correlation between the positions of two successive peaks in the four-atom recombination process.

  4. Heterogeneity of cells may explain allometric scaling of metabolic rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of allometric scaling of metabolic rate is a long-standing question in biology. Several models has been proposed for explaining the origin; however, they have advantages and disadvantages. In particular, previous models only demonstrate either two important observations for the allometric scaling: the variability of scaling exponents and predominance of 3/4-power law. Thus, these models have a dispute over their validity. In this study, we propose a simple geometry model, and show that a hypothesis that total surface area of cells determines metabolic rate can reproduce these two observations by combining two concepts: the impact of cell sizes on metabolic rate and fractal-like (hierarchical) organization. The proposed model both theoretically and numerically demonstrates the approximately 3/4-power law although several different biological strategies are considered. The model validity is confirmed using empirical data. Furthermore, the model suggests the importance of heterogeneity of cell size fo...

  5. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process helped inform potential users of the model what kinds of information would be needed to accurately characterize the system.

  6. Feed process studies: Research-Scale Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittington, K.F.; Seiler, D.K.; Luey, J.; Vienna, J.D.; Sliger, W.A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of a two-phase approach to privatizing the processing of hazardous and radioactive waste at Hanford, research-scale melter (RSM) experiments were conducted to determine feed processing characteristics of two potential privatization Phase 1 high-level waste glass formulations and to determine if increased Ag, Te, and noble metal amounts would have bad effects. Effects of feed compositions and process conditions were examined for processing rate, cold cap behavior, off-gas, and glass properties. The 2 glass formulations used were: NOM-2 with adjusted waste loading (all components except silica and soda) of 25 wt%, and NOM-3 (max waste loaded glass) with adjusted waste loading of 30 wt%. The 25 wt% figure is the minimum required in the privatization Request for Proposal. RSM operated for 19 days (5 runs). 1010 kg feed was processed, producing 362 kg glass. Parts of runs 2 and 3 were run at 10 to 30 degrees above the nominal temperature 1150 C, with the most significant processing rate increase in run 3. Processing observations led to the choice of NOM-3 for noble metal testing in runs 4 and 5. During noble metal testing, processing rates fell 50% from baseline. Destructive analysis showed that a layer of noble metals and noble metal oxides settled on the floor of the melter, leading to current ``channeling`` which allowed the top section to cool, reducing production rates.

  7. Scaling the Web Composing Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Composing Web Services:A QoS View A n Internet application can invoke several ser- vices -- a stock-trading Web service, for example, could invoke a payment service, which could then invoke an authentication service. Such a scenario is called a composite Web service, and it can

  8. Scaling of pressurized fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guralnik, S.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project has two primary objectives. The first is to verify a set of hydrodynamic scaling relationships for commercial pressurized fluidized bed combustors (PFBC). The second objective is to investigate solids mixing in pressurized bubbling fluidized beds. American Electric Power`s (AEP) Tidd combined-cycle demonstration plant will provide time-varying pressure drop data to serve as the basis for the scaling verification. The verification will involve demonstrating that a properly scaled cold model and the Tidd PFBC exhibit hydrodynamically similar behavior. An important issue in PFBC design is the spacing of fuel feed ports. The feed spacing is dictated by the fuel distribution and the mixing characteristics within the bed. After completing the scaling verification, the cold model will be used to study the characteristics of PFBCs. A thermal tracer technique will be utilized to study mixing both near the fuel feed region and in the far field. The results allow the coal feed and distributor to be designed for optimal heating.

  9. Visualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    that are now considered the "lenses" for examining large-scale data. THE LARGE-SCALE DATA VISUALIZATIONVisualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data Jason Leigh1 , Andrew Johnson1 , Luc Renambot1 representation of data and the interactive manipulation and querying of the visualization. Large-scale data

  10. Criticality and Scaling Relations in a Sheared Granular Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Hatano; Michio Otsuki; Shin-ichi Sasa

    2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a rheological property of a dense granular material under shear. By a numerical experiment of the system with constant volume, we find a critical volume fraction at which the shear stress and the pressure behave as power-law functions of the shear strain rate. We also present a simple scaling argument that determines the power-law exponents. Using these results, we interpret a power-law behavior observed in the system under constant pressure.

  11. Brane World Models Need Low String Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

  12. Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shivakumar, K.N.; Argade, S.D.; Sadler, R.L.; Sharpe, M.M.; Dunn, L.; Swaminathan, G.; Sorathia, U. [North Carolina Agriculture & Technical State University, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for syntactic foam made from fly ash, a waste product of coal combustion from thermal power plants, has been developed using phenolic resin binders at low levels. The fly ash consists of hollow glass or ceramic microspheres and needs to be treated to remove contaminants. The production process is easily scalable and can be tailored to produce foams of desired properties for specific applications. Complex shaped parts also are possible with appropriate compression mold tooling. Mechanical properties, compression, tension, shear and fracture toughness, have been determined in this preliminary investigation on this syntactic material and are found to be comparable or better than commercially available core materials. Initial testing for fire resistance has indicated very encouraging results. Further work is being continued to develop this core material with superior mechanical and fire resistance properties.

  13. Proliferation resistance for fast reactors and related fuel cycles: issues and impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend to a significant degree on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance and nuclear materials accountability. The challenges for fast reactors and related fuel cycles are especially critical. They are being explored in the Generation IV Tnternational Forum (GIF) and the Tnternational Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) initiative, as well as by many states that are looking to these systems for the efficient lise of uranium resources and long-term energy security. How do any proliferation risks they may pose compare to other reactors, both existing and under development, and their fuel cycles? Can they be designed with intrinsic (technological) features to make these systems more proliferation resistant? What roles can extrinsic (institutional) features play in proliferation resistance? What are the anticipated safeguards requirements, and will new technologies and approaches need to be developed? How can safeguards be facilitated by the design process? These and other questions require a rethinking of proliferation resistance and the prospects for new technologies and other intrinsic and extrinsic features being developed that are responsive to specific issues for fast reactors and related fuel cycles and to the broader threat environment in which these systems will have to operate. There are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, but technology and design can playa role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating non-state threats. There will be a significant role for extrinsic factors, especially the various measures - from safeguards and physical protection to export controls - embodied in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. This paper will offer an assessment of the issues surrounding, and the prospects for, efforts to develop proliferation resistance for fast reactors and related fuel cycles in the context of a nuclear renaissance. The focus of the analysis is on fast reactors.

