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1

Pilot tests guide VOC control choice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site pilot testing determines proper operating conditions for catalysts of pollution control equipment at optimum performance levels while demonstrating their ability to reduce emissions, odors and opacity from stack gases in manufacturing processes. Examples are provided ofr the catalytic control of emissions from coffee roasting, carbon fiber manufacturing, and can coating. Portable oxidizer units are employed in the pilot testing.

Van Benschoten, D.M. [Johnson Matthey Environmental Products, Wayne, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Kentucky WRI Pilot Test Universal ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kentucky WRI Pilot Test ­ Universal ID Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Universal ID Pilot TestKentucky Pilot Test #12;Kentucky Pilot Test (Not to Scale) Sorter WIM USDOT Reader >>>> Park/Proceed Signs Mainline >>>> #12;Kentucky Pilot Test · Information is captured from the commercial

3

500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Americium/Curium Vitrification Pilot Tests - Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. These highly radioactive and valuable isotopes have been stored in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of this solution will allow the material to be more safely stored until it is transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation for use in research and medical applications. A previous paper described operation results from the Am-Cm Melter 2A pilot system, a full-scale non-radioactive pilot facility. This paper presents the results from continued testing in the Pilot Facility and also describes efforts taken to look at alternative vitrification process operations and flowsheets designed to address the problems observed during melter 2A pilot testing.

Marra, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baich, M.A.; Fellinger, A.P.; Hardy, B.J.; Herman, D.T.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, C.B.; Miller, D.H.; Snyder, T. K.; Stone, M.E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

J. Francfort (INEEL)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Results from a pilot cell test of cermet anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal was to develop long-lasting, energy-efficient anodes for Hall-Heroult cells used to produce Al metal. The anodes were made from a ceramic/metal composite consisting of NiO and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and a Cu/Ni metal phase. Thirteen cermet anodes were tested at Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL. All anodes corroded severely during the pilot test. Electrolyte components were found deep within the anodes. However, there were many deficiencies in the pilot cell test, mainly the failure to maintain optimal operating conditions. It is concluded that there is a variety of fabrication and operational considerations that need to be addressed carefully in any future testing. 118 figs, 16 tabs, 17 refs.(DLC)

Windisch, Jr, C F; Strachan, D M; Henager, Jr, C H; Greenwell, E N [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alcorn, T R [Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned gas field located near Rio Vista will be used for the Rosetta pilot tests. STACKED RESERVOIR

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE??s goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines, Incorporated Saturn engine rig. High pressure single-injector rig and modified engine rig tests demonstrated NOx less than 2 ppm and CO less than 10 ppm over a wide flame temperature operating regime with low combustion noise (<0.15% peak-to-peak). Minimum NOx for the optimized engine retrofit Full RCL® designs was less than 1 ppm with CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Durability testing of the substrate and catalyst material was successfully demonstrated at pressure and temperature showing long term stable performance of the catalytic reactor element. Stable performance of the reactor element was achieved when subjected to durability tests (>5000 hours) at simulated engine conditions (P=15 atm, Tin=400C/750F.). Cyclic tests simulating engine trips was also demonstrated for catalyst reliability. In addition to catalyst tests, substrate oxidation testing was also performed for downselected substrate candidates for over 25,000 hours. At the end of the program, an RCL® catalytic pilot system has been developed and demonstrated to produce NOx emissions of less than 3 ppm (corrected to 15% O2) for 100% and 50% load operation in a production engine operating on natural gas. In addition, a Full RCL® combustor has been designed and demonstrated less than 2 ppm NOx (with potential to achieve 1 ppm) in single injector and modified engine testing. The catalyst/substrate combination has been shown to be stable up to 5500 hrs in simulated engine conditions.

Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

106-AN grout pilot-scale test HGTP-93-0501-02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) at Hanford, Washington will process the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes into a cementitious waste form. This facility, which is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), mixes liquid waste with cementitious materials to produce a waste form that immobilizes hazardous constituents through chemical reactions and/or microencapsulation. Over 1,000,000 gal of Phosphate/Sulfate Waste were solidified in the first production campaign with this facility. The next tank scheduled for treatment is 106-AN. After conducting laboratory studies to select the grout formulation, part of the normal formulation verification process is to conduct tests using the 1/4-scale pilot facilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The major objectives of these pilot-scale tests were to determine if the proposed grout formulation could be processed in the pilot-scale equipment and to collect thermal information to help determine the best way to manage the grout hydration heat.

Bagaasen, L M

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

BENECKE MW

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.

Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25{degrees}C.

Brodsky, N.S. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

A PILOT HEATER TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per- meability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine andMechanical Properties of Granite, Stripa, Sweden. Terra Tek,TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE : Hans Carlsson .. , Division of

Carlsson, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin hydraulic cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Sixteen of these cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column (1/2 scale column). Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 3 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale IX system. The RF resin bed showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. The hydraulic and chemical performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins. The pilot-scale testing indicates that the RF resin is durable and should hold up to many hydraulic cycles in actual radioactive Cesium (Cs) separation.

Adamson, D.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

Wittreich, C.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

Follett, Jordan R.

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994) and a recent 200 NPL Agreement Change Control Form (Appendix A). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-BP-5 Operable Unit Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) Proposed Plan be developed for use in preparing an Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-BP-5 Operable Unit activities (e.g., development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the Interim Action ROD will specify the interim action(s) for groundwater contamination at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. The treatability test approach is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for each of the two contaminant plumes associated with the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are {sup 99}Tc and {sup 60}Co for underwater affected by past discharges to the 216-BY Cribs, and {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239/240}Pu, and Cs for groundwater affected by past discharges to the 216-B-5 Reverse Well. The purpose of the pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this testplan is to provide the data basis for preparing an IRM Proposed Plan. To achieve this objective, treatability testing must: Assess the performance of groundwater pumping with respect to the ability to extract a significant amount of the primary contaminant mass present in the two contaminant plumes.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydraulic Testing of Salado Formation Evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted in bedded evaporates of the Salado Formation from May 1992 through May 1995 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes from the nation's defense programs. The WIPP disposal horizon is located in the lower portion of the Permian Salado Formation. The hydraulic tests discussed in this report were performed in the WIPP underground facility by INTERA inc. (now Duke Engineering and Services, Inc.), Austin, Texas, following the Field Operations Plan and Addendum prepared by Saulnier (1988, 1991 ) under the technical direction of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Beauheim, Richard L.; Domski, Paul S.; Roberts, Randall M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

Chisholm, J.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

HIGH-TEMPERATURE HEAT EXCHANGER TESTING IN A PILOT-SCALE SLAGGING FURNACE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract, has designed, constructed, and operated a 3.0-million Btu/hr (3.2 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) slagging furnace system (SFS). Successful operation has demonstrated that the SFS meets design objectives and is well suited for testing very high-temperature heat exchanger concepts. Test results have shown that a high-temperature radiant air heater (RAH) panel designed and constructed by UTRC and used in the SFS can produce a 2000 F (1094 C) process air stream. To support the pilot-scale work, the EERC has also constructed laboratory- and bench-scale equipment which was used to determine the corrosion resistance of refractory and structural materials and develop methods to improve corrosion resistance. DOE projects that from 1995 to 2015, worldwide use of electricity will double to approach 20 trillion kilowatt hours. This growth comes during a time of concern over global warming, thought by many policy makers to be caused primarily by increases from coal-fired boilers in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions through the use of fossil fuels. Assuming limits on CO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers are imposed in the future, the most economical CO{sub 2} mitigation option may be efficiency improvements. Unless efficiency improvements are made in coal-fired power plants, utilities may be forced to turn to more expensive fuels or buy CO{sub 2} credits. One way to improve the efficiency of a coal-fired power plant is to use a combined cycle involving a typical steam cycle along with an indirectly fired turbine cycle using very high-temperature but low-pressure air as the working fluid. At the heart of an indirectly fired turbine combined-cycle power system are very high-temperature heat exchangers that can produce clean air at up to 2600 F (1427 C) and 250 psi (17 bar) to turn an aeroderivative turbine. The overall system design can be very similar to that of a typical pulverized coal-fired boiler system, except that ceramics and alloys are used to carry the very high-temperature air rather than steam. This design makes the combined-cycle system especially suitable as a boiler-repowering technology. With the use of a gas-fired duct heater, efficiencies of 55% can be achieved, leading to reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions of 40% as compared to today's coal-fired systems. On the basis of work completed to date, the high-temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) concept appears to offer a higher-efficiency technology option for coal-fired power generation systems than conventional pulverized coal firing. Concept analyses have demonstrated the ability to achieve program objectives for emissions (10% of New Source Performance Standards, i.e., 0.003 lb/MMBtu of particulate), efficiency (47%-55%), and cost of electricity (10%-25% below today's cost). Higher-efficiency technology options for new plants as well as repowering are important to the power generation industry in order to conserve valuable fossil fuel resources, reduce the quantity of pollutants (air and water) and solid wastes generated per MW, and reduce the cost of power production in a deregulated industry. Possibly more important than their potential application in a new high-temperature power system, the RAH panel and convective air heater tube bank are potential retrofit technology options for existing coal-fired boilers to improve plant efficiencies. Therefore, further development of these process air-based high-temperature heat exchangers and their potential for commercial application is directly applicable to the development of enabling technologies in support of the Vision 21 program objectives. The objective of the work documented in this report was to improve the performance of the UTRC high-temperature heat exchanger, demonstrate the fuel flexibility of the slagging combustor, and test methods for reducing corrosion of brick and castable refractory in such combustion environments. Specif

Michael E. Collings; Bruce A. Dockter; Douglas R. Hajicek; Ann K. Henderson; John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven; Greg F. Weber

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Test plan for the pilot cell test of inert anodes: Report on the June 1991 meeting at the Reynolds Metals Company facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Inert Electrodes Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes (OIP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (1) evaluate the anode material in a pilot cell facility, (2) investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anodes surface, and (3) develop sensors for monitoring various anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report discusses a test plan that has been developed for the pilot cell test of the inert anodes. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Windisch, C.F. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T. (Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Construction of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories has the responsibility for experimental activities at the WIPP and has emplaced several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The construction of the tests relied heavily on earlier excavations at the WIPP site to provide a basis for selecting excavation, surveying, and instrumentation methods, and achievable construction tolerances. The tests were constructed within close tolerances to provide consistent room dimensions and accurate placement of gages. This accuracy has contributed to the high quality of data generated which in turn has facilitated the comparison of test results to numerical predictions. The purpose of this report is to detail the construction activities of the TSI tests.

Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship D.A. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others] [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hanford Waste Vitrification Program process development: Melt testing subtask, pilot-scale ceramic melter experiment, run summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Waste Vitrification Program (HWVP) activities for FY 1985 have included engineering and pilot-scale melter experiments HWVP-11/HBCM-85-1 and HWVP-12/PSCM-22. Major objectives designated by HWVP fo these tests were to evaluate the processing characteristics of the current HWVP melter feed during actual melter operation and establish the product quality of HW-39 borosilicate glass. The current melter feed, defined during FY 85, consists of reference feed (HWVP-RF) and glass-forming chemicals added as frit.

Nakaoka, R.K.; Bates, S.O.; Elmore, M.R.; Goles, R.W.; Perez, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Westsik, J.H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

R. A. Christini

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Scaleup of Structured Packing from Distillation Pilot Plant Testing to Commercial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fractionator was performed, it was necessary to inventory the column with feed and, under total reflux conditions, draw off distillate or bottoms product until the proper composition profile was achieved. To investigate various design options, both... stream by a factor of five. In summary, from the customer's point of view, the application of structured packing to the main fractionator in the SFP fractionation train is a cOOluercial success. NEW DISTILLATION DEVELOPMENT PILOT PLANT Since...

Berven, O. J.; Ulowetz, M. A.

54

FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger WVDP facility, lending confidence to the tests results [1]. Since the inclusion or exclusion of a bubbler has significant design implications, the Project commissioned further tests to address this issue. In an effort to identify factors that might increase the glass production rate for projected WTP melter feeds, a subsequent series of tests was performed on the DM100 system. Several tests variables led to glass production rate increases to values significantly above the 400 kg/m2/d requirement. However, while small-scale melter tests are useful for screening relative effects, they tend to overestimate absolute glass production rates, particularly for un-bubbled tests. Consequently, when scale-up effects were taken into account, it was not clear that any of the variables investigated would conclusively meet the 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d requirement without bubbling. The present series of tests was therefore performed on the DM1200 one-third scale HLW pilot melter system to provide the required basis for a final decision on whether bubblers would be included in the HLW melter. The present tests employed the same AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing for consistency and comparability with the results from the earlier tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air water partitioning and water soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

Duignan, M.R.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Installation of UPR-100-N-17 Bioremediation Wells and Performance of Bioventing Pilot Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling and analytical requirements for in situ bioremediation pilot study for remediation of vadose zone petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

W. S. Thompson

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

60

Determining coal permeabilities through constant pressure production interference testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINING COAL PERMEABILITIES THROUGH CONSTANT PRESSURE PRODUCTION INTERFERENCE TESTING A Thesis by STEPHEN KURT SCHUBARTH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University fn Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DETERMINING COAL PERMEABILITIES THROUGH CONSTANT PRESSURE PRODUCTION INTERFERENCE TESTING A Thesis by STEPHEN KURT SCHUBARTH Approved as to style and content by: tephen A. Hold...

Schubarth, Stephen Kurt

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

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61

West Pearl Queen CO2 sequestration pilot test and modeling project 2006-2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Pearl Queen is a depleted oil reservoir that has produced approximately 250,000 bbl of oil since 1984. Production had slowed prior to CO{sub 2} injection, but no previous secondary or tertiary recovery methods had been applied. The initial project involved reservoir characterization and field response to injection of CO{sub 2}; the field experiment consisted of injection, soak, and venting. For fifty days (December 20, 2002, to February 11, 2003) 2090 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into the Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Queen Formation at the West Pearl Queen site. This technical report highlights the test results of the numerous research participants and technical areas from 2006-2008. This work included determination of lateral extents of the permeability units using outcrop observations, core results, and well logs. Pre- and post-injection 3D seismic data were acquired. To aid in interpreting seismic data, we performed numerical simulations of the effects of CO{sub 2} replacement of brine where the reservoir model was based upon correlation lengths established by the permeability studies. These numerical simulations are not intended to replicate field data, but to provide insight of the effects of CO{sub 2}.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Symons, Neill Phillip; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Byrer, Charles (National Energy Laboratory, Morgantown, WV); Elbring, Gregory Jay; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Laboratory, Morgantown, WV); Aldridge, David Franklin; Lorenz, John Clay

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work done under Phase I, the moisture tolerance testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The following coals were used in the test program: Western Bituminous (Utah), Eastern Bituminous (Pennsylvania), North Dakota Lignite, Sub-Bituminous (Montana), and Eastern Bituminous coal mixed with 20-percent Limestone. The coals were initially tested at the as-received moisture level and subsequently tested after surface moisture was added by water spray. Test results and recommendations for future research and development work are presented.

None

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Pilot-scale ESP (electrostatic precipitator) and hydro-sonic scrubber parametric tests for particulate, metals, and HC1 emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA's Office of Solid Waste is currently developing additional regulations to control emissions of particulate matter, toxic metals, and hydrochloric acid (HC1) from hazardous-waste incinerators. Emissions data were collected to support these regulations; testing was conducted on two pilot-scale air-pollution-control systems installed and operated in Tulsa, OK. The test program took place between March 28 and April 4, 1989. This report represents the results of the testing program and describes the processes involved as well as the testing and analytical methods used. The primary objective of the test program was to collect particulate and toxic metals removal-efficiency and emissions data for two pilot-scale air-pollution-control systems: hydro-sonic wet scrubber; and beltran two-stage electrostatic precipitator.

Garg, S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Novel Carbon Capture Solvent Begins Pilot-Scale Testing for Emissions...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

technology being tested integrates BASF's advanced aqueous amine-based solvent (OASE blue) and process technology with novel CO2-capture process and engineering innovations...

67

PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for pre-treatment of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile field laboratory incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine softening $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled Appendices

Burnett, David

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R. [eds.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Wicks, G.G. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy Efficiency Pilot Projects in Jaipur: Testing the Energy Conservation Building Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) in Jaipur, India is constructing two new buildings on its campus that allow it to test implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC), which Rajasthan made mandatory in 2011. PNNL has been working with MNIT to document progress on ECBC implementation in these buildings.

Evans, Meredydd; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Yu, Sha

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A New Seismic Data System for Determining Nuclear Test Yields At the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important capability in conducting underground nuclear tests is to be able to determine the nuclear test yield accurately within hours after a test. Due to a nuclear test moratorium, the seismic method that has been used in the past has not been exercised since a non-proliferation high explosive test in 1993. Since that time, the seismic recording system and the computing environment have been replaced with modern equipment. This report describes the actions that have been taken to preserve the capability for determining seismic yield, in the event that nuclear testing should resume. Specifically, this report describes actions taken to preserve seismic data, actions taken to modernize software, and actions taken to document procedures. It concludes with a summary of the current state of the data system and makes recommendations for maintaining this system in the future.

LEE, JONATHAN W.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

1. RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 1.1 Analysis of Step Rate Injection Tests in the O'Daniel Pilot Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1- 1. RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 1.1 Analysis of Step Rate Injection Tests in the O the reservoir rock. This pressure is referred as to formation parting pressure. Determination of formation demonstrates stress-sensitive behavior, one of the phenomena that influences the performance of waterflooding

Schechter, David S.

76

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Microbial field pilot study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed to utilize the High Intensity Infrared lamp located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the measurement of thermal conductivity of bulk refractory materials at elevated temperatures. The applicability of standardized test methods to determine the thermal conductivity of refractory materials at elevated temperatures is limited to small sample sizes (laser flash) or older test methods (hot wire, guarded hot plate), which have their own inherent problems. A new method, based on the principle of the laser flash method, but capable of evaluating test specimens on the order of 200 x 250 x 50 mm has been developed. Tests have been performed to validate the method and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Loveland, Erick R [ORNL; Prigmore, Andre L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

Slevinsky, B.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

Duignan, M.R.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

Experimental determination of foundation properties without shaker tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tests performed at the tilting pad bearing interface. The instrumentation used for this testing were ~ DYMAC M81- Velocity transducer. ~ PCB 086B20 ? Impedance hammer with the hard tip. ~ PCB 480D06 Power unit (power the hammer). 22 ~ HP Dual...

