Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

WRI Pilot Test 2012.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 2: Pilot Test Phase 2: Pilot Test Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has commissioned the Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program to validate technologies and methodologies that can improve safety through inspections using wireless technologies that convey real-time identification of commercial vehicles, drivers, and carriers, as well as information about the status of the vehicles and their drivers. It is

2

500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver panel test requirements document solar thermal test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing plans for a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally, the design planned for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Testing is to include operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the panel's transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. Test hardware are described, including the pilot plant receiver, the test receiver assembly, receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and structural assembly. Requirements for the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. The safety of the system is briefly discussed, and procedures are described for assembly, installation, checkout, normal and abnormal operations, maintenance, removal and disposition. Also briefly discussed are quality assurance, contract responsibilities, and test documentation. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort (INEEL) Don Karner (ETA) 2004 Fuel Cell Seminar - San Antonio Session 5B - Hydrogen DOE - Advanced Vehicle Testing...

5

Interwell pressure testing for field pilots  

SciTech Connect

Procedures are described, and results are compared with core analyses, for a number of transient pressure experiments that were carried out between wells in a small chemical flood pilot. Tests include: a standard pulse test, a simultaneous pressure buildup and falloff of wells in a five-spot pattern, a reverse pulse test, in which response from a producer was measured at a nearby injector during injection, and production drawdown tests from normally shut-in observation wells during polymer injection and during subsequent waterflood in a nearby injector. Flowing these observation wells provided an effective way to measure in-situ mobilities of injected fluids. For pulse tests, a simplified method for design and interpretation of single pulses is derived from basic equations. Dimensionless functions, representing directional permeability and geometrical mean permeability, are shown to be functions of a single dimensionless time lag of the maximum pressure response. For large dimensionless time lags, the ratio of dimensionless permeabilities approaches the value ..pi..e and simple geometric relationships may be used to predict either compressibility or formation thickness.

Stegemeier, G.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver-panel test-requirements document: Solar Thermal Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for insolation testing of a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally the design planned for the 10 MWe pilot plant. Testing includes operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. A brief description of the pilot plant receiver subsystem is presented, followed by a detailed description of the receiver assembly to be tested at the Solar Thermal Test Facility. Major subassemblies are described, including the receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and the structural assembly. Requirements of the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. System safety measures are described. The tests, operating conditions, and expected results are presented. Quality assurance, task responsibilities, and test documentation are also discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ecosystem Services Decision Tree Pilot Test with New York Power Authority  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI published the report “Ecosystem Services Decision Tree: A Decision-Support Tool for Consideration of Ecosystem Services in the Electric Power Industry” (1026845) in December of 2012. The Decision Tree was created to help a company determine why, when, and how to consider ecosystem services. The Decision Tree was pilot-tested in 2013 in a theoretical application by New York Power Authority.BackgroundThe pilot test was intended to inform the ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

9

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Pilot Testing of Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts Project Summary Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts Project Summary URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX, will demonstrate at the pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project's pilot tests, conducted at electric generating plants using wet flue gas desulfurization systems and particulate collection systems, will be conducted for periods up to 14 months to provide data for future, full-scale designs. Mercury-oxidation potential will be measured periodically to provide long-term catalyst life data. The project is applicable to about 90,000 megawatts of generation capacity. Project partners are the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, which will co-manage and co-fund the pilot tests, and five utilities.

10

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Microsoft Word - Bldg 100 Pilot Test.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE-LM/GJ791-2005 DOE-LM/GJ791-2005 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Young - Rainey STAR Center Building 100 Area Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test Final Report January 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test Final Report January 2005 Page ii Contents 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Results from the May 2004 (P8) Sampling Event .............................................................. 1 3.0 Microorganism Data

12

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

J. Francfort (INEEL)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems Title Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and...

14

Paris Valley Combination Thermal Drive Pilot Demonstration Test. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wet combustion pilot within the Paris Valley Field, Monterey County, California was initiated in January, 1975 in order to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this enhanced recovery process within a sandstone reservoir having a very viscous crude. Cyclic steaming was also performed and evaluated. Due to the low oil production rates, which were not capable of offsetting the high operating costs, the pilot was terminated during March, 1979. Eighteen producing wells, five air injectors, and one water disposal well were drilled. Primary oil production averaged less than 3 BOPD per well and initial water production ranged from 30 to 100 BWPD per well. Cumulative oil produced during the pilot was 120,623 STBO. Over 90% of the oil produced was due to response from cyclic steaming.

Shipley, R.G. Jr.; Meldau, R.F.; White, P.D.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing  

SciTech Connect

PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOEâ??s goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines, Incorporated Saturn engine rig. High pressure single-injector rig and modified engine rig tests demonstrated NOx less than 2 ppm and CO less than 10 ppm over a wide flame temperature operating regime with low combustion noise (<0.15% peak-to-peak). Minimum NOx for the optimized engine retrofit Full RCL® designs was less than 1 ppm with CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Durability testing of the substrate and catalyst material was successfully demonstrated at pressure and temperature showing long term stable performance of the catalytic reactor element. Stable performance of the reactor element was achieved when subjected to durability tests (>5000 hours) at simulated engine conditions (P=15 atm, Tin=400C/750F.). Cyclic tests simulating engine trips was also demonstrated for catalyst reliability. In addition to catalyst tests, substrate oxidation testing was also performed for downselected substrate candidates for over 25,000 hours. At the end of the program, an RCL® catalytic pilot system has been developed and demonstrated to produce NOx emissions of less than 3 ppm (corrected to 15% O2) for 100% and 50% load operation in a production engine operating on natural gas. In addition, a Full RCL® combustor has been designed and demonstrated less than 2 ppm NOx (with potential to achieve 1 ppm) in single injector and modified engine testing. The catalyst/substrate combination has been shown to be stable up to 5500 hrs in simulated engine conditions.

Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Distributed Power Program DER Pilot Test at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Distributed Power Program conducted a pilot test of interconnection test procedures November 12-16, 2001 at Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of this pilot test was to respond to Congressional direction in the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 2001 to complete a distributed power demonstration at the Nevada Test Site and validated interconnection tests in the field. The demonstration consisted of field verification of tests in IEEE P1547 (Draft 7) that are required for interconnection of distributed generation equipment to electrical power systems. Some of the testing has been conducted in a laboratory setting, but the Nevada Test Site provided a location to verify the interconnection tests in the field. The testing also provided valuable information for evaluating the potential for the Nevada Test Site to host future field-testing activities in support of Distributed Energy Resources System Integration R&D.

Kroposki, B.; DeBlasio, R.; Galdo, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test  

SciTech Connect

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Expansion capacity of an SX unit in uranium process pilot tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rising price of uranium has led uranium producers to increase their plant capacity. The new project proposed to increase capacity is based on processing low-grade uranium by heap leaching. It is necessary to modify the plant, particularly the solvent extraction unit, to handle the increased flow. The goal of our study is to determine the minimal changes necessary to process the whole flow. Several stages have been carried out (i) thermodynamic modelling of the solvent extraction process to determine the capacities of the SX plant and the impact of the modification and (ii) pilot tests at the plant of the different configurations proposed by modelling. This paper presents results of the pilot tests performed at the plant. (authors)

Courtaud, B.; Auger, F.; Morel, P. [AREVA-NC/SEPA, Bessines sur Gartempe (France); Sanoussi, M. [SOMAIR, Arlit (Niger)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems Title Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4985E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D., Peter J. Biermayer, and Derek A. King Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-4985E Pagination 29 Date Published January 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4985E Abstract This paper provides an overview of the pilot phase of a field study to determine the feasibility of a method of directly measuring the waste of water and energy caused by current hot water distribution systems (HWDS) in California residences using wireless sensor network technologies. The experience gained in the pilot phase study using wireless sensor networks demonstrates that it is clearly feasible to use this technology for measuring water and gas flows and temperatures.The goal was to demonstrate a method to reliably collect water flow and temperature data from every indoorhot water end use point, at the water heater in one second intervals when water was flowing. The overall success of the pilot phase study indicates that this technique can work. However, the pilot phase study did reveal shortcomings in many areas. The recommendations in this paper address those shortcomings and provide ways to improve the outcomes of any follow-on field study. The project's tasks were to test and evaluate the proposed hardware, installation protocols, data collection, and processing procedures. The techniques developed in this project provide a way to accurately measure temperature and flow of indoor water use events at one second resolution. The technologies used in this pilot phase study are viable for use in a larger field study to determine the energy and water efficiency of hot water distribution systems in California homes. The lessons learned from this experience will improve procedures, programming and wireless sensor network specifications.

22

Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide >99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50 {micro}m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of the perforated plate configuration on bag protection and AHPC overall performance and to optimize the perforated plate design. Five different perforated plate configurations were evaluated in a coal combustion system. The AHPC performed extremely well even at a low current level (1.5-3.0 mA) and a low pulse trigger pressure of 6.5 in. W.C. (1.62 kPa), resulting in a bag-cleaning interval of over 40 min at an A/C ratio of 12 ft/min (3.7 m/min) for most of the test period. The longest bag-cleaning interval was 594 min, which is the best to date. The residual drag was reduced to the range from 0.25 to 0.35 in. H{sub 2}O/ft/min, showing an excellent bag-cleaning ability under the perforated plate configurations. The K{sub 2}C{sub i} at the current level of 3 mA was as low as 1.0, indicating excellent ESP performance. All the results are the best achieved to date.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FAQ for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program December 2010 Table of Contents Introduction............................................................................................................................... 1 What product types will be tested? ................................................................................................. 1 Will testing continue after the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) ends? .................................................................................................................................................... 1 For Consumers .......................................................................................................................... 1

26

Degassing and two-phase flow pilot hole test report  

SciTech Connect

A pilot hole test was conducted to support the design of the Degassing of Groundwater and Two-Phase Flow experiments planned for the Hard Rock Laboratory, Aespoe, Sweden. The test consisted of a sequence of constant pressure borehole inflow tests (CPTs) and pressure recovery tests (PRTs) in borehole KA2512A. The test sequence was designed to detect degassing effects from the change in transmissivity, or hydraulic conductivity, and storativity when the borehole pressure is lowered below the groundwater bubble pressure. The entire 37.3m of the borehole section was tested without packers. Flow response to pressure changes in CPTs occurred rapidly. Flowrates fluctuated before attaining a steady trend, probably due to effective stress changes when borehole pressure was reduced for the first time. These factors decreased the sensitivity of type-curve fits to values of specific storage. The relationship between borehole pressure and steady-state flowrates was linear over borehole pressures of 1500 kPa (abs) down to 120 kPa (abs) during testing in December 1994, indicating that processes that may change hydraulic conductivity at low borehole pressures, such as degassing, calcite precipitation or turbulence, did not occur to a measurable degree. Test results during January and February of 1995 suggest that degassing may have occurred. The hydraulic conductivity measured at a borehole pressure equal to 120 kPa (abs) was 20% lower than the hydraulic conductivity measured at a borehole pressure of 1500 kPa (abs); the latter value was 10% lower than the hydraulic conductivity measured in December, 1994. The volumetric gas content measured during this time was 1% v/v. Pressures in monitoring well KA2511A responded to the testing in KA2512A. Step-changes in flowrates coincided with blasting at 3300-3400 m tunnel length. The magnitude of these changes was greater at the lower borehole pressures. Step increases in pressures in KA2511A also coincided with the blasts.

Geller, J.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jarsjoe, J. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Water Resource Engineering

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

hydrogen pilot plant, H2ICE vehicle testing INL alternative energy vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Pilot Plant, H2ICE Hydrogen Pilot Plant, H2ICE Vehicle Testing, & INL Alternative Energy Vehicles (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INL/CON-05-00694 AVTA Presentation Outline * Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design and Operations * Hydrogen internal combustion engine vehicle testing * Oil bypass filter system evaluation * Diesel engine idling testing * INL alternative fuel infrastructure * INL alternative fuel fleet * WWW information APS Alternative Fuel (Alt-Fuel) Pilot Plant - Partners * Arizona Public Service (APS) * Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) * Idaho National Laboratory (INL) * Started operations - 2002 Alt-Fuel Pilot Plant & Vehicle Testing - Objectives * Evaluate the safety & reliability of operating ICE

28

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

BENECKE MW

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evaluation of the North Burbank unit tertiary recovery pilot test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of the performance of the Phillips North Burbank micellar-polymer flood has been completed. The projected ultimate recovery is estimated to be about 300,000 barrels, which is about one half of the initial prediction made by Phillips. Although oil recovery has been less than expected, sufficient additional oil has been recovered to consider the project technically successful. The lower-than-expected oil recovery is attributed principally to high sulfonate losses. Loss of the sulfonate appears to be the result of significant adsorption to the oil-wet pore surfaces and mixing of micellar fluids with in-place water, which is of high salinity and hardness. Contact of the sulfonate with the high concentration of calcium ions creates calcium sulfonate, which either precipitates as an insoluble phase or partitions into the oil phase. Sulfonate partitioning would have created an upper-phase microemulsion, which cannot be easily displaced by water due to the relatively high interfacial tension. The following recommendations are made for improvement of the project: (1) Since preflushes may not always be effective or practical, use a surfactant system which is more tolerant of salinity and hardness. (2) A preflush, if needed, could be improved by designing the volume and salinity of injected fluids to efficiently remove divalent ions from reservoir clays and to displace excess salinity. (3) The surfactant system should be designed with the aid of displacement tests in field cores, conducted over the range of frontal velocities expected in the reservoir. It is particularly important to evaluate displacement at the lower velocity range. (4) Improve operational procedures by conducting workovers prior to pilot initiation and by careful control of injection pressures to insure that fracture extension does not occur.

Tracy, G.W.; Dauben, D.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and testing the wells. Capay Shale — Gas Reservoir Pilot Thethe 2-3 m thick Capay Shale gas interval containing methanedepleted gas reservoir located within the Middle Capay shale

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride at a former grain storage facility in Missouri March 26, 2013 At a former grain storage facility in Missouri, EVS has initiated a pilot test of an innovative treatment using amended zero-valent iron to achieve in situ chemical reduction of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations above regulatory levels in soil and groundwater (at 8-89 ft below ground level [BGL]) are confined to a small area of the former facility, on property that is now a county fairground. At present, the contamination poses no known risks to fairgrounds workers or visitors. The deep bedrock aquifers in the area are at minimal risk of contamination. The areas targeted for treatment in the pilot test are localized

33

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and testing the wells. Capay Shale — Gas Reservoir Pilot Thewithin the Middle Capay shale Figure 3. Typical geologic2 is in the Middle Capay Shale. at a depth of 928 m (3044

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Scaleup of Structured Packing from Distillation Pilot Plant Testing to Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structured packing is being utilized more and more in the process industry for increased efficiency, greater capacity, and energy savings in distillation columns. Pilot plant testing of the actual chemical system using commercially available structured packing is invaluable, but years of experience in pilot plant testing have shown that scaleup to successful commercial designs is a complicated process. In this paper an actual case history is cited as an example of the problems and benefits of conducting pilot plant tests which set the commercial design bases for a distillation train. The actual pilot plant testing involved a different structured packing type and blocked out operations to simulate a large number of theoretical stages. The pilot plant results verified the thermodynamic data to a high confidence level. As a result, the initial commercial installation of structured packing was started immediately. The actual installation and the startup are covered with a discussion of the energy savings and quality improvement which were obtained by replacing trays with the packing. Another case of retrofit testing in the new Koch Development Pilot Plant is discussed indicating other areas for attention to detail.

Berven, O. J.; Ulowetz, M. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, First-Year Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers are conducting field tests to evaluate the ability of a variety of materials to oxidize vapor-phase elemental mercury. Testing will be conducted at two sites for 14 months at each site. This report summarizes the first year of work on the project, including installation, and four months of testing of the pilot at the first site.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology  

SciTech Connect

Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power's DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.

Provol, S.J.; Dryden, R.J. (Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power`s DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.