  14. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haj?asz, M., E-mail: m.hajlasz@m2i.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Donkers, J. J. T. M.; Sque, S. J.; Heil, S. B. S. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gravesteijn, D. J. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Rietveld, F. J. R. [NXP Semiconductors, Gerstweg 2, 6534 AE, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schmitz, J. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact is thought to come from reactions between the contact metals and the AlGaN/GaN. As a consequence, conventional extraction of the specific contact resistance and transfer length leads to erroneous results. In this Letter, the sheet resistance under gold-free Ti/Al-based Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates has been investigated by means of electrical measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and technology computer-aided design simulations. It was found to be significantly lower than that outside of the contact area; temperature-dependent electrical characterization showed that it exhibits semiconductor-like behavior. The increase in conduction is attributed to n-type activity of nitrogen vacancies in the AlGaN. They are thought to form during rapid thermal annealing of the metal stack when Ti extracts nitrogen from the underlying semiconductor. The high n-type doping in the region between the metal and the 2-dimensional electron gas pulls the conduction band towards the Fermi level and enhances horizontal electron transport in the AlGaN. Using this improved understanding of the properties of the material underneath the contact, accurate values of transfer length and specific contact resistance have been extracted.

  15. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  17. Corrosion Resistance of Niobium Alloys in Lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignativ, M.I.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NbP1-1 niobium and NV-7, NTsU, and 5VMTs alloys, the chemical composition of which and the experimental method for were presented earlier, were investigated. The specimens were heat treated after which they were held in lithium. It was shown that in long holds of niobium alloys in lithium at temperatures below 1050/sup 0/C, the increase in their corrosion resistance is obtained not by combining the oxygen in oxides, but by the increase in the equilibrium concentration of oxygen in the investigated material by solid solution alloying of it with a metal more active toward oxygen.

  18. Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Rutherford, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Mangan, D.L.; Moya, R.W.; Moore, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 National Academy of Sciences study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This report proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

  19. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, J.W.

    1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An elbow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveyancing comprises a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe. 4 figs.

  20. Observations on resistance to sorghum leaf blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuleen, Darlene Mae

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and 9, pp. 43-44) reflect genetic segrega- tion, they should be viewed as individual plant phenomena rather than as an intermediate-type susceptibility to toxin. Further genetic study of the host may clarify the role of this toxin in the intermediate..., they are uniformly susceptible to attack by parasites. Hybrid grain sorghums are built on a dangerously narrow genetic base (16) susceptible to leaf blight, Resistant cultivars have, however, been recently discovered (2, 11). The purpose of this thesis is (a...

  1. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  2. Large-scale tidal fields on primordial density perturbations ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Gonzalez

    1997-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the strength of the tidal field produced by the large-scale density field acting on primordial density perturbations in power law models. By analysing changes in the orientation of the deformation tensor, resulted from smoothing the density field on different mass scales, we show that the large-scale tidal field can strongly affect the morphology and orientation of density peaks. The measure of the strength of the tidal field is performed as a function of the distance to the peak and of the spectral index. We detected evidence that two populations of perturbations seems to coexist; one, with a misalignment between the main axes of their inertia and deformation tensors. This would lead to the angular momentum acquisition and morphological changes. For the second population, the perturbations are found nearly aligned in the direction of the tidal field, which would imprint them low angular momentum and which would allow an alignment of structures as those reported between clusters of galaxies in filaments, and between galaxies in clusters. Evidence is presented that the correlation between the orientation of perturbations and the large-scale density field could be a common property of Gaussian density fields with spectral indexes $n < 0$. We argue that alignment of structures can be used to probe the flatness of the spectrum on large scales but it cannot determine the exact value of the spectral index.

  3. CX-010277: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Screening of Low Cost Ferritic Steel Designs for AUSC Boiler CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/22/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-010957: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-010955: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-004658: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Solar - Ground Mounted - Ram ManufacturingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 12/02/2010Location(s): Saint George, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  7. CX-011103: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale-up of Algal Biofuel Production Using Waste Nutrients CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-009059: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Scale Hanford Mixing Studies with Cohesive Simulants, Phase III, and Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. CX-008369: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Scale Hanford Mixing Studies with Cohesive Simulants, Phase III, and Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/28/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-003281: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Utility Scale Renewable Energy - Sandywood HomesCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/10/2010Location(s): Tiverton, Rhode IslandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-004410: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Utility Scale Renewable Energy - Sandywood HomesCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 11/09/2010Location(s): Tiverton, Rhode IslandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-012256: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/11/2014 Location(s): Norway Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport MembranesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 10/20/2010Location(s): Boulder, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-008289: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-008311: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/24/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-002139: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Solar InstallationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/29/2010Location(s): Manitowoc, WisconsinOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-008002: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  18. CX-009268: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Development and Scale-Up for New and Retrofit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/11/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-011452: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/12/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-010484: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scaled Saltstone Facility Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/29/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-010741: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Smart Market Advance Retrofit Transformer Program (SMART Scale) CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-010749: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-Scale Mixotrophic Algae Integrated Biorefinery CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-008970: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil Fleet Transition with Fuel Changes and Large Scale Variable Renewable Integration CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): Spain Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-008010: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Research and Development Projects Using Nanoscale Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.15 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  5. CX-009372: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-006131: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench and Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Processing ConditionsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/21/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-012421: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Low-Leakage Shaft End Seals for Utility-Scale SCO2 Turbo Expanders CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 41880 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-010956: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010958: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-004680: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Scale Demonstration of Cowboy Coal Upgrading ProcessCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/08/2010Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-010235: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-Scale Production of Fuels and Feed from Marine Microalgae CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 02/14/2013 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-003977: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Production of Fuels and Feeds from Marine MicroalgaeCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 09/22/2010Location(s): HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. CX-004832: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Solar - Roof Mounted - Red Rock Canyon SchoolCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 12/22/2010Location(s): Saint George, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  14. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alman, David; Marcio, Duffles