Sampathkumar, Varadharajan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ``Geostatistics Test Problem`` is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1.

Zimmerman, D.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, D.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Interim measure conceptual design for remediation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas : pilot test and remedy implementation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for the short-term, field-scale pilot testing and subsequent implementation of a non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Centralia, Kansas. The IM is recommended to mitigate both (1) localized carbon tetrachloride contamination in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and (2) present (and potentially future) carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the shallow groundwater beneath and in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated that groundwater at the Centralia site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at levels that exceed the Kansas Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. Groundwater sampling and analyses conducted by Argonne under a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) indicated that the carbon tetrachloride levels at several locations in the groundwater plume have increased since twice yearly monitoring of the site began in September 2005. The identified groundwater contamination currently poses no unacceptable health risks, in view of the absence of potential human receptors in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride contamination has also been identified at Centralia in subsurface soils at concentrations on the order of the Kansas Tier 2 RBSL of 200 {micro}g/kg in soil for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Soils contaminated at this level might pose some risk as a potential source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater. To mitigate the existing contaminant levels and decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil, the CCC/USDA recommends initial short-term, field-scale pilot testing of a remedial approach that employs in situ chemical reduction (ISCR), in the form of a commercially available material marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc., Freeport, Illinois (http://www.adventusgroup.com). If the pilot test is successful, it will be followed by a request for KDHE authorization of full implementation of the ISCR approach. In the recommended ISCR approach, the Adventus EHC{reg_sign} material--a proprietary mixture of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron--is introduced into the subsurface, where the components are released slowly into the formation. The compounds create highly reducing conditions in the saturated zone and the overlying vadose zone. These conditions foster chemical and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride. The anticipated effective lifetime of the EHC compounds following injection is 1-5 yr. Although ISCR is a relatively innovative remedial approach, the EHC technology has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater and has been employed at a carbon tetrachloride contamination site elsewhere in Kansas (Cargill Flour Mill and Elevator, Wellington, Kansas; KDHE Project Code C209670158), with the approval of the KDHE. At Centralia, the CCC/USDA recommends use of the ISCR approach initially in a short-term pilot test addressing the elevated carbon tetrachloride levels identified in one of three persistently highly contaminated areas ('hot-spot areas') in the groundwater plume. In this test, a three-dimensional grid pattern of direct-push injection points will be used to distribute the EHC material (in slurry or aqueous form) throughout the volume of the contaminated aquifer and (in selected locations) the vadose zone in the selected hot-spot area. Injection of the EHC material will be conducted by a licensed contractor, under the supervision of Adventus and Argonne technical personnel. The contractor will be identified upon acceptanc

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Determination of dispersivities from a natural-gradient dispersion test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and radioactive wastes. Contaminant hydrogeology is presently a focal point in the realm of hydrologic modeling. Generally, models are designed to represent simplified versions of reality and The style and format of this document was taken from the Journal... dispersivities, v ia a graphical approach, from a natural-gradient dispersion test in which artificial pollution was injected into an aquifer. The dispersion test was conducted by Sud icky et al. (1983) in order to characterize the dispersive properties...

Hoover, Caroline Marie

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Results of brine flow testing and disassembly of a crushed salt/bentonite block seal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Seal Performance Tests, Series C, a set of in situ experiments conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, are designed to evaluate the performance of various seal materials emplaced in large (0.9-m-diameter) boreholes. This report documents the results of fluid (brine) flow testing and water and clay content analyses performed on one emplaced seal comprised of 100% salt blocks and 50%/50% crushed salt/bentonite blocks and disassembled after nearly three years of brine injection testing. Results from the water content analyses of 212 samples taken from within this seal show uniform water content throughout the 50%/50% salt/bentonite blocks with saturations about 100%. Clay content analyses from the 100% salt endcaps of the seal show a background clay content of about 1% by weight uniformly distributed, with the exception of samples taken at the base of the seal at the borehole wall interface. These samples show clay contents up to 3% by weight, which suggests some bentonite may have migrated under pressure to that interface. Results of the brine-flow testing show that the permeability to brine for this seal was about 2 to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} darcy (2 to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} m{sup 2}).

Finley, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DEVELOPMENT OF A RAPID TEST TO DETERMINE MOISTURE SENSTIVITY OF HMA (SUPERPAVE) MIXTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exiting test methods to determine moisture sensitivity in hot mix asphalt are time consuming and inconsistent. This research focused on wheel tracking devices to develop a rapid test method to evaluate moisture sensitivity. The Asphalt Pavement...

Shiwakoti, Harihar

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Validation testing of the EERC pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed combustor using Salt Creek coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to provide a technical basis for assessing the economic and environmental feasibility of circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) technology, focusing on the effect of system configuration and coal properties on performance. Other underlying goals of the program were to (1) design and construct a CFBC test facility, thereby providing a test facility at an independent laboratory; (2) demonstrate that the test unit is capable of meeting the original design objectives; and (3) assess the ability of the unit to provide scalable data. The purpose of this interim report is to present data from validation testing to establish the scalability of data generated from this unit.

Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Moe, T.A.; Henderson, A.K.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Validation testing of the EERC pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed combustor using Salt Creek coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to provide a technical basis for assessing the economic and environmental feasibility of circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) technology, focusing on the effect of system configuration and coal properties on performance. Other underlying goals of the program were to (1) design and construct a CFBC test facility, thereby providing a test facility at an independent laboratory; (2) demonstrate that the test unit is capable of meeting the original design objectives; and (3) assess the ability of the unit to provide scalable data. The purpose of this interim report is to present data from validation testing to establish the scalability of data generated from this unit.

Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Moe, T.A.; Henderson, A.K.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tests of transfer reaction determinations of astrophysical S factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional nuclear transfer re- actions @2?5# to determine S factors for direct capture reac- PRC 590556-2813/99/59~2!/1149~5!/$15.00 s of astrophysical S factors Lui, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov, A. Sattarov, and L. Trache , College Station, Texas 77843 , S...!. @8# L. Trache, A. Azhari, H. L. Clark, C. A. Gagliardi, Y.-W. Lui, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov, R. E. Tribble, and F. Carstoiu, Phys. Rev. C 58, 2715 ~1998!. @9# R. Morlock, R. Kunz, A. Mayer, M. Jaeger, A. Muller, J. W. Hammer, P. Mohr, H. Oberhummer, G...

Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Azhari, A.; Clark, HL; Lui, YW; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Sattarov, A.; Trache, L.; Burjan, V.; Cejpek, J.; Kroha, V.; Piskor, S.; Vincour, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Pilot-scale testing of a fuel oil-explosives cofiring process for recovering energy from waste explosives: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army generates and stores a significant quantity of explosives and explosive-related materials that do not meet specifications for their primary use. Current explosives disposal processes do not recover any resources from these materials. The heat of combustion of these materials is typically 9 to 15 kJ/g (4000 to 6500 Btu/lb), which is 21 to 33% of the high heating value of No. 2 fuel oil. One secondary use for explosives is to cofire them with other fuels to recover their energy content. Bench-scale testing has shown that cofiring is feasible and safe within certain guidelines. To further evaluate cofiring, a proof-of-principle test was conducted in a 300-kW (10/sup 6/ Btu/h) combustion chamber. The test program was discontinued before completion because of failures largely unrelated to the explosives contained in the fuel. This report presents the results of the proof-of-principle tests, as well as design and operational changes that would eliminate problems encountered during the course of the test program. It is clearly feasible to cofire explosives and fuel oil. However, more data are needed before the process can be tested in a production boiler, furnace, or incinerator. 20 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bradshaw, W.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Standard test method for conducting drop-weight test to determine nil-ductility transition temperature of ferritic steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature of ferritic steels, 5/8 in. (15.9 mm) and thicker. 1.2 This test method may be used whenever the inquiry, contract, order, or specification states that the steels are subject to fracture toughness requirements as determined by the drop-weight test. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Data report on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Small-Scale Seal Performance Test, Series F grouting experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SSSPT-F was designed to evaluate sealing materials at WIPP. It demonstrated: (1) the ability to practically and consistently produce ultrafine cementitious grout at the grouting site, (2) successful, consistent, and efficient injection and permeation of the grout into fractured rock at the repository horizon, (3) ability of the grout to penetrate and seal microfractures, (4) procedures and equipment used to inject the grout. Also techniques to assess the effectiveness of the grout in reducing the gas transmissivity of the fractured rock were evaluated. These included gas-flow/tracer testing, post-grout coring, pre- and post-grout downhole televiewer logging, slab displacement measurements, and increased loading on jacks during grout injection. Pre- and post-grout diamond drill core was obtained for use in ongoing evaluations of grouting effectiveness, degradation, and compatibility. Diamond drill equipment invented for this test successfully prevented drill cuttings from plugging fractures in grout injection holes.

Ahrens, E.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dale, T.F.; Van Pelt, R.S. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

Rodman, J.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine who to admit (and, in some cases, to award merit-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine-prepared for these tests. Some are tests of aptitude in quantitative skills, verbal and analytical reasoning and/or writing ability (e.g., GRE, LSAT, GMAT), while others are tests of content knowledge (e.g., GRE Subject Tests

Hampton, Randy

103

Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

Tamhane, Ajit C.

104

Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Report Detailing Data Collection In Support Of Potential FY13 Pilot Scale Melter Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the ?reference ceramic? waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste forms indicated that the pour spout must be maintained above 1400{deg}C to avoid flow blockages due to crystallization. In-situ electron irradiations simulate radiolysis effects indicated hollandite undergoes a crystalline to amorphous transition after a radiation dose of 10{sup 13} Gy which corresponds to approximately 1000 years at anticipated doses (2?10{sup 10}-2?10{sup 11} Gy). Dual-beam ion irradiations employing light ion beam (such as 5 MeV alpha) and heavy ion beam (such as 100 keV Kr) studies indicate that reference ceramic waste forms are radiation tolerant to the ??particles and ?-particles, but are susceptible to a crystalline to amorphous transition under recoil nuclei effects. A path forward for refining the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere with the use of Ti/TiO2 buffers, and the addition of Cr to the transition metal additives to facilitate Cs-incorporation in the hollandite phase. In addition to melt processing, alternative fabrication routes are being considered including Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP).

Brinkman, K. S.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery--the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brochure describing the capabilities of NREL's Biochemical Pilot Plant. In this facility, researchers test ideas for creating high-value products from cellulosic biomass.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of spiral notch torsion test: A new Fracture mechanics approach to determination of KISCC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SNTT utilizes an extremely innovative concept of testing round-rod specimens having a V-grooved spiral notch line with a 45 a-pitch angle. The paper discusses the validity of SNTT in determining the fracture toughness, KIC, as established at ORNL. The paper also presents preliminary results of a collaborative research program of Monash University, NRL, ORNL and DSTO, for development and use of the novel technique of Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT) for determination of threshold stress intensity for stress corrosion cracking, i.e., KISCC. SNTT experiments have been carried out in chloride and air environments, using fatigue pre-cracked SNTT specimens of Al-alloy, 7075.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Singh, R. K. [Monash University, Australia; Bayles, Robert [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Knight, S. P. [Monash University, Australia; Hinton, B. R.W. [Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia; Muddle, B. C. [Monash University, Australia

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Determination of the length and compass orientation of hydraulic fractures by pulse testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S3HAIDVHi OIlflVHOAH i0 NOIlVIN3IHO SSVHWOO QNV HlBN31 3Wl iO NOIlVNIWH3l30 DETERMINATION OF THE LENGTH AND COMPASS ORIENTATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURES BY PULSE TESTING A Thesis by MADAN MOHAN MANOHAR Approved as to Style and Content by: Wi... liam J. Lee (Ch ai rman of Commi t tee ) Le a M. Je Member) Richard A. Morse (Member) D. Yon Gonten ( d of Department) December 1984 ABSTRACT Determination of the Length and Compass Drientat1on of Hydraulic Fractures by Pulse Testing...

Manohar, Madan Mohan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

Method for determining liquid recovery during a closed-chamber drill stem test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for determining a rate of production of well fluid produced during a closed chamber drill stem test of a subterranean formation. It comprises generating an acoustic signal capable of propagating down a well containing a drill stem test tubing; measuring a travel time of an acoustic signal reflected from an identifiable reference point in the drill stem test tubing; flowing the subterranean formation a predetermined length of time; measuring a travel time of an acoustic signal reflected from a liquid level in the drill stem test tubing during the flow interval; shutting in the flow of the subterranean formation; determining a volume of liquid produced during the flow interval based on the travel time of the reflected acoustic signal; determining a total amount of well fluid produced during the flow interval based on the volume of fluid produced and the surface pressure measurements during the flow period; and determining the rate of production from the subterranean formation during the flow period.

Finley, D.B.; Bass, A.O.

1992-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the final report for ASHRAE Research Project 1004-RP: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents the results of the development and application of the methodology to Case Study #2...

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Materials performance in coal gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of several materials testing projects which were conducted in operating coal gasification pilot plants in the United States. These projects were designed to test potential materials of construction for commercial plants under actual operating conditions. Pilot plants included in the overall test program included the Hygas, Conoco Coal, Synthane, Bi-Gas, Peatgas (Hygas operating with peat), Battelle, U-Gas, Westinghouse (now KRW), General Electric (Gegas), and Mountain Fuel Resources plants. Test results for a large variety of alloys are discussed and conclusions regarding applicability of these materials in coal gasification environments are presented. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Judkins, R.R.; Bradley, R.A.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

NREL Determines Better Testing Methods for Photovoltaic Module Durability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL discoveries will enable manufacturers to produce more robust photovoltaic modules. Over the past decade, some photovoltaic (PV) modules have experienced power losses because of the system voltage stress that modules experience in fielded arrays. This is partly because qualification tests and standards do not adequately evaluate the durability of modules that undergo the long-term effects of high voltage. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) tried various testing methods and stress levels to demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. The results of these accelerated tests, along with outdoor testing, were used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to more accurately evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. NREL was able to determine stress factors, levels, and methods for testing based on the stresses experienced by modules in the field. These results, in combination with those in the literature, suggest that constant stress with humidity and system voltage is more damaging than stress applied intermittently or with periods of recovery comprising hot and dry conditions or alternating bias in between. NREL has determined some module constructions to be extremely durable to PID. These findings will help the manufacturers of PV materials and components produce more durable products that better satisfy their customers. NREL determined that there is rapid degradation of some PV modules under system voltage stress and evaluated degradation rates in the field to develop more accurate accelerated testing methods. PV module manufacturers will be better able to choose robust materials and durable designs and guarantee sturdier, longer-lasting products. As PV modules become more durable, and thus more efficient over the long term, the risks and the cost of PV power will be reduced.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Standard test method for determination of technetium-99 in uranium hexafluoride by liquid scintillation counting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method is a quantitative method used to determine technetium-99 (99Tc) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) by liquid scintillation counting. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Standard Test Method for Determination of the Susceptibility of Metallic Materials to Hydrogen Gas Embrittlement (HGE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of the susceptibility of metallic materials to hydrogen embrittlement, when exposed to high pressure gaseous hydrogen. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art thermochemical conversion pilot plant includes several configurable, complementary unit operations for testing and developing various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. NREL engineers and scientists as well as clients can test new processes and feedstocks in a timely, cost-effective, and safe manner to obtain extensive performance data on processes or equipment.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PEATGAS pilot plant operating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology has been developing the PEATGAS process for the conversion of peat to synthetic fuels. A program has recently been completed for the pilot-plant-scale testing of the process. In this scheme, peat is gasified in a two-stage reactor system, which operates at temperatures up to 1750/sup 0/F and pressures up to 500 psig. The process can be controlled to maximize the production of either substitute natural gas (SNG) or liquid hydrocarbons. The technical feasibility of the process was demonstrated in a series of five gasification tests. Highlights of this operating program are presented in this paper.

Biljetina, R.; Punwani, D.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

PEATGAS pilot plant operating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology has been developing the PEATGAS process for the conversion of peat to synthetic fuels. A program has recently been completed for the pilot-plant-scale testing of the process. In this scheme, peat is gasified in a two-stage reactor system, which operates at temperatures up to 1750/sup 0/F and pressures up to 500 psig. The process can be controlled to maximize the production of either substitute natural gas (SNG) or liquid hydrocarbons. The technical feasibility of the process was demonstrated in a series of five gasification tests. Highlights of this operating program are presented in this paper.

Biljetina, R.; Punwani, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies. Annual status report, September 28, 1992--September 27, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the MOLIS project was to develop, design, and pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities as well as federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since going on-line on April 29, 1991, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, precollege and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from participating federal agencies. Six federal agencies are currently participating in MOLIS, including: Agency for International Development; Department of Commerce; Department of Energy; Department of Housing and Urban Development; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and National Science Foundation.

Rodman, J.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Model predictive control of a pilot-scale distillation column using a programmable automation controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model predictive control of a pilot-scale distillation column using a programmable automation). The controller is tested on a pilot-scale binary distillation column to track reference temperatures. A majorRIO) to control a pilot-scale binary distillation col- umn. Both the PI-controllers and the supervising online MPC

126

COURSE SYLLABUS SPORT / PRIVATE PILOT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COURSE SYLLABUS SPORT / PRIVATE PILOT #12;#12;Cessna eLearning Web Based Instructional Programs Cessna Sport / Private Pilot Training Course SYLLABUS King Schools, Inc. 3840 Calle Fortunada San Diego States of America. #12;Ver. 1.02 Cessna Sport / Private Pilot Syllabus Your Path to Becoming a Pilot

127

Renewable Energy Pilot Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In June 2010, the Louisiana Public Service Commission (LPSC) unanimously approved a Renewable Energy Pilot Program for the state. The final implementation plan was adopted in November 2010. The...