Provol, S.J.; Dryden, R.J. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Test results from the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500 kW power plant utilizing direct contact heat exchange (DCHX) between the geothermal brine and the isobutane (IC/sub 4/) working fluid is being operated at the East Mesa test facility. The power plant incorporates a 40-inch-diameter direct-contactor approximately 35 feet tall. The purpose of the pilot plant is to determine the feasibility of large-scale direct-contact heat exchange and power plant operation with the DCHX. The binary cycle offers higher conversion factors (heat energy transformed to electrical energy) than the flashed steam approach for geothermal brines in the 300 to 400/sup 0/F range and preliminary results indicate the DCHX system may have higher performance than the conventional tube-and-shell binary approach. This performance advantage results from the absence of any fouling and the very close pinch temperatures achieved in the DCHX itself. The baseline performance tests for the plant were completed in January 1980. The results of these tests and follow-on testing are covered.

Nichols, K.E.; Olander, R.G.; Lobach, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Pilot Tests of In Situ Reactive Zone Groundwater Remediation for Arsenic Near a Coal Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ groundwater treatment is an alternative to groundwater extraction and above ground treatment. The applicability of this technology is being evaluated for the treatment of dissolved trace elements associated with ash impoundments and landfills. The objective of this work is to demonstrate practical in situ treatment through initial bench testing for technology selection followed by a field pilot test. Laboratory bench test results provided the basis for the field testing; ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

North Burbank Unit Tertiary Recovery Pilot Test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last fifteen months of the project, fresh water injection was continued, while efforts were made to raise injection rates. Chemical analyses of fluids showed that production of surfactant components and polyacrylamide declined steadily almost to the vanishing point in all the producers. The oil production rate has declined slowly since reaching its peak level of 286 BPD in April 1978, and appears to be on an exponential decline curve which projects the continuation of tertiary oil production several years into the future. As of August 11, 1979 (expiration date), the total oil production rate was about 195 BPD at a water-oil ratio of about 66. At that time, a total of 153,500 barrels of tertiary oil had been recovered. It is predicted that 283,000 barrels of tertiary oil will be recovered if the pilot is operated to the economic limit of the wells. This will require an additional 9 years at present rates of injection.

Trantham, J.C. (ed.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

50

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, Second-Year Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the second year of technical progress on the project entitled "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems." The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. ...

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

NETL: Pilot Test of a Nanoporous, Super-hydrophobic Membrane Contactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE00013123 SRI is incorporating an advanced carbon capture sorbent-based process in a 1 MWe slipstream pilot plant that will reduce the parasitic plant load by using a CO2 capture sorbent requiring a reduced amount of steam. The process is based on advanced carbon sorbents having a low heat of adsorption, high CO2 adsorption capacity, and excellent selectivity. Design and performance data will be produced by testing the sorbent using the slipstream from an operating pulverized coal (PC)-fired boiler under realistic conditions and continuous long-term operation. The acquired data will be used for further development and commercialization of the process.

55

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

56

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Risk-Informed Snubber Inservice Testing Guidelines: Pilot Project Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current industry practice of assuming nuclear power plant snubbers are a homogenous population requires more frequent examination and expanding the test samples if failures are encountered. This report proposes a risk-informed approach that would reduce snubber examination and testing scope and thereby reduce plant O&M costs, shorten plant outages, and reduce personnel radiation exposure.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

NETL: Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System Project No.: DE-FE0013105 TDA is developing a new sorbent-based pre-combustion carbon capture technology for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The process, which was evaluated at bench-scale under a previous effort, uses an advanced physical adsorbent that selectively removes CO2 from coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) above the dew point of the gas. The sorbent consists of a mesoporous carbon grafted with surface functional groups that remove CO2 via an acid-base interaction. The reactor design will be optimized by using computational fluid dynamics and adsorption modeling to improve the pressure swing adsorption cycle sequence. The research will include: two 0.1 MWe tests with a fully-equipped prototype unit using actual synthesis gas to prove the viability of the new technology; long-term sorbent life evaluation in a bench-scale setup of 20,000 cycles; the fabrication of a pilot-scale testing unit that will contain eight sorbent reactors; and the design of a CO2 purification sub-system. The CO2 removal technology will significantly improve (3 to 4 percent) the IGCC process efficiency needed for economically viable production of power from coal.

59

MHK Projects/Neptune Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.7123,"lon":-0.38306,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this information is not repeated here.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

10 MWe solar thermal central receiver pilot plant control system automation test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes results of tests on the automatic features added to the control system for the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, CA. The plant, called Solar One, is a cooperative activity between the Department of Energy and the Associates: Southern California Edison, the Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power and the California Energy Commission. This report provides an overview of the automation features added to the plant control system, a description of tests performed on the system, and the results of those tests.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB GeologicPilot Test  

SciTech Connect

WESTCARB, one of seven U.S. Department of Energypartnerships, identified (during its Phase I study) over 600 gigatonnesof CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations located in the Westernregion. The Western region includes the WESTCARB partnership states ofAlaska, Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and theCanadian province of British Columbia. The WESTCARB Phase II study iscurrently under way, featuring three geologic and two terrestrial CO2pilot projects designed to test promising sequestration technologies atsites broadly representative of the region's largest potential carbonsinks. This paper focuses on two of the geologic pilot studies plannedfor Phase II -referred to-collectively as the Rosetta-Calpine CO2 StorageProject. The first pilot test will demonstrate injection of CO2 into asaline formation beneath a depleted gas reservoir. The second test willgather data for assessing CO2 enhanced gas recovery (EGR) as well asstorage in a depleted gas reservoir. The benefit of enhanced oil recovery(EOR) using injected CO2 to drive or sweep oil from the reservoir towarda production well is well known. EaR involves a similar CO2 injectionprocess, but has received far less attention. Depleted natural gasreservoirs still contain methane; therefore, CO2 injection may enhancemethane production by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance.CO2 injection into a saline formation, followed by injection into adepleted natural gas reservoir, is currently scheduled to start inOctober 2006.

Trautz, Robert; Benson, Sally; Myer, Larry; Oldenburg, Curtis; Seeman, Ed; Hadsell, Eric; Funderburk, Ben

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Decontamination and decommissioning of the EBR-I complex. Topical report No. 3. NAK disposal pilot plant test  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) requires processing of the primary coolant, an eutectic solution of sodium and potassium (NaK), remaining in the EBR-I primary and secondary coolant systems. While developing design criteria for the NaK processing system, reasonable justification was provided for the development of a pilot test plant for field testing some of the process concepts and proposed hardware. The objective of this activity was to prove the process concept on a low-cost, small- scale test bed. The pilot test plant criteria provided a general description of the test including: the purpose, location, description of test equipment available, waste disposal requirements, and a flow diagram and conceptual equipment layout. The pilot plant test operations procedure provided a detailed step-by-step procedure for operation of the pilot plant to obtain the desired test data and operational experience. It also spelled out the safety precautions to be used by operating personnel, including the requirement for alkali metals training certification, use of protective clothing, availability of fire protection equipment, and caustic handling procedures. The pilot plant test was performed on May 16, 1974. During the test, 32.5 gallons or 240 lb of NaK was successfully converted to caustic by reaction with water in a caustic solution. (auth)

Commander, J C; Lewis, L; Hammer, R

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NO{sub x} Abatement Pilot Plant 90-day test results report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to provide both volume reduction and a more stable waste form. Because a large component of the HLW is nitric acid, high levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) are produced in the process and discharged to the environment via the calciner off-gas. The NO{sub x} abatement program is required by the new Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project permit to construct to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from the NWCF. Extensive research and development has indicated that the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process is the most promising technology for treating the NWCF off-gas. Pilot plant tests were performed to determine the compatibility of the SCR process with actual NWCF off-gas. Test results indicate that the SCR process is a viable method for abating the NO{sub x} from the NWCF off-gas. Reduction efficiencies over 95% can be obtained, with minimal amounts of ammonia slip, provided favorable operating conditions exist. Two reactors operated with series flow will provide optimum reduction capabilities. Typical operation should be performed with a first reactor stage gas space velocity of 20,000 hr{sup {minus}1} and an inlet temperature of 320{degrees}C. The first stage exhaust NO{sub x} concentration will then dictate the parameter settings for the second stage. Operation should always strive for a peak reactor temperature of 520{degrees}C in both reactors, with minimal NH{sub 3} slip from the second reactor. Frequent fluctuations in the NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentration will require a full-scale reduction facility that is versatile and quick-responding. Sudden changes in NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentrations will require quick detection and immediate response to avoid reactor bed over-heating and/or excessive ammonia slip.

McCray, J.A.; Boardman, R.D. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant: 1983 operational test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of the world's largest solar thermal central receiver electric power plant, the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant, ''Solar One,'' located near Barstow, California, were completed in 1982. The plant continued in the two-year experimental Test and Evaluation phase throughout 1983. Experiences during 1983 have shown that all parts of the plant, especially solar unique ones, operated as well as or better than expected. It was possible to incorporate routine power production into the Test and Evaluation phase because plant performance yielded high confidence. All operational modes were tested, and plant automation activities began in earnest. This report contains: (1) a brief description of the plant system; (2) a summary of the year's experiences; (3) topical sections covering preliminary power production, automation activities, and receiver leak repairs; (4) a monthly list of principal activities; and (5) operation and maintenance costs.

Bartel, J.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900 C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter a sample of the Herrin No. 6 coal (IBCSP 112) was delivered to the CANMET facility and testing is scheduled for the week of 11 December 1994. Also at this time, all of the IBCSP samples are being evaluated for blast furnace injection using the CANMET computer model.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low ( 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 June 19, 2007 LBNL Report Number 62218 ii Acknowledgements The work described in this report was funded by the Emerging Technologies Program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Additional funding was provided by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded by the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission), Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program, under Work for Others Contract No.500-03-026, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are grateful for the extensive

73

Field pilot tests for tertiary recovery using butane and propane injection  

SciTech Connect

This work describes a pilot project for tertiary recovery of liquid hydrocarbons through LPG injection in water-out sections of the Bolivar reservoir in La Pena Field, Santa Cruz, Boliva. The promising results obtained in the initial field miscibility tests, as well as the results from a mathematical model built to stimulate and evaluate the tertiary recovery project, directed subsequent work into a cyclic scheme for enhanced recovery. This scheme is explained and injection production data is presented. Field facilities built to handle both the injected LPG and the produced oil-LPG mixture are described. The oil/LPG ratio and the LPG recovered/injected fraction are the main factors measured in this to make further considerations for a full scale project.

Pacheco, E.F.; Garcia, A.I.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Underground tank vitrification: A pilot-scale in situ vitrification test of a tank containing a simulated mixed waste sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report documents research on sludge vitrification. The first pilot scale in-situ vitrification test of a simulated underground tank was successfully completed by researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The vitrification process effectively immobilized the vast majority of radionuclides simulants and toxic metals were retained in the melt and uniformly distributed throughout the monolith.

Thompson, L.E.; Powell, T.D.; Tixier, J.S.; Miller, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Owczarski, P.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

10 MWe solar pilot plant, Daggett, California. Flushing and steam blows preoperational test procedure 980. Revision: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prescribed steps are given for flushing and steam blowing the condenser hotwell, deaerator, inline demineralizers, thermal storage subsystem flash tank, and steam lines of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. Included are acceptance criteria, precautions, a list of test equipment, initial conditions, procedures and data collection, and system restoration. (LEW)

Williams, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pilot Testing of WRI'S Novel Mercury Control Technology by Pre-Combustion Thermal Treatment of Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges to the coal-fired power industry continue to focus on the emission control technologies, such as mercury, and plant efficiency improvements. An alternate approach to post-combustion control of mercury, while improving plant efficiency deals with Western Research Institute's (WRI)'s patented pre-combustion mercury removal and coal upgrading technology. WRI was awarded under the DOE's Phase III Mercury program, to evaluate the effectiveness of WRI's novel thermal pretreatment process to achieve >50% mercury removal, and at costs of Edison (DTE), and SaskPower to undertake this evaluation. The technical objectives of the project were structured in two phases: Phase I--coal selection and characterization, and bench-and PDU-scale WRI process testing and; and Phase II--pilot-scale pc combustion testing, design of an integrated boiler commercial configuration, its impacts on the boiler performance and the economics of the technology related to market applications. This report covers the results of the Phase I testing. The conclusion of the Phase I testing was that the WRI process is a technically viable technology for (1) removing essentially all of the moisture from low rank coals, thereby raising the heating value of the coal by about 30% for subbituminous coals and up to 40% for lignite coals, and (2) for removing volatile trace mercury species (up to 89%) from the coal prior to combustion. The results established that the process meets the goals of DOE of removing <50% of the mercury from the coals by pre-combustion methods. As such, further testing, demonstration and economic analysis as described in the Phase II effort is warranted and should be pursued.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Kumar Sellakumar

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

80

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pilot Testing of WRI'S Novel Mercury Control Technology by Pre-Combustion Thermal Treatment of Coal  

SciTech Connect

The challenges to the coal-fired power industry continue to focus on the emission control technologies, such as mercury, and plant efficiency improvements. An alternate approach to post-combustion control of mercury, while improving plant efficiency deals with Western Research Institute's (WRI)'s patented pre-combustion mercury removal and coal upgrading technology. WRI was awarded under the DOE's Phase III Mercury program, to evaluate the effectiveness of WRI's novel thermal pretreatment process to achieve >50% mercury removal, and at costs of <$30,000/lb of Hg removed. WRI has teamed with Etaa Energy, Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (FWNA), and Washington Division of URS (WD-URS), and with project co-sponsors including Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC), Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU), North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), Detroit Edison (DTE), and SaskPower to undertake this evaluation. The technical objectives of the project were structured in two phases: Phase I--coal selection and characterization, and bench-and PDU-scale WRI process testing and; and Phase II--pilot-scale pc combustion testing, design of an integrated boiler commercial configuration, its impacts on the boiler performance and the economics of the technology related to market applications. This report covers the results of the Phase I testing. The conclusion of the Phase I testing was that the WRI process is a technically viable technology for (1) removing essentially all of the moisture from low rank coals, thereby raising the heating value of the coal by about 30% for subbituminous coals and up to 40% for lignite coals, and (2) for removing volatile trace mercury species (up to 89%) from the coal prior to combustion. The results established that the process meets the goals of DOE of removing <50% of the mercury from the coals by pre-combustion methods. As such, further testing, demonstration and economic analysis as described in the Phase II effort is warranted and should be pursued.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Kumar Sellakumar

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s)...

86

FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger WVDP facility, lending confidence to the tests results [1]. Since the inclusion or exclusion of a bubbler has significant design implications, the Project commissioned further tests to address this issue. In an effort to identify factors that might increase the glass production rate for projected WTP melter feeds, a subsequent series of tests was performed on the DM100 system. Several tests variables led to glass production rate increases to values significantly above the 400 kg/m2/d requirement. However, while small-scale melter tests are useful for screening relative effects, they tend to overestimate absolute glass production rates, particularly for un-bubbled tests. Consequently, when scale-up effects were taken into account, it was not clear that any of the variables investigated would conclusively meet the 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d requirement without bubbling. The present series of tests was therefore performed on the DM1200 one-third scale HLW pilot melter system to provide the required basis for a final decision on whether bubblers would be included in the HLW melter. The present tests employed the same AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing for consistency and comparability with the results from the earlier tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Installation of UPR-100-N-17 Bioremediation Wells and Performance of Bioventing Pilot Tests  

SciTech Connect

Sampling and analytical requirements for in situ bioremediation pilot study for remediation of vadose zone petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

W. S. Thompson

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- February 3, 2012 ENERGY STAR® is a joint program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with a dual focus on energy and cost savings. These goals are reached through a combination of increasing customer awareness, partnering with over 15,000 private and public sector organizations and driving widespread technological advances in energy efficiency. ENERGY STAR recognizes three paths to increased daily energy efficiency: bringing to market new energy-efficient products, constructing efficient new homes and commercial buildings, and improving the efficiency of existing homes, commercial buildings and industrial facilities. In 2010, DOE launched a pilot program to verify the energy efficiency and water-use characteristics of

89

Solvent extraction of methane from simulated geopressured-geothermal fluids: sub-pilot test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extraction of methane dissolved in 15 wt % sodium chloride solution at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi has been demonstrated using n-hexadecane as the solvent in a sub-pilot scale extraction column operated in a continuous, countercurrent flow mode. Greater than 90% recovery of methane was obtained with solvent/brine mass flow ratios in the range of .040 to .045. The height of an ideal stage in this experimental Elgin-type spray column is estimated to be 1.5 ft. Application of this process on actual geopressured fluids is technically feasible, and when combined with direct drive injection disposal is economically attractive. Design and operation of a methane saturated-brine supply system to provide simulated geopressured fluid continuously at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi are also described.