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Stage Gate IV project was to test and substantiate the viability of an erosion?resistant nanocoating for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbines in both industrial power generation and commercial aviation applications. To effectively complete this project, the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Office of Research & Development teamed with MDS Coating Technologies Inc. (MCT), Delta Air Lines ? Technical Operations Division (Delta Tech Ops), and Calpine Corporation. The coating targeted for this application was MCT’s Next Generation Coating, version 4 (NGC?v4 ? with the new registered trademark name of BlackGold®). The coating is an erosion and corrosion resistant composite nanostructured coating. This coating is comprised of a proprietary ceramic?metallic nano?composite construction which provides enhanced erosion resistance and also retains the aerodynamic geometry of the airfoils. The objective of the commercial aviation portion of the project was to substantiate the coating properties to allow certification from the FAA to apply an erosion?resistant coating in a commercial aviation engine. The goal of the series of tests was to demonstrate that the durability of the airfoils is not affected negatively with the application of the NGC v4 coating. Tests included erosion, corrosion, vibration and fatigue. The results of the testing demonstrated that the application of the coating did not negatively impact the properties of the blades, especially fatigue performance – which is of importance in acceptance for commercial aviation applications. The objective of the industrial gas turbine element of the project was to evaluate the coating as an enabling technology for inlet fogging during the operation of industrial gas turbines. Fluid erosion laboratory scale tests were conducted to simulate inlet fogging conditions. Results of these tests indicated that the application of the erosion resistant NGC?v4 nanocoating improved the resistance to simulated inlet fogging conditions by a factor of 10 times. These results gave confidence for a field trial at Calpine’s power plant in Corpus Christi, TX, which commenced in April 2012. This test is still on?going as of November 2013, and the nanocoated blades have accumulated over 13,000 operational hours on this specific power plant in approximately 19 months of operation.

  15. Proliferation resistance of small modular reactors fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polidoro, F.; Parozzi, F. [RSE - Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico,Via Rubattino 54, 20134, Milano (Italy); Fassnacht, F.; Kuett, M.; Englert, M. [IANUS, Darmstadt University of Technology, Alexanderstr. 35, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the proliferation resistance of different types of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) has been examined and classified with criteria available in the literature. In the first part of the study, the level of proliferation attractiveness of traditional low-enriched UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels to be used in SMRs based on pressurized water technology has been analyzed. On the basis of numerical simulations both cores show significant proliferation risks. Although the MOX core is less proliferation prone in comparison to the UO{sub 2} core, it still can be highly attractive for diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material. In the second part of the paper, calculations to assess the proliferation attractiveness of fuel in typical small sodium cooled fast reactor show that proliferation risks from spent fuel cannot be neglected. The core contains a highly attractive plutonium composition during the whole life cycle. Despite some aspects of the design like the sealed core that enables easy detection of unauthorized withdrawal of fissile material and enhances proliferation resistance, in case of open Non-Proliferation Treaty break-out, weapon-grade plutonium in sufficient quantities could be extracted from the reactor core.

  16. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Masakazu, E-mail: masakazu731079@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)] [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Inoguchi, Toyoshi, E-mail: toyoshi@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan) [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Batchuluun, Battsetseg, E-mail: battsetseg.batchuluun@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)] [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sugiyama, Naonobu, E-mail: nao1@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)] [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kunihisa, E-mail: nihisak@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, 1-1-1 Zokumyoin, Chikushino, Fukuoka 818-8502 (Japan)] [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, 1-1-1 Zokumyoin, Chikushino, Fukuoka 818-8502 (Japan); Sonoda, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan) [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takayanagi, Ryoichi, E-mail: takayana@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)] [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •CTLA-4Ig completely alleviates HFD-induced insulin resistance. •CTLA-4Ig reduces epididymal and subcutaneous fat tissue weight and adipocyte size. •CTLA-4Ig alters ATM polarization from inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2. •CTLA-4Ig may lead to a novel anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent. •We identified the mechanism of the novel favorable effects of CTLA-4lg. -- Abstract: It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein ?, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  17. The scale of cosmic isotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinoni, C.; Bel, J.; Buzzi, A., E-mail: christian.marinoni@cpt.univ-mrs.fr, E-mail: Julien.Bel@cpt.univ-mrs.fr, E-mail: Adeline.Buzzi@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Centre de Physique Théorique, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS UMR 7332, case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most fundamental premise to the standard model of the universe states that the large-scale properties of the universe are the same in all directions and at all comoving positions. Demonstrating this hypothesis has proven to be a formidable challenge. The cross-over scale R{sub iso} above which the galaxy distribution becomes statistically isotropic is vaguely defined and poorly (if not at all) quantified. Here we report on a formalism that allows us to provide an unambiguous operational definition and an estimate of R{sub iso}. We apply the method to galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, finding that R{sub iso} ? 150h{sup ?1}Mpc. Besides providing a consistency test of the Copernican principle, this result is in agreement with predictions based on numerical simulations of the spatial distribution of galaxies in cold dark matter dominated cosmological models.

  18. Emerging universe from scale invariance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Campo, Sergio; Herrera, Ramón [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Guendelman, Eduardo I. [Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Labraña, Pedro, E-mail: sdelcamp@ucv.cl, E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: ramon.herrera@ucv.cl, E-mail: plabrana@ubiobio.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Bío Bío, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a scale invariant model which includes a R{sup 2} term in action and show that a stable ''emerging universe'' scenario is possible. The model belongs to the general class of theories, where an integration measure independent of the metric is introduced. To implement scale invariance (S.I.), a dilaton field is introduced. The integration of the equations of motion associated with the new measure gives rise to the spontaneous symmetry breaking (S.S.B) of S.I. After S.S.B. of S.I. in the model with the R{sup 2} term (and first order formalism applied), it is found that a non trivial potential for the dilaton is generated. The dynamics of the scalar field becomes non linear and these non linearities are instrumental in the stability of some of the emerging universe solutions, which exists for a parameter range of the theory.