128

A Pilot Plant: The Fastest Path to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key Science Needs for a Technically Sound MFE Pilot Plant Design Integrated Plasma Material Interface Plant Design? (2) Integrated Plasma-Materials Interface · High heat and particle flux and fluence · What seconds in 2028. The MFE Program Needs to Move Faster Implications Building a Component Test Facility

129

Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are determined from (i) the cross-sectional shape of a core sample and (ii) Ps obtained by the HF test performed., 2010; Moe et al., 2012]. A new borehole, Hole C0009A, was drilled to 1603.7 mbsf (meters below seafloor stress magnitudes directly. In this test, a section of a borehole is isolated, and the borehole wall

130

Multivariate accelerated shelf-life testing: a novel approach for determining the shelf-life of foods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multivariate accelerated shelf-life testing: a novel approach for determining the shelf-lives, accelerated studies have to be conducted and a third parameter has to be estimated: the acceleration factor approach for determining the shelf-life of industrialised food products, the Multivariate Accelerated Shelf

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

131

Determination of Interfacial Mechanical Properties of Ceramic Composites by the Compression of Micro-pillar Test Specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel method to determine the fiber-matrix interfacial properties of ceramic matrix composites is proposed and evaluated; where micro- pillar samples containing inclined fiber/matrix interfaces were prepared from a SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites then compression-tested using the nano-indentation technique. This new test method employs a simple geometry and mitigates the uncertainties associated with complex stress state in the conventional single filament push-out method for the determination of interfacial properties. Based on the test results using samples with different interface orientations , the interfacial debond shear strength and the internal friction coefficient are explicitly determined and compared with values obtained by other test methods.

Shih, Chunghao [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic pilot plant Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate, Summary: conflicting. The Erie wastewater treatment plant sludge incinerator flue gas contains arsenic but pilot tests......

133

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

134

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- March 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

135

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- March 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

136

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- February 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

137

CX-000903: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

903: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000903: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Photovoltaic Pilot CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02242010 Location(s): Illinois...

138

Leveraging Resources for the Weatherization Innovation Pilot...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) - Webinar Transcript Leveraging Resources for the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) - Webinar Transcript This...

139

Leveraging Resources for Weatherization Innovation Pilot Projects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Weatherization Innovation Pilot Projects (WIPP) Presentation Leveraging Resources for Weatherization Innovation Pilot Projects (WIPP) Presentation As a WIPP agency, reporting...

140

Microbial enhanced waterflooding Mink Unit and Phoenix field pilots. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the feasibility of improving oil recovery and the economics of microbial enhanced waterflooding in mature oil wells in the United States, two field pilots have been conducted. Candidate fields were screened to determine whether they have any potential for a microbial system developed at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), and microbial compatibility tests were conducted in the laboratory to select the target field. A specific microbial formulation was selected that was compatible with the chosen reservoir environment and had been shown to recover oil after waterflooding in Berea sandstone and field core. The microbial formulation was designed to improve microscopic oil displacement efficiency by surfactant, gas and acid production from fermentation of molasses. A 20-acre pilot test was initiated in October 1986, and completed in December 1989. Results from this pilot demonstrated that microorganisms could be injected into an ongoing waterflood and that such injection could increase oil production by at least 13%. A larger test (520 acres) was completed in the same formation to evaluate the feasibility of commercial application of the technology. This field pilot was injected with microorganisms and molasses from a centralized injection station in June 1990. Although microorganisms were injected only once per site, nutrient injection continued throughout the project life. All 19 injection wells were treated, and oil production was monitored from the 47 production wells. Injection pressures and volumes were monitored throughout the project. No operational problems were encountered. At the end of May 1993, oil production was improved by 19.6 %. Results from both projects are presented and the potential for microbial-enhanced waterflooding technology is evaluated.

Bryant, R.S.; Steep, A.K.; Bertus, K.M.; Burchfield, T.E. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Dennis, M. [Microbial Systems Corp., OK (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

MINNESOTA ROAD FEE TEST MILEAGE BASED USER FEE RATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Center Oregon Road User Fee Pilot Program Other Interest: Nevada, Texas, Ohio, Idaho, etc. May Cellular Tower Data Warehouse May 24, 2012 6 #12;Determination of Mileage Fees · MBUF Rate StructureMINNESOTA ROAD FEE TEST MILEAGE BASED USER FEE RATE STRUCTURE CONCEPT 23rd Annual Transportation

Minnesota, University of

142

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies. Annual status report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

Rodman, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

ISOE Pilot Project Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide show introduces the Pilot Project to increase the value of Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)#11;data by increasing participation and amount of data reported from the U.S., reduce the hurdles and effort in participating, streamline the process of reporting and reduce time delay, and eliminate data entry and redundant effort.

D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site - September...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site - September 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site - September 2004 September 2004 Security and Emergency Management Pilot Integrated Performance Tests at the...

148

Development and testing of a standard procedure for determining the viscous properties of crosslinked fracture fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the shear rate at the bob by use of the Kr ieger correction. During the develop- ment of the testing pr ocedur e, it was discover ed that the gel experienced shear degradation when subjected to an incr easing shear rate. Therefore, the shear rate should... always be decreased when measuring these fluids. The applicability of the testing procedure was verified by test- ing gel systems supplied by four service companies with gel concentrations of 0. 48$ and 0. 72$ HPG (40 and 60 Ib/1000 gal, respectively...

Worlow, David Wayne

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Determination of accuracy of measurements by NREL`s Scanning Hartmann Optical Test instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL`s Scanning Hartmann Optical Test (SHOT) instrument is routinely used to characterize the surface of candidate dish concentration elements for solar thermal applications. An approach was devised to quantify the accuracy of these measurements. Excellent reproducibility was exhibited and high confidence established. The SHOT instrument was designed to allow the surface figure of large optical test articles to be accurately specified. Such test articles are nominally parabolic with an f/D ratio (in which f=focal length and D=aperture diameter) in the range of 0.5--1.0. Recent modifications of SHOT have extended the characterization range out to about f/D=3.0. A series of experiments was designed to investigate and quantify the uncertainties associated with optical characterization performed by SHOT. This approach involved making a series of measurements with an arbitrary test article positioned at a number of locations transverse to the optical axis of SHOT. 3 refs.

Jorgensen, G.; Wendelin, T.; Carasso, M.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Determination of accuracy of measurements by NREL's Scanning Hartmann Optical Test instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's Scanning Hartmann Optical Test (SHOT) instrument is routinely used to characterize the surface of candidate dish concentration elements for solar thermal applications. An approach was devised to quantify the accuracy of these measurements. Excellent reproducibility was exhibited and high confidence established. The SHOT instrument was designed to allow the surface figure of large optical test articles to be accurately specified. Such test articles are nominally parabolic with an f/D ratio (in which f=focal length and D=aperture diameter) in the range of 0.5--1.0. Recent modifications of SHOT have extended the characterization range out to about f/D=3.0. A series of experiments was designed to investigate and quantify the uncertainties associated with optical characterization performed by SHOT. This approach involved making a series of measurements with an arbitrary test article positioned at a number of locations transverse to the optical axis of SHOT. 3 refs.

Jorgensen, G.; Wendelin, T.; Carasso, M.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Some evidence on determinants of fuel economy as a function of driving cycle and test type  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical methods are used with 107 vehicles whose fuel economy was presented and reported for five test types in a single publication by Consumers Union (CU) for 1986--1988 vehicles. Standard loglinear statistical formulations (i.e., multiplicative models of interactions) are used with data from this and supplementary sources to develop coefficients estimating the percent fuel economy gain per percent change in engine/vehicle design characteristic. The coefficients are developed for the five different test conditions evaluated by CU and are compared with each other on the basis of attributes of the tests. The insights of engineering models are used to develop expectations regarding the shift in size of coefficients as driving cycles change. In both the engineering models and the statistical model, the effect of weight is estimated to be higher in urban driving than in highway driving. For two test categories -- field tests and dynamometer tests -- the benefits of weight reduction are statistically estimated to be greatest in urban driving conditions. The effect on idle fuel flow rate of designing vehicles to hold performance roughly constant by maintaining power per kilogram and/or displacement per kilogram is examined, and its implication for the size of the weight effect is simply approximated from Sovran`s 1983 engineering model results. The fuel-economy-decreasing effect of the desire for performance is estimated to be somewhat larger in the statistical analysis than in the NAS study, when engine technology is held constant.

Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PILOT: design and capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed design for PILOT is a general-purpose, wide-field 1 degree 2.4m, f/10 Ritchey-Chretien telescope, with fast tip-tilt guiding, for use 0.5-25 microns. The design allows both wide-field and diffraction-limited use at these wavelengths. The expected overall image quality, including median seeing, is 0.28-0.3" FWHM from 0.8-2.4 microns. Point source sensitivities are estimated.

W. Saunders; P. R. Gillingham; A. J. McGrath; J. W. V. Storey; J. S. Lawrence

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

ISO test method to determine sustained-load-cracking resistance of aluminium cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak as well as rupture types of failures related to sustained-load-cracking (SLC) have been observed in high-pressure gas cylinders fabricated from certain aluminium alloy. The stable crack growth mechanism observed primarily in the cylinder neck and shoulder area have been identified as the SLC mechanism occurring at room temperature without any environmental effect. The International Organization for standardization (ISO) Sub-Committee 3, Working Group 16 has developed a test method to measure the SLC resistance using fracture mechanics specimens along with an acceptance criterion for aluminium cylinders. The technical rationale for the proposed test method and the physical significance of the acceptance criterion to the cylinder performance in terms of critical stress-crack size relationship is presented. Application of the developed test method for characterizing new aluminium alloy for manufacturing cylinders is demonstrated. SLC characteristics of several aluminium cylinders as well as on-board cylinders for natural gas vehicles assessed by the authors are discussed.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Standard test method for the radiochemical determination of americium-241 in soil by alpha spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method covers the determination of americium241 in soil by means of chemical separations and alpha spectrometry. It is designed to analyze up to ten grams of soil or other sample matrices that contain up to 30 mg of combined rare earths. This method allows the determination of americium241 concentrations from ambient levels to applicable standards. The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precaution statements, see Section 10.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Status of the PEATGAS Pilot Plant Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minnesota peat has been successfully processed in a 2 ton/h, continuous, fully integrated pilot plant since April 1981 at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Energy Development Center in Chicago. The reactor system is based on the PEATGAS process for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) developed by IGT. Three tests have been conducted in the pilot plant at a 500-psig pressure and gasification temperatures up to 1650/sup 0/F. Peat conversions consistently averaged over 90% at the upper temperature levels. These tests were conducted using a slurry feeding system to inject peat, which contained about 10% moisture, into the gasifier. The facility is currently being modified to accept dry peat feed using a two-stage lockhopper system. When this modification is completed, testing will begin with peat containing 30% to 50% moisture. Results of the successful test series using slurry feed and the progress made on the pilot plant lockhopper modification are summarized.

Biljetina, R.; Punwani, D.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hematological and hemorheological Determinants of the Six-Minute Walk Test Performance in Children with Sickle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Sickle Cell Anemia Xavier Waltz1,2,3 , Marc Romana1,3 , Marie-Dominique Hardy-Dessources1,3 , Yann-established submaximal exercise reflecting the functional status and the clinical severity of sickle cell patients-minute walk test performance in children with sickle cell anemia. Hematological and hemorheological parameters

Boyer, Edmond

159

Microbial field pilot study. [Quarterly report], July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Determination of soil properties for sandy soils and road base at Riverside Campus using laboratory testing and numerical simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Chair of Committee, Jean-Louis Briaud Committee Members, Charles Aubeny Julian Kang Head of Department, John Niedzwecki Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Determination of Soil Properties of Sandy... Soils and Road Base at Riverside Campus Using Laboratory Testing and Numerical Simulation. (May 2010) Deeyvid Oscar Saez Barrios, B.En., Technological University of Panama Chair of Advisory Committee: Jean-Louis Briaud This study evaluated...

Saez Barrios, Deeyvid O.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

A FEASIBILITY AND OPTIMIZATION STUDY TO DETERMINE COOLING TIME AND BURNUP OF ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FUELS USING A NONDESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method for ATR applications the technique was tested using one-isotope, multi-isotope and fuel simulated sources. Burnup calibrations were perfomed using convoluted and deconvoluted data. The calibrations results showed burnup prediction by this method improves using deconvolution. The final stage of the deconvolution method development was to perform an irradiation experiment in order to create a surrogate fuel source to test the deconvolution method using experimental data. A conceptual design of the fuel scan system is path forward using the rugged LaBr3 detector in an above the water configuration and deconvolution algorithms.

Jorge Navarro

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Standard test method for determination of susceptibility of metals to embrittlement in hydrogen containing environments at high pressure, high temperature, or both  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard test method for determination of susceptibility of metals to embrittlement in hydrogen containing environments at high pressure, high temperature, or both

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Standard test method for determining plane-strain crack-arrest fracture toughness, kIa, of ferritic steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method employs a side-grooved, crack-line-wedge-loaded specimen to obtain a rapid run-arrest segment of flat-tensile separation with a nearly straight crack front. This test method provides a static analysis determination of the stress intensity factor at a short time after crack arrest. The estimate is denoted Ka. When certain size requirements are met, the test result provides an estimate, termed KIa, of the plane-strain crack-arrest toughness of the material. 1.2 The specimen size requirements, discussed later, provide for in-plane dimensions large enough to allow the specimen to be modeled by linear elastic analysis. For conditions of plane-strain, a minimum specimen thickness is also required. Both requirements depend upon the crack arrest toughness and the yield strength of the material. A range of specimen sizes may therefore be needed, as specified in this test method. 1.3 If the specimen does not exhibit rapid crack propagation and arrest, Ka cannot be determined. 1.4 The values stat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Standard test method for determination of impurities in nuclear grade uranium compounds by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of 67 elements in uranium dioxide samples and nuclear grade uranium compounds and solutions without matrix separation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3) if these compounds are treated and converted to the same uranium concentration solution. 1.2 The elements boron, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and iron can be determined using different techniques. The analyst's instrumentation will determine which procedure is chosen for the analysis. 1.3 The test method for technetium-99 is given in Annex A1. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

Horn, Kevin M.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Summary of Tests to Determine Effectiveness of Gelatin Strike on SS{ampersand}C Dissolver Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solutions from the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS&C) material are sufficiently different from previous solutions processed via the F-Canyon Purex process that the effectiveness of individual process steps needed to be ascertained. In this study, the effectiveness of gelatin strike was tested under a variety of conditions. Specifically, several concentrations of silica, fluoride, nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), and aluminium nitrate nonahydrate (ANN) were studied. The disengagement times of surrogate and plant SS&C dissolver solutions from plant solvent also were measured. The results of the tests indicate that gelatin strike does not coagulate the silica at the low concentration of silica ({tilde 30} ppm) expected in the SS&C dissolver solutions because the silicon is complexed with fluoride ions (e.g., SiF{sub 6}{sup -2}). The silicon fluoride complex is expected to remain with the aqueous phase during solvent extraction. The disengagement times of the dissolver solutions from the plant solvent were not affected by the presence of low concentrations of silica and no third phase formation was observed in the disengagement phase with the low silica concentrations. Tests of surrogate SS&C dissolver solutions with higher concentration of silica (less than 150 ppm) did show that gelatin strike followed by centrifugation resulted in good phase disengagement of the surrogate SS{ampersand}C dissolver solution from the plant dissolver solution. At the higher silica concentrations, there is not sufficient fluoride to complex with the silica, and the silica must be entrained by the gelatin and removed from the dissolver solution prior to solvent extraction.

Murray, A.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Karraker, D.G.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August...

172

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant October 2, 2002 Independent Oversight...

173

CX-003202: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass and Algae Residues via Integrated Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydroconversion CX(s)...

174

CX-011785: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-011785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02192014 Location(s): Colorado...

175

CX-011274: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-011274: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09262013 Location(s): North Dakota...

176

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Determining the dissolution rates of actinide glasses: A time and temperature Product Consistency Test study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification has been identified as one potential option for the e materials such as Americium (Am), Curium (Cm), Neptunium (Np), and Plutonium (Pu). A process is being developed at the Savannah River Site to safely vitrify all of the highly radioactive Am/Cm material and a portion of the fissile (Pu) actinide materials stored on site. Vitrification of the Am/Cm will allow the material to be transported and easily stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Am/Cm glass has been specifically designed to be (1) highly durable in aqueous environments and (2) selectively attacked by nitric acid to allow recovery of the valuable Am and Cm isotopes. A similar glass composition will allow for safe storage of surplus plutonium. This paper will address the composition, relative durability, and dissolution rate characteristics of the actinide glass, Loeffler Target, that will be used in the Americium/Curium Vitrification Project at Westinghouse Savannah River Company near Aiken, South Carolina. The first part discusses the tests performed on the Loeffler Target Glass concerning instantaneous dissolution rates. The second part presents information concerning pseudo-activation energy for the one week glass dissolution process.

Daniel, W.E.; Best, D.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor RDAS and LPCIS Replacement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The replacement of the ATR Control Complex's obsolete computer based Reactor Data Acquisition System (RDAS) and its safety-related Lobe Power Calculation and Indication System (LPCIS) software application is vitally important to ensure the ATR remains available to support this national mission. The RDAS supports safe operation of the reactor by providing 'real-time' plant status information (indications and alarms) for use by the reactor operators via the Console Display System (CDS). The RDAS is a computer support system that acquires analog and digital information from various reactor and reactor support systems. The RDAS information is used to display quadrant and lobe powers via a display interface more user friendly than that provided by the recorders and the Control Room upright panels. RDAS provides input to the Nuclear Engineering ATR Surveillance Data System (ASUDAS) for fuel burn-up analysis and the production of cycle data for experiment sponsors and the generation of the Core Safety Assurance Package (CSAP). RDAS also archives and provides for retrieval of historical plant data which may be used for event reconstruction, data analysis, training and safety analysis. The RDAS, LPCIS and ASUDAS need to be replaced with state-of-the-art technology in order to eliminate problems of aged computer systems, and difficulty in obtaining software upgrades, spare parts, and technical support. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project design did not lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification. The negative major modification determination is driven by the fact that the project requires a one-for-one equivalent replacement of existing systems that protects and maintains functional and operational requirements as credited in the safety basis.