Quong, R.; Otsuki, H.H.; Locke, F.E.

1982-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Final phase testing and evaluation of the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing performed during the last phase of the geothermal direct contact heat exchanger program utilizing the 500 kW pilot plant provided more insight into the capabilities and limits of the direct contact approach and showed that more work needs to be done to understand the inner workings of a large direct contact heat exchanger if they are to be modeled analytically. Testing of the column demonstrated that the performance was excellent and that the sizing criteria is conservative. The system operated smoothly and was readily controlled over a wide range of operating conditions. Performance evaluation showed pinch differentials of 4/sup 0/F or less and better than predicted heat transfer capability. Testing during this final phase was directed towards establishing the limits of the column to transfer heat. The working column height was shortened progressively to approximately 16 feet from a design length of 28 feet. The short column performed as well as a full length column and there are indications that the column could have been shortened even more without affecting its ability to transfer heat. The column's ability to perform as well with shortened lengths indicates that the heat transfer coefficients and criteria derived from the small scale tests are very conservative.

Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Nichols, K.; Werner, D.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Test report for cesium powder and pellets inner container decontamination method determination test  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the decontamination method determination testing that was performed on three cesium powder and pellets inner container test specimens The test specimens were provided by B and W Hanford Company (BVMC). The tests were conducted by the Numatec Hanford Company (NHC), in the 305 Building. Photographic evidence was also provided by NHC. The Test Plan and Test Report were provided by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations. Witnesses to testing included a test engineer, a BC project engineer, and a BC Quality Assurance (QA) representative. The Test Plan was modified with the mutual decision of the test engineer, the BWHC project engineer, and the BVMC QA representative. The results of this decision were written in red (permanent type) ink on the official copy of the test procedure, Due to the extent of the changes, a summary of the test results are provided in Section 3.0 of this Test Report. In addition, a copy of the official copy field documentation obtained during testing is included in Appendix A. The original Test Plan (HNF-2945) will be revised to indicate that extensive changes were required in the field during testing, however, the test documentation will stand as is (i.e., it will not be retyped, text shaded, etc.) due to the inclusion of the test parameters and results into this Test Report.

Kelly, D.L.

1998-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Gridley Ethanol Demonstration Project Utilizing Biomass Gasification Technology: Pilot Plant Gasifier and Syngas Conversion Testing; August 2002 -- June 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of an overall evaluation of using a modified Pearson Pilot Plant for processing rice straw into syngas and ethanol and the application of the Pearson technology for building a Demonstration Plant at Gridley. This report also includes information on the feedstock preparation, feedstock handling, feedstock performance, catalyst performance, ethanol yields and potential problems identified from the pilot scale experiments.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R. [eds.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Wicks, G.G. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: in-vivo measurements, pilot study report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a project to evaluate the in-vivo counting performance criteria of draft ANSI Standard N13.30, Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay. The draft ANSI Standard provides guidance to in-vivo counting facilities regarding the precision and accuracy of measurements for certain categories of commonly assayed radionuclides and critical regions of the body. The draft ANSI Standard was evaluated by conducting an intercomparison test involving a number of whole-body counting facilities. The testing involved three types of measurements: chest counting for detection of radioactive materials in the lung, whole-body counting for detection of uniformly distributed activity, and neck counting for detection of radioactive material concentrated in the thyroid. Results of the first-round intercomparison test are presented in this report. The appropriateness of the draft Standard performance criteria was judged by the measurement results reported by participating in-vivo counting facilities. The intercomparison testing showed that some laboratories had difficulty meeting the performance criteria specified in the draft ANSI Standard N13.30.

Robinson, A.V.; Fisher, D.R.; Reece, W.D.; MacLellan, J.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Results of HWVP transuranic process waste treatment laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests using specially ground zeolite  

SciTech Connect

Process waste streams from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) may require treatment for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) element removal in order to meet criteria for incorporation in grout. The approach planned for cesium and strontium removal is ion exchange using a zeolite exchanger followed by filtration. Filtration using a pneumatic hydropulse filter is planned to remove TRU elements which are associated with process solids and to also remove zeolite bearing the cesium and strontium. The solids removed during filtration are recycled to the melter feed system to be incorporated into the HWVP glass product. Fluor Daniel, Inc., the architect-engineering firm for HWVP, recommended a Pneumatic Hydropulse (PHP) filter manufactured by Mott Metallurgical Corporation for use in the HWVP. The primary waste streams considered for application of zeolite contact and filtration are melter off-gas condensate from the submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and equipment decontamination solutions from the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT). Other waste streams could be treated depending on TRU element and radionuclide content. Laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests were conducted to provide a preliminary assessment of the adequacy of the recommended filter for application to HWVP waste treatment.

Eakin, D.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CMVRTC: WRI Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WRI PRE-FOt WRI PRE-FOt diagram The purpose of this Pre-FOT is to provide a bridge between the just-completed WRI Commercial Mobile Radio Services (CMRS) Pilot Test (Pilot Test) (31 Jan 11) and the desired large-scale FOT (2014). A bridge is needed because critical portions of the WRI CMRS Pilot Test were not completed or fully tested (e.g. pull-in/by-pass, safety sensor data present in Safety Data Message (SDM), flexible geo-fencing, carrier interface), and the Government Back Office System (GBOS) was not developed in a way to support real, large-scale WRI testing (e.g., interface not relevant to enforcement, system not stable or robust, safety sensor data not understood by developers). This effort, the WRI CMRS Pre-FOT End-to-End System Validation (WRI Pre-FOT), seeks to develop and test a complete end-to-end

99

Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 06/10/2013 | NR-13-06-04 Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Image courtesy of National Institutes of Health. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Using data derived from nuclear weapons testing of the 1950s and '60s, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that a small portion of the human brain involved in memory makes new neurons well into adulthood. The research may have profound impacts on human behavior and mental health. The study supports the importance of investigating the therapeutic potential of applying adult neurogenesis to the treatment of age-related cognitive disorders. Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated from neural stem

100

Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed to utilize the High Intensity Infrared lamp located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the measurement of thermal conductivity of bulk refractory materials at elevated temperatures. The applicability of standardized test methods to determine the thermal conductivity of refractory materials at elevated temperatures is limited to small sample sizes (laser flash) or older test methods (hot wire, guarded hot plate), which have their own inherent problems. A new method, based on the principle of the laser flash method, but capable of evaluating test specimens on the order of 200 x 250 x 50 mm has been developed. Tests have been performed to validate the method and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Loveland, Erick R [ORNL; Prigmore, Andre L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant, solar-facilities design integration: system integration laboratory test plan (RADL item 6-4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general demonstration test plan is provided for the activities to be accomplished at the Systems Integration Laboratory. The Master Control System, Subsystem Distributed Process Control, Representative Signal Conditioning Units, and Redline Units from the Receiver Subsystem and the Thermal Storage Subsystem and other external interface operational functions will be integrated and functionally demonstrated. The Beckman Multivariable Control Unit will be tested for frequency response, static checks, configuration changes, switching transients, and input-output interfaces. Maximum System Integration Laboratory testing will demonstrate the operational readiness of Pilot Plant controls and external interfaces that are available. Minimum System Integration Laboratory testing will be accomplished with reduced set of hardware, which will provide capability for continued development and demonstration of Operational Control System plant control application software. Beam Control System Integration Laboratory testing will demonstrate the operational readiness of the Beam Control System equipment and software. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Microbial field pilot study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Standard Test Method for Determining Electrical Conductivity Using the Electromagnetic (Eddy-Current) Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Test Method for Determining Electrical Conductivity Using the Electromagnetic (Eddy-Current) Method

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Final design, installation and baseline testing of 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa  

SciTech Connect

The pilot plant was configured to accomplish two objectives - first to evaluate the overall performance potential of direct contact powerplants and second to develop design criteria and parameters for full-scale direct contact plants. The pilot plant includes all of the process functions that would be incorporated in a full-scale plant. Incoming brine is treated to remove undissolved gases, pumped through the direct contact heat exchanger (DCHX), and then sent to a recovery system for removal of the dissolved working fluid. The chosen working fluid is isobutane (IC/sub 4/). The working fluid loop includes a radial inflow turbine with generator, condensers, hot-well reservoir, and a feed pump. A downwell pump was installed in the geothermal well to supply the plant with unflashed brine. (MHR)

Hlinak, A.; Lobach, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Werner, D.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

CX-008271: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Flowback Water CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 05142012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s):...

106

CX-009892: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination "25A2115 - Pilot Scale Testing of Carbon Negative, Product Flexible Syngas Chemical Looping CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01152010 Location(s): Ohio, Alabama...

107

The use of mathematical modeling and pilot plant testing to develop a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanistic mathematical model for carbon oxidation, nitrogen removal, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal was used to develop the Step Bio-P process, a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process with a step-feed configuration. A 9,000-L pilot plant with diurnally varying influent process loading rates was operated to verify the model results and to optimize the Step Bio-P process for application at the lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, wastewater treatment plant. The pilot plant was operated for 10 months. An automatic on-line data acquisition system with multiple sampling and metering points for dissolved oxygen, mixed liquor suspended solids, ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, ortho-phosphate, and flow rates was used. A sampling program to obtain off-line data was carried out to verify the information from the on-line system and monitor additional parameters. The on-line and off-line data were used to recalibrate the model, which was used as an experimental design and process optimization tool.

Nolasco, D.A.; Daigger, G.T.; Stafford, D.R.; Kaupp, D.M.; Stephenson, J.P.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microsoft Word - Sludge Test Area CX Determination Form12172012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sludge Test Facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) [CX-TWPC-13-0001] Sludge Test Facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) [CX-TWPC-13-0001] Program or Field Office: Environmental Management - Oak Ridge Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The proposed action is to construct and operate a sludge test facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) to conduct testing activities for sludge mobilization, mixing, and removal from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST). The testing is needed to develop appropriate, compliant treatment to a final waste form that will meet the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This testing is needed for the mobilization, removal, and treatment of the sludge regardless of

109

Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under Surrogate Normal Conditions of Truck Transport R0.1 Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR...

110

Pilot-scale Pilot scale Testing Questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed or represents that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. DE-FC26 DE FC26-07NT42785

Alan E. Bl; Collin Greenwell; Jesse Newcomer Wri; Barbara Carney; Us Doe Netl; High Temperature; Sorbent Testing; De-fc De Fc-nt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Experimental determination of foundation properties without shaker tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The foundation of a rotating machine can contribute to the dynamics of the system, and therefore it becomes essential to include the foundation in the model to predict the correct response of the system. The primary objective of this research is to develop and implement a method to extract foundation properties without resorting to shaker or impedance hammer testing. The method developed in this research uses the rotor vibration data and requires knowledge of bearing coefficients. The results for the foundation stiffness, damping and mass are much higher than the values extracted from impedance hammer tests at the bearing interface. Sources of errors include application of the excitation forces, measurement errors, accuracy of bearing coefficients and modal interaction between the pedestals. The concept of using fiber optic sensors to measure bearing forces is studied. Calibration and dynamic testing of the FFPI sensors is conducted. Results from this testing are encouraging and are in acceptable range of predicted values.

Sampathkumar, Varadharajan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Interim measure conceptual design for remediation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas : pilot test and remedy implementation.  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for the short-term, field-scale pilot testing and subsequent implementation of a non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Centralia, Kansas. The IM is recommended to mitigate both (1) localized carbon tetrachloride contamination in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and (2) present (and potentially future) carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the shallow groundwater beneath and in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated that groundwater at the Centralia site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at levels that exceed the Kansas Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. Groundwater sampling and analyses conducted by Argonne under a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) indicated that the carbon tetrachloride levels at several locations in the groundwater plume have increased since twice yearly monitoring of the site began in September 2005. The identified groundwater contamination currently poses no unacceptable health risks, in view of the absence of potential human receptors in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride contamination has also been identified at Centralia in subsurface soils at concentrations on the order of the Kansas Tier 2 RBSL of 200 {micro}g/kg in soil for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Soils contaminated at this level might pose some risk as a potential source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater. To mitigate the existing contaminant levels and decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil, the CCC/USDA recommends initial short-term, field-scale pilot testing of a remedial approach that employs in situ chemical reduction (ISCR), in the form of a commercially available material marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc., Freeport, Illinois (http://www.adventusgroup.com). If the pilot test is successful, it will be followed by a request for KDHE authorization of full implementation of the ISCR approach. In the recommended ISCR approach, the Adventus EHC{reg_sign} material--a proprietary mixture of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron--is introduced into the subsurface, where the components are released slowly into the formation. The compounds create highly reducing conditions in the saturated zone and the overlying vadose zone. These conditions foster chemical and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride. The anticipated effective lifetime of the EHC compounds following injection is 1-5 yr. Although ISCR is a relatively innovative remedial approach, the EHC technology has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater and has been employed at a carbon tetrachloride contamination site elsewhere in Kansas (Cargill Flour Mill and Elevator, Wellington, Kansas; KDHE Project Code C209670158), with the approval of the KDHE. At Centralia, the CCC/USDA recommends use of the ISCR approach initially in a short-term pilot test addressing the elevated carbon tetrachloride levels identified in one of three persistently highly contaminated areas ('hot-spot areas') in the groundwater plume. In this test, a three-dimensional grid pattern of direct-push injection points will be used to distribute the EHC material (in slurry or aqueous form) throughout the volume of the contaminated aquifer and (in selected locations) the vadose zone in the selected hot-spot area. Injection of the EHC material will be conducted by a licensed contractor, under the supervision of Adventus and Argonne technical personnel. The contractor will be identified upon acceptanc

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

113

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

BSCSP Basalt Pilot Phase II Factsheet 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basalt Sequestration Pilot Test 1 Basalt Sequestration Pilot Test 1 FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Big Sky Regional Carbon Partnership Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William Aljoe NETL William.Aljoe@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Lee Spangler Field Test Information: Field Test Name Basalt Sequestration Pilot Test Test Location Near Wallula township in Eastern Washington State Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 1000 Refinery Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Boise White Paper L.L.C., Shell Exploration and Production Company, Port of Walla Walla,

116

Biotransformation of PCBs in Substation Soils: A Review of Laboratory and Pilot-Scale Testing for the Development of an In Situ Proc ess for PCB Biotransformation in Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ methods are desirable for remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), to prevent disruption of activities at industrial sites such as substations. This study follows the development, from laboratory testing through pilot-scale demonstration, of an in situ soil irrigation process for biotransformation of PCBs in soils.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

An automatic method to create flow lines for determination of glacier length: A pilot study with Alaskan glaciers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glacier length is a key parameter in global glacier inventories, but difficult to determine in a consistent way and subject to frequent change. Its vector representation (a flow line) is a most important input for modeling future glacier evolution, but ... Keywords: Algorithm, Flow lines, Glacier, Remote sensing

Raymond Le Bris, Frank Paul

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&D ·Plasma Material Interface Fusion Nuclear Facility Component test facility (CTF)* Pilot plant&D ·Plasma Material Interface Fusion Nuclear Facility Component test facility (CTF)* Pilot plant for a Nuclear Next Step ITER Demo Fusion S&T Research & Development ·High performance, steady state ·Materials R

119

Pilot-scale testing of a new sorbent for combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new regenerable sorbent concept for SO{sub 2} and NOx removal was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station at a 1.5 to 2-MW(e) level. A radial panel-bed filter of a new dry, granular sorbent was exposed to flue gas and regenerated in an experimental proof-of-concept program. The project was successful in demonstrating the new sorbent`s ability to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal, 30% NOx removal, and over 80% removal of residual particulates with realistic approach temperatures and low pressure drops. Based on the results of this project, the retrofit cost of this technology is expected to be on the order of $400 per ton of SO{sub 2} and $900 per ton of NOx removed. This assumes that gas distribution is even and methane regeneration is used for a 30% average utilization. For a 2.5%-sulfur Ohio coal, this translates to a cost of approximately $17 per ton of coal. Two by-product streams were generated in the process that was tested: a solid, spent-sorbent stream and a highly-concentrated SO{sub 2} or elemental-sulfur stream. While not within the scope of the project, it was found possible to process these streams into useful products. The spent sorbent materials were shown to be excellent substrates for soil amendments; the elemental sulfur produced is innocuous and eminently marketable.