  19. Breeding Strains of Cotton Resistant to Bacterial Blight.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blank, Lester M. (Lester Marion); Bird, L. S. (Luther Smith)

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained by grading infection of individual plants in F, progenies from crosses of Stoneville 20 with susceptible Delta- pine and Acala supported the monohybrid hypothesis of the inheritance of Stoneville 20 resistance. The data strongly indi- cated... that susceptibility was dominant and resistance was recessive. The nature of the genetic data, along with the results of indi- vidual plant selections, indicated that minor genes greatly in- fluence the degree of resistance given by the major genes. CONTENTS...

  20. Use of dual plane PIV to assess scale-by-scale energy budgets in wall turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Use of dual plane PIV to assess scale-by-scale energy budgets in wall turbulence N Saikrishnan1-layer, the buffer region, the logarithmic region and the outer region. In the space of scales, turbulent energy is produced at the large scales and transferred to smaller scales, finally dissipating in the form of heat

  1. Chameleon gravity on cosmological scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Farajollahi; A. Salehi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional approach to the chameleon mechanism, by assuming a static and spherically symmetric solutions in which matter density and chameleon field are given by $\\rho=\\rho(r)$ and $\\phi=\\phi(r)$, it has been shown that mass of chameleon field is matter density-dependent. In regions of high matter density such as earth, chameleon field is massive, in solar system it is low and in cosmological scales it is very low. In this article we revisit the mechanism in cosmological scales by assuming a redshift dependence of the matter density and chameleon field, i.e. $\\rho=\\rho(z)$, $\\phi=\\phi(z)$. To support our analysis, we best fit the model parameters with the observational data. The result shows that in cosmological scales, the mass of chameleon field increases with the redshift, i.e. more massive in higher redshifts. We also find that in both cases of power-law and exponential potential function, the current universe acceleration can be explained by the low mass chameleon field. In comparison with the high redshift observational data, we also find that the model with power-law potential function is in better agreement with the observational data.

  2. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we coated coupons of selected alloy steels with diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, as well as with titanium and tantalum nitrides. The coated samples were analyzed for their surface composition. In several instances, the samples were also cut to determine the depth profile of the coating. Several of the early runs did not yield uniform or deep enough coatings and hence a significant portion of the effort in this period was devoted fixing the problems with our fluidized bed reactor. Before the end of the quarter we had prepared a number of samples, many of them in duplicates, and sent one set to Wabash River Energy Laboratory for them to install in their gasifier. The gasifier was undergoing a scheduled maintenance and thus presented an opportunity to place some of our coupons in the stream of an operating gasifier. The samples submitted included coated and uncoated pairs of different alloys.

  3. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  4. acquired resistance genes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fractionation resistance Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: in Paramecium, Gout et al. 10 identify a clear relationship between high WGD duplicate gene retention...

  5. Resistivity Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Resistivity Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al., 1987)...

  6. acquired resistance pathway: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resistance (IR) or hyperinsulinemia, and laminitis is a common endocrine disorder of horses. The mechanisms responsible (more) Banse, Heidi Elise 2013-01-01 265 Psychology:...

  7. anaerobic acid resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Antibacterial Activities of Liposomal Linolenic Acids against Antibiotic-Resistant Helicobacter pylori Materials Science Websites Summary: , California 92093, United States...

  8. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  9. Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electrical Resistivity and...

  10. Study on PID Resistance of HIT PV Modules

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2013 Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop NREL, Golden, CO February 26-27, 2013 Study on PID resistance of HIT PV modules Tasuku Ishiguro 1 , Hiroshi Kanno 1 , Mikio...

  11. agent resistant coating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the polymer coating dramatically Matthewson, M. John 33 Protective Coatings for Turbomachinery Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: broad range of corrodents. 2) Resist...

  12. Test Procedure for UV Weathering Resistance of Backsheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NREL PVRWS 2013 % 2013 Feb. 27 % Test Procedure for UV Weathering % Resistance of Backsheet % Kusato Hirota, Michiko Tanaka, Takao Amioka, Miki Terada % Toray Industries, Inc. %...

  13. aminoglycoside resistance genes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Aminoglycoside resistance in clinical Gram-negative isolates from Norway . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Aminoglycosides represent an...

  14. aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Aminoglycoside resistance in clinical Gram-negative isolates from Norway . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Aminoglycosides represent an...

  15. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and M Oostrom.2011."Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation."Environmental Science & Technology...

  16. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Project Officer: Dan KingGreg Stillman Total budget: 300 K April 24 , 2013 Principal Investigator: Dr. Toshifumi...

  17. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date...

  18. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  19. acquired apoptotic resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cancers exhibit or acquire resistance (more) Son, Jae Kyoung 2010-01-01 44 Acquired Dyslexia in Japanese: Implications for Reading Theory . Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  20. acquired antiestrogen resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cancers exhibit or acquire resistance (more) Son, Jae Kyoung 2010-01-01 34 Acquired Dyslexia in Japanese: Implications for Reading Theory . Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  1. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea...

  2. Direct-Current Resistivity At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Kilauea...

  3. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa...

  4. Structural Dependence of Grain Boundary Resistance in Copper Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae Hwan [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Bala [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Li, An-Ping [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current choice of the interconnect metal in integrated circuits is copper due to its higher electrical conductivity and improved electromigration reliability in comparison with aluminum. However, with reducing feature sizes, the resistance of copper interconnects (lines) increases dramatically. Greater resistance will result in higher energy use, more heat generation, more failure due to electromigration, and slower switching speeds. To keep pace with the projected planar transistor density, the first challenge is to identify the dominant factors that contribute to the high interconnect resistance. Here we directly measure individual grain boundary (GB) resistances in copper nanowires with a one-to-one correspondence to the GB structure. The specific resistivities of particular GBs are measured using four-probe scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to establish a direct link between GB structure and the resistance. High-angle random GBs contribute to a specific resistivity of about 25 10-12 cm2 for each boundary, while coincidence boundaries are significantly less-resistive than random boundaries. Thus, replacing random boundaries with coincidence ones would be a route to suppress the GB impact to the resistivity of polycrystalline conductors. Acknowledgement: The research was supported by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, U. S. Department of Energy.