David E. Korns

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Production of Biodiesel from Jatropha Oil (Jatropha curcas) in Pilot Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AbstractIn this research, among the chemical properties, free fatty acid value of jatropha oil was determined to be 22.6%, 5.23% and 8.8 % respectively. Total, free and combined glycerol percent of raw jatropha oil were 8.27 %, 0.58 % and 7.69 % respectively. Yield of biodiesel from jatropha oil at optimal sodium hydroxide catalyst concentration 1%, reaction temperature 65C, reaction time one hour and molar ratio of methanol to oil 6:1 was 92 % from lab scale. Yield of biodiesel from jatropha oil at optimal potassium hydroxide catalyst concentration 1%, reaction temperature room temperature, reaction time 5 hours and molar ratio of ethanol to oil 8:1 was 90% from the lab scale. Biodiesel was also produced from pilot plant at optimum transesterification process condition as stated above. The yield of biodiesel (methyl ester) and ethyl ester were 92 % and 90% on the basis of refined jatropha oil in the pilot plant scale. The capacity of biodiesel pilot plant is 30 gal / day. The fuel properties of biodiesel, namely cetane index, flash point, pour point, kinematic viscosity, specific gravity, color, copper strip corrosion, acid value, water and sediment and distillation at 90 % recovery, were found to be within the limits of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications for biodiesel and diesel fuel. The fuel consumption of the engine which used biodiesel produced from free fatty acid content 5.23 % in raw jatropha oil is more than the fuel consumption of the engine which used biodiesel produced from free fatty acid content 1 % in refined raw jatropha oil. Keywordsrenewable energy, biodiesel, transesterification, methyl ester, ethyl ester, pilot plant. I.

Tint Tint Kywe; Mya Mya Oo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Key Geomechanics Issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geomechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical and hydrological properties of rock salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory compliance determinations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) stand as testament to the widely held conclusion that salt provides excellent isolation properties. The WIPP saga began in the 1950s when the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommended a salt vault as a promising solution to the national problem of nuclear waste disposal. For over 20 years, the Scientific basis for the NAS recommendation has been fortified by Sandia National Laboratories through a series of large scale field tests and laboratory investigations of salt properties. These scientific investigations helped develop a comprehensive understanding of salt's 4 reformational behavior over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Sophisticated constitutive modeling, validated through underground testing, provides the computational ability to model long-term behavior of repository configurations. In concert with advancement of the mechanical models, fluid flow measurements showed not only that the evaporite lithology was essentially impermeable but that the WIPP setting was hydrologically inactive. Favorable mechanical properties ensure isolation of materials placed in a salt geological setting. Key areas of the geomechanics investigations leading to the certification of WIPP are in situ experiments, laboratory tests, and shaft seal design.

HANSEN,FRANCIS D.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through discussion of five case studies (test homes), this project evaluates strategies to elevate the performance of existing homes to a level commensurate with best-in-class implementation of high-performance new construction homes. The test homes featured in this research activity participated in Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) Pilot Program sponsored by the electric and gas utility National Grid in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Building enclosure retrofit strategies are evaluated for impact on durability and indoor air quality in addition to energy performance. Evaluation of strategies is structured around the critical control functions of water, airflow, vapor flow, and thermal control. The aim of the research project is to develop guidance that could serve as a foundation for wider adoption of high performance, 'deep' retrofit work. The project will identify risk factors endemic to advanced retrofit in the context of the general building type, configuration and vintage encountered in the National Grid DER Pilot. Results for the test homes are based on observation and performance testing of recently completed projects. Additional observation would be needed to fully gauge long-term energy performance, durability, and occupant comfort.

Neuhauser, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Coalbed-methane pilots - timing, design, and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four distinct sequential phases form a recommended process for coalbed-methane (CBM)-prospect assessment: initial screening reconnaissance, pilot testing, and final appraisal. Stepping through these four phases provides a program of progressively ramping work and cost, while creating a series of discrete decision points at which analysis of results and risks can be assessed. While discussing each of these phases in some degree, this paper focuses on the third, the critically important pilot-testing phase. This paper contains roughly 30 specific recommendations and the fundamental rationale behind each recommendation to help ensure that a CBM pilot will fulfill its primary objectives of (1) demonstrating whether the subject coal reservoir will desorb and produce consequential gas and (2) gathering the data critical to evaluate and risk the prospect at the next-often most critical-decision point.

Roadifer, R.D.; Moore, T.R.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Portland General Electric Co. Pilot Evaluation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capability to support the utility's control of residential customers' central electric space heating systems DIRECT LOAD CONTROL PILOT FOR ELECTRIC SPACE HEAT #12;Direct Load Control Pilot for Electric Space Heat) an evaluation report of its direct load control pilot for electric space heat, called "Direct Load control Pilot

186

Portland General Electric Company Pilot Evaluation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential electric water heating systems, and estimate the feasibility of operating a full residential load, 2004 DIRECT LOAD CONTROL PILOT FOR ELECTRIC WATER HEAT #12;1 PGE Direct Load Control Pilot for Electric direct load control pilot for electric water heat, called "Direct Load Control Pilot for Electric Water

187

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory International Workshop MFE Roadmapping for the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 10 September 2011 #12;Outline 2 · Pilot plant ­ mission, motivation, and description. · Role of pilot plants on the Roadmap to Demo. Pilot Plant

189

Turbine fuels from tar sands bitumen and heavy oil. Volume 1. Phase 3. Pilot plant testing, final design, and economics. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 March 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pilot-plant-scale demonstration of an upgrading/refining scheme to convert bitumen or heavy crude oil into high yields of specification-quality aviation turbine fuel was performed. An atmospheric residue from San Ardo (California) crude was converted under hydrovisbreaking conditions to synthetic crude for further refining. Naphtha cuts from the straight run and synthetic crude were combined, catalytically hydrotreated, then hydrocracked. Products from these operations were combined to produce two prototype specification fuels (JP-4 and JP-8) as well as two heavier, variable-quality fuels. An engineering design (Volume II) was developed for a 50,000 BPSD grass-roots refinery, from the pilot-plant operations. Capital investment and operating costs were estimated, and fuel manufacturing costs projected. Conclusions and recommendations for further work are included.

Talbot, A.F.; Carson, T.C.; Magill, L.G.; Swesey, J.R.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

An evaluation of the management system verification pilot at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Management System (CMS), currently under development at Hanford, was used as the ''test program'' for pilot testing the value added aspects of the Chemical Manufacturers Association's (CMA) Management Systems Verification (MSV) process. The MSV process, which was developed by CMA's member chemical companies specifically as a tool to assist in the continuous improvement of environment, safety and health (ESH) performance, represents a commercial sector ''best practice'' for evaluating ESH management systems. The primary purpose of Hanford's MSV Pilot was to evaluate the applicability and utility of the MSV process in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment. However, because the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is the framework for ESH management at Hanford and at all DOE sites, the pilot specifically considered the MSV process in the context of a possible future adjunct to Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) efforts at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex. The pilot involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with four separate panels of individuals with functional responsibilities related to the CMS including the Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL), Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and FDH's major subcontractors (MSCS). A semi-structured interview process was employed by the team of three ''verifiers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels regarding the development, integration and effectiveness of management systems necessary to ensure the sustainability of the CMS effort. An ''MSV Pilot Effectiveness Survey'' also was completed by each panel participant immediately following the interview.

BRIGGS, C.R.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Score: 2013 Pilot Overview Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview provides an overview of the 2013 pilot for the commercial building energy asset score...

192

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training Session Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training Session overview of the June 18, 2013 pilot training session for the...

193

VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

Enneking, J. C.

194

Fireaxe: The DHS Secure Design Competition Pilot [Extended Abstract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discusses the methods at- tempted and lessons learned, as well as future directions and competition for discovering, learning, and testing secure design principles. Fireaxe is the pilot competition that attempts.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Secu- rity Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

Vorobeychik, Eugene

195

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively sequester CO2 in saline aquifers.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

Design considerations for a steam-injection pilot with in-situ foaming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the necessary aspects of the planning, operation, evaluation, environmental impact and cost to implement a field pilot of steam injection with in-situ foaming. The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI) is planning to implement such a pilot in Kern County, California. The cost of the pilot will be shared by the US Department of Energy and an oil company. Some important aspects of drilling and completion programs and their specifications, permits from regulatory bodies, and downhole tools to improve steam stimulation are discussed. The essential surface facilities which include water treatment plant, steam generator, demulsifier and dehydrator are considered. The necessary laboratory research in support of the pilot has been recommended. The formation evaluation and reservoir engineering effort for the pilot has been divided into three phases: reservoir definition, reservoir monitoring and post-pilot study. Appropriate techniques applicable to each phase of the test have been discussed. The environmental impact regulations as related to the steam injection process have been considered. In particular, the environmental problems associated with the burning of crude oil and desulfurization of flue gas have been discussed. Other environmental considerations such as solid and liquid waste disposal, health and safety are also discussed. An estimate of the cost of this field test is presented. Three scenarii (for pilots with high, medium, and low investment potentials, respectively) are presented. Since this report was prepared, a specific site for the supri pilot has been chosen. Appendices G and H present the details on this site.

Siddiqui, M.H.; Sanyal, S.K.; Horn, A.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests; Literature Review and Site Selection, Nov. 1997 (Revised Feb. 1998)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the preliminary report contains the literature review and site selection recommendations for ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004 "Determining Long-term Performance of Cool Storage Systems From Short-term Tests"....

Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A prototype with a 5-meter span, built in January 2013. Afterwards, the mechanical strength of the construction was determined by destructive testing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the construction was determined by destructive testing. With this smart and simple solution for connecting, connects the indoors to the outdoors and adds a modern, luxurious feel. Moreover, good double glazing has

Langendoen, Koen

199

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition. Addendum: Volume 7, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming: Case history of the in situ combustion pilot operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) is a federally owned oil field that has been in operation since 1922 and has produced more than 15 million barrels of oil since full production began in 1976. The Shannon sandstone is the shallowest and most productive of nine producing formations at NPR-3. Since only 5% of the Shannon`s estimated 144 million bbl of original oil in place (OOIP) was estimated to be recoverable by primary means, studies were undertaken in 1978 to determine the most suitable enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method which would merit a pilot test and could ultimately lead to a fieldwide application.

Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.; Williams, C.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as glass waste forms by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 2C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07302012 Location(s): Oregon...

203

CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine 1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06132013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s):...

204

Decision support for the general aviation pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ATC procedures, aircraft operating procedures and limitations, and aircraft performance to infer current flight operating mode without direct pilot intervention or input. A flight mode interpreter (FMI) enables automatic display selection, pilot...

Alcorn, W. P.; Lee, K. A.; Ward, D. T.; Trang, J. A.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Crump, J. W.; Branham, P. A.; Woo, D. L. Y.; Ren-Jye Yu; Robbins, A. C.; Painter, John H.; Kelly, W. E. III

1997-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants The Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Program sponsored three cycles of Biomedical Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants Cycle 2 The Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Program sponsored three cycles of Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants, which were directed at improving human health project. Funding decisions for the second cycle of Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants were announced

Church, George M.

206

Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants The Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Program sponsored three cycles of Biomedical Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants Cycle 1 The Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Program sponsored three cycles of Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants, which were directed at improving human health project. Funding decisions for the first cycle of Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants were announced

Church, George M.

207

Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants The Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Program sponsored three cycles of Biomedical Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants Cycle 3 The Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Program sponsored three cycles of Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants, which were directed at improving human health project. Funding decisions for the third cycle of Biomedical Collaborative Pilot Grants were announced

Church, George M.

208

In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas. Special study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to resuspend the MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles so that they can be removed from the tank, and to suspend the MST so it can contact strontium and actinides. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5, B3, and B1). Previous testing showed that three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank, and to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST and CST that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 84% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (2) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST, CST, and simulated sludge that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 82% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (3) A contact time of 6-12 hours is needed for strontium sorption by MST in a jet mixed tank with cooling coils, which is consistent with bench-scale testing and actinide removal process (ARP) operation.

Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

210

Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination: Office of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-383 Pilot Power Group Inc Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX)...

211

Groundwater monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GPM) being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Regulatory and Environmental Programs (REP) section of the Environment, Safety and Health department (ES H) is responsible for conducting environmental monitoring at the WIPP. Groundwater monitoring is one of the ongoing environmental activities currently taking place. The REP section includes water quality sampling and water level monitoring. The WIPP Project is a research and develop facility designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-generated waste in a geologic repository. Water quality sampling for physical, chemical, and radiological parameters has been an ongoing activity at the WIPP site for the past six years, and will continue through the life of the project. The water quality of a well is sampled while the well is continuously pumped. Serial samples of the pumped water are collected and tested for pH, Eh, temperature, specific gravity, specific conductivity, alkalinity, chlorides, divalent cations, ferrous iron, and total iron. Stabilization of serial sampling parameters determined if a representative sample is being obtained, Representative samples are sent to contract laboratories and analyzed for general chemistry, major cations and anions, and radionuclides. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Kehrman, R.; Broberg, K.; Tatro, G.; Richardson, R.; Dasczcyszak, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Standard test method for the determination of uranium by ignition and the oxygen to uranium (O/U) atomic ratio of nuclear grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.2 This test method does not include provisions for preventing criticality accidents or requirements for health and safety. Observance of this test method does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all international, national, or federal, state and local regulations pertaining to possessing, shipping, processing, or using source or special nuclear material. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 This test method also is applicable to UO3 and U3O8 powder.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Basic data report for drillholes at the H-11 complex (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drillholes H-11b1, H-11b2, and H-11b3 were drilled from August to December 1983 for site characterization and hydrologic studies of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Upper Permian Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. In October 1984, the three wells were subjected to a series of pumping tests designed to develop the wells, provide information on hydraulic communication between the wells, provide hydraulic properties information, and to obtain water samples for quality of water measurements. Based on these tests, it was determined that this location would provide an excellent pad to conduct a convergent-flow non-sorbing tracer test in the Culebra dolomite. In 1988, a fourth hole (H-11b4) was drilled at this complex to provide a tracer-injection hole for the H-11 convergent-flow tracer test and to provide an additional point at which the hydraulic response of the Culebra H-11 multipad pumping test could be monitored. A suite of geophysical logs was run on the drillholes and was used to identify different lithologies and aided in interpretation of the hydraulic tests. 4 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Mercer, J.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Snyder, R.P. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.

Johnston, J.R.; Perry, G.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Progress Report, 6-99, Revised 12-99  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the Spring 1999 progress report on ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents an update concerning the work that has been accomplished since the June...

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Long Island Smart Metering Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) Smart Meter Pilots provided invaluable information and experience for future deployments of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), including the deployment planned as part of LIPA??s Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000220). LIPA will incorporate lessons learned from this pilot in future deployments, including lessons relating to equipment performance specifications and testing, as well as equipment deployment and tracking issues. LIPA ultimately deployed three AMI technologies instead of the two that were originally contemplated. This enabled LIPA to evaluate multiple systems in field conditions with a relatively small number of meter installations. LIPA experienced a number of equipment and software issues that it did not anticipate, including issues relating to equipment integration, ability to upgrade firmware and software ??over the air? (as opposed to physically interacting with every meter), and logistical challenges associated with tracking inventory and upgrade status of deployed meters. In addition to evaluating the technology, LIPA also piloted new Time-of-Use (TOU) rates to assess customer acceptance of time-differentiated pricing and to evaluate whether customers would respond by adjusting their activities from peak to non-peak periods. LIPA developed a marketing program to educate customers who received AMI in the pilot areas and to seek voluntary participation in TOU pricing. LIPA also guaranteed participating customers that, for their initial year on the rates, their electricity costs under the TOU rate would not exceed the amount they would have paid under the flat rates they would otherwise enjoy. 62 residential customers chose to participate in the TOU rates, and every one of them saved money during the first year. 61 of them also elected to stay on the TOU rate ?? without the cost guarantee ?? at the end of that year. The customer who chose not to continue on the rate was also the one who achieved the greatest savings. However, after the first year, the customer in question installed equipment that would have made TOU rates a more costly option than the residential flat rate. During the second year, all but one customer saved money. That customer increased usage during peak hours, and as a result saw an increase in annual costs (as compared to the flat rate) of $24.17. The results were less clear for commercial customers, which LIPA attributes to rate design issues that it will take into account for future deployments. LIPA views this pilot as a complete success. Not only is LIPA better prepared for a larger deployment of AMI, but it is confident that residential customers will accept AMI and TOU rates and shift their energy consumption from peak to non-peak periods in response to pricing. On a larger scale, this will benefit LIPA and all of its customers by potentially lowering peak demand when energy costs are highest.

None

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Weiland, Mark A.

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A flight test system for the determination of the stability and control derivatives of a general aviation aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ensuing motion of the aircraft diminishes after an initial disturbance. If an aircraft does not posses static stability, a disturbance from the equilibrium, or trim condition will grow exponentially. Dynamic instability implies either an aperiodic... in order to de termine the performance capabilities of an aircraft. Control authority refers to the de sired output as compared to the required input. The purpose of this research was to design, fabricate, test, and integrate a flight test system which...

Oehl, David Christopher

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

WAT ENVIRON RESEARCH (in press, final version may have small changes) ODOR AND VOC TREATMENT BY BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: PILOT SCALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Plant (HTP) in Los Angeles have been testing pilot- scale biotrickling filters and biofilters odorous waste gases. The waste gas from the Headworks at HTP (100,000 cfm) contains 10-50 ppm H2S

223

High Temperature Expansion Due to Compression Test for the Determination of a Cladding Material Failure Criterion under RIA Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is mainly dedicated to the development of an out-of-pile test reproducing the thermo-mechanical loading conditions encountered during the first stage of a Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) transient, dominated by Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). In particular, the strain-controlled clad loading under high strain rate associated with temperatures up to 600 deg. C expected during the PCMI phase is simulated by an Expansion Due to Compression (EDC) test achievable at high temperature. The use of appropriate materials for the inner pellet made it possible to achieve the tests from 20 deg. C up to 900 deg. C. The interpretation of the test data is supported by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) including parameters tuned using an inverse method coupling FEA and tests results. A deformation model, identified upon the PROMETRA (Transient Mechanical Properties) experimental database and describing the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Cold-Worked Stress Relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding alloys under typical RIA loading conditions, is exploited. The combined analysis of experimental results and finite element simulations provides a deeper understanding of the deformation mode (near pure hoop tension) that arises during the tests. The failure mode appears to be representative of that obtained on tubes during the PCMI stage of RIA experiments. An appropriate device is currently developed in order to reach a bi-axiality of the loading path closer to that expected during the PCMI stage (between plane-strain and equal-biaxial tension). (authors)

Le Saux, M.; Poussard, C.; Averty, X.; Sainte Catherine, C.; Carassou, S. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Besson, J. [Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris, CNRS UMR 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

CX-004063: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10012010 Location(s): Wilsonville,...