Nelson, S. Jr. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Addition on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under consent decree, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the utility industry in December 2011. The floor for mercury emissions was determined using the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) basis under Section 112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. As a result, many plants both in the eastern and western parts of the United States will be required to control and continuously measure mercury concentrations ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REPORT DETAILING DATA COLLECTION IN SUPPORT OF POTENTIAL FY13 PILOT SCALE MELTER TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the “reference ceramic” waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste forms indicated that the pour spout must be maintained above 1400{deg}C to avoid flow blockages due to crystallization. In-situ electron irradiations simulate radiolysis effects indicated hollandite undergoes a crystalline to amorphous transition after a radiation dose of 10{sup 13} Gy which corresponds to approximately 1000 years at anticipated doses (2×10{sup 10}-2×10{sup 11} Gy). Dual-beam ion irradiations employing light ion beam (such as 5 MeV alpha) and heavy ion beam (such as 100 keV Kr) studies indicate that reference ceramic waste forms are radiation tolerant to the ?–particles and ?-particles, but are susceptible to a crystalline to amorphous transition under recoil nuclei effects. A path forward for refining the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere with the use of Ti/TiO2 buffers, and the addition of Cr to the transition metal additives to facilitate Cs-incorporation in the hollandite phase. In addition to melt processing, alternative fabrication routes are being considered including Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP).

Brinkman, K.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.; Fox, K.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Report Detailing Data Collection In Support Of Potential FY13 Pilot Scale Melter Test  

SciTech Connect

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the ?reference ceramic? waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste forms indicated that the pour spout must be maintained above 1400{deg}C to avoid flow blockages due to crystallization. In-situ electron irradiations simulate radiolysis effects indicated hollandite undergoes a crystalline to amorphous transition after a radiation dose of 10{sup 13} Gy which corresponds to approximately 1000 years at anticipated doses (2?10{sup 10}-2?10{sup 11} Gy). Dual-beam ion irradiations employing light ion beam (such as 5 MeV alpha) and heavy ion beam (such as 100 keV Kr) studies indicate that reference ceramic waste forms are radiation tolerant to the ??particles and ?-particles, but are susceptible to a crystalline to amorphous transition under recoil nuclei effects. A path forward for refining the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere with the use of Ti/TiO2 buffers, and the addition of Cr to the transition metal additives to facilitate Cs-incorporation in the hollandite phase. In addition to melt processing, alternative fabrication routes are being considered including Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP).

Brinkman, K. S.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Renewable Energy Pilot Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Pilot Program Renewable Energy Pilot Program Renewable Energy Pilot Program < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Other Policy Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission In June 2010, the Louisiana Public Service Commission (LPSC) unanimously approved a Renewable Energy Pilot Program for the state. The final implementation plan was adopted in November 2010. The goal of the pilot program is to determine whether a renewable portfolio standard is suitable for Louisiana. The pilot program has two major components: the Research

125

Tests to determine effect of humidity on high-efficiency filters when installed horizontally  

SciTech Connect

The object of tests is to determine effect of high-humidity air on the physical characteristics of filter media and separators when the filter is mounted in the horizontal position. Usual installation is with the filter mounted vertically.

Palmer, J.H.

1960-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation  

SciTech Connect

The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

Doughty, C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 2. Preliminary pilot plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preliminary design of a solar water desalination pilot plant is presented. Pilot plant drawings and process descriptions are provided. Use of solar and wind energy are discussed. Testing, performance and cost of the pilot plant are studied. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine who to admit (and, in some cases, to award merit-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine-prepared for these tests. Some are tests of aptitude in quantitative skills, verbal and analytical reasoning and/or writing ability (e.g., GRE, LSAT, GMAT), while others are tests of content knowledge (e.g., GRE Subject Tests

Hampton, Randy

129

Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under Surrogate Normal Conditions of Truck Transport R0.1 Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under Surrogate Normal Conditions of Truck Transport R0.1 The United States current approach of long-term storage at its nuclear power plants and independent spent fuel storage installation, and deferred transportation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), along with the trend of nuclear power plants using reactor fuel for a longer time, creates questions concerning the ability of this aged, high-burnup fuel to withstand stresses and strains seen during normal conditions of transport from its current location to a future consolidated storage facility or permanent repository. UNFD R&D conducted testing employing surrogate instrumented

130

JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite-based activated (800 C, 1472 F) carbons required a shorter (15-minute) conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas and captured gaseous mercury more effectively than those activated at 750 C (1382 F). Subsequent tests with higher acid gas concentrations including 50 ppm HCl showed no early mercury breakthrough for either the activated (750 C, 1382 F) Bienfait carbon or the DARCO FGD. Although these high acid gas tests yielded better mercury capture initially, significant breakthrough of mercury ultimately occurred sooner than during the simulated lignite flue gas tests. The steam-activated char, provided by Luscar Ltd., and DARCO FGD, provided by NORIT Americas, were evaluated for mercury removal potential in a 580 MJ/hr (550,000-Btu/hr) pilot-scale coal combustion system equipped with four particulate control devices: (1) an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), (2) a fabric filter (FF), (3) the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter, and (4) an ESP and FF in series, an EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} technology. The Ontario Hydro method and continuous mercury monitors were used to measure mercury species concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the control technology devices with and without sorbent injection. Primarily Hg{sup o} was measured when lignite coals from the Poplar River Plant and Freedom Mine were combusted. The effects of activated Luscar char, DARCO FGD, injection rates, particle size, and gas temperature on mercury removal were evaluated for each of the four particulate control device options. Increasing injection rates and decreasing gas temperatures generally promoted mercury capture in all four control devices. Relative to data reported for bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases, higher sorbent injection rates were generally required for the lignite coal to effectively remove mercury. Documented results in this report provide the impacts of these and other parameters and provide the inputs needed to direct Phase II of the project.

John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Enviropower hot gas desulfurization pilot  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable zinc titanate sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of the elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator and (3) hot gas particulate removal system using ceramic candle filters. Results are presented on pilot plant design and testing and modeling efforts.

Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.; Konttinen, J.; Ghazanfari, R.; Lehtovaara, A.; Mojtahedi, W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Microsoft Word - NTS Performance Test Rpt - Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE September 21, 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT...

133

Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery--the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure describing the capabilities of NREL's Biochemical Pilot Plant. In this facility, researchers test ideas for creating high-value products from cellulosic biomass.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Doe Water Cycle Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multilaboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the ...

N. L. Miller; A. W. King; M. A. Miller; E. P. Springer; M. L. Wesely; K. E. Bashford; M. E. Conrad; K. Costigan; P. N. Foster; H. K. Gibbs; J. Jin; J. Klazura; B. M. Lesht; M. V. Machavaram; F. Pan; J. Song; D. Troyan; R. A. Washington-Allen

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partnered with counties, utilities, and non-profit organizations ("Pilots") across the country to test and evaluate the Home Energy Score from November 2010 through July 2011. Through these Pilots, DOE tested a wide range of issues associated with the program and the associated software, the Home Energy Scoring Tool, including: How homeowners responded to the Home Energy Score and process Training of the home energy assessors and reaction to the Scoring Tool Methods to conduct Quality Assurance Climatic sensitivity of the Home Energy Scoring Tool The Pilots were spread out across varied climates, represented most U.S. regions, and included both urban and rural communities. DOE and the Pilots

138

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-10-01 for End Station Test Beam (ESTB)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-01 for End Station Test Beam (ESTB) 0-01 for End Station Test Beam (ESTB) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-10-01 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The End Station Test Beam (ESTB) is a new experimental facility that will use 5Hz of the 120 hz 13.6 GeV electron beam from the existing Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to restore test beam capabilities in End Station A (ESA), an existing building at SLAC. In Stage I of this proposal, four new kicker magnets will be added to the Beam Switchyard (BSY) to divert a small fraction of the existing LCLS beam pulses to the A-line for beam instrumentation and accelerator physics studies at full electron beam intensity. The Personnel Protection System in ESA will be

139

Interim test methods and procedures for determining the performance of small photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides test methods and procedures for determining the performance of small stand-alone and utility-grid connected PV systems. The procedures in this document provide a common approach for evaluating whether a given PV system is suitable to perform the function it was designed and manufactured to accomplish and meet the application load. This test document fills a testing void and provides the catalyst and focus for establishing the technical foundation and bridging the institutional barriers needed to reduce uncertainty that a system`s performance will be what its designers and builders claim. The need for this document was recently made more apparent with the initiation of a PV Global Approval Program (PVGAP) at the international level and is in response to concerns that PV systems being fielded must meet performance standards and that these standards include system-level performance type tests. The title of these test procedures is prefaced with the word interim because experience in using the procedures is needed before a consensus standard is developed and accepted by the PV community through its activities with the IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21 (SCC21) and International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Committee 82 (IEC TC82) national and international standards-making bodies. Both entities have initiated projects to develop test standards and will need the technical basis and validation of test procedures such as those presented in this document before a consensus is achieved by the PV community.

McNutt, P.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; DeBlasio, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

NREL Determines Better Testing Methods for Photovoltaic Module Durability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL discoveries will enable manufacturers to produce more robust photovoltaic modules. Over the past decade, some photovoltaic (PV) modules have experienced power losses because of the system voltage stress that modules experience in fielded arrays. This is partly because qualification tests and standards do not adequately evaluate the durability of modules that undergo the long-term effects of high voltage. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) tried various testing methods and stress levels to demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. The results of these accelerated tests, along with outdoor testing, were used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to more accurately evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. NREL was able to determine stress factors, levels, and methods for testing based on the stresses experienced by modules in the field. These results, in combination with those in the literature, suggest that constant stress with humidity and system voltage is more damaging than stress applied intermittently or with periods of recovery comprising hot and dry conditions or alternating bias in between. NREL has determined some module constructions to be extremely durable to PID. These findings will help the manufacturers of PV materials and components produce more durable products that better satisfy their customers. NREL determined that there is rapid degradation of some PV modules under system voltage stress and evaluated degradation rates in the field to develop more accurate accelerated testing methods. PV module manufacturers will be better able to choose robust materials and durable designs and guarantee sturdier, longer-lasting products. As PV modules become more durable, and thus more efficient over the long term, the risks and the cost of PV power will be reduced.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Pilot 2013 Pilot Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot DOE conducted its first pilot test of the Asset Score in 2012. Findings from that pilot have led to improvements in the overall program and the Asset Scoring Tool. The current program includes the following new features: Enhanced Asset Scoring Tool capabilities, including the ability to score complex buildings and the following building types: multifamily, lodging, libraries, court houses and mixed use. Retail, office, schools, and unrefrigerated warehouses were part of the 2012 Pilot and will continue to be included in the 2013 Pilot. Improved usability, including clearer input definitions, an enhanced user interface, and the ability for multiple users to edit one building Reduced data requirements to generate a simple Asset Score

142

Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) in Environmentally Controlled Areas for Spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue (NVR) fallout in environmentally controlled areas used for the assembly, testing, and processing of spacecraft. 1.2 The NVR of interest is that which is deposited on sampling plate surfaces at room temperature: it is left to the user to infer the relationship between the NVR found on the sampling plate surface and that found on any other surfaces. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Loudon surfactant flood pilot--overview and update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful surfactant (microemulsion) flood pilot test in a watered-out portion of the Weiler sand, Loudon Field, Illinois (USA) was completed in October, 1981. The microemulsion system tested was designed to be effective in the presence of highsalinity formation water containing 104,000 ppm (mg/1) total dissolved solids (TDS) without use of a preflush. The test was conducted in a single, 0.68acre (2752 m/sup 2/) 5-spot operated in a manner that approximated a confined pattern. The test was highly successful, recovering 60% of the oil remaining after waterflood. Cores from a post-flood well drilled within the pattern have confirmed the low final oil saturations and low surfactant retention achieved in the flood. Although oil recovery was excellent, loss of mobility control in the polymer drive bank and premature breakthrough of lower-salinity drive water were observed part-way through the test. Laboratory and field studies conducted since flood termination have confirmed that loss was caused by bacterial degradation of the xanthan biopolymer used. Several biocides were tested in the laboratory and in a field injection experiment to determine their effectiveness against the bacteria contaminating the pilot. Formaldehyde was shown to kill bacteria within the formation, have negligible absorption on reservoir rock, and permit propagation of undegraded polymer. Based on these test results, formaldehyde should protect xanthan biopolymer from bacterial degradation in future microemulsion floods at Loudon.

Bragg, J.R.; Canning, J.W.; Gale, W.W.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Determination of soil liquefaction characteristics by large-scale laboratory tests. [Sand  

SciTech Connect

The testing program described in this report was carried out to study the liquefaction behavior of a clean, uniform, medium sand. Horizontal beds of this sand, 42 inches by 90 inches by 4 inches were prepared by pluviation with a special sand spreader, saturated, and tested in a shaking table system designed for this program, which applied a horizontal cyclic shear stress to the specimens. Specimen size was selected to reduce boundary effects as much as possible. Values of pore pressures and shear strains developed during the tests are presented for sand specimens at relative densities of 54, 68, 82, and 90 percent, and the results interpreted to determine the values of the stress ratio causing liquefaction at the various relative densities.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Standard test method for determination of "microwave safe for reheating" for ceramicware  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method determines the suitability of ceramicware for use in microwave re-heating applications. Microwave ovens are mainly used for reheating and defrosting frozen foods. Severe thermal conditions can occur while reheating foods. Typical reheating of foods requires one to five min. in the microwave at the highest power settings. Longer periods than five minutes are considered cooking. Cooking test methods and standards are not addressed in this test method. Most ceramicware is minimally absorbing of the microwave energy and will not heat up significantly. Unfortunately there are some products that absorb microwave energy to a greater extent and can become very hot in the microwave and pose a serious hazard. Additionally, the nature of microwave heating introduces radiation in a non-uniform manner producing temperature differentials in the food being cooked as well as the ceramic container holding it. The differential may become great enough to thermal shock the ware and create dangerous condition...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Standard test method for radiochemical determination of uranium isotopes in soil by alpha spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of alpha-emitting uranium isotopes in soil. This test method describes one acceptable approach to the determination of uranium isotopes in soil. 1.2 The test method is designed to analyze 10 g of soil; however, the sample size may be varied to 50 g depending on the activity level. This test method may not be able to completely dissolve all forms of uranium in the soil matrix. Studies have indicated that the use of hydrofluoric acid to dissolve soil has resulted in lower values than results using total dissolution by fusion. 1.3 The lower limit of detection is dependent on count time, sample size, detector, background, and tracer yield. The chemical yield averaged 78 % in a single laboratory evaluation, and 66 % in an interlaboratory collaborative study. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ass...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pilot chargeback system program plan  

SciTech Connect

This planning document outlines the steps necessary to develop, test, evaluate, and potentially implement a pilot chargeback system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for the treatment, storage, and disposal of current waste. This pilot program will demonstrate one system that can be used to charge onsite generators for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. In FY 1997, mock billings will begin by July 15, 1997. Assuming approvals are received to do so, FY 1998 activities will include modifying the associated automated systems, testing and evaluating system performance, and estimating the amount generators will spend for waste storage, treatment, and disposal in FY 1999. If the program is fully implemented in FY 1999, generators will pay actual, automated bills for waste management services from funds transferred to their budgets from Environmental Management.