  5. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP sets federal efficiency requirements and provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential electric resistance water heaters.

  6. Determination of Thermoelectric Module Efficiency A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin [ORNL; McCarty, Robin [Marlow Industries, Inc; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Yamamoto, Atsushi [AIST, Japan; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of thermoelectrics (TE) for energy conversion is in the transition phase from laboratory research to device development. There is an increasing demand to accurately determine the module efficiency, especially for the power generation mode. For many thermoelectrics, the figure of merit, ZT, of the material sometimes cannot be fully realized at the device level. Reliable efficiency testing of thermoelectric modules is important to assess the device ZT and provide the end-users with realistic values on how much power can be generated under specific conditions. We conducted a general survey of efficiency testing devices and their performance. The results indicated the lack of industry standards and test procedures. This study included a commercial test system and several laboratory systems. Most systems are based on the heat flow meter method and some are based on the Harman method. They are usually reproducible in evaluating thermoelectric modules. However, cross-checking among different systems often showed large errors that are likely caused by unaccounted heat loss and thermal resistance. Efficiency testing is an important area for the thermoelectric community to focus on. A follow-up international standardization effort is planned.

  7. CX-005591: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory This project will develop advanced nanostructured corrosion resistant coatings for high temperature boiler tubes by using science-based...

  8. CX-005589: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory This project will develop advanced nanostructured corrosion resistant coatings for high temperature boiler tubes by using science-based...

  9. CX-005592: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory This project will develop advanced nanostructured corrosion resistant coatings for high temperature boiler tubes by using science-based...

  10. CX-005590: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory This project will develop advanced nanostructured corrosion resistant coatings for high temperature boiler tubes by using science-based...

  11. CX-011556: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office The University of Wisconsin proposes to study corrosion resistance in advanced materials, testing of new diffusion bonded heat exchanger...

  12. Travel determinants and multi-scale transferability of national activity patterns to local populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, Kriste M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gou; ias, Konstadinos G [UCSB

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to transfer national travel patterns to a local population is of interest when attempting to model megaregions or areas that exceed metropolitan planning organization (MPO) boundaries. At the core of this research are questions about the connection between travel behavior and land use, urban form, and accessibility. As a part of this process, a group of land use variables have been identified to define activity and travel patterns for individuals and households. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) participants are divided into categories comprised of a set of latent cluster models representing persons, travel, and land use. These are compared to two sets of cluster models constructed for two local travel surveys. Comparison of means statistical tests are used to assess differences among sociodemographic groups residing in localities with similar land uses. The results show that the NHTS and the local surveys share mean population activity and travel characteristics. However, these similarities mask behavioral heterogeneity that are shown when distributions of activity and travel behavior are examined. Therefore, data from a national household travel survey cannot be used to model local population travel characteristics if the goal to model the actual distributions and not mean travel behavior characteristics.

  13. Developing governmental decision strategies for determining involvement in highly uncertain, large-scale capital investment projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Robert J

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the project. Finally, in order to test the model's applicability in assisting governmental decision-makers to rationally allocate resources, the model has been empirically tested by a Westinghouse proposal (concerning offshore floating nuclear power... . Classification of Models . Models as a Frame of Reference The Contextual Matrix Development of the Matrix Model Methodology Exmployed to Utilize ~ ~ ~ ~ the 27 29 30 32 33 Matrix Framework . IV. WESTINGHOUSE'S OFFSHORE FLOATING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT...

  14. Determining equivalent damage loading for full-scale wind turbine blade fatigue tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freebury, G.; Musial, W.

    2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simplified method for converting wind turbine rotor design loads into equivalent-damage, constant-amplitude loads and load ratios for both flap and lead-lag directions. It is an iterative method that was developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using Palmgren-Miner's linear damage principles. The general method is unique because it does not presume that any information about the materials or blade structural properties is precisely known. According to this method, the loads are never converted to stresses. Instead, a family of M-N curves (moment vs. cycles) is defined with reasonable boundaries for load-amplitude and slope. An optimization program iterates and converges on the constant amplitude test load and load ratio that minimizes the sensitivity to the range of M-N curves for each blade section. The authors constrained the general method to match the NedWind 25 design condition for the Standards, Measurements, and Testing (SMT) blade testing pro gram. SMT participants agreed to use the fixed S-N slope of m = 10 from the original design to produce consistent test-loads among the laboratories. Unconstrained, the general method suggests that slightly higher test loads should be used for the NedWind 25 blade design spectrum. NedWind 25 blade test loads were computed for lead-lag and flap under single-axis and two-axis loading.

  15. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Surveys at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth S. Haines; Bethany L. Burton; Donald S. Sweetkind; Theodore H. Asch