225

CX-004064: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10012010 Location(s): Holbrook,...

226

GI Self-Supply Pilot Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPA TRANSMISSION SERVICES Transmission Wind Integration Systems Team GENERATION IMBALANCE SELF SUPPLY PILOT PROJECT OVERVIEW VERSION: 0.1 UPDATED: 7292009 giself-supplypilotov...

227

Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the 2009 Legislative Session, the Florida Legislature established the Pilot Program to address economic development and the creation of energy efficient land use patterns. The Energy Economic...

228

Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

December, 2014 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Conduct of Maintenance Recovery Plan The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the U.S. Department...

229

Enforcement Documents - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies associated with the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter Non-Destructive Assay System Refurbishment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

230

Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

December 2014 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan for Operating Diesel Equipment with Available Underground Airflows. The Office of Nuclear Safety and...

231

Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the feasibility study showed that several factors can greatly affect, both positively and negatively, the "per kg" cost of hydrogen. After a September 15, 2005, meeting to evaluate the advisability of funding Phase II of the project DOE concurred with BEPC that Phase I results did warrant a "go" recommendation to proceed with Phase II activities. The hydrogen production system was built by Hydrogenics and consisted of several main components: hydrogen production system, gas control panel, hydrogen storage assembly and hydrogen-fueling dispenser The hydrogen production system utilizes a bipolar alkaline electrolyzer nominally capable of producing 30 Nm3/h (2.7 kg/h). The hydrogen is compressed to 6000 psi and delivered to an on-site three-bank cascading storage assembly with 80 kg of storage capacity. Vehicle fueling is made possible through a Hydrogenics-provided gas control panel and dispenser able to fuel vehicles to 5000 psi. A key component of this project was the development of a dynamic scheduling system to control the wind energy's variable output to the electrolyzer cell stacks. The dynamic scheduling system received an output signal from the wind farm, processed this signal based on the operational mode, and dispatched the appropriate signal to the electrolyzer cell stacks. For the study BEPC chose to utilize output from the Wilton wind farm located in central ND. Site design was performed from May 2006 through August 2006. Site construction activities were from August to November 2006 which involved earthwork, infrastructure installation, and concrete slab construction. From April - October 2007, the system components were installed and connected. Beginning in November 2007, the system was operated in a start-up/shakedown mode. Because of numerous issues, the start-up/shakedown period essentially lasted until the end of January 2008, at which time a site acceptance test was performed. Official system operation began on February 14, 2008, and continued through the end of December 2008. Several issues continued to prevent consistent operation, resulting in operation o

Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

232

A stochastic Monte Carlo computer simulation of the drop-weight test for the determination of nil-ductility transition temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the surface of the specimen blank can produce heat affected zones that are tougher than the base metal, which could lead to artificially low predictions of NDIT [17[. In such m O zS O e O 0 LU 4 CR ki ?E O Z -I of 0 tiE I- O z 1 V gm 0) c e H N... aside, the manner in which test temperatures are chosen may contribute most to the variance and bias inherent in the drO-wweigh test method (ASTM E 208) for determining the nil-ductility transition temperature, NDTI; for ferritic steels...

Lambert, Michael Andrew

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

CX-011276: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-011276: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09262013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s):...

234

CX-011273: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-011273: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09262013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s):...

235

CX-011786: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-011786: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02192014 Location(s): Texas Offices(s):...

236

CX-008162: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-008162: Categorical Exclusion Determination Redmond-Pilot Butte Number 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 04132012 Location(s): Oregon...

237

CX-006263: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-006263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Eddy-Redmond and Redmond-Pilot Butte Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07072011 Location(s): Wasco County,...

238

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Determining the effect of seawater on the interfacial shear strength of fiber reinforced epoxies using the single fiber fragmentation test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fiber reinforced polymer composite materials. The single fiber fragmentation test (SFFT) and Kelly-Tyson shear lag analysis were used to evaluate the effect of seawater on the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composite...

Pratt, Barbara Ann

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

NONE

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Operating Experience of the 20-MW AFBC Pilot Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recycle ratio. Tests at the Pilot Plant have shown that increasing the recycle ratio above 2.5 to 3.0 will only provide minimal improvement in carbon burnup. Potential improvement in combustion efficiency will come from increasing the size... of the ceramic material. By extending the ceramic beyond the end of the bend will further protect the feed line. Another method tested to prevent feed line erosion was the use of two 45 0 blind laterals. The blind leg of the lateral allows feed material...

Stephens, E. A. Jr.

242

Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots September 19, 2012 Presenter: Mike Hillman, Program Manager, Office of Health, Safety...

243

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year in 2013 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year in 2013 December 24,...

244

Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal...

245

Clean Energy Works Portland Pilot Process Evaluation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Works Portland Pilot Process Evaluation Clean Energy Works Portland Pilot Process Evaluation This is a document from Research Into Action Inc., posted to the website of the...

246

2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program Due December 10 November 18, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments)...

247

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update The webinar was held on April 16, 2014, to share the findings...

248

Algenol Biofuels Inc., Integrated Pilot-Scale Biorefinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Pilot- Scale Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae Algenol Biofuels Inc., together with its partners, will construct an integrated pilot-scale...

249

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energys FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Peat-Gasification Pilot-Plant Program. Final report, April 9, 1980-March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities included the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. After shakedown of the new feed preparation equipment (drying, screening, and crushing) was successfully completed, the first integrated pilot plant test was conducted in April 1981 to provide solids flow data and operating experience with the new PEATGAS gasifier configuration. Three gasification tests were subsequently conducted using the existing slurry feed system. The lockhopper feed system, capable of providing a continuous, measured flow of 1 to 4 tons of dry feed at pressures up to 500 psig, was then successfully integrated with the gasifier. Two gasification tests were conducted, expanding the data to more economical operating conditions. The operation of the PEATGAS pilot plant has confirmed that peat is an excellent raw material for SNG production. Peat conversions over 90% were consistently achieved at moderate gasification temperatures and at sinter-free conditions. A large data base was established for Minnesota peat at pressure 1.0. The technical feasibility of the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated. However, an economic assessment of the peat gasification process indicates that the cost of the peat feedstock delivered to a plant site has a significant effect on the cost of the product SNG. 28 figures, 36 tables.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evaluation of nickel flash smelting through piloting and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive study of the nickel flash smelting process has been undertaken. It is aimed at the optimization of the burner design to improve the smelting performance and to increase the throughput of the rebuilt furnace. A design-based mathematical model was developed to simulate the operation of the four burners and the reaction shaft of the flash furnace at Western Mining Corporation Ltd.`s Kalgoorlie Nickel Smelter. A modified single burner version of the model was validated against data obtained from the pilot plant at the Pyrometallurgical Research Centre (PRC) of the Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.`s Toyo Smelter. The approach taken involved experimental measurements of key process parameters in the pilot plant and detailed numerical simulation of the fluid flow, heat transfer, and combustion in the entire burner-shaft complex. Several burner designs have been tested experimentally at the pilot plant and theoretically through computer simulation. The main outcome of the study was the development of an experimentally validated mathematical model of the flash smelter providing a new powerful design tool. The insight gained about the process from the application of this tool led to the design of a more efficient nickel flash smelting process.

Varnas, S.R.; Koh, P.T.L. [CSIRO, Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Div. of Minerals; Kemori, N. [Sumitomo Metal Mining Co., Ehime (Japan)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE-TRACK VEHICLE AUTONOMOUS PILOT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE-TRACK VEHICLE AUTONOMOUS PILOT Dana Vrajitoru Intelligent Systems algorithms to an autonomous pilot designed for motorized single-track vehicles (motorcycles). The pilot contribute efficiently to configuring the autonomous pilot. Key Words Genetic algorithms, multi

Vrajitoru, Dana

255

Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project has demonstrated the compatibility of biodiesel technology and economics on a local scale. The project has been committed to making homegrown biodiesel a viable form of community economic development. The project has benefited by reducing risks by building the facility gradually and avoiding large initial outlays of money for facilities and technologies. A primary advantage of this type of community-scale biodiesel production is that it allows for a relatively independent, local solution to fuel production. Successfully using locally sourced feedstocks and putting the fuel into local use emphasizes the feasibility of different business models under the biodiesel tent and that there is more than just a one size fits all template for successful biodiesel production.

Doon, Ben; Quintana, Dan

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Better Plants Water Pilot- Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is expanding the Better Buildings Challenge to help partners demonstrate successful approaches to saving water and decrease their utility bills. The commercial and industrial sectors account for more than 25 percent of the withdrawals from public water supplies and many organizations in these sectors may have savings opportunities of 20 to 40%. The efficient use of water resources results in lower operating costs, a more reliable water supply, and improved water quality. Additionally, because energy is required to transport and treat water, saving water also saves energy. Through this pilot, DOE will work with a small, diverse group of Better Buildings Challenge Partners to expand their resource management strategies to include water in addition to energy, set water savings goals, track progress and showcase solutions.

257

Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir zones and 3 flow-interior/caprock intervals were performed during drilling and immediately following reaching the final borehole drilling depth (i.e., 4,110 ft). In addition, six of the 12 basalt interflow zones were selected for detailed hydrochemical characterization. Results from the detailed hydrologic test characterization program provided the primary information on basalt interflow zone transmissivity/injectivity, and caprock permeability characteristics.

B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Porosity, permeability, and petroleum: Determining the three P's by integrating mud logs with wireline logs and drill-stem tests in central and western Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mud logging has long been a part of the complete formation evaluation picture in most oil and gas producing provinces of the US. In Kansas, however, mud logging has often been omitted from this picture. Typically, a well in central and western Kansas is drill-stem tested and then logged. Although this technique is often successful, there are also times when drill-stem tests and logs conflict with one another. Mud-logging techniques, especially hydrocarbon ratio analysis, could provide this necessary third aspect of formation evaluation to be integrated with drill-stem tests and wireline logs. Generally, the most important characteristics of a reservoir are porosity, permeability, and petroleum saturation. All three styles of formation evaluation (mud logs, wireline logs, and drill-stem tests) can determine most of these characteristics either qualitatively or quantitatively. The mud log, through hydrocarbon ratio analysis in conjunction with the drilling time log, can contribute at least ballpark estimates on porosity, permeability, and type of reservoir fluid. Wireline logs and drill-stem tests provide the more direct or quantitative measure of these formation characteristics. The central/western Kansas wells chosen for this study show that no single formation evaluation method is more important than the others. Each method must be weighed or calibrated to each specific study area as to its particular track record in that area. The difficulty in answering the question, Should I set pipe therefore can be minimized by integrating the mud log, the wireline log, and drill-stem test information.

Deboer, D.A. (Oil Production Systems, Inc., Cushing, OK (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

NREL Test-to-Failure Protocol (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation describes the test-to-failure protocol that was developed and piloted at NREL, stressing PV modules with multiple applications of damp heat (with bias) and thermal cycling until they fail.

Hacke, P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

262

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cleveland EnergySaver Pilot Program (From Pilot to Permanent Program)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides an overview of the Cleveland EnergySaver Pilot Program aimed at reducing barriers to widespread adoption of residential energy efficient retrofits.

264

PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF PILOT PERFORMANCE-BASED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................................................................5 History of the Energy Commission's PBI Program and Its DevelopmentCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF PILOT PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM STAFFREPORT SEPTEMBER 2007 CEC-300-2007-011 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

265

Journey to Leadership Certificate Program (Pilot)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Learning and Workforce Development is pleased to announce a pilot training program for DOE entry-level professionals. The program orientation is scheduled for June 4, 2014.For Entry...

266

Murray City Power- Net Metering Pilot Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Under a pilot program, Murray City Power offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV), wind-electric or hydroelectric systems with a maximum capacity of 10...

267

CX-012473: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercialization of Iron-Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping for Power Prod-Lab & Pilot-Scale Testing CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 41870 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

268

CX-009319: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Study and Pilot Test of Preformed Particle Gel Conformance Control Combined with Surfactant Treatment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

269

CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury ConcentrationsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced burner test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POWER Vol. 21, No. 1, JanuaryFebruary 2005 Summary: each test sequence. IV. Blowout Phenomenology A. Piloted Burner In this section, we describe... attachment to nonattachment at...

271

Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 2030% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R.; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study Julian Deissa; accepted 6 February 2004 Abstract A set of peat column experiments was used to determine the transport-bearing stream 250 m from the site. Three pairs of peat columns were extracted from the rifle range for analysis

Walter, M.Todd

273

Pilot plant used to develop load and pressure controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Viewed from the perspective of the power-generation mixture in Japan, nuclear power plants will continue to be operated to meet the base load. Meanwhile, integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants will be required to serve as thermal power plants to cover the middle load, as is the case with conventional thermal power plants. In terms of operational performance, therefore, IGCC power plants will need to have a capability of following a wide range of load demand at high speed. For this purpose, a load and pressure controller was developed and tested during the operational research on a 200 tons/day entrained flow IGCC pilot plant at the Nakoso Power Station by the Engineering Research Association for IGCC Power Systems (IGC Association). This article reports on the development of the load and pressure controller and the results of the control test carried out to check the load follow capability of the pilot plant, while touching upon the simulation study also being conducted.

Nagata, Kazue; Yamada, Toshihiro; Hiza, Tomoyuki

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Arizona Public Service - Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen has promise to be the fuel of the future. Its use as a chemical reagent and as a rocket propellant has grown to over eight million metric tons per year in the United States. Although use of hydrogen is abundant, it has not been used extensively as a transportation fuel. To assess the viability of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the viability of producing hydrogen using off-peak electric energy, Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (PNW) and its electric utility subsidiary, Arizona Public Service (APS) designed, constructed, and operates a hydrogen and compressed natural gas fueling stationthe APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant. This report summarizes the design of the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and presents lessons learned from its design and construction. Electric Transportation Applications prepared this report under contract to the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

James E. Francfort

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

Standard Test Method for Determination of Uranium, Oxygen to Uranium (O/U), and Oxygen to Metal (O/M) in Sintered Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinia-Uranium Dioxide Pellets by Atmospheric Equilibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard Test Method for Determination of Uranium, Oxygen to Uranium (O/U), and Oxygen to Metal (O/M) in Sintered Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinia-Uranium Dioxide Pellets by Atmospheric Equilibration

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 1, October 1, 1980-August 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 200 peat gasification tests were conducted in laboratory-scale and PDU-scale (process development unit) equipment since 1976. A kinetic model for peat gasification was developed from laboratory and PDU data. The encouraging results of these tests and the model projections show that on the basis of its chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for commercial synthetic natural gas (SNG) production. To further advance peat gasification technology, DOE and GRI initiated a pilot-plant-scale program using an existing coal gasification pilot plant. This facility was adapted to peat processing and can convert 50 tons of peat to about 0.5 million standard cubic feet of SNG daily. The pilot plant is described in Appendix A. Only three major pieces of equipment - a peat dryer, a grinder, and a screener - were required to prepare the pilot plant for peat processing. This modification phase was completed in the winter of 1980-1981. After a number of drying, grinding, and screening tests, peat was first fed to the gasifier in April 1981, initiating the pilot plant studies to develop the PEATGAS process. Since that time, the gasification of Minnesota peat by the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated in a series of gasification tests. This report covers the work done between October 1, 1980, and August 31, 1981, under DOE Contract No. AC01-80ET14688.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Providing proof: Desalination technology tested for efficiency, economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;is new technology was tested in a pilot project in Laredo. #31;e pilot AdVE project, which opened in August #30;#29;#28;#29;, was funded by the city of Laredo and Terrabon, Inc., a bioenergy technology transfer company. Because the population...

Bentz, Laura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

researchers conducted bench-scale experiments to verify the effectiveness of electrofiltration, few studies plant. Presedimentation basin water was used as the influent with a turbidity ranging from 12 to 37 NTU to be more effective for removal of smaller particles (

Li, Ying

282

A PILOT HEATER TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i sprickigt berg, University of Lulea. KSB Technical reportDivision of Rock Mechanics Universit,y. ,gf LuleaLulea, SW~aen TWO-WEEK LOAN COpy August 1978 iLAWRENCE ,

Carlsson, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement ||More EmphasisofEMABTankDepartment

284

FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department of Energy56Executive212-2012 June;'

285

Microsoft Word - Bldg 100 Pilot Test.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcGand Surface Water Sampling ANNUALH

286

Magnetic Fusion Pilot Plant Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FNSF = Fusion Nuclear Science Facility CTF = Component Test Facility · Powerplantlike maintenance. · Targeted ultimate capabilities: ­ Fusion nuclear S&T development, component testing · Steady applicable to power plant · Demonstrate methods for fast replacement of in-vessel components ­ Net

287

The Acquisition of English Derivational Suffixes: A Pilot Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Children, ages six through twelve, were tested to determine when they acquired certain derivational suffixes as rule governed elements of their grammars. The suffixes tested were -y and -able. "Rule governed" was defined ...

Harris, Herbert R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RECOVERY ACT AND SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ACTDraft DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico

290

EECBG Success Story: Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates the Way in Alabama EECBG Success Story: Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates the Way in Alabama September 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis...

291

HUD PowerSaver Pilot Loan Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently announced the creation of a pilot loan program for home energy improvements. The PowerSaver loan program is a new, energy-focused variant of the Title I Property Improvement Loan Insurance Program (Title I Program) and is planned for introduction in early 2011. The PowerSaver pilot will provide lender insurance for secured and unsecured loans up to $25,000 to single family homeowners. These loans will specifically target residential energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. HUD estimates the two-year pilot will fund approximately 24,000 loans worth up to $300 million; the program is not capped. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), HUD's mortgage insurance unit, will provide up to $25 million in grants as incentives to participating lenders. FHA is seeking lenders in communities with existing programs for promoting residential energy upgrades.