Smith, P.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE/EIS-0200-SA-01: Supplement Analysis and Determination for the Proposed Characterization for Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (12/00)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CH-TRU waste may be shipped to WIPP in drums, standard waste boxes, or drum overpacks; 1,250 cubic meters is the CH-TRU waste may be shipped to WIPP in drums, standard waste boxes, or drum overpacks; 1,250 cubic meters is the equivalent of about 6,000 drums (4.8 drums/cubic meter). 1 Supplement Analysis and Determination for the Proposed Characterization for Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (DOE/EIS- 0200-SA-01) 1.0 Introduction In the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (63 Fed. Reg. 3623, January 23, 1998), the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to dispose of transuranic (TRU) waste at WIPP after preparing it to meet WIPP's Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of

149

DOE/EIS-0200-SA-01: Supplement Analysis and Determination for the Proposed Characterization for Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (12/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH-TRU waste may be shipped to WIPP in drums, standard waste boxes, or drum overpacks; 1,250 cubic meters is the CH-TRU waste may be shipped to WIPP in drums, standard waste boxes, or drum overpacks; 1,250 cubic meters is the equivalent of about 6,000 drums (4.8 drums/cubic meter). 1 Supplement Analysis and Determination for the Proposed Characterization for Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (DOE/EIS- 0200-SA-01) 1.0 Introduction In the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (63 Fed. Reg. 3623, January 23, 1998), the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to dispose of transuranic (TRU) waste at WIPP after preparing it to meet WIPP's Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of

150

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-004065: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 10/01/2010 Location(s): Palo Alto, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 1, 2010 CX-004064: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10/01/2010 Location(s): Holbrook, Arizona Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 1, 2010 CX-004063: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System

151

FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

Microsoft Word - Basalt Pilot Phase II Fact Sheet FY08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16.0 Basalt Pilot 1 16.0 Basalt Pilot 1 FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Big Sky Regional Carbon Partnership Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail David Lang NETL LANG@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Lee Spangler Field Test Information: Basalt Sequestration Pilot Test Test Location Near Wallula township in Eastern Washington State Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 3000 Refinery Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Pacific Northwest National Lab - Pacific Northwest Division, Idaho

153

Use of instrumented charpy tests to determine onset of upper-shelf energy  

SciTech Connect

The Charpy V-notch (C/sub v/) upper-shelf energy is usually defined as that temperature range in which the surface of the C/sub v/ specimen exhibits an appearance indicative of a 100 percent ductile fracture. In an attempt to avoid the need for interpretation, the selection of the C/sub v/ upper-shelf energy is based on the results from an instrumented impact test which provides a permanent record of the load-deflection history of a C/sub v/ specimen during the testing sequence. In the brittle-ductile transition temperature regime, a precipitous drop in the load trace occurs. The amount of the drop decreases at higher temperatures until it is zero, and the zero-drop-in-load temperature is identical to the onset of the C/sub v/ upper shelf. This relationship between the drop in load and energy in an instrumented impact test provides incontestable assurance that the C/sub v/ upper shelf has been obtained. This relationship between drop in load and temperature permits a prediction of the onset of the upper-shelf temperature with as few as two instrumented impact tests. It is also shown that nil-ductility temperature (NDT) (determined by the drop-weight test) is released to the C/sub v/ upper shelf. For the SA-508 Class 2 and SA-533 Grade B Class 1 steels employed in the fabrication of pressure vessels for light-water reactors, C/sub v/ testing at NDT + 180$sup 0$F (100$sup 0$C) will provide upper-shelf energy values. (DLC)

Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the final report for ASHRAE Research Project 1004-RP: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents the results of the development and application of the methodology to Case Study #2, the Delmar College, in Corpus Christi, Texas, and Case Study #3, the Austin Convention Center, in Austin, Texas. A previous report presented the analysis results for Case Study #1, which was a large hotel located in San Francisco, CA. This report also includes a summary and discussion of the results from all three case studies, recommendations for further research, and a step-by-step guide to applying the analysis methodology.

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art thermochemical conversion pilot plant includes several configurable, complementary unit operations for testing and developing various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. NREL engineers and scientists as well as clients can test new processes and feedstocks in a timely, cost-effective, and safe manner to obtain extensive performance data on processes or equipment.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations September 19th, 2012 Presenter: David Freshwater, Emergency Management Specialist, Office of Emergency Management, National Nuclear Security Administration Topics covered: Confirm that Critical Safety Function scenarios were addressed in HS/EPHA Determine whether site/facility had robust capabilities that allow flexible and effective emergency response to severe events Engage site/facility personnel regarding preferences for requirements/guidance changes where alternate courses of action existed Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations More Documents & Publications Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes

158

Does Determinism conflict with Wave-Particle Realism? Proposal for an Experimental Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave-particle duality, superposition and entanglement are among the most counterintuitive aspects of quantum theory. Their clash with classical intuition motivated construction of hidden variable (HV) theories designed to remove or explain these "strange" quantum features, and contributed to the development of quantum technologies. Quantum controlling devices enable us to run experiments in superposition of distinct set-ups, allowing, e.g., a freedom in temporal ordering of the control and detection and forcing modification of the complementarity principle. We study the entanglement-assisted delayed-choice experiment and show that, in the absence of superluminal communication, realism (defined as a property of photons being either particles or waves, but not both) is incompatible with determinism, even if the hidden variable theory satisfying one of these properties reproduces quantum predictions. Our analysis does not use inequalities and is robust against experimental inefficiencies. We outline an experimental design that will be used to test our results.

Radu Ionicioiu; Thomas Jennewein; Robert B. Mann; Daniel R. Terno

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Standard Test Method for Determining Resistance of Photovoltaic Modules to Hail by Impact with Propelled Ice Balls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. 1.2 This test method defines test specimens and methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, provides a method for determining changes in electrical performance, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The size of the ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified. This test method can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 This test method may be applied to concentrator and nonconcentrator modules. 1.6 The v...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Determining the leaching characteristics of solidified/stabilized wastes using constant pH leaching tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solidification/Stabilization treatment using Portland cement is an established procedure in the management of hazardous wastes. The technology is relatively simple, cheap, and highly reliable in prohibiting the migration of hazardous contaminants into groundwater. The success of this technology is measured by the amount of contaminants retained in the solidified matrix system. The most widely-used procedure to determine the amount that can leach out of the solidified waste is the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP), which was developed by the EPA. The TCLP, however, lacks control on the shape and dimensions of the samples, as well as the pH at which the test takes place. Thus, it does not provide a true leaching characteristic of the contaminants through the solidified matrix. By keeping the pH at a constant value and using samples with fixed dimensions, the TCLP can be vastly improved. These conditions allow most of the contaminants to leach out of the matrix at controlled conditions. Consequently, the characteristics of the leaching process can be measured more accurately. The procedure developed in this research, the Constant pH Leaching Test (CPLT), is a modification of the TCLP. It is designed to measure the leaching rates of a fixed-dimension sample at a constant pH. In addition to measuring the leaching rates, the research also investigated the effects of different water-to-cement ratios, pH of the acid baths, and concentrations of the acid baths.

Sofjan, Indratjahja

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sheri A. Lippman, PhD, PI Reaching transgender women with home-based, self-HIV testing in San Francisco: a pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sheri A. Lippman, PhD, PI Reaching transgender women with home-based, self-HIV testing in San home-based self-administered HIV testing for transwomen in three phases. Two focus groups the first attempt to systematically examine acceptability, feasibility, preferences, and support for home-based

Klein, Ophir

162

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) The DOE Carlsbad Field Office funds a number of...

163

Comparison of Tumor Volumes as Determined by Pathologic Examination and FDG-PET/CT Images of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the cut-off standardized uptake value (SUV) on {sup 18}F fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to pathologic gross tumor volume (GTV{sub path}) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with NSCLC who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 5-7-mum sections at approximately 4-mm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The tumor-containing area was outlined slice by slice and the GTV{sub path} determined by summing over all the slices, taking into account the interslice thickness and fixation-induced volume reduction. The gross tumor volume from the PET images, GTV{sub PET}, was determined as a function of cut-off SUV. The optimal threshold or optimal absolute SUV was defined as the value at which the GTV{sub PET} was the same as the GTV{sub path}. Results: The fixation process induced a volumetric reduction to 82% +- 10% (range, 62-100%) of the original. The maximal SUV was 10.1 +- 3.6 (range, 4.2-18.7). The optimal threshold and absolute SUV were 31% +- 11% and 3.0 +- 1.6, respectively. The optimal threshold was inversely correlated with GTV{sub path} and tumor diameter (p 0.05). Conclusion: This study evaluated the use of GTV{sub path} as a criterion for determining the optimal cut-off SUV for NSCLC target volume delineation. Confirmatory studies including more cases are being performed.

Yu Jinming, E-mail: jn7984729@public.jn.sd.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Li Xinke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Xing Ligang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mu Dianbin [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Fu Zheng [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xiaorong [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xiangyu [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Yang Guoren [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Zhang Baijiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xindong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Ling, C. Clifton [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Determination of Interfacial Mechanical Properties of Ceramic Composites by the Compression of Micro-pillar Test Specimens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method to determine the fiber-matrix interfacial properties of ceramic matrix composites is proposed and evaluated; where micro- pillar samples containing inclined fiber/matrix interfaces were prepared from a SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites then compression-tested using the nano-indentation technique. This new test method employs a simple geometry and mitigates the uncertainties associated with complex stress state in the conventional single filament push-out method for the determination of interfacial properties. Based on the test results using samples with different interface orientations , the interfacial debond shear strength and the internal friction coefficient are explicitly determined and compared with values obtained by other test methods.

Shih, Chunghao [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CX-006807: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07: Categorical Exclusion Determination 07: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006807: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Production with Innovative Methods of Geothermal Heat Recovery CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/09/2011 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide federal funding to GeoTek Energy, LLC (GeoTek) to complete feasibility studies and conceptual designs of the Gravity Head Energy System (GHES) components required to complete the manufacturing designs for the GHES Pilot Well size components. GeoTek's goal is a GHES Pilot Well capable of producing 200 to 400 kilowatt hours. GeoTek would operate and test the GeoTek GHES Pilot Well for the purposes of verifying the output, operating costs, control functions and reliability

166

A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal or ground-source heat pump (GHP) has been shown to be a very efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. GHPs exchange (reject or extract) heat with the earth by way of circulating water, rather than by use of circulating outdoor air, as with an air-source heat pump. The temperature of water entering a GHP is generally cooler than that of outdoor air when space cooling is required, and warmer than that of outdoor air when space heating is required. Consequently, the temperature lift across a GHP is less than the lift across an air-source heat pump. The lower temperature lift leads to greater efficiency, higher capacity at extreme outdoor air temperatures, and better indoor humidity control. These benefits are achieved, however, at the cost of installing a ground heat exchanger. In general, this cost is proportional to length of the heat exchanger, and for this reason there is an incentive to install the minimum possible length such that design criteria are met. The design of a ground heat exchanger for a GHP system requires, at a minimum, the operating characteristics of the heat pumps, estimates of annual and peak block loads for the building, and information about the properties of the heat exchanger: the size of the U-tubes, the grouting material, etc. The design also requires some knowledge of the thermal properties of the soil, namely thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and undisturbed soil temperature. In the case of a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) these properties generally vary with depth; therefore, in the design, effective or average thermal properties over the length of the borehole are usually sought. When the cost of doing so can be justified, these properties are measured in an in situ experiment: a test well is drilled to a depth on the same order as the expected depth of the heat pump heat exchangers; a U-tube heat exchanger is inserted and the borehole is grouted according to applicable state and local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short-term variations in heat input. Also, since the model is accurate even for short times, there is no n

Shonder, J.A.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pasadena Chemical Corp Pilot Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pasadena Chemical Corp Pilot Plant Pasadena Chemical Corp Pilot Plant - TX 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PASADENA CHEMICAL CORP., PILOT PLANT (TX.01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. Mobil Mining and Minerals TX.01-2 TX.01-1 Location: Pasadena , Texas TX.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 TX.01-1 Site Operations: Process development studies and pilot plant testing of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid during the mid-1950s. TX.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority TX.01-1 TX.01-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Natural Uranium TX.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes TX.01-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PASADENA CHEMICAL CORP., PILOT PLANT

168

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pilot-plant technical assessment of wet flue gas desulfurization using limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on a countercurrent pilot-scale packed scrubber for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The flow rate of the treated flue gas was around 300 Nm{sup 3}/h, so the pilot-plant capacity is one of the largest with respect to other published studies on a pilot-plant wet FGD. The tests were carried out at an SO{sub 2} inlet concentration of 2000 ppm by changing the recycle slurry pH to around 4.8 and the L/G ratio to between 7.5 and 15. Three types of limestone were tested, obtaining desulfurization efficiencies from 59 to 99%. We show the importance of choosing an appropriate limestone in order to get a better performance from the FGD plant. Thus, it is important to know the reactivity (on a laboratory scale) and the sorbent utilization (on a pilot-plant scale) in order to identify if a limestone is reactive enough and to compare it with another type. In addition, by using the transfer-unit concept, a function has been obtained for the desulfurization efficiency, using the L/G ratio and the recycle slurry pH as independent variables. The Ca/S molar ratio is related to these and to the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. This function, together with a simplified function of the operation variable cost, allows us to determine the pair (L/G ratio and pH) to achieve the desired SO{sub 2} removal with the minimum operation cost. Finally, the variable operation costs between packed towers and spray scrubbers have been compared, using as a basis the pilot packed tower and the industrial spray column at the Compostilla Power Station's FGD plant (in Leon, Spain).

Ortiz, F.J.G.; Vidal, F.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.; Cortes, V.; Gimenez, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Pilot Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilot Systems Place London, United Kingdom Zip W4 4PH Sector Services Product London-based provider of metering services to business consumers. References Pilot Systems1 LinkedIn...

172

Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

175

Microbial enhanced waterflooding Mink Unit and Phoenix field pilots. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine the feasibility of improving oil recovery and the economics of microbial enhanced waterflooding in mature oil wells in the United States, two field pilots have been conducted. Candidate fields were screened to determine whether they have any potential for a microbial system developed at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), and microbial compatibility tests were conducted in the laboratory to select the target field. A specific microbial formulation was selected that was compatible with the chosen reservoir environment and had been shown to recover oil after waterflooding in Berea sandstone and field core. The microbial formulation was designed to improve microscopic oil displacement efficiency by surfactant, gas and acid production from fermentation of molasses. A 20-acre pilot test was initiated in October 1986, and completed in December 1989. Results from this pilot demonstrated that microorganisms could be injected into an ongoing waterflood and that such injection could increase oil production by at least 13%. A larger test (520 acres) was completed in the same formation to evaluate the feasibility of commercial application of the technology. This field pilot was injected with microorganisms and molasses from a centralized injection station in June 1990. Although microorganisms were injected only once per site, nutrient injection continued throughout the project life. All 19 injection wells were treated, and oil production was monitored from the 47 production wells. Injection pressures and volumes were monitored throughout the project. No operational problems were encountered. At the end of May 1993, oil production was improved by 19.6 %. Results from both projects are presented and the potential for microbial-enhanced waterflooding technology is evaluated.