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2007, the USGS collected direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity data and shear- (S) and compressional- (P) wave seismic data to provide new detail of previously mapped, overlapping fault splays at two administrative areas in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In NTS Area 7, we collected two-dimensional DC resistivity data along a transect crossing the Yucca Fault parallel to, and between, two transects along which resistivity data were collected in a previous study in 2006. In addition, we collected three-dimensional DC resistivity data in a grid that overlies part of the 2007 transect. The DC resistivity data show that the fault has a footwall that is more conductive than the hanging wall and an along-strike progression of the fault in a location where overlapping splays are present. Co-located with the northernmost of the two 2006 DC resistivity transects, we acquired S- and P-wave seismic data for both reflection and refraction processing. The S-wave data are corrupted by large amounts of converted (P-wave) energy likely due to the abundance of fractured caliche in the shallow subsurface. The P-wave data show minimal reflected energy, but they show clear refracted first arrivals. We have inverted these first arrival times to determine P-wave seismic velocity models. The seismic model for the transect in Area 7 shows low velocities extending to the base of the model at the location of the Yucca Fault, as well as low velocities at the eastern end of the transect, in the vicinity of the adjacent crater. These new surveys provide further detail about the geometry of the Yucca Fault in this location where it shows two overlapping splays. We collected P- and S-wave seismic data along a transect in the southern part of NTS Area 2, corresponding with the location of a 2006 DC resistivity transect that targeted a set of small faults identified with field mapping. Again, the S-wave data are difficult to interpret. The P-wave data show clear first arrivals that we inverted, yielding a velocity model that shows lateral heterogeneity similar to the 2006 DC resistivity models. Finally, we collected P-wave data along a second transect in Area 2, located north of the first line and in an area of a very minor fault that was targeted by another 2006 DC resistivity survey. The P-wave refraction velocity model shows generally high velocities, with a zone of somewhat lower velocities in the central part of the transect. The position of the low velocity zone corresponds with the location of a minor fault, though it is unclear whether the two are related. Together, these results demonstrate the value of geophysical data for mapping the subsurface extent of faults. The 2007 DC resistivity data complement the 2006 data and provide important new detail of the overlapping fault splays. The seismic data demonstrate the ability of P-wave refraction methods to identify the damage zones at faults, and they show the difficulties associated with S-wave methods in areas with caliche. Combining all of the geophysical data from the Area 7 studies, we are able to develop a coherent interpretation of the relation between the site geology, the fault, and the observations.

  16. Scaling laws for slippage on superhydrophobic fractal surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cottin-Bizonne; C. Barentin; L. Bocquet

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the slippage on hierarchical fractal superhydrophobic surfaces, and find an unexpected rich behavior for hydrodynamic friction on these surfaces. We develop a scaling law approach for the effective slip length, which is validated by numerical resolution of the hydrodynamic equations. Our results demonstrate that slippage does strongly depend on the fractal dimension, and is found to be always smaller on fractal surfaces as compared to surfaces with regular patterns. This shows that in contrast to naive expectations, the value of effective contact angle is not sufficient to infer the amount of slippage on a fractal surface: depending on the underlying geometry of the roughness, strongly superhydrophobic surfaces may in some cases be fully inefficient in terms of drag reduction. Finally, our scaling analysis can be directly extended to the study of heat transfer at fractal surfaces, in order to estimate the Kapitsa surface resistance on patterned surfaces, as well as to the question of trapping of diffusing particles by patchy hierarchical surfaces, in the context of chemoreception.

  17. Low thermal resistance power module assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassani, Vahab (Denver, CO); Vlahinos, Andreas (Castle Rock, CO); Bharathan, Desikan (Arvada, CO)

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power module assembly with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate with passageways or openings for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface to an upper surface. A circuit substrate is provided and positioned on the spreader plate to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate includes a bonding layer configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening in the plate. The assembly includes power modules mounted on the circuit substrate on a surface opposite the bonding layer. The power modules are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

  18. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  19. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular flat front face comprising a plurality of load bearing struts of a predetermined size attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides and top thereof, a pair of pliable opposing flat sheets having an outside edge portion attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides thereof and an upper edge with a predetermined curve; the opposing flat sheets being bent and attached to the struts to form effective curved airfoil shapes, and a top pliable flat sheet disposed adjacent the top of the flat front face and having predetermined curved side edges, which, when the top sheet is bent and attached to the struts to form an effective curved airfoil shape, mate with the curved upper edges of the opposing sheets to complete the aerodynamic device.

  20. Load-resistant coaxial transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission line for downhole tools that make up all or part of a tool string for drilling and production of oil, gas, and geothermal wells that can withstand the dynamic gravitational forces and other accelerations associated with downhole excavations. The transmission line has a metal tube, or outer conductor, that houses a coaxial wire inner conductor. A non-metallic dielectric material is interposed between the inner and outer conductors. The outer and inner conductors and the dielectric are sufficiently compressed together so that independent motion between them is abated. Compression of the components of the transmission line may be achieved by drawing the transmission through one or more dies in order to draw down the outer conductor onto the dielectric, or by expanding the inner conductor against the dielectric using a mandrel or hydraulic pressure. Non-metallic bead segments may be used in aid of the compression necessary to resist the dynamic forces and accelerations of drilling.

  1. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  2. A Study of Stacking Limit and Scaling in 3D ICs: An Interconnect Perspective Michael B. Healy and Sung Kyu Lim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    the power supply bumps by increasing resistance and inductance. The cause of these parasitics is the through, limsk}@ece.gatech.edu Abstract An examination of large-scale stacking of 3D integrated ICs from a power-supply-silicon-via (TSV) size and pitch as well as other power-supply topology characteristics are included. Thermal

  3. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark J. Rigali

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of materials property data for potential wear resistant materials was collected. These materials are designated for use as the ''core'' materials in the Fibrous Monolith structure. The material properties of hardness, toughness, thermal conductivity and cost were selected as determining factors for material choice. Data for these four properties were normalized, and weighting factors were assigned for each property to establish priority and evaluate the effects of priority fluctuation. Materials were then given a score based on the normalized parameters and weighting values. Using the initial estimates for parameter priority, the highest ranking material was tungsten carbide, with diamond as the second ranked material. Several materials were included in the trade study, and five were selected as promising ''core'' materials to include in this effort. These materials are tungsten carbide, diamond, boron carbide, titanium diboride and silicon carbide. Work was initiated on a trade study to evaluate ''shell'' materials. These materials will require the investigation of different material properties, including ultimate tensile strength, ductility, toughness, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and compatibility during consolidation with the ''core'' materials. Kyocera Industrial Ceramics in Kyoto, Japan was visited, with the purpose of negotiating and signing the subcontract for Kyocera's participation on this program. An assessment was made on the testing and manufacturing capabilities of Kyocera and how such capabilities can be integrated into our development effort. Tours were conducted of Kyocera's machine tool production plant in Sendai, Japan, as well as their research and development facilities in Kagoshima, Japan. Kyocera's facilities include substantial materials characterization and testing capabilities at room and elevated temperatures, and manufacturing capabilities of thousands of parts/hr, all of which will be made available to us for use on this program as part of Kyocera's in-kind program cost share contribution. The Kyocera subcontract and the details of Kyocera's participation on this program were discussed and agreed upon during the two-day meeting (see Attachment A). Kennametals's Vice President and Chief Technical joined discussions regarding potential 3-way collaborations between Kyocera, ACR Inc. and Kennametal. This collaboration would involve the utilization of Kennametal's Rapid Omni-Directional Compaction Process (ROC Process) in the production of FM-based cutting tools. Kyocera and ARC Inc are in the process of evaluating the potential of this process in the fabrication of wear resistant composite tooling.