Zimring, Mark; Hoffman, Ian

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE has mandated in DOE Order 5400.1 that its operations will be conducted in an environmentally safe manner. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will comply with DOE Order 5400.1 and will conduct its operations in a manner that ensures the safety of the environment and the public. This document outlines how the WIPP will protect and preserve groundwater within and surrounding the WIPP facility. Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. The WIPP groundwater surveillance program is designed to determine statistically if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will be determined and appropriate corrective action initiated.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

EIS-0026: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management prepared this EIS for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

294

Competitive Coevolution versus Objective Fitness for an Autonomous Motorcycle Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Competitive Coevolution versus Objective Fitness for an Autonomous Motorcycle Pilot Dana Vrajitoru algorithm to configure a multi-agent probabilistic pilot for single track vehicles (STV) like motorcycles is directed toward piloting aircrafts [7], and cars [9]. Our approach targets motorcycles which have not yet

Vrajitoru, Dana

295

Microbial field pilot study: Quarterly progress report, March 1, 1989--June 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Experiments are underway to determine the influence of permeability, pore throat size, and porosity on bacterial movement within porous media. The penetration rates of two motile Escherichia coli strains, as well as two nonmotile strains, are being compared for their ability to penetrate cores consisting of uniformity packed glass beads. To establish if gas production has an effect at differing pore throat sizes, each strain will be compared either under a condition which supports gas production for both wild type strains only (i.e. fermentation), or one which does not result in gas production from any strain (i.e. nitrate-reducing conditions). Research progress on mathematical modeling, core flooding and field experiments is also briefly discussed. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

296

Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

Magrini, Kim

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

Magrini, Kim

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

46th Street Pilot Street Lighting Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Street to 48th Street) as standard high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting comparison corridor #12;The over time #12;Initial Lighting Comparison #12;Lighting Project Location #12;Street Light Layout 3046th Street Pilot Street Lighting Project A Joint Venture: Hennepin County & City of Minneapolis

Minnesota, University of

300

New Summer Pilot Course 2013 Biodiversity Informatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to advanced under- graduates and graduate students interested in biodiversity, conservation biology, dataNew Summer Pilot Course ­ 2013 Biodiversity Informatics (BIO 494 / BIO 598 ­ 2 Credits) June 17 Franz, David Patterson, Ed Gilbert Contact nico.franz@asu.edu for additional information Biodiversity

Franz, Nico M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Decision Support System for Fighter Pilots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parts of the electronic warfare domain. A brief description of this domain is given. It contains is detected the pilot may choose to deploy electronic countermeasures to avoid the impact of the missile, and the availability of countermeasures. Radar systems, guidance of missiles, and electronic countermeasures are all

302

Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 2, September 1-November 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant; and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities include the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. Drying, grinding, and screening equipment for peat was installed and operated during the previous reporting periods. Three gasification tests (PT-1 through PT-3) had also been conducted using the toluene slurry feed system. Installation of the lockhopper dry feed system was completed on schedule. Shakedown of the system has begun. Operation of the modified 400-ton storage and transport system was successfully demonstrated with peat containing 10% moisture. Preparations for Test PT-4 are currently underway. Data analyses for Test PT-2 were completed and are presented. The low-pressure Plexiglas unit was modified to investigate the use of a downflowing pneumatic feed system for the dryer bed. Initial testing was begun.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Evaluation of Type I cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, November 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was focused on evaluating hydrated cement sorbents in the U. C. pilot spray dryer. The main goal of this work was to determine the hydration conditions resulting in reactive hydrated cement sorbents. Hydration of cement was achieved by stirring or by grinding in a ball mill at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. Also, the effects of several additives were studied. Additives investigated include calcium chloride, natural diatomite, calcined diatomaceous earth, and fumed silica. The performance of these sorbents was compared with conventional slaked lime. Further, the specific surface area and pore volume of the dried SDA sorbents were measured and compared to reactivity. Bench-scale tests were performed to obtain a more detailed picture of the development of the aforementioned physical properties as a function of hydration time.

Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

On-Site Pilot Study - Removal of Uranium, Radium-226 and Arsenic from Impacted Leachate by Reverse Osmosis - 13155  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conestoga-Rovers and Associates (CRA-LTD) performed an on-site pilot study at the Welcome Waste Management Facility in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada, to evaluate the effectiveness of a unique leachate treatment process for the removal of radioactive contaminants from leachate impacted by low-level radioactive waste. Results from the study also provided the parameters needed for the design of the CRA-LTD full scale leachate treatment process design. The final effluent water quality discharged from the process to meet the local surface water discharge criteria. A statistical software package was utilized to obtain the analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the results from design of experiment applied to determine the effect of the evaluated factors on the measured responses. The factors considered in the study were: percent of reverse osmosis permeate water recovery, influent coagulant dosage, and influent total dissolved solids (TDS) dosage. The measured responses evaluated were: operating time, average specific flux, and rejection of radioactive contaminants along with other elements. The ANOVA for the design of experiment results revealed that the operating time is affected by the percent water recovery to be achieved and the flocculant dosage over the range studied. The average specific flux and rejection for the radioactive contaminants were not affected by the factors evaluated over the range studied. The 3 month long on-site pilot testing on the impacted leachate revealed that the CRA-LTD leachate treatment process was robust and produced an effluent water quality that met the surface water discharge criteria mandated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the local municipality. (authors)

McMurray, Allan; Everest, Chris; Rilling, Ken [Conestoga-Rovers and Associates, 651 Colby Dr, Waterloo, ON (Canada)] [Conestoga-Rovers and Associates, 651 Colby Dr, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Vandergaast, Gary [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON (Canada); LaMonica, David [RoChem Membrane Systems Inc., 430 30th Street, Hermosa Beach, CA (United States)] [RoChem Membrane Systems Inc., 430 30th Street, Hermosa Beach, CA (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

Burdick, A.; Poerschke, A.; Rapport, A.; Wayne, M.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

307

Energy Efficiency Investments in Public Facilities - Developing a Pilot Mechanism for Russia and Chelyabinsk Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Russian public sector buildings tend to be very inefficient, which creates vast opportunities for savings. This paper reviews opportunities to implement energy efficiency projects in Russian public buildings, created by new Russian legislation and regulations. Given Russia's limited experience with energy performance contracts (EPCs), a pilot project can help test an implementation mechanism. The authors use Chelyabinsk Region as an example to discuss opportunities, challenges and solutions to financing and implementing an EPC in Russia, navigating through federal requirements and specific local conditions.

Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha; Parker, Steven A.; Baranovskiy, Aleksandr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass via Integrated Pyrolysis, Catalytic Hydroconversion and Co-processing with Vacuum Gas Oil Raymond G. Wissinger...

310

Federal Highway Administration - Pilot Car Escort - Best Practices...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Federal Highway Administration - Pilot Car Escort - Best Practices Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

311

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

On the Piloted Ignition of Solid Fuels in Spacecraft Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Describing the Steady-State Gasification of Bubble-FormingEffects on the Endothermic Gasification and Piloted Ignitionon Nonflaming Transient Gasification of PMMA and PE During

Fereres-Rapoport, Sonya M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) preparedness for severe natural phenomena...

314

Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Pilot...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Florida Homes - Central and South Florida (Fact Sheet) In this pilot project, the Florida Solar Energy Center and Florida Power and Light are collaborating to retrofit a large...

315

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool...

316

airline pilots: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

owners: an Oxfordshire pilot 208 ORIGINAL PAPER Eric J. Hall Basil V. Worgul Lubomir Smilenov Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: of ocular cataracts at younger ages has been...

317

Microsoft Word - Outdoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

regulations); conventional laboratory operations (such as preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis); and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than 2...

318

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ClearFuels-Rentech Pilot-Scale Biorefinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ClearFuels-Rentech pilot-scale biorefinery will use Fisher-Tropsch gas-to-liquids technology to create diesel and jet fuel.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Controlled pilot oxidizer for a gas turbine combustor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustor (22) for a gas turbine (10) includes a main burner oxidizer flow path (34) delivering a first portion (32) of an oxidizer flow (e.g., 16) to a main burner (28) of the combustor and a pilot oxidizer flow path (38) delivering a second portion (36) of the oxidizer flow to a pilot (30) of the combustor. The combustor also includes a flow controller (42) disposed in the pilot oxidizer flow path for controlling an amount of the second portion delivered to the pilot.

Laster, Walter R. (Oviedo, FL); Bandaru, Ramarao V. (Greer, SC)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

San Diego Hero Alliance: Community-Based Social Marketing Pilot...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Social Marketing Pilot Program Presents an overview of the California Center for Sustainable Energy's community-based social marketing strategies to promote home energy...

323

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-383 Pilot...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Power Group, Inc Application from Pilot Power Group, Inc. to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-383 Pilot Power Group.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-383 Pilot Power...

325

Microbial enhanced waterflooding pilot project, Mink Unit, Delaware-Childers (OK) field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first microbial-enhanced waterflood field project was initiated in October of 1986. The site selected for the project is in the Mink Unit of Delaware-Childers field in Nowata County, Oklahoma. The pilot area consists of four adjacent inverted five-spot patterns drilled on 5-acre spacing. There are 21 injection and 15 production wells on this pilot. Four of the 21 injection wells were treated with microbial formulation. Laboratory screening criteria were developed to evaluate microorganisms for this project. Several different microbial formulations were tested. Injectivity and microbial field survivability tests were conducted during the baseline period on two off-pattern wells, and a chemical tracer, fluorescein, was injected into the four injection wells during the baseline period. Methodologies for field applications of microorganisms in ongoing waterfloods were developed as a result of this project. Results from the field pilot showed that microorganisms could be injected into an ongoing waterflood without causing any problems in injectivity. Microbial treatment did improve oil production rate, and water/oil ratios for producing wells nearest the microbially treated injection wells continue to be more favorable than baseline values. 23 refs., 30 figs., 28 tabs.

Bryant, R.S.; Burchfield, T.E.; Dennis, D.M.; Hitzman, D.O.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Situational Effects in Ability Testing 1 Running head: SITUATIONAL EFFECTS IN ABILITY TESTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for entry into the French Aircraft Pilot Training, gathered on a set of three tests (visual perception stability of broad cognitive abilities within a short time interval like one year. Broad cognitive abilities Testing 4 2. broad abilities (also named "stratum II"), defined as very general abilities like fluid

Boyer, Edmond

328

Microbial field pilot study: Quarterly technical progress report: November 22, 1988--February 28, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field test pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug the flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to encounter regions of the reservoir bypassed by the first flood, thereby increasing sweep efficiency. During this quarter studies were made to characterize the in situ bacteria in brine samples recovered from various locations in the SEVVSU. The characteristics of five anaerobic nitrate-using bacteria have been investigated. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; Mcinerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1989-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

Process performance of Ahlstrom Pyroflow PCFB pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ahlstrom Pyropower has designed and built a 10 MW{sub th} (34 MMBtu) pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) pilot plant in Karhula, Finland. The unit is now operating. Data from this unit supports the design of a nominal 80 MW, Des Moines Energy Center 1 (DMEC-1) PCFB Repowering Project. The pilot plant PCFB combustor is of square cross-section. It is housed in a 3.6 m (11.8 ft) diameter pressure vessel. A high pressure high temperature gas cleaning unit downstream of the PCFB exhaust is installed in a separate 2.6 m (8.5 ft) diameter pressure vessel. The maximum plant operating pressure is 16 bar (232 psia). The fuel is fed in slurry form; sorbent is also fed along with the fuel. The net heat input per unit cross section of the combustor is the highest of any known combustion mode. The heat release can go up to 40 MW/m{sup 2} (12.6 MMBtu/ft{sup 2} hr). Many types of coals including high sulfur, bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and Western sub bituminous, low sulfur Powder River Basin coal were tested. Combustion efficiencies in the range of 99.5 to 99.9% have been consistently observed. Emissions of various gases such as NO{sub x} SO{sub 2} and CO at different operating pressures and loads were monitored. The gas emissions have been lower than expected based on atmospheric circulating fluidized bed boiler experience. The sulfur retention is over 95 % with a Ca/S molar ratio of 1 to 2 for high sulfur Illinois No.6 coal. A GAVS molar ratio of 2.5 to 3.5 was observed to retain 95 % of sulfur with low sulfur Powder River Basin coal. All gaseous emissions during testing with Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin coal are well within the projected limits for the DMEC1 project. Emission data from tests with Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin coal are presented in the paper.

Sellakumar, K.M. [R& D Center, Ahlstrom Pyropower, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Isaksson, J.; Tiensuu, J. [Ahlstroem Pyropower, Inc., Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstroem Lab.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Process performance of Ahlstrom Pyroflow PCFB pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ahlstrom Pyropower has designed and built a 10 MW[sub th] (34 MMBtu) pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) pilot plant in Karhula, Finland. The unit is now operating. Data from this unit supports the design of a nominal 80 MW, Des Moines Energy Center 1 (DMEC-1) PCFB Repowering Project. The pilot plant PCFB combustor is of square cross-section. It is housed in a 3.6 m (11.8 ft) diameter pressure vessel. A high pressure high temperature gas cleaning unit downstream of the PCFB exhaust is installed in a separate 2.6 m (8.5 ft) diameter pressure vessel. The maximum plant operating pressure is 16 bar (232 psia). The fuel is fed in slurry form; sorbent is also fed along with the fuel. The net heat input per unit cross section of the combustor is the highest of any known combustion mode. The heat release can go up to 40 MW/m[sup 2] (12.6 MMBtu/ft[sup 2] hr). Many types of coals including high sulfur, bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and Western sub bituminous, low sulfur Powder River Basin coal were tested. Combustion efficiencies in the range of 99.5 to 99.9% have been consistently observed. Emissions of various gases such as NO[sub x] SO[sub 2] and CO at different operating pressures and loads were monitored. The gas emissions have been lower than expected based on atmospheric circulating fluidized bed boiler experience. The sulfur retention is over 95 % with a Ca/S molar ratio of 1 to 2 for high sulfur Illinois No.6 coal. A GAVS molar ratio of 2.5 to 3.5 was observed to retain 95 % of sulfur with low sulfur Powder River Basin coal. All gaseous emissions during testing with Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin coal are well within the projected limits for the DMEC1 project. Emission data from tests with Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin coal are presented in the paper.

Sellakumar, K.M. (R D Center, Ahlstrom Pyropower, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)); Isaksson, J.; Tiensuu, J. (Ahlstroem Pyropower, Inc., Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstroem Lab.)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Final report for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IT Corporation (IT) was contracted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the effectiveness of thermal desorption as a remedial technology for removing mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain soil. Previous laboratory studies by Energy Systems suggested that this technology could reduce mercury to very low levels. This pilot-scale demonstration study was initiated to verify on an engineering scale the performance of thermal desorption. This report includes the details of the demonstration study, including descriptions of experimental equipment and procedures, test conditions, sampling and analysis, quality assurance (QA), detailed test results, and an engineering assessment of a conceptual full-scale treatment facility. The specific project tasks addressed in this report were performed between October 1993 and June 1994. These tasks include soil receipt, preparation, and characterization; prepilot (bench-scale) desorption tests; front-end materials handling tests; pilot tests; back-end materials handling tests; residuals treatment; and engineering scale-up assessment.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - agreement pilot project Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pilot Projects. The purpose of the brownfields pilots... , could learn from. This section examines ten brownfields ... Source: Delaware, University of - Center for Energy...

333

ERCOT's Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERCOTs Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot CATEE 12-17-13 ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Disclaimer The information contained in this report has been obtained from... services along with other information about our business is available online at constellation.com. ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Demand Response in ERCOT CATEE 121313 - Tim Carter...

Carter, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Pilot Power Group Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips Color Kinetics Jump to:PiedmontMauna LoaPilot

335

WINDExchange: Wind for Schools Pilot Project Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden,WIMapPilot Project

336

Technologist in Residence Pilot | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8,MaterialsTechnologist in Residence Pilot

337

Microsoft PowerPoint - TIR Pilot Webinar  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007NavalMelvin G.Workforce in Louisiana Stephen R. Barnes,Pilot

338

CX-006710: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006710: Categorical Exclusion Determination Binary Power Unit Test (Recurrent Engineering LLC, Geothermal Test) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08...

339

CX-011096: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-011096: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wave Energy Test - New Zealand Multi-Mode Technology Demonstration at the US Navy's Wave Energy Test...

340

End User Impacts of Automated Electrochromic Windows in a Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6027E End User Impacts of Automated Electrochromic Windows in a Pilot Retrofit Application E Electrochromic Windows in a Pilot Retrofit Application Eleanor S. Lee1 Abstract , Erin S. Claybaugh Building Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585 USA Automated electrochromic (EC) windows, advanced thermally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Safety Warnings Quad Rotors (Quad-Pilot 2 F.3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Warnings Quad Rotors (Quad-Pilot 2 F.3) The quad rotor "quad-pilot 2 F.3" is a complicated accidents from taking place. Operation of the quad rotor should be performed in a safe and responsible not accept any liability for damage and consequent damage arising from the use of the quad rotors, as we have

Langendoen, Koen

342

Perspectives in Practice A Garden Pilot Project Enhances Fruit and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Perspectives in Practice A Garden Pilot Project Enhances Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Children STEPHANIE HEIM, MPH, RD; JAMIE STANG, PhD, MPH, RD; MARJORIE IRELAND, PhD ABSTRACT Fruit a strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable intake in chil- dren. A 12-week pilot intervention was designed

Maxwell, Bruce D.

343

Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Topical Report Prepared Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Ross Edward Dugas, M capture using monoethanolamine (MEA). MEA is an appropriate choice for a baseline study since

Rochelle, Gary T.

344

Multi-Agent Autonomous Pilot for Motorcycles Dana Vrajitoru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Agent Autonomous Pilot for Motorcycles Dana Vrajitoru Intelligent Systems Laboratory Indiana with an automatic pilot. The application is written in OpenGL and includes a model of a vehicle (a motorcycle) based (Mourant & Marangos 2003). Our approach targets motorcycles which have not yet been studied as extensively

Vrajitoru, Dana

345

FINAL REPORT DM1200 TESTS WITH AZ 101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-03R3800-4 REV 0 2/17/04  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test success criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; GONG W; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

CX-001714: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001714: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vehicle Test Location at Bone Yard; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tracking Number...

347

CX-005022: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005022: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Center, Canyon Texas; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking...