Bryant, R.S.; Steep, A.K.; Bertus, K.M.; Burchfield, T.E. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Dennis, M. [Microbial Systems Corp., OK (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NETL: Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Project No.: DE-FE0013303 ION Engineering is conducting small pilot-scale (~ 0.7 MW) testing of an advanced CO2 capture solvent technology that has previously undergone bench-scale testing. The small pilot-scale testing will involve continuous long-term operation in order to gather the necessary data ultimately required for further scale-up. Activities will include the design and fabrication of the 0.5-0.7 MWe (equivalent) slipstream pilot plant; scale-up of solvent manufacturing; testing, data collection, and analysis of solvent performance; degradation and air emission analysis; modeling and simulation for the detailed preliminary and final techno-economic analyses; and decommissioning of pilot plant equipment upon completion of solvent testing. The advanced solvent is anticipated to have significant operating and capital cost advantages over other solvents currently in development. Advantages include significant reductions in parasitic load and liquid flow rates which directly translate to smaller more efficient CO2 capture processes. Make-up water and amine emissions rates will be examined during this project. There is the potential that additional solvent, system, and integration savings will be identified, which could result in further operating and capital cost reductions.

177

CX-002394: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002394: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05242010 Location(s): Arlington,...

178

CX-001429: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-001429: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 04082010 Location(s): Portland, Texas...

179

CX-002440: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002440: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05262010 Location(s): Austin,...

180

CX-002517: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002517: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05272010 Location(s): Dallas,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CX-000351: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000351: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12102009 Location(s): Austin, Texas...

182

CX-006187: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006187: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s): Alvin, Texas...

183

CX-002488: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002488: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 06022010 Location(s): Richardson,...

184

CX-002947: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002947: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 07092010 Location(s): Angleton,...

185

CX-002494: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002494: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 06022010 Location(s): Aledo,...

186

CX-001681: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-001681: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04222010 Location(s): Austin, Texas...

187

CX-003793: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003793: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09172010 Location(s): Bastrop, Texas...

188

CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program (Summary Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 06...

189

CX-002520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05272010 Location(s): Grapevine,...

190

CX-003790: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003790: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09172010 Location(s): Taylor, Texas...

191

CX-002519: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002519: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05272010 Location(s): Dallas,...

192

CX-008926: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008926: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Alternative Fuel Vehicle Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08242012 Location(s):...

193

CX-010202: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010202: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Alternative Fuel Vehicle Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 04042013...

194

CX-010275: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Alternative Fuel Vehicle Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 05222013...

195

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

Gary Blythe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Determination of accuracy of measurements by NREL's Scanning Hartmann Optical Test instrument  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's Scanning Hartmann Optical Test (SHOT) instrument is routinely used to characterize the surface of candidate dish concentration elements for solar thermal applications. An approach was devised to quantify the accuracy of these measurements. Excellent reproducibility was exhibited and high confidence established. The SHOT instrument was designed to allow the surface figure of large optical test articles to be accurately specified. Such test articles are nominally parabolic with an f/D ratio (in which f=focal length and D=aperture diameter) in the range of 0.5--1.0. Recent modifications of SHOT have extended the characterization range out to about f/D=3.0. A series of experiments was designed to investigate and quantify the uncertainties associated with optical characterization performed by SHOT. This approach involved making a series of measurements with an arbitrary test article positioned at a number of locations transverse to the optical axis of SHOT. 3 refs.

Jorgensen, G.; Wendelin, T.; Carasso, M.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Determination of accuracy of measurements by NREL`s Scanning Hartmann Optical Test instrument  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL`s Scanning Hartmann Optical Test (SHOT) instrument is routinely used to characterize the surface of candidate dish concentration elements for solar thermal applications. An approach was devised to quantify the accuracy of these measurements. Excellent reproducibility was exhibited and high confidence established. The SHOT instrument was designed to allow the surface figure of large optical test articles to be accurately specified. Such test articles are nominally parabolic with an f/D ratio (in which f=focal length and D=aperture diameter) in the range of 0.5--1.0. Recent modifications of SHOT have extended the characterization range out to about f/D=3.0. A series of experiments was designed to investigate and quantify the uncertainties associated with optical characterization performed by SHOT. This approach involved making a series of measurements with an arbitrary test article positioned at a number of locations transverse to the optical axis of SHOT. 3 refs.

Jorgensen, G.; Wendelin, T.; Carasso, M.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING  

SciTech Connect

In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The JASMINE Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methods and initial results of an extensive pilot study, the Joint Air-Sea Monsoon Interaction Experiment (JASMINE) held in the Indian Ocean during the summer of 1999, are described. The experimental design was based on the precept that the ...

P. J. Webster; E. F. Bradley; C. W. Fairall; J. S. Godfrey; P. Hacker; R. A. Houze Jr.; R. Lukas; Y. Serra; J. M. Hummon; T. D. M. Lawrence; C. A. Russell; M. N. Ryan; K. Sahami; P. Zuidema

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

ISOE Pilot Project Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide show introduces the Pilot Project to increase the value of Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)#11;data by increasing participation and amount of data reported from the U.S., reduce the hurdles and effort in participating, streamline the process of reporting and reduce time delay, and eliminate data entry and redundant effort.

D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

202

A. SCOPE METHOD OF TEST FOR DETERMINING THEORETICAL MAXIMUM SPECIFIC GRAVITY AND DENSITY OF HOT MIX ASPHALT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This test method provides procedures for determining the theoretical maximum specific gravity (also known as Rice specific gravity) and density of uncompacted hot mix asphalt (HMA) at 77?F using the weighing in air method. A supplemental dry back procedure is provided for reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and for HMA where combined virgin aggregate water absorption is 2.0 % or more determined by California Test 206 and California Test 207. The theoretical maximum specific gravities and densities of HMA are intrinsic properties whose values are influenced by the composition of the mixtures in terms of types and amounts of aggregates and asphalt binder materials. They are: 1. Used to calculate values for percent air voids in compacted HMA. 2. Used to establish target values for the compaction of HMA. 3. Essential when calculating the amount of binder absorbed by the internal porosity of the individual aggregate particles in HMA. B. REFERENCES

C. Apparatus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Typical fault mode determination for rotor test rig based on correlation dimension and Kolmogorov entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper experimentally investigates the vibration faults of rotor, such as the unbalance, the loosening and the friction, using the rotor test rig. According to the theory of fractal and chaos, the vibration signal series are reconstructed. By the ... Keywords: Kolmogorov entropy, correlation dimension, fractal and chaos, vibration fault

Fengling Zhang; Yanting Ai; Fei Liu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Testing the Role of Radiation in Determining Tropical Cloud-Top Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to test the hypothesis that radiative cooling by water vapor emission is the primary control on the temperature of tropical anvil clouds. The temperature of ice clouds in the simulation can be increased or decreased ...

Bryce E. Harrop; Dennis L. Hartmann

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Residential Energy Display Devices: Utility Pilot Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief is a snapshot of selected utility-sponsored programs and test pilots of residential energy display devices as of the third quarter of 2008. Also known as in-home displays, the devices used in these programs are stand-alone units; they are not incorporated with an advanced metering infrastructure system. Such displays provide real-timeor near real-timeinformation about a household's electricity consumption.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

EPRI Integrated Dose Reduction Program Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Dose Reduction (IDR) project is an integral part of EPRI's support to nuclear plant radiation protection programs. The broad objective of the IDR program is to review existing and recent industry developments and provide utilities with an integrated plan for EPRI's assistance based on a plant's specific needs. This document describes a pilot test of this product at a host site, and identifies areas where EPRI's RP assessments and technical assistance can support key plant programs.

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

210

Pilot aerial infrared roof top survey. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A summary is presented of a pilot aerial infrared roof top study conducted by the Minnesota Energy Agency. Infrared surveys of 27 Minnesota cities were conducted during the fall and winter of the 1976-1977 heating season. In addition, conventional daytime color photographs were taken of several cities. Film processing was done by the Environmental Protection Agency. The University of Minnesota conducted ground tests to verify the aerial infrared imagery. Thermograph dissemination centers were established in each city and training seminars and materials were prepared and delivered to dissemination center staff. A survey of homeowners who viewed their thermograph at a dissemination center were used to determine the energy savings resulting from the program. An Aerial Infrared Program Users Manual was prepared by the Energy Agency and the Remote Sensing Institute of Brookings, South Dakota.

1979-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Pilot Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities, ND; Detroit Edison, MI; and SaskPower, Canada. Contacts: For further information on this project, contact NETL Project Manager, Barbara Carney or Alan Bland from WRI...

212

Utility of drill-stem tests in determination of the geothermal regime of Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate representation of geothermal conditions is necessary to determine generation potential of source rocks buried in Railroad Valley. Boreholes, provide the best source of geothermal information, but formation temperature data must be screened for variations caused by drilling. Bottomhole temperatures from wireline logs are affected by initial formation conditions, drilling fluid that moves into the formation while drilling, and lag time between cessation of drilling fluid circulation and acquisition of logs. More accurate indicators of formation conditions are temperatures recorded during drill-stem tests, especially for tests that recovered large amounts of fluid. Over 130 drill-stem tests were examined to establish the viability of this source of data and to determine the geothermal conditions of the Railroad Valley basin. Results indicate that 500 feet or more of fluid recovery on a test is necessary to get a temperature recorded that is not influenced by drilling perturbations. The formation temperature data collected for Railroad Valley indicate the possibility of 2 thermal regimes. A low-temperature gradient regime is probably influenced by meteoric water. The high-temperature gradient regime probably reflects the regional heat flow associated with the thin crust of the Great Basin.

French, D.E. [Independent Geologist, Billings, MT (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX H: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Berkeley have been investigating and analyzing a program for the implementation of Community Choice Aggregation

214

Astrophysical tests of atomic data important for stellar Mg abundance determinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnesium abundances of cool stars with different metallicities are important for understanding the galactic chemical evolution. This study tests atomic data used in stellar magnesium abundance analyses. We evaluate non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Mg I using the most up-to-date theoretical and experimental atomic data available so far and check the Mg abundances from individual lines in the Sun, four well studied A-type stars, and three reference metal-poor stars. With the adopted gf-values, NLTE abundances derived from the Mg I 4703 A, 5528 A, and Mg Ib lines are consistent within 0.05 dex for each A-type star. The same four Mg I lines in the solar spectrum give consistent NLTE abundances at $\\log N_{\\rm Mg}/N_{\\rm H} = -4.45$, when correcting the van der Waals damping constants inferred from the perturbation theory. Inelastic Mg+H collisions as treated by Barklem, Belyaev, Spielfiedel, Guitou, and Feautrier serve as efficient thermalizing process for the statistical equilibri...

Mashonkina, Lyudmila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Standard Test Method for Determination of the Spectral Mismatch Parameter Between a Photovoltaic Device and a Photovoltaic Reference Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a procedure for the determination of a spectral mismatch parameter used in performance testing of photovoltaic devices. 1.2 The spectral mismatch parameter is a measure of the error, introduced in the testing of a photovoltaic device, caused by mismatch between the spectral responses of the photovoltaic device and the photovoltaic reference cell, as well as mismatch between the test light source and the reference spectral irradiance distribution to which the photovoltaic reference cell was calibrated. Examples of reference spectral irradiance distributions are Tables E490 or G173. 1.3 The spectral mismatch parameter can be used to correct photovoltaic performance data for spectral mismatch error. 1.4 This test method is intended for use with linear photovoltaic devices. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 1, 2010 October 1, 2010 CX-004064: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10/01/2010 Location(s): Holbrook, Arizona Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 1, 2010 CX-004063: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10/01/2010 Location(s): Wilsonville, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 1, 2010 CX-004062: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategy to Accelerate United States Transition to Electric Vehicles

217

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.  

SciTech Connect

Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor RDAS and LPCIS Replacement  

SciTech Connect

The replacement of the ATR Control Complex's obsolete computer based Reactor Data Acquisition System (RDAS) and its safety-related Lobe Power Calculation and Indication System (LPCIS) software application is vitally important to ensure the ATR remains available to support this national mission. The RDAS supports safe operation of the reactor by providing 'real-time' plant status information (indications and alarms) for use by the reactor operators via the Console Display System (CDS). The RDAS is a computer support system that acquires analog and digital information from various reactor and reactor support systems. The RDAS information is used to display quadrant and lobe powers via a display interface more user friendly than that provided by the recorders and the Control Room upright panels. RDAS provides input to the Nuclear Engineering ATR Surveillance Data System (ASUDAS) for fuel burn-up analysis and the production of cycle data for experiment sponsors and the generation of the Core Safety Assurance Package (CSAP). RDAS also archives and provides for retrieval of historical plant data which may be used for event reconstruction, data analysis, training and safety analysis. The RDAS, LPCIS and ASUDAS need to be replaced with state-of-the-art technology in order to eliminate problems of aged computer systems, and difficulty in obtaining software upgrades, spare parts, and technical support. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project design did not lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification. The negative major modification determination is driven by the fact that the project requires a one-for-one equivalent replacement of existing systems that protects and maintains functional and operational requirements as credited in the safety basis.

David E. Korns

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government StateProvincial Govt Utility Program Information Kentucky Program Type...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

TVA pilot greenhouse for waste heat research  

SciTech Connect

A pilot facility for evaluating the use of waste heat from power plants, both fossil-fueled and nuclear, to heat a greenhouse was designed and built at the TVA reservation at Muscle Shoals, Ala. The simulation of waste heat was from an electric hot water heater. The subjects to be evaluated included: greenhouse environmental control system operation during one year period under wide range of climatic conditions and the crop performance, i.e., yield and disease control under various controlled-environment conditions and with various rooting media conditions. The facility design, control instrumentation, tests performed, and operating conditions obtained for airflow, air temperature, and humidity are described. No information is included on the crops produced. It is concluded that the pilot facility is providing valuable guidelines for the design of a larger demonstration plant to be located at an operating power plant. (LCL)

King, L.D.; Furlong, W.K.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Microbial field pilot study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microbial field pilot study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX A: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Community in this report. #12;1 COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX A Community Choice Aggregation in the Community Choice Aggregation Demonstration project and assesses the costs and availability of renewable

225

SPP/CPM excavate bulk sample of Stuart oil shale for testing  

SciTech Connect

Southern Pacific Petroleum N.L. and Central Pacific Minerals N.L. of Australia continue to evaluate retorting technologies suitable for the processing of Stuart oil shale. A sample of 400 Kg of Kerosene Creek oil shale was shipped to UMATAC in Calgary, Alberta for bench testing of the TACIUK process. The objective of the bench scale testing program is to evaluate the process and to determine whether pilot plant tests should be undertaken in the existing 5 ton per hour plant located in Calgary. Preliminary results of the bench scale work were encouraging. In preparation for the 5 ton per hour pilot plant program a bulk sample is being extracted from a box cut in the Kerosene Creek seam. During the same period, Esso completed a series of trials of Rundle Kerosene Creek shale in the Exxon Shale Retort pilot plant at Baytown, Texas. At the Rundle site, data collection concerned with waste management studies is in progress.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: collector subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 6 (Approved)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The configurations of the experimental heliostat, power and control system, and support elements for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are described, and the analytical and experimental determination of performance parameters is discussed. A system analysis is presented, including demonstration of pointing accuracy by error analysis, and demonstration of loop performance by simulation. Engineering model test plans are given that are to evaluate subassemblies, processes, and procedures as well as provide insight into best tests for heliostat subsystem testing. Mirror module test data are analyzed. A comprehensive test plan for the experimental model is presented. Appended are: a heliostat power consumption analysis; collector subsystem research experiment detail specification; structural analysis; solar image analysis; computer and software information; breadboard test data; simulation of the heliostat control loop; mirror module reflectance measurements; plywood frame fixed focus mirror module test data; techniques for redirected image characterization; performance of a meteorological measuring system; and heliostat design data. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Golden Field Office March 21, 2010 CX-001394: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sacramento Municipal Utility District Photovoltaic and Smart Grid Pilot at Anatolia CX(s)...

228

CX-006808: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant- Electric Vehicle Pilot in County Fleet CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08312011 Location(s):...

229

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2010 CX-001557: Categorical Exclusion Determination Charlotte 1-485 Park and Ride Energy Efficiency Lighting Pilot American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Efficiency and...

230

CX-000947: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Raleigh) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s):...

231

CX-000949: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Princeton) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s): New...

232

CX-000946: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Portland) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s):...