  4. THE EFFECT OF SUBBANDGAP ILLUMINATION ON THE BULK RESISTIVITY OF CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J.; Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in bulk resistivity during infrared (IR) illumination above 950 nm of state-of-the-art CdZnTe (CZT) crystals grown using the traveling heating method or the modified Bridgman method is documented. The change in steady-state current with and without illumination is also evaluated. The influence of secondary phases (SP) on current?voltage (I?V) characteristics is discussed using IR transmission microscopy to determine the defect concentration within the crystal bulk. SP present within the CZT are connected to the existence of deep, IR-excitable traps within the bandgap.

  5. Method and apparatus for remote tube crevice detection by current and voltage probe resistance measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kikta, T.J.; Mitchell, R.D.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the extent of contact between an electrically conducting tube and an electrically conductive tubesheet surrounding the tube, based upon the electrical resistance of the tube and tubesheet. A constant current source is applied to the interior of the electrically conducting tube by probes and a voltmeter is connected between other probes to measure the voltage at the point of current injection, which is inversely proportional to the amount of contact between the tube and tubesheet. Namely, the higher the voltage measured by the voltmeter, the less contact between the tube and tubesheet. 4 figs.

  6. Holographic Superconductors with Lifshitz Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Brynjolfsson; U. H. Danielsson; L. Thorlacius; T. Zingg

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes in asymptotically Lifshitz spacetime provide a window onto finite temperature effects in strongly coupled Lifshitz models. We add a Maxwell gauge field and charged matter to a recently proposed gravity dual of 2+1 dimensional Lifshitz theory. This gives rise to charged black holes with scalar hair, which correspond to the superconducting phase of holographic superconductors with z > 1 Lifshitz scaling. Along the way we analyze the global geometry of static, asymptotically Lifshitz black holes at arbitrary critical exponent z > 1. In all known exact solutions there is a null curvature singularity in the black hole region, and, by a general argument, the same applies to generic Lifshitz black holes.

  7. Scaled Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSaltonSprings,Sardinia,SawasdeeSayreville, NewScaled

  8. Scale Models & Wind Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -EnergyProcess HeatingatSawDepartment ofScale

  9. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  10. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  11. Small-Scale Energy Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) - created in 1981 after voters approved a constitutional amendment authorizing the sale of bonds to finance small-scale, local energy projects - is...

  12. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- 56556 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE DANIEL T.ph/0410035v1 2 Oct 2004 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE ?without grand uni?cation, proton decay can be a powerful

  13. Scale in object and process ontologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke; Bittner, Thomas

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale is of great importance to the analysis of real world phenomena, be they enduring objects or perduring processes. This paper presents a new perspective on the concept of scale by considering it within two complementary ...

  14. Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Amanda C. (Malibu, CA); Kirby, Kevin K. (Calabasas Hills, CA); Gregoire, Daniel J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

  15. Optimal determination of the vapor pressure critical exponent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Clifford Wayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1969), while scaling theory predicts about 0. 1 (Vicentini-Missoni et al. , 1969; Widom and Rowlinson, 1970). The object of this study was to determine the optimum value of 0 by means of a least squares fit of various nonanalytic vapor pressure... onal : cj ence Foundation, Grant ENG76-00692, is acknowl- edged. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page SCOPE. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNII'ICANCE INTRODUCTION Theory. Development of Vapor Pressure Equations PROCEDURE. Curve Fit Method (CFN). Numerical...

  16. FORTRAN algorithm for correcting normal resistivity logs for borehold diameter and mud resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J H

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FORTRAN algorithm described was developed for applying corrections to normal resistivity logs of any electrode spacing for the effects of drilling mud of known resistivity in boreholes of variable diameter. The corrections are based on Schlumberger departure curves that are applicable to normal logs made with a standard Schlumberger electric logging probe with an electrode diameter of 8.5 cm (3.35 in). The FORTRAN algorithm has been generalized to accommodate logs made with other probes with different electrode diameters. Two simplifying assumptions used by Schlumberger in developing the departure curves also apply to the algorithm: (1) bed thickness is assumed to be infinite (at least 10 times larger than the electrode spacing), and (2) invasion of drilling mud into the formation is assumed to be negligible.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  18. Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  19. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

  20. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  1. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; McKamey, C.G.; Tortorelli, P.F.; David, S.A.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium. 9 figs.

  2. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN); Tortorelli, Peter F. (Knoxville, TN); David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  3. Enhancement of thermal stability and water resistance in yttrium-doped GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Cimang, E-mail: cimang@adam.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hyun Lee, Choong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Nishimura, Tomonori; Nagashio, Kosuke; Toriumi, Akira [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST, CREST, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have systematically investigated the material and electrical properties of yttrium-doped GeO{sub 2} (Y-GeO{sub 2}) on Germanium (Ge). A significant improvement of both thermal stability and water resistance were demonstrated by Y-GeO{sub 2}/Ge stack, compared to that of pure GeO{sub 2}/Ge stack. The excellent electrical properties of Y-GeO{sub 2}/Ge stacks with low D{sub it} were presented as well as enhancement of dielectric constant in Y-GeO{sub 2} layer, which is beneficial for further equivalent oxide thickness scaling of Ge gate stack. The improvement of thermal stability and water resistance are discussed both in terms of the Gibbs free energy lowering and network modification of Y-GeO{sub 2}.