348

CX-003523: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003523: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Center Kansas State University; National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

349

Bovine babesiosis in Guyana: a comparison of the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and complement-fixation (CF) tests in determining the prevalence of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis infections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOVINE BABESIOSIS IN GUYANA: A COMPARISON OF THE INDIREC T FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY (IFA) AND COMPLEMENT-FIXATION (CF) TESTS IN DETERMINING THE PREVALENCF. OF BABESIA BIGEMINA AND BABESIA BOVIS INFECTIONS A Thesis by LENNOX MORTIMER APPLEWHAITE... FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY (IFA) AND COMPLE1YIENT-FIXATION (CF ) TES TS IN DETERMINING THE PREVAI ENCE OF BABES IA B1GEMINA AND BABESIA BOVIS INFECTIONS A Thesis by LENNOX MORTIMER APPLErJHAITE Appro red as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

Applewhaite, Lennox Mortimer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, Vol. 248, No. 3 (2001) 795799 Testing a new small-volume technique for determining 234Th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, Vol. 248, No. 3 (2001) 795­799 Testing a new, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA 2 Department of Marine Chemistry the soluble parent uranium-238 (T1/2 = 4.5.109 y), and its particle reactive daughter, 234 Th (T1/2 = 24.1 d

Hinch, Scott G.

351

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 8: Appendices HYDRO, IRD, LTM, NUTS, PAR, PMR, QAPD, RBP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geohydrologic data have been collected in the Los Medanos area at the US Department of Energy`s proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico since 1975 as part of a study evaluating the feasibility of storing defense-associated nuclear wastes within the bedded salt of the Salado Formation of Permian age. Drilling and hydrologic testing have identified three principal water-bearing zones above the Salado Formation and one below that could potentially transport wastes to the biosphere if the proposed facility were breached. The zones above the Salado are the contact between the Rustler and Salado Formations and the Culebra and Magenta Dolomite Members of the Rustler Formation of Permian age. The zone below the Salado Formation consists of channel sandstones in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Permian Delaware Mountain Group. Determinations of hydraulic gradients, directions of flow, and hydraulic properties were hindered because of the negligible permeability of the water-bearing zones. Special techniques in drilling, well completion, and hydraulic testing have been developed to determine the hydrologic characteristics of these water-producing zones.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 3, December 1, 1981-February 28, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant; and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities include the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. The lockhopper system was successfully integrated with the gasifier, and shakedown of the newly installed unit was completed. Test PT-4, the first test using this system, was completed during January. Results far exceeded the objectives set for this test. One hundred fifty tons of Minnesota peat containing up to 25-weight-percent moisture were fed to the gasifier at a pressure of 300 psig. Peat conversions averaged more than 90%. Over 57 hours of steady operating time were selected for data analysis. Post-run inspection following Test PT-4 was completed. Peat dried to 10 and 20-weight-percent moisture is currently being stored in preparation for Test PT-5, scheduled to begin in March.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Magnetic and electric bulge-test instrument for the determination of coupling mechanical properties of functional free-standing films and flexible electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time a novel multi-field bulge-test instrument which enables measurements of the biaxial mechanical properties and electro-magnetic-mechanical coupling effect of free-standing films in external magnetic/electric fields was proposed. The oil pressure was designed with two ranges, 01 MPa for elastic small deformation and 07 MPa for plastic/damage large deformation. A magnetic field that was horizontal and uniform in the film plane was supplied by a hollow cylindrical magnet. The magnitude could be changed from 0 to 10?000 Oe by adjusting the position of the testing film. Meanwhile, an electric field applied on the film was provided by a voltage source (Maximum voltage: 1000 V; Maximum current: 1 A). Various signals related to deformation, mechanical loading, magnetic field, and electric field could be measured simultaneously without mutual interference, which was confirmed by the coincidence of the measured P-H curves for titanium (Ti)/nickel (Ni) specimens with/without external fields. A hardening phenomenon under magnetic/electric fields was observed for Ni and lead zirconate titanate specimens. The multi-field bulge-test instrument will provide a powerful research tool to study the deformation mechanism of functional films and flexible electronics in the coupling field.

Yu, Zejun; Li, Faxin; Pei, Yongmao, E-mail: peiym@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: fangdn@pku.edu.cn; Fang, Daining, E-mail: peiym@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: fangdn@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Mao, Weiguo [Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronics Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Feng, Xue [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Application of the HWVP measurement error model and feed test algorithms to pilot scale feed testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the feed preparation subsystem in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is to provide, for control of the properties of the slurry that are sent to the melter. The slurry properties are adjusted so that two classes of constraints are satisfied. Processability constraints guarantee that the process conditions required by the melter can be obtained. For example, there are processability constraints associated with electrical conductivity and viscosity. Acceptability constraints guarantee that the processed glass can be safely stored in a repository. An example of an acceptability constraint is the durability of the product glass. The primary control focus for satisfying both processability and acceptability constraints is the composition of the slurry. The primary mechanism for adjusting the composition of the slurry is mixing the waste slurry with frit of known composition. Spent frit from canister decontamination is also recycled by adding it to the melter feed. A number of processes in addition to mixing are used to condition the waste slurry prior to melting, including evaporation and the addition of formic acid. These processes also have an effect on the feed composition.

Adams, T.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Evaporative oxidation treatability test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Amino acid nutrition of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus): development of an improved test diet and determination of the total sulfur amino acid requirement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1985) also found a significant correlation (r=0. 96) between dietary amino acid requirements and whole-body amino acid composition of channel catfish. However, a lower correlation (r-0. 68) was observed between dietary requirements and amino acid... fed amino acid test diets for six weeks1 Diet Weight gain Feed efficiency Survival designation ('/o of initial weight) (g gain/ g feed) (%%d) PM C G/AA CG RDM R D M/A A 210 c 227 c 68 1116 507 b 0. 40c 0. 41 c 0. 17d 0. 81 a 0. 67...

Moon, Hae Young

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR OTEC PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Preoperational Test Platform,Thermal EnergyConversion (OTEC), Preoperational Ocean Test1979. Sands, M.D. , Draft OTEC Programmatic Environmental

Wilde, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Macroalgae for CO{sub 2} Capture and Renewable Energy - A Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate, at a pilot scale, the beneficial use of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through a technology designed to capture CO2 from fossil-fuel fired power plant stack gas, generating macroalgae and converting the macroalgae at high efficiency to renewable methane that can be utilized in the power plant or introduced into a natural gas pipeline. The proposed pilot plant would demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and CO{sub 2}/ NO{sub x} flue-gas removal efficiency of an innovative ??algal scrubber? technology where seaweeds are grown out of water on specially-designed supporting structures contained within greenhouses where the plants are constantly bathed by recycled nutrient sprays enriched by flue gas constituents. The work described in this document addresses Phase 1 of the project only. The scope of work for Phase 1 includes the completion of a preliminary design package; the collection of additional experimental data to support the preliminary and detailed design for a pilot scale utilization of CO{sub 2} to cultivate macroalage and to process that algae to produce methane; and a technological and economic analysis to evaluate the potential of the system. Selection criteria for macroalgae that could survive the elevated temperatures and potential periodic desiccation of near desert project sites were identified. Samples of the selected macroalgae species were obtained and then subjected to anaerobic digestion to determine conversions and potential methane yields. A Process Design Package (PDP) was assembled that included process design, process flow diagram, material balance, instrumentation, and equipment list, sizes, and cost for the Phase 2 pilot plant. Preliminary economic assessments were performed under the various assumptions made, which are purposely conservative. Based on the results, additional development work should be conducted to delineate the areas for improving efficiency, reducing contingencies, and reducing overall costs.

Kristine Wiley

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Use Matlab Code to Link and Pilot Softwares Used for MEMS Simulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use Matlab Code to Link and Pilot Softwares Used for MEMS Simulation. H. ACHKAR1 , D. PEYROU1 , F. Then, an explication is done on how we piloted ABAQUS using a Matlab routine. In a third and very on piloting software using Matlab, especially Abaqus (COMSOL is already piloted by Matlab and we are trying

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report- August 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

364

Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EIS-0207: Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Forest Service prepared this statement to analyze three alternatives and associated environmental impacts for it to enable the CEE Exploration Company of Portland, Oregon to build and operate a geothermal pilot project and supporting facilities capable of generating 33 megawatts of electric power in the Deschutes National Forest in central Oregon. The Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) served as a cooperating agency in preparing this statement in order to fulfill its National Environmental Policy Act obligations ahead of its statutory obligations to purchase and transmit power to customers in the Pacific Northwest, if it is decided that the project will proceed. BPA adopted this statement by October 1994.

366

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A historical review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant backfill development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. Its introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; BRUSH,LAURENCE H.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included.

Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

From science to compliance: Geomechanics studies of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical and hydrological properties of salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) testifies to the nearly ideal characteristics of bedded salt deposits in southeast New Mexico. The WIPP history includes decades of testing and scientific investigations, which have resulted in a comprehensive understanding of salt's mechanical deformational and hydrological properties over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Comprehensive evaluation of salt's favorable characteristics helped demonstrate regulatory compliance and ensure isolation of radioactive waste placed in a salt geological setting.

HANSEN,FRANCIS D.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote) or the United States Forest Service (USFS) via the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (SFIA

Hung, I-Kuai

373

Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The new Home Energy Score pilot program provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The program also offers...

374

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Interagency Pilot of Greenhouse Gas Accounting Tools: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and Tongass National Forest (Tongass) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct a pilot study of three greenhouse gas (GHG) inventorying tools.

Carpenter, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Kandt, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Situation Awareness Information Requirements For Commercial Airline Pilots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Situation awareness is presented as a fundamental requirement for good airmanship, forming the basis for pilot decision making and performance. To develop a better understanding of the role of situation awareness in flying, ...

Endsley, Mica R.

377

In situ combustion - from pilot to commercial application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, there are at least 14 active commercial in-situ combustion (ISC) projects worldwide. A review of these projects is carried out in order to emphasize the important factors which contributed to the success of the processes. The success of the developing an ISC pilot into a commercial ISC project is strongly connected with two factors: (a) starting the operation from the uppermost part of the structure and extending the process downwards and (b) application of the line drive well configuration instead of patterns, whenever is possible. An effective, peripheral line drive operation requires pool utilization. The most challenging phase towards commercialization of an ISC project is the field pilot design, implementation and evaluation. This paper is focused on the advantages of locating ISC pilot at the upper zone of the reservoir, due to the need for a full scale integration of the pilot with the subsequent semi- and commercial development of the process.

Turta, A. [Petroleum Recovery Institute, Alberta (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Summary of the 2006 Automated Demand Response Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the specific concept for, design of, and results from a pilot program to automate demand response with critical peak pricing. California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak pricing (CPP) to help reduce peak...

Piette, M.; Kiliccote, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Community Based Renewable Energy Production Incentive (Pilot Program)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In June 2009, Maine established the Community-based Renewable Energy Pilot Program. As the name suggests, this program is intended to encourage the development of locally owned, in-state renewable...

380

Evaluation of laboratory test method for determining the potential alkali contribution from aggregate and the ASR safety of the Three-Gorges dam concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The releasable alkali from granite, which was used in the Three-Gorges concrete dam project in China, and from gneiss and feldspar was estimated by extraction in distilled water and super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. Results show that: i) the finer the particles and the higher the temperature, the greater and faster the release of alkali; ii) compared with extraction by distilled water, super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution had a stronger activation on feldspar than on granite and gneiss; iii) for the three rocks tested, thermal activation had the largest effect on gneiss and a lower and similar effect on granite and feldspar. For very fine particles, temperature had a similar effect on the release of alkali by all three rocks. Because the aggregate used in the Three-Gorges dam concrete is non-reactive and a low calcium fly ash was used in the concrete, ASR would not be an issue for the dam, despite the release of alkali from the aggregate into the concrete.

Lu Duyou [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China)]. E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiaoling [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Xu Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Lan Xianghui [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Tang Mingshu [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Fournier, Benoit [ICON/CANMET, Natural Resources Canada, 405 Rocherster Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G1 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The H-Coal pilot plant and the Breckinridge Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large coal-liquefaction pilot plant is in operation at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, expanding on the H-Coal technology. The pilot plant operated very successfully during 1981, confirming research yield data on eastern bituminous coal, demonstrating operability of the process, and resulting in a significant accumulation of engineering data. Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc., and Bechtel Petroleum, Inc., are developing the Breckinridge Project, a commercial coal-liquefaction plant proposed for Breckinridge County, Kentucky, based on the H-Coal technology.

Wigglesworth, T.H.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR 264.90 through 264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Field test of microemulsion flooding, Chateaurenard Field, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot test of microemulsion flooding was conducted in a single five-spot pattern in the Chateaurenard field in France. The test had to accommodate a 40-mPa*s (40-cp) oil viscosity and a regional pressure gradient across the pattern. A very clear oil bank was observed, resulting in a substantial increase in oil production. 9 refs.

Putz, A.; Chevalier, J.P.; Stock, G.; Philippot, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was the subject of the issued Campaign I interim report (Duignan et al., 2004a or Appendix I-1). The streams created in Campaign I were used for Campaign II, and during Campaign II more of the same recycle streams were produced, with the addition of recycle streams created during the pilot-scale ion exchange unit operation (Duignan et al., 2004b or Appendix I-2). Campaign III used the recycles from Campaign II and was the first campaign to use all the recycle streams (Duignan et al., 2004c or Appendix I-3). The operation of each of the subsequent campaigns, i.e., II, III, and IV, while different from Campaign I, are very similar to each other, and can be best understood as the process of operating a series of Pretreatment Unit Operations in a somewhat prototypic manner. That is, while Campaign I studied the operation of a single, albeit important, Pretreatment Unit Operation, i.e., Ultrafiltration, subsequent campaigns were to study the four major unit operations that make-up the RPP-WTP Pretreatment Facility. They are: Waste Feed Evaporation Process (FEP), Ultrafiltration Process (UFP), Cesium Ion Exchange Process (CIX), and the Treated LAW Evaporation Process (TLP). Each of the campaigns operated basically as a separate subtask, but as with Campaign I, the recycle streams produced in one campaign were fed into the subsequent campaign. Therefore, all four campaigns were chemically connected through these recycle streams, which carry over effects of the preceding campaign. The results of Campaign IV operations are the subject of this fourth and final report. Separate reports were issued after each of the previous campaigns, but they were treated as interim because of being limited to the results obtained from a single campaign (or past campaigns) and further limited to only highlights of that single campaign. This final report not only discusses the Campaign IV results but compares those with the previous campaigns. Also included is a more comprehensive discussion of the overall task activities, as well as abridged versions of the full databases of the accumulated

Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An analysis of salt and moisture deposition on the air sampling probes in the exhaust shaft of the waste isolation pilot plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study was performed to determine the source of moist salt formations on air sampling , probes at the top of the exhaust shaft used in ventilating the waste repository at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). An earlier study by Texas A&M Univ...

Weaver, Gregg Shelton

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pilot Residential Deep Energy Retrofits and the PNNL Lab Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes research investigating the technical and economic feasibility of several pilot deep energy retrofits, or retrofits that save 30% to 50% or more on a whole-house basis while increasing comfort, durability, combustion safety, and indoor air quality. The work is being conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. As part of the overall program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers are collecting and analyzing a comprehensive dataset that describes pre- and post-retrofit energy consumption, retrofit measure cost, health and comfort impacts, and other pertinent information for each home participating in the study. The research and data collection protocol includes recruitment of candidate residences, a thorough test-in audit, home energy modeling, and generation of retrofit measure recommendations, implementation of the measures, test-out, and continued evaluation. On some homes, more detailed data will be collected to disaggregate energy-consumption information. This multi-year effort began in October 2010. To date, the PNNL team has performed test-in audits on 51 homes in the marine, cold, and hot-humid climate zones, and completed 3 retrofits in Texas, 10 in Florida, and 2 in the Pacific Northwest. Two of the retrofits are anticipated to save 50% or more in energy bills and the others - savings are in the 30% to 40% range. Fourteen other retrofits are under way in the three climate zones. Metering equipment has been installed in seven of these retrofits - three in Texas, three in Florida, and one in the Pacific Northwest. This report is an interim update, providing information on the research protocol and status of the PNNL deep energy retrofit project as of December, 2011. The report also presents key findings and lessons learned, based on the body of work to date. In addition, the report summarizes the status of the PNNL Lab Homes that are new manufactured homes procured with minimal energy-efficiency specifications typical of existing homes in the region, and sited on the PNNL campus. The Lab Homes serve as a flexible test facility (the first of its kind in the Pacific Northwest) to rapidly evaluate energy-efficient and grid-smart technologies that are applicable to residential construction.

Widder, Sarah H.; Chandra, Subrato; Parker, Graham B.; Sande, Susan; Blanchard, Jeremy; Stroer, Dennis; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Beal, David; Sutherland, Karen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. Howeve

Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hanford Site Hazardous waste determination report for transuranic debris waste streams NPFPDL1A, NPFPDL1B, NPFPDL1C and NPFPDL1D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Determination Report is intended to satisfy the terms of a Memorandum of Agreement (Agreement signed on June 16, 1999) between the U.S. Department of Energy and the New Mexico Environment Department. The Agreement pertains to the exchange of information before a final decision is made on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant application for a permit under the ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act''. The Agreement will terminate upon the effective date of a final ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act'' permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In keeping with the principles and terms of the Agreement, this report describes the waste stream data and information compilation process, and the physical and chemical analyses that the U.S. Department of Energy has performed on selected containers of transuranic debris waste to confirm that the waste is nonhazardous (non-mixed). This also summarizes the testing and analytical results that support the conclusion that the selected transuranic debris waste is not hazardous and thus, not subject to regulation under the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' or the ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act''. This report will be submitted to the New Mexico Environment Department no later than 45 days before the first shipment of waste from the Hanford Site to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, unless the parties mutually agree in writing to a shorter time. The 52 containers of transuranic debris waste addressed in this report were generated, packaged, and placed into storage between 1995 and 1997. Based on reviews of administrative documents, operating procedures, waste records, generator certifications, and personnel interviews, this transuranic debris waste was determined to be nonhazardous. This determination is supported by the data derived from nondestructive examination, confirmatory visual examination, and the results of container headspace gas sampling and analysis. Therefore, it is concluded that this transuranic debris waste, which consists of 52 containers from waste streams NPFPDLIA, NPFPDLIB, NPFPDLIC, and NPFPDLID, is not hazardous waste, and no hazardous waste numbers specified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 261, have been assigned. Accordingly, the 52 containers of transuranic debris waste addressed in this report meet the requirements for transuranic waste as defined by the Department of Energy Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The 52 containers are acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as nonhazardous transuranic waste.

WINTERHALDER, J.A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

International Safeguards Technology and Policy Education and Training Pilot Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major focus of the National Nuclear Security Administration-led Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. NNSA launched two pilot programs in 2008 to develop university level courses and internships in association with James, Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) and Texas A&M University (TAMU). These pilot efforts involved 44 students in total and were closely linked to hands-on internships at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between TAMU, LANL, and LLNL. The LANL-based coursework was shared with the students undertaking internships at LLNL via video teleconferencing. A weeklong hands-on exercise was also conducted at LANL. A second pilot effort, the International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at MIIS in cooperation with LLNL. Speakers from MIIS, LLNL, and other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. The two pilots programs concluded with an NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The value of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of the two programs in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G A; Essner, J T; Dougan, A D; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokava, E; Wehling, F; Martin, J; Charlton, W

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

A PILOT FOR A VERY LARGE ARRAY H I DEEP FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution 21 cm H I deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved images of neutral hydrogen at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for an H I deep field done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0 < z < 0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hr, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of 34' Multiplication-Sign 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of H I and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results, and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for H I deep fields since its long spacings mitigate radio frequency interference. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future H I deep fields planned with other Square Kilometer Array pathfinders.

Fernandez, Ximena; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hess, Kelley M. [Department of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Kreckel, Kathryn [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Momjian, Emmanuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Popping, Attila [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, NL-7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chomiuk, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Verheijen, M. A. W. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Henning, Patricia A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wilcots, Eric M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scoville, Nick, E-mail: ximena@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pilot-scale evaluation of chemical oxidation for MTBE-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has tentatively classified MTBE as a possible human carcinogen, thus further emphasizing the importance for study of fate, transport, and environmental effects of MTBE. The treatment of subsurface contaminants (e.g., MTBE) from leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites presents many complex challenges. Many techniques have been employed for the remediation of contaminants in soil and groundwater at LUST sites. Under sponsorship of US EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory, IT Corporation has conducted evaluations of chemical oxidation of MTBE contaminated soil using Fenton's Reagent (hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by ferrous sulfate), simulating both ex-situ and in-situ soil remediation. Bench-scale ex-situ tests have shown up to 90% degradation of MTBE within 12 hours. Pilot-scale MTBE oxidation tests were conducted in a stainless paddle-type mixer with a 10 cubic foot mixing volume. The reactor was designed with a heavy duty mixer shaft assembly to homogenize soil and included provisions for contaminant and reagent addition, mixing, and sample acquisition. The tests were performed by placing 400 pounds of a synthetic soil matrix (consisting of a mixture of top soil, sand, gravel and clay) in the reactor, spiking with 20 ppm of MTBE, and mixing thoroughly. The variables evaluated in the pilot-scale tests included reaction time, amount of hydrogen peroxide, and amount of ferrous sulfate. After 8 hours of reaction, using 4 times the stoichiometric quantity of hydrogen peroxide and a 10:1 hydrogen peroxide: ferrous iron weight ratio, approximately 60% MTBE degradation was observed. When 10 times the stoichiometric quantity of hydrogen peroxide was used (with the same ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ferrous iron), 90% MTBE degradation was observed. When the same test was performed without any ferrous iron addition, 75% MTBE degradation was observed.

Rahman, M.; Schupp, D.A.; Krishnan, E.R.; Tafuri, A.N.; Chen, C.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electric Power Research Institute, High Sulfur Test Center report to the Steering Committee, March 1994. [Monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s High Sulfur Test Center. The Suncor Limestone Reagent and Dewatering tests were completed on the Pilot unit this month. As this test block ended, the Pilot unit was modified for the High Velocity Scrubbing tests. This testing began on March 28, 1994 with test PHV-AN. As Phase II of the Mini-Pilot Clear Liquor Scrubbing test block was completed this month, the unit was taken off-line. Testing on the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted. Catalyst material from the reactor was inspected and sampled during a scheduled outage this month in preparation for a low temperature test block.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

HWVP pilot-scale vitrification system campaign: LFCM-8 summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to treat the high-level radiative waste (HLW) stored in underground storage tanks as an alkaline sludge. Tank waste will first be retrieved and pretreated to minimize solids requiring vitrification as HLW. The glass product resulting from HWVP operations will be stored onsite in stainless steel canisters until the HLW repository is available for final disposal. The first waste stream scheduled to be processed by the HWVP is the neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) stored in double-shell storage tanks. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by providing research, development, and engineering expertise in defined areas. As a part of this support, pilot-scale testing is being conducted to support closure of HWVP design and development issues. Testing results will verify equipment design performance, establish acceptable and optimum process parameters, and support product qualification activities.

Perez, J.M.; Whitney, L.D.; Buchmiller, W.C.; Daume, J.T.; Whyatt, G.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help Communities Assess Possible Impact of Sea Level Rise on Energy Assets New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach...

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution pilot Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pilot Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution pilot Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Real-Time Monitoring and Mapping of Air...

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol pilot study Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pilot study Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alcohol pilot study Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Influence of Age at Drinking Onset on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: No-migration variance petition. Figures: Volume 8, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of engineering drawings concerned with seal arrangement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of ALTA for NOx Control in Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and pilot-scale testing conducted to demonstrate the ability of the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. Testing specifically focused on characterizing NO{sub x} behavior with deep burner staging combined with Rich Reagent Injection (RRI). Tests were performed in a 4 MBtu/hr pilot-scale furnace at the University of Utah. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team which included the University of Utah and Combustion Components Associates (CCA). Deep burner staging and RRI, combined with selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), make up the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) for NO{sub x} reduction. The application of ALTA in a PC environment requires homogenization and rapid reaction of post-burner combustion gases and has not been successfully demonstrated in the past. Operation of the existing low-NO{sub x} burner and design and operation of an application specific ALTA burner was guided by CFD modeling conducted by REI. Parametric pilot-scale testing proved the chemistry of RRI in a PC environment with a NOx reduction of 79% at long residence times and high baseline NOx rate. At representative particle residence times, typical operation of the dual-register low-NO{sub x} burner provided an environment that was unsuitable for NO{sub x} reduction by RRI, showing no NOx reduction. With RRI, the ALTA burner was able to produce NO{sub x} emissions 20% lower than the low-NO{sub x} burner, 76 ppmv vs. 94 ppmv, at a burner stoichiometric ratio (BSR) of 0.7 and a normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR) of 2.0. CFD modeling was used to investigate the application of RRI for NO{sub x} control on a 180 MW{sub e} wall-fired, PC boiler. A NO{sub x} reduction of 37% from baseline (normal operation) was predicted using ALTA burners with RRI to produce a NO{sub x} emission rate of 0.185 lb/MBtu at the horizontal nose of the boiler. When combined with SNCR, a NO{sub x} emission rate of 0.12-0.14 lb/MBtu can be expected when implementing a full ALTA system on this unit. Cost effectiveness of the full ALTA system was estimated at $2,152/ton NO{sub x} removed; this was less than 75% of the cost estimated for an SCR system on a unit of this size.

Andrew Fry; Devin Davis; Marc Cremer; Bradley Adams

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Production Test (Phase III - AdministrativePlanningModeling Tasks) CX(s) Applied: A2,...

405

CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Procedures for Measuring Energy Efficiency of Consumer Products and Industrial Equipment...

406

CX-003969: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003969: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mobile Plutonium Facility (MPF); Set Up and Test Thermogravimetric Analyzer CX(s) Applied:...

407

CX-011090: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-011090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Upgrades of the Field Test Laboratory Building and the Solar Energy...

408

CX-004740: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Amonix Panels at National Solar Thermal Test Facility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11232010...

409

CX-006395: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006395: Categorical Exclusion Determination Corrosion Tests on Carbon Steel Exposed to Oxalic Acid and a Sludge Simulant CX(s) Applied:...

410

CX-005801: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-005801: Categorical Exclusion Determination Polymer Synthesis, Corrosion, and Electrochemical Tests in Lab D-0115 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03312011...

411

CX-003902: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003902: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Center Windward Engineering, LLC in Utah - NREL Tracking Number 10-027...

412

CX-010478: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010478: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Permanent Subsea Pressure Compensated Chemical Reservoir Construction and Testing CX(s) Applied: A9,...

413

CX-010789: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010789: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Permanent Subsea Pressure Compensated Chemical Reservoir Construction and Testing CX(s) Applied: A9...

414

CX-010768: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010768: Categorical Exclusion Determination ZIRCEX Nuclear Fuel Dissolution Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08122013 Location(s): Idaho...

415

CX-011694: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011694: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment Fast Time of Flight Detector Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

416

CX-005594: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mechanical Testing Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04112011 Location(s): Albany, Oregon...

417

CX-003396: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003396: Categorical Exclusion Determination Environmental Mechanical Testing Laboratory Construction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08112010 Location(s):...

418

CX-002698: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

98: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002698: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Testing (Under Task 5 of Statement of Project Objectives) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date:...

419

CX-010634: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Creation of Li-Ion Battery Test Labs, Customer Return Repair Center & End of Life Battery - Task 8...

420

Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Asset-building Initiatives in Peru and Colombia: Pilot Study and Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asset-building Initiatives in Peru and Colombia: Pilot Study and Directions By Yves Moury 2006-building pilot initiatives have begun in Southern Peru and one is soon to be approved in Colombia. In rural Peru in Peru and Colombia. The first, a six-year asset-building pilot program, is now underway in southern Peru

Subramanian, Venkat

422

Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pilot-scale study of the solar detoxification of VOC-contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Detoxification Field Experiment was designed to investigate the photocatalytic decomposition of organic contaminants in groundwater at a Superfund site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The process uses ultraviolet (UV) energy, available in sunlight, in conjunction with the photocatalyst, titanium dioxide, to decompose organic chemicals into nontoxic compounds. The field experiment was developed by three federal laboratories: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNLA), and LLNL. The US Department of Energy funded the experiment. The objectives of the pilot-scale study included the advancement of the solar technology into a nonlaboratory waste-remediation environment the compilation of test data to help guide laboratory research and future demonstrations and the development of safe operational procedures. Results of the pilot study are discussed, emphasizing the effect of several process variables on the system performance. These variables include alkalinity, catalyst loading, flow velocity through the reactor, and incident solar UV radiation. The performance of the solar detoxification process are discussed as it relates to concentrating and nonconcentrating collectors.

Mehos, M.; Turchi, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pacheco, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boegel, A.J.; Merrill, T.; Stanley, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Progress report for the period November 1989 through December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of three material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base materials, and Ti-base materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments included anoxic brine and anoxic brine with overpressures of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of a protective iron sulfide reaction product. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

Neuhauser, K.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

October 2, 2009 Request for Pilot Proposals in Nanomedicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 2, 2009 Request for Pilot Proposals in Nanomedicine The Center for Nanoscience and pending funding. Award information: http://nanoscience.bu.edu/nanomedicine/ - Stage I: $20k, 6 months Stage II funding. Proposals will be reviewed by a panel consisting of CRC faculty in nanoscience and MED

430

CIP Eco-innovation Pilot and market replication projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIP Eco-innovation Pilot and market replication projects Call 2008 Call Identifier: CIP-EIP-Eco-Innovation-2008 GUIDE FOR PROPOSERS CIP Eco-innovation website: http to the Competitiveness and Innovation Programme (CIP) and the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme (EIP) (2008

De Cindio, Fiorella

431

Results from the Texas Pilot Project on Superior Energy Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Performance. Five plants in Texas are participating in this national pilot project, which began July 2008. ESL-IE-09-05-02 Proceedings of the Thirty-First Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 12-15, 2009 ...

Ferland, K.

432

A Pilot Project in Preparation of an Aerodynamic Optimization Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Pilot Project in Preparation of an Aerodynamic Optimization Workshop with Lessons Learned John C-scale Aerodynamic Optimization Workshop. Three independent optimization efforts were conducted concurrently, each in the preparation of a possible future workshop on aerodynamic shape optimization. 1.0 Introduction During AIAA

Jameson, Antony

433

Pilot Stabilisatie Cavernes Twente Advies over reikwijdte en detailniveau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Stabilisatie Cavernes Twente Advies over reikwijdte en detailniveau van het ondergrondse holtes (cavernes) ontstaan. Van deze cavernes voldoen er 63 niet aan de huidige regels ter voorkoming van daling aan het aardoppervlak.1 In de huidige praktijk worden potentieel instabiele2 cavernes

Hack, Robert

434

NetPilot: Automating Datacenter Network Failure Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NetPilot: Automating Datacenter Network Failure Mitigation Xin Wu Daniel Turner Chao-Chih Chen Duke-on and fast-response online ser- vices have driven modern datacenter networks to undergo tremen- dous growth of critical failures commonly encountered in production datacenter networks. Categories and Subject

435

Nortel CallPilot A-Style Command Comparison Card  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reserved. CallPilot 4.0 or later. Issue Standard 01.01 March 2007 1 Skip Back 2 Pause Resume 3 Skip Forward 4 Re-Play 5 Envelope 6 Forward 7 Delete 8 Reply 9 Save * Exit 0 Help ...

436

Making the World a Witness report on the pilot phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this unlikely consortium as the beginning of a paradigm shift, when instruments of national security, heretoforeMaking the World a Witness report on the pilot phase december 2010 - june 2012 Satellite Sentinel december 2010 - june 2012 Satellite Sentinel Project #12;Table of Contents Introduction by Charlie Clements

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

437

Grid Computing Workloads: Bags of Tasks, Workflows, Pilots, and Others  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Grid Computing Workloads: Bags of Tasks, Workflows, Pilots, and Others Alexandru Iosup and Dick, the Netherlands Contact info: A.Iosup@tudelft.nl, D.H.J.Epema@tudelft.nl Abstract--In the mid 1990s, the grid computing com- munity promised the "compute power grid," a utility com- puting infrastructure for scientists

Iosup, Alexandru

438

Regional Drinking Water Security District Level Pilot Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Drinking Water Security District Level Pilot Project Concept Note Milind Sohoni Head that most habitations of several talukas will face drinking water stress for much of the coming year. The central objective of the project will be to ensure regional drinking water security for a district

Sohoni, Milind

439

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP), collectively referred to as the Permittees Isolation Plan (Plan) for identified nitrate salt bearing waste disposed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant detailed proposal for the expedited closure of underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) Panel 6, so

Napp, Nils

440

CX-002474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Full Scale Testing Characterization, System Optimization, Demonstration of Grid Connected Wind Turbines and Wind Powered Water Desalination...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Dynamic Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment Tool - 12490  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Performance Assessment (PA) methodology comprises a toolbox used to demonstrate regulatory compliance of the repository after facility closure. The PA framework rests upon an extensive suite of computational codes. In some cases, significant alteration of code inputs is a tedious and difficult task. Due to the nature of the application for which they are used, PA codes used in support of WIPP regulatory compliance demonstration must satisfy stringent quality assurance requirements. Consequently, many of the coding practices used during original code development are still implemented today. A more efficient workflow configuration has the potential to alleviate difficulties associated with extensive code input modifications. Here, this potential is assessed via an implementation of a more flexible scientific workflow system for a subset of the codes used in WIPP PA. The scientific workflow approach taken here for a dynamic PA system enables users from disparate backgrounds to dramatically shorten the time between hypothesis and analysis by decreasing the amount of a priori knowledge, from a range of disciplines, needed to execute the code. Having smaller iteration times allows for more ideas to be tested and explored, which leads to safer and more optimized systems. Note that these high-level, dynamic tools are intended only for initial scoping studies on the personal computer of a researcher. Full, regulatory compliance calculations may occur only within a qualified computing environment. However, the WIPP PA tools here may guide future research and indicate regions of the analysis space that are worth further study. This next generation of PA software provides the ability to perform scoping investigations of repository performance quickly and easily, and has an accessible and useful interface to a variety of users, such as fuel cycle systems designers, domain experts such as repository modelers, and policy makers. The purview of this project allows for many opportunities for future work. Foremost among these is the desire to implement the full BRAGFLO suite within the workflow. This will entail porting or wrapping Genmesh, Matset, LHS, and ICSet within Python. Moreover, unifying the two GUIs into a single driver application would be a natural next step. Once the BRAGFLO suite is completed, other portions of WIPP PA could be implemented with corresponding and inter-operable work-flows. Likely first candidates for this are those codes that are similarly computationally intensive, such as the one used to generate complementary cumulative distribution functions used to demonstrate regulatory compliance (code CCDFGF). (authors)

Scopatz, Anthony M.; March, Jonathan; Weckesser, Warren; Jones, Eric [Enthought Inc, Austin, Texas, 78701 (United States); Lee, Moo; Camphouse, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Software/firmware design specification for 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The software and firmware employed for the operation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are completely described. The systems allow operator control of up to 2048 heliostats, and include the capability of operator-commanded control, graphic displays, status displays, alarm generation, system redundancy, and interfaces to the Operational Control System, the Data Acquisition System, and the Beam Characterization System. The requirements are decomposed into eleven software modules for execution in the Heliostat Array Controller computer, one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Field Controller microprocessor, and one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Controller microprocessor. The design of the modules to satisfy requirements, the interfaces between the computers, the software system structure, and the computers in which the software and firmware will execute are detailed. The testing sequence for validation of the software/firmware is described. (LEW)

Ladewig, T.D.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis.

Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Pilot Survey for KX QSOs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have undertaken a pilot survey for faint QSOs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey Field using the KX selection technique. These observations exploit the very deep near-infrared and optical imaging of this field from UKIRT and Subaru to select candidate QSOs based on their VJK colours and morphologies. We determined redshifts for 426 candidates using the AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT in service time. We identify 17 QSOs (M_BKX selection) to constrain the surface density of QSOs with KKX QSOs at faint limits in the face of the significant contamination by compact, foreground galaxies. The brightest examples from our combined QSO sample will be used in conjunction with a large VLT VIMOS spectroscopic survey of high redshift galaxies in this region to study the structures inhabited by gas, galaxies and growing super-massive black holes at high redshifts in the UKIDSS UDS.

Ian Smail; Rob Sharp; A. M. Swinbank; M. Akiyama; Y. Ueda; S. Foucaud; O. Almaini; S. Croom

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature.

Trauth, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Business Admin