233

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Portland) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s):...

234

CX-000951: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Los Angeles) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s):...

235

CX-000950: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (College Station) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010...

236

CX-000948: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Stennis Space Center) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010...

237

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico 3-Dimensional Operational Ocean Forecast System Pilot Project (Los Angeles) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s):...

238

CX-008625: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008625: Categorical Exclusion Determination Abandonment of M-Area Oil Injection Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Three shallow vadose zone wells, designated as M-Area Oil Injection (MOI), wells were installed in 2009 as part of a pilot to test the effectiveness of Vadose Oil Substrate (VOS(tm)) in the treatment of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) along a section of the abandoned M-Area Process Sewer Line (MAPSL). The pilot has been completed and no further injection of VOS will be performed. Therefore, the three injection wells will be abandoned in place by grouting. CX-008625.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010312: Categorical Exclusion Determination

239

APS ALternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Monitoring System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Monitoring System Dimitri Hochard James Francfort July 2005 Idaho National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-05-00502 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Monitoring System Dimitri Hochard a James Francfort b July 2005 Idaho National Laboratory Transportation Technology Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office

240

Advanced Remote Maintenance Design for Pilot-Scale Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced designs of used nuclear fuel recycling processes and radioactive waste treatment processes are expected to include more ambitious goals for aqueous based separations including; higher separations efficiency, high-level waste minimization, and a greater focus on continuous processes to minimize cost and footprint. Therefore, annular centrifugal contactors are destined to play a more important role for such future processing schemes. Pilot-scale testing will be an integral part of development of many of these processes. An advanced design for remote maintenance of pilot-scale centrifugal contactors has been developed and a prototype module fabricated and tested for a commercially available pilot-scale centrifugal contactor (CINC V-02, 5-cm rotor diameter). Advanced design features include air actuated clamps for holding the motor-rotor assembly in place, an integral electrical connection, upper flange o-rings, a welded bottom plate, a lifting bale, and guide pins. These design features will allow for rapid replacement of the motor rotor assembly, which can be accomplished while maintaining process equilibrium. Hydraulic testing of a three-stage prototype unit was also performed to verify that design changes did not impact performance of the centrifugal contactors. Details of the pilot-scale remote maintenance design, results of testing in a remote mockup test facility, and results of hydraulic testing of the advanced design are provided.

Jack Law; David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Lawrence Macaluso

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced Gasifier Pilot Plant Concept Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from definition of a preferred commercial-scale advanced gasifier configuration and concept definition for a gasification pilot plant incorporating those preferred technologies. The preferred commercial gasifier configuration was established based on Cost Of Electricity estimates for an IGCC. Based on the gasifier configuration trade study results, a compact plug flow gasifier, with a dry solids pump, rapid-mix injector, CMC liner insert and partial quench system was selected as the preferred configuration. Preliminary systems analysis results indicate that this configuration could provide cost of product savings for electricity and hydrogen ranging from 15%-20% relative to existing gasifier technologies. This cost of product improvement draws upon the efficiency of the dry feed, rapid mix injector technology, low capital cost compact gasifier, and >99% gasifier availability due to long life injector and gasifier liner, with short replacement time. A pilot plant concept incorporating the technologies associated with the preferred configuration was defined, along with cost and schedule estimates for design, installation, and test operations. It was estimated that a 16,300 kg/day (18 TPD) pilot plant gasifier incorporating the advanced gasification technology and demonstrating 1,000 hours of hot-fire operation could be accomplished over a period of 33 months with a budget of $25.6 M.

Steve Fusselman; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Portland General Electric Company Pilot Evaluation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the billing software were omitted, and there is no factor for free riders. The analysis assumed that all, 2004 DIRECT LOAD CONTROL PILOT FOR ELECTRIC WATER HEAT #12;1 PGE Direct Load Control Pilot for Electric direct load control pilot for electric water heat, called "Direct Load Control Pilot for Electric Water

244

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR OTEC PILOT PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Logical and orderly progression of the OTEC program from conceptual designs through component testing to the goal of commercially viable OTEC plants require that the socio-legal requirements be met and the proper operating permits be obtained and maintained. This function is accomplished in a series of activities including: (1) Development and annual revision of a published OTEC Environmental Development Plan (EDP); (2) Compliance with NEPA/EPA and other regulatory requirements; and (3) Studies and research in support of the above. The Environmental Development Plan (EDP) lists the concerns, outlines the program to consider the effects and validity of such concerns on the OTEC program, and gives the time-table to meet the schedule, integrated with that of the engineering and design programs. The schedules of compliance activities and, to a lesser degree, research also are governed by the development progress of the technology. However, because of the lead time necessary to insure proper review the appropriate regulatory agencies, the environmental assessment program for the OTEC pilot plants (initially starting with the 10/40 MWe unit) is founded on the strategy of progressive improvement of previously accepted documentation. Based on experience with OTEC-1, the procedure for pilot plants will be: (1) Produce generic Environmental Assessment (EA) at the appropriate level of technology in advance of hardware contract; (2) Produce generic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) at approximately the same time as the hardware procurement; (3) Monitor production of site specific supplement to the generic EIS prepared by the hardware contractor; (4) Assist pilot plant operator in applying and obtaining permits by providing current research and modeling data; (5) Monitor environmental program as required by regulatory agency; and (6) Use new site data for refining models for future pilot plant. assessments.

Wilde, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coalbed-methane pilots - timing, design, and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four distinct sequential phases form a recommended process for coalbed-methane (CBM)-prospect assessment: initial screening reconnaissance, pilot testing, and final appraisal. Stepping through these four phases provides a program of progressively ramping work and cost, while creating a series of discrete decision points at which analysis of results and risks can be assessed. While discussing each of these phases in some degree, this paper focuses on the third, the critically important pilot-testing phase. This paper contains roughly 30 specific recommendations and the fundamental rationale behind each recommendation to help ensure that a CBM pilot will fulfill its primary objectives of (1) demonstrating whether the subject coal reservoir will desorb and produce consequential gas and (2) gathering the data critical to evaluate and risk the prospect at the next-often most critical-decision point.

Roadifer, R.D.; Moore, T.R.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through discussion of five case studies (test homes), this project evaluates strategies to elevate the performance of existing homes to a level commensurate with best-in-class implementation of high-performance new construction homes. The test homes featured in this research activity participated in Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) Pilot Program sponsored by the electric and gas utility National Grid in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Building enclosure retrofit strategies are evaluated for impact on durability and indoor air quality in addition to energy performance. Evaluation of strategies is structured around the critical control functions of water, airflow, vapor flow, and thermal control. The aim of the research project is to develop guidance that could serve as a foundation for wider adoption of high performance, 'deep' retrofit work. The project will identify risk factors endemic to advanced retrofit in the context of the general building type, configuration and vintage encountered in the National Grid DER Pilot. Results for the test homes are based on observation and performance testing of recently completed projects. Additional observation would be needed to fully gauge long-term energy performance, durability, and occupant comfort.

Neuhauser, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

THE DETERMINATION OF EXCESSIVE EMULSIFICATION BY COALESCENCE BEHAVIOR MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The development of a remotely operated device for determining the coalescence times of plant process streams suspected of containing surfactants such as silicic compounds and fission product zirconium compounds is described. A general correlation between the coalescence times of pilot plant extraction column aluminum nitrate feeds and 3.25 percent tributyl phosphate extractant streams and the observations of column behavior of these streams is demonstrated. The application of the coalescence test to plant streams is given. (auth)

Parrett, O.W.

1959-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX B: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Project Reports on California Public Utilities Commission Decisions on Community Choice Aggregation Prepared For Participants FROM: John Dalessi, NCI SUBJECT: CPUC COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PHASE 1 DECISION On December 16

250

CX-004941: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Categorical Exclusion Determination 41: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004941: Categorical Exclusion Determination Makani Power, Inc. - Advanced Wind Turbine CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/14/2010 Location(s): Alameda, California Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support research, design, and a pilot-scale project involving the operability of a prototype Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT), an airborne system intended to generate utility-scale electricity by using tethered, high-performance wings outfitted with turbines. Proposed work consists entirely of research, development, and demonstration work to be completed in manufacturing and outdoor testing facilities located in Alameda, California (CA); Davenport, CA; and Sherman Island, CA. The work performed will be limited to on-site research, design, fabrication, and pilot-scale

251

CX-010706: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

706: Categorical Exclusion Determination 706: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010706: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor, Small-and Pilot-Scale Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.24, B3.4, B3.6, B3.8, B3.11, B3.16 Date: 07/03/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct outdoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, and national security including but not limited to collecting samples and analyzing ecosystem and atmospheric field data; developing, evaluating and testing equipment, materials and components; and inspecting

252

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP WIPP Transportation Security Gregory M. Sahd Security Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy Contact Information Gregory M. Sahd Security Operations Carlsbad Field Office * U.S. Department of Energy 575.234.8117 * Greg.Sahd@wipp.ws WIPP Transportation "...The (WIPP transportation) system is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the U.S...." - National Academy of Sciences, WIPP Panel Hanford Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Argonne National Laboratory - East Nevada Test Site Argonne National Laboratory - West Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CBFO Manager Senior Management

253

Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as “glass waste forms” by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 ± 2°C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NREL Bioprocessing Pilot Plant: Available for Industrial Use  

SciTech Connect

Microbial bioprocessing can produce a myriad of valuable products. If you are an industry needing small- or large-scale trials to test or advance a bioprocessing technology, National Bioenergy Center (NBC) facilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, may allow you to use world-class systems and expertise without the expense of building your own pilot plant.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Design considerations for a steam-injection pilot with in-situ foaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the necessary aspects of the planning, operation, evaluation, environmental impact and cost to implement a field pilot of steam injection with in-situ foaming. The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI) is planning to implement such a pilot in Kern County, California. The cost of the pilot will be shared by the US Department of Energy and an oil company. Some important aspects of drilling and completion programs and their specifications, permits from regulatory bodies, and downhole tools to improve steam stimulation are discussed. The essential surface facilities which include water treatment plant, steam generator, demulsifier and dehydrator are considered. The necessary laboratory research in support of the pilot has been recommended. The formation evaluation and reservoir engineering effort for the pilot has been divided into three phases: reservoir definition, reservoir monitoring and post-pilot study. Appropriate techniques applicable to each phase of the test have been discussed. The environmental impact regulations as related to the steam injection process have been considered. In particular, the environmental problems associated with the burning of crude oil and desulfurization of flue gas have been discussed. Other environmental considerations such as solid and liquid waste disposal, health and safety are also discussed. An estimate of the cost of this field test is presented. Three scenarii (for pilots with high, medium, and low investment potentials, respectively) are presented. Since this report was prepared, a specific site for the supri pilot has been chosen. Appendices G and H present the details on this site.

Siddiqui, M.H.; Sanyal, S.K.; Horn, A.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Carbon Supply for the Pilot Region: Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Project "Quantifying Carbon Market Opportunities in the United States" began in 2001. The first major task was the design of a methodology for estimating the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities in the United States and a test of this methodology in a pilot region. The primary outputs from this task are carbon supply curves for the most important classes of carbon sequestration activities in land-use change and forestry projects. This report presents the results for the pilot region...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

DANSSino: a pilot version of the DANSS neutrino detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANSSino is a reduced pilot version of a solid-state detector of reactor antineutrinos (to be created within the DANSS project and installed under the industrial 3 GW(th) reactor of the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant -- KNPP). Numerous tests performed at a distance of 11 m from the reactor core demonstrate operability of the chosen design and reveal the main sources of the background. In spite of its small size (20x20x100 ccm), the pilot detector turned out to be quite sensitive to reactor antineutrinos, detecting about 70 IBD events per day with the signal-to-background ratio about unity.

I. Alekseev; V. Belov; V. Brudanin; M. Danilov; V. Egorov; D. Filosofov; M. Fomina; Z. Honz; A. Kobyakin; D. Medvedev; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; A. Olshevsky; S. Rozov; N. Rumyantseva; V. Rusinov; A. Salamatin; Ye. Shevchik; M. Shirchenko; Yu. Shitov; A. Starostin; D. Svirida; E. Tarkovsky; I. Tikhomirov; E. Yakushev; I. Zhitnikov; D. Zinatulina

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests; Literature Review and Site Selection, Nov. 1997 (Revised Feb. 1998)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the preliminary report contains the literature review and site selection recommendations for ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004 — "Determining Long-term Performance of Cool Storage Systems From Short-term Tests".

Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CX-008270: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Frac Flowback Water CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

260

CX-008950: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Frac Flowback Water CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/13/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CX-009318: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Study and Pilot Test of Preformed Particle Gel Conformance Control Combined with Surfactant Treatment CX(s) Applied: A11, B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

262

EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii 1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc. to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel. The project would generate reliable cost information and test data to access its viability for implementation at a future commercial scale. If approved, DOE would provide approximately 80 percent of the funding for the project. Public Comment Opportunities

263

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/AirCred/index.html

264

Arsenic pilot plant operation and results : Anthony, New Mexico.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Anthony, New Mexico between August 2005 and December 2006 at Desert Sands Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association (MDWCA) (Desert Sands) Well No.3. The pilot demonstrations are a part of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Desert Sands site obtained arsenic removal performance data for fourteen different adsorptive media under intermittent flow conditions. Well water at Desert Sands has approximately 20 ppb arsenic in the unoxidized (arsenite-As(III)) redox state with moderately high total dissolved solids (TDS), mainly due to high sulfate, chloride, and varying concentrations of iron. The water is slightly alkaline with a pH near 8. The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Adsorptive media were compared side-by-side in ambient pH water with intermittent flow operation. This pilot is broken down into four phases, which occurred sequentially, however the phases overlapped in most cases.

Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E., Jr.; Wright, Jerome L.; Dwyer, Brian P.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CX-002410: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: Categorical Exclusion Determination 10: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002410: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems Print Verification Line Pilot Line CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9 Date: 05/24/2010 Location(s): North Canton, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Stark State College of Technology proposes to use federal funds to complete electrical and mechanical build of a Stack Block Test Stand for active fuel cell tubes at the Fuel Cell Prototyping Center in North Canton, Ohio. They will also initialize testing of the Stack Block Test Stand. Project activities include completion of control software, installation of facility electrical and controls wiring, initializing and commissioning testing for the Stack Block Test Stand, post operation inspection of the vessel heads

266

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant A pilot-scale conversion plant for researchers, industry partners, and stakeholders to test a variety of biochemical conversion processes and technologies. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. In the biochemical conversion pilot plant, NREL's engineers and scientists focus on all aspects of the efficiency and cost reduction of biochemical conversion processes. Our capabilities accommodate research from bench-scale to pilot-scale (up to one ton per day). NREL's biochemical conversion pilot plant is located in the Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF). Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL/PIX 20248

267

Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana's active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study N.L. Miller 1 *, A.W. KingCycle Research Strategy, DOE SC-0043, Office of BiologicalLBNL Report LBNL-53826. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study is

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation of the home-energy-rating concept and the Massachusetts Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on the results of an evaluation of a home-energy-rating concept based on a Massachusetts pilot project. The focus of the evaluation was on: (1) the compatibility of the Massachusetts rating with the RCS program, (2) who would use the rating and how, (3) qualitative estimates of benefits and costs, and (4) recommendations for further use and testing of the rating. In addition the evaluation of the rating concept also attempted to determine what if any effect the home energy rating has on the demand for energy audits, on the propensity of customers who received ratings to undertake recommended energy-efficiency home improvements, and on changes in mortgage-lending procedures for energy-efficient homes. The evaluation consisted of telephone and in-person discussions with the project developers, the various professional user groups, the recipients of the energy ratings, and control groups of audit customers that did not receive the energy rating. The evaluation was designed to determine the results of the pilot project, assess the project's effectiveness, and analyze the potential for transferring the rating procedure to other geographic locations.

Frankel, M.L.; Duberg, J.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of the home-energy-rating concept and the Massachusetts Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on the results of an evaluation of a home-energy-rating concept based on a Massachusetts pilot project. The focus of the evaluation was on: (1) the compatibility of the Massachusetts rating with the RCS program, (2) who would use the rating and how, (3) qualitative estimates of benefits and costs, and (4) recommendations for further use and testing of the rating. In addition the evaluation of the rating concept also attempted to determine what if any effect the home energy rating has on the demand for energy audits, on the propensity of customers who received ratings to undertake recommended energy-efficiency home improvements, and on changes in mortgage-lending procedures for energy-efficient homes. The evaluation consisted of telephone and in-person discussions with the project developers, the various professional user groups, the recipients of the energy ratings, and control groups of audit customers that did not receive the energy rating. The evaluation was designed to determine the results of the pilot project, assess the project's effectiveness, and analyze the potential for transferring the rating procedure to other geographic locations.

Frankel, M.L.; Duberg, J.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Microsoft Word - NTS Performance Test Rpt - Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE September 21, 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Summary ....................................................................................................................................................... 2 Results...........................................................................................................................................................

272

APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), along with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Pubic Service (APS), is monitoring the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant to determine the costs to produce hydrogen fuels (including 100% hydrogen as well as hydrogen and compressed natural gas blends) for use by fleets and other operators of advanced-technology vehicles. The hydrogen fuel cost data will be used as benchmark data by technology modelers as well as research and development programs. The Pilot Plant can produce up to 18 kilograms (kg) of hydrogen per day by electrolysis. It can store up to 155 kg of hydrogen at various pressures up to 6,000 psi. The dispenser island can fuel vehicles with 100% hydrogen at 5,000 psi and with blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas at 3,600 psi. The monitoring system was designed to track hydrogen delivery to each of the three storage areas and to monitor the use of electricity on all major equipment in the Pilot Plant, including the fuel dispenser island. In addition, water used for the electrolysis process is monitored to allow calculation of the total cost of plant operations and plant efficiencies. The monitoring system at the Pilot Plant will include about 100 sensors when complete (50 are installed to date), allowing for analysis of component, subsystems, and plant-level costs. The monitoring software is mostly off-the-shelve, with a custom interface. The majority of the sensors input to the Programmable Automation Controller as 4- to 20-mA analog signals. The plant can be monitored over of the Internet, but the control functions are restricted to the control room equipment. Using the APS general service plan E32 electric rate of 2.105 cents per kWh, during a recent eight-month period when 1,200 kg of hydrogen was produced and the plant capacity factor was 26%, the electricity cost to produce one kg of hydrogen was $3.43. However, the plant capacity factor has been increasing, with a recent one-month high of 49%. If a plant capacity factor of 70% can be achieved with the present equipment, the cost of electricity would drop to $2.39 per kg of hydrogen. In this report, the power conversion (76.7%), cell stack (53.1%), and reverse osmosis system (7.14%) efficiencies are also calculated, as is the water cost per kg of hydrogen produced ($0.10 per kg). The monitoring system has identified several areas having the potential to lower costs, including using an reverse osmosis system with a higher efficiency, improving the electrolysis power conversion efficiency, and using air cooling to replace some or all chiller cooling. These activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory for the AVTA, which is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

CX-004071: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004071: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09302010 Location(s):...

274

CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine 1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06132013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s):...

275

CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07302012 Location(s): Oregon...

276

CX-006185: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006185: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s): Conroe,...

277

CX-005595: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-005595: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 04112011 Location(s):...

278

CX-006186: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006186: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s): Humble,...

279

CX-006184: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006184: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s):...

280

CX-002158: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-002158: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05042010 Location(s): Round Rock,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CRDL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 2. Collector subsystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The methods and plans for the manufacture of the 10-MW collector heliostats and associated controls for the pilot plant are detailed. An in-depth description of the production, installation, and verification testing of heliostats for the pilot plant is presented. Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the pilot plant collector subsystem are included. Also, a heliostat location summary report is given. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

User computer system pilot project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The User Computer System (UCS) is a general purpose unclassified, nonproduction system for Mound users. The UCS pilot project was successfully completed, and the system currently has more than 250 users. Over 100 tables were installed on the UCS for use by subscribers, including tables containing data on employees, budgets, and purchasing. In addition, a UCS training course was developed and implemented.

Eimutis, E.C.

1989-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

283

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX E: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Community in this report. #12;«CCA_Name» - DRAFT - COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION IMPLEMENTATION PLAN «Date Choice Aggregation Implementation Plan Template Prepared For: California Energy Commission Prepared By

284

CX-009059: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009059: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Scale Hanford Mixing Studies with Cohesive Simulants, Phase III, and Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory will conduct a mixing demonstration of the Hanford AY-102 High Level Waste (HLW) tank. This testing will be conducted in 786-A. The test is a visual type of demonstration where no instrumentation will be used on the test apparatus. Video recordings will be made of the demonstration. Process water and simulant will be used in the testing. Solid particles will be added to the simulant to aid in the visual inspection. CX-009059.pdf

285

CX-008369: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

369: Categorical Exclusion Determination 369: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008369: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Scale Hanford Mixing Studies with Cohesive Simulants, Phase III, and Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/28/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory will conduct a mixing demonstration of the Hanford AY-102 High level Waste (HLW) tank. This testing will be conducted in 786-A. The test is a visual type of demonstration where no instrumentation will be used on the test apparatus. Video recordings will be made of the demonstration. Process water and simulant will be used in the testing. Solid particles will be added to the simulant to aid in the visual inspection. CX-008369.pdf

286

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in FracturedFRACTURE-MATRIX HEAT TRANSFER AREA Karsten Pruess andimprove the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

THOREX PILOT PLANT: CRITICALITY REVIEW OF THE THOREX PILOT PLANT USING THE INT-23 PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The results of a criticality review of the ORNL Thorex pilot plant are presented for the condition where a low TBP (INT-23) flowsheet is used in recovering U/sup 233/ from irradiated thorium. Criticality control will be maintained by limiting the U/sup 233/ inventory in the solvent extraction system to less than 550g by means of streamvolume and U/sup 233/ material balances determined at 8 hr intervals. Equipment modification and improved operating procedures for safe plant operation are outlined. (auth)

McDuffee, W.T.; Yarbro, O.O.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Piloting the Smart Grid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piloting the Smart Grid Piloting the Smart Grid Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Piloting the Smart Grid Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Best Practices Website: www.smartgridnews.com/artman/uploads/1/Piloting_the_smart_grid__05-29- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/piloting-smart-grid Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Cost Recovery/Allocation This paper provides guidance regarding when and how Smart Grid piloting studies should be conducted along with examples from several recent pilots that involved dynamic pricing, a key element of the smart grid. Smart Grid

289

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY REPORT. PART II. PILOT PLANT WORK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABS>The stoicbiometric HNO/sub 3/ concentrations required to digest feed materials to 200g U/I, 3N excess acid are tabulated. Stoichiometrically the minimum HNO/sub 3/ concentration required to dissolve feed materials to flowsheet conditions flowsheet tests is presented. The sensitivity of the Weldon Spring TBP-extraction system to process flow rates is discussed. A series of pilot plant experiments are deserined for removing TBP from raffinate. Steam distillstion of the raffinate slurries proved to be more effective than washing with hexone in a pulse column. The flame fusion melting of UO/sub 2/ to form dense rods of relatively constant cross section continued. The rods and tubes which were extruded from micronized UO/sub 2/ had excellent surface quality and sintered densities greater than 98% of theoretical. Bomb center temperatures of 500 deg F and higher prior to fining, obtained by increasing the firing time, tended to produce low hydrogen U. A method for producing dingot U with an acceptable H/sub 2/ contact was developed. A number of solid additions to the UF/ sub 4/-Mg bomb charge were investigated. The tonnage of forged bar stock produced during this period is given. The variables affeeting diagot extrusion are discussed. An investigation of the dingot process is given. The determination of plant decontamination faetors for Ce/sup 3+/, Mg, and Al are presented. (W.L.H.)

Elliott, B. ed.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Determining the basic operational characteristics of a solar thermostat in the conditions of full-scale tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of calculating a heat-receiver-heater and the volume of the heat store is presented, together with the results of full-scale tests of a solar thermostat with stochastic variations of climatic factors.

Gryadunov, A.I.; Mamedova, A.I.; Razaev, P.F.; Sadykov, S.A.; Velieva, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Basic data report for drillholes at the H-11 complex (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-WIPP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drillholes H-11b1, H-11b2, and H-11b3 were drilled from August to December 1983 for site characterization and hydrologic studies of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Upper Permian Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. In October 1984, the three wells were subjected to a series of pumping tests designed to develop the wells, provide information on hydraulic communication between the wells, provide hydraulic properties information, and to obtain water samples for quality of water measurements. Based on these tests, it was determined that this location would provide an excellent pad to conduct a convergent-flow non-sorbing tracer test in the Culebra dolomite. In 1988, a fourth hole (H-11b4) was drilled at this complex to provide a tracer-injection hole for the H-11 convergent-flow tracer test and to provide an additional point at which the hydraulic response of the Culebra H-11 multipad pumping test could be monitored. A suite of geophysical logs was run on the drillholes and was used to identify different lithologies and aided in interpretation of the hydraulic tests. 4 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Mercer, J.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Snyder, R.P. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

Carlson, Thomas J

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Long Island Smart Metering Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) Smart Meter Pilots provided invaluable information and experience for future deployments of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), including the deployment planned as part of LIPAâ??s Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000220). LIPA will incorporate lessons learned from this pilot in future deployments, including lessons relating to equipment performance specifications and testing, as well as equipment deployment and tracking issues. LIPA ultimately deployed three AMI technologies instead of the two that were originally contemplated. This enabled LIPA to evaluate multiple systems in field conditions with a relatively small number of meter installations. LIPA experienced a number of equipment and software issues that it did not anticipate, including issues relating to equipment integration, ability to upgrade firmware and software â??over the airâ?ť (as opposed to physically interacting with every meter), and logistical challenges associated with tracking inventory and upgrade status of deployed meters. In addition to evaluating the technology, LIPA also piloted new Time-of-Use (TOU) rates to assess customer acceptance of time-differentiated pricing and to evaluate whether customers would respond by adjusting their activities from peak to non-peak periods. LIPA developed a marketing program to educate customers who received AMI in the pilot areas and to seek voluntary participation in TOU pricing. LIPA also guaranteed participating customers that, for their initial year on the rates, their electricity costs under the TOU rate would not exceed the amount they would have paid under the flat rates they would otherwise enjoy. 62 residential customers chose to participate in the TOU rates, and every one of them saved money during the first year. 61 of them also elected to stay on the TOU rate â?? without the cost guarantee â?? at the end of that year. The customer who chose not to continue on the rate was also the one who achieved the greatest savings. However, after the first year, the customer in question installed equipment that would have made TOU rates a more costly option than the residential flat rate. During the second year, all but one customer saved money. That customer increased usage during peak hours, and as a result saw an increase in annual costs (as compared to the flat rate) of $24.17. The results were less clear for commercial customers, which LIPA attributes to rate design issues that it will take into account for future deployments. LIPA views this pilot as a complete success. Not only is LIPA better prepared for a larger deployment of AMI, but it is confident that residential customers will accept AMI and TOU rates and shift their energy consumption from peak to non-peak periods in response to pricing. On a larger scale, this will benefit LIPA and all of its customers by potentially lowering peak demand when energy costs are highest.

None

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project  

SciTech Connect

The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

AZ CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 WESTCARB region has major CO2 point sources 3 WESTCARB region has many deep saline formations - candidates for CO2 storage WESTCARB also created GIS layers for oil/gas fields and deep coal basins Source: DOE Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada 4 - Aspen Environmental - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. Arizona Utilities CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National

298

The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

NONE

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | June 2007 Salt Disposal Investigations Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | June 2007 Salt Disposal Investigations The mission of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site is to provide permanent, underground disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes (wastes that also have hazardous chemical components). TRU waste consists of clothing, tools, and debris left from the research and production of nuclear weapons. TRU waste is contaminated with small amounts of plutonium and other TRU radioactive elements. Over the next 35 years, WIPP is expected to receive approximately 175,000 cubic meters of waste from various DOE sites. Enforcement September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter, Washington TRU Solutions - September 8, 2006

300

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem. [10-MW Pilot Plant and 100-MW Commercial Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conception, design, and testing of the receiver subsystem proposed by the McDonnell Douglas/Rocketdyne Receiver team for the DOE 10-MW Pilot Plant and the 100-MW Commercial Plant are described. The receiver subsystem consists of the receiver unit, the tower on which the receiver unit is mounted above the collector field, and the supporting control and instrumentation equipment. The plans for implementation of the Pilot Plant are given including the anticipated schedule and production plan (procurement, installation, checkout, and maintenance). Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the Pilot Plant receiver subsystem are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and injection systems necessary to serve the pilot power and mineral recovery plants planned for Phase 3. The scope of the Area Resource Test Facility Subprogram will include evaluation, costing, design, construction and operation of an ARTF that can serve as a field facility for testing and evaluating high temperature, high salinity geothermal brine utilization components and systems being developed by various organizations and laboratories in the United States. [DJE-2005

None

1975-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Community Based Renewable Energy Production Incentive (Pilot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Community Based Renewable Energy Production Incentive (Pilot Program) (Maine) This is the approved revision of this...

303

The Pilot Study R&D Task  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pilot Study R&D Task. EDT – a complex of four tasks: 1) Detection of Entities – limited to five types: PER ORG GPE ...

304

Argonne's Pilot Electric Vehicle Charging Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's Pilot Electric Vehicle Charging Project solar array and charging station Solar array and charging station. View larger image. As part of Argonne's continuing efforts to...

305

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP occupies approximately 28 square kilometers (16 square miles). The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's history is relatively short, as it became operational in 1999. The facility...

306

CX-001999: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1999: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Commercialization Effort for 1 Watt Consumer Electronics Power Pack CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04/29/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office MTI Micro Fuel Cells (Albany, New York) would use DOE and cost share funding to develop a 1 Watt Direct Methanol Fuel Cell powered charger for the consumer electronics industry. This project would involve research on component cost reduction, redesign for manufacturability, safety certification, performance and reliability testing, system integration, and pilot field testing. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001999.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009567: Categorical Exclusion Determination

307

CX-004066: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004066: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10/01/2010 Location(s): Menlo Park, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Design, build and operate a 1 megawatt (20 tons of carbon dioxide per day) membrane carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system at the Arizona Public Service's (APS) Cholla Power Plant. Continued laboratory research and analysis, and testing of 1 ton per day (TPD) CO2 membrane unit at APS. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004066.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000324: Categorical Exclusion Determination

308

Experimental Test of Instability-Enhanced Collisional Friction for Determining Ion Loss in Two Ion Species Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments have shown that ions in weakly collisional plasmas containing two ion species of comparable densities nearly reach a common velocity at the sheath edge. A new theory suggests that collisional friction between the two ion species enhanced by two stream instability reduces the drift velocity of each ion species relative to each other near the sheath edge and finds that the difference in velocities at the sheath edge depends on the relative concentrations of the species. It is small when the concentrations are comparable and is large, with each species reaching its own Bohm velocity, when the relative concentration differences are large. To test these findings, ion drift velocities were measured with laser-induced fluorescence in argon-xenon plasmas. We show that the predictions are in excellent agreement with the first experimental tests of the new model.

Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California 92110 (United States)

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CX-004063: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10012010...

312

CX-004065: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 10012010...

313

CX-004064: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10012010...

314

Theoretical and experimental determination of matrix diffusion and related solute transport properties of fractured tuffs from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical and experimental studies of the chemical and physical factors which affect molecular diffusion of dissolved substances from fractures into a tuffaceous rock matrix have been made on rocks from G-Tunnel and Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A variety of groundwater tracers, which may be useful in field tests at the NTS, have also been developed and tested. Although a number of physical/chemical processes may cause nonconvective transport of dissolved species from fractures into the tuff matrix, molecular diffusion seems to be the most important process. Molecular diffusion in these rocks