  4. Calculation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics and two-fluid tearing modes by example of reversed-field-pinch-like plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svidzinski, V. A.; Li, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm suitable for numerical solution of linear eigenmode problems in resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and two-fluid MHD models without prior approximations is presented. For these plasma models, sets of equations suitable for numerical solution are derived and the details of the algorithm of this solution are given. The algorithm is general and is suitable for solution of boundary (eigenmode) problems for different plasma configurations. It is most effective, however, in one-dimensional models since the grid size has to be sufficiently small in order to resolve the tearing layer together with the scale of the size of the plasma. The technique is applied for solving for tearing eigenmodes in reversed field pinch (RFP) -like plasma in plane geometry. Results of resistive MHD and two-fluid models are compared in this case, showing that the two-fluid effects on tearing modes in RFPs are sizable.

  5. The origins and limits of metalgraphene junction resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    with a drain bias of 1 mV. The source­drain resistance (Rtotal) is plotted in Fig. 1a as a function of back resistance (Rtotal) between the source and drain in a graphene transistor is regarded as the combination and drain contacts are made from palladium/gold (25/25 nm). We first performed measurements at 300 K

  6. Resistance Movements in Conflict Transformation and Social Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    as a form of reflection of people's power to establish social justice. Hence, a non-violent mass movement Pinochet in 1983; the overthrow of Ferdinand Marcos, the president of Philippines ,by people's power.1 Resistance Movement in State Transformation and Social Change The people's resistant movement of April 2006

  7. Resistance and spontaneous potential measurements over Heald Bank, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferebee, Thomas Wilson

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will be relatively hi gh. Nat1ve elements frequently occur as solid solutions. Impurities have the opposite effect on semiconductors and solid electrolytes, that 1s, they reduce resistivity (Parkhomenko, 1967). Rock Res i s ti vi ty Electrica'l resist1vity 1n...

  8. acid resistance test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acid resistance test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acid Resistance of Fly ash based...

  9. Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet Preweld and postweld current modifications on the resistance spot welding of galvanized steel sheet ·are analyzed using high phenomena through· out the weld process are discussed. In addition. the duration of current modifi· cation

  10. Disorder resistivity of solid neutron-star matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Jones

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower limits are found for the disorder resistivity of solid neutron-star matter in the neutron-drip region which is amorphous and heterogeneous in nuclear charge. This temperature-independent resistivity, large compared with that produced by phonon scattering, has direct consequences for theories of neutron-star magnetic field generation and evolution.

  11. Cancer Treatment Using Multiple Chemotheraputic Agents Subject to Drug Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Floyd B.

    Cancer Treatment Using Multiple Chemotheraputic Agents Subject to Drug Resistance J. J. Westman-7045 USA Abstract A compartment model for the evolution of cancer subject to multiple chemotherapeutic agents is presented. The formulation accounts for the heterogeneous nature of cancer and drug resistance

  12. Original article Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in dogs and cats were investigated in an unmatched case-control study MRSA cases and 92 controls with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infection. The association

  13. Salt Concentration Differences Alter Membrane Resistance in Reverse Electrodialysis Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt Concentration Differences Alter Membrane Resistance in Reverse Electrodialysis Stacks Geoffrey is usually measured by immersing the membrane in a salt solution at a single, fixed concentration. While salt resistance of the membranes separating different salt concentration solutions has implications for modeling

  14. PLANT RESISTANCE Impact of Diuraphis noxia and Rhopalosiphum padi (Hemiptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    PLANT RESISTANCE Impact of Diuraphis noxia and Rhopalosiphum padi (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on Primary wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphidi- dae) on susceptible and resistant wheat, Triticum aestivum L., near

  15. Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics Via Massive Resistive Electromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for cryogenic refrigeration plants needed to maintain the magnets' temperature near absolute zero, direct costsImproved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics Via Massive Resistive Electromagnets Robert D. Woolley for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum

  16. Attrition resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst support having improved attrition resistance and a catalyst produced therefrom. The catalyst support is produced by a method comprising the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina having no catalytic material added thereto with an acidic aqueous solution having an acidity level effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the calcined .gamma.-alumina.

  17. An aluminum resist substrate for microfabrication by LIGA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, James J.; Boehme, Dale R.; Hauck, Cheryl A. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Hunter, Luke L.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Hachman, John T.; Losey, Matthew W.; Skala, Dawn M.; Korellis, John S.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resist substrates used in the LIGA process must provide high initial bond strength between the substrate and resist, little degradation of the bond strength during x-ray exposure, acceptable undercut rates during development, and a surface enabling good electrodeposition of metals. Additionally, they should produce little fluorescence radiation and give small secondary doses in bright regions of the resist at the substrate interface. To develop a new substrate satisfying all these requirements, we have investigated secondary resist doses due to electrons and fluorescence, resist adhesion before exposure, loss of fine features during extended development, and the nucleation and adhesion of electrodeposits for various substrate materials. The result of these studies is a new anodized aluminum substrate and accompanying methods for resist bonding and electrodeposition. We demonstrate successful use of this substrate through all process steps and establish its capabilities via the fabrication of isolated resist features down to 6 {micro}m, feature aspect ratios up to 280 and electroformed nickel structures at heights of 190 to 1400 {micro}m. The minimum mask absorber thickness required for this new substrate ranges from 7 to 15 {micro}m depending on the resist thickness.

  18. atmospheric corrosion resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric corrosion resistance First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Corrosion resistance...

  19. affecting corrosion resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    affecting corrosion resistance First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Corrosion resistance of...

  20. Evaluation of Plasma Resistant Hollow Fiber Membranes For Artificial Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Evaluation of Plasma Resistant Hollow Fiber Membranes For Artificial Lungs HEIDE J. EASH,* HEATHER in artificial lungs (ox- ygenators) undergo plasma leakage (or wetting) in which blood plasma slowly fills2 gas permeance of a plasma resistant fiber imposes the greatest constraint upon artificial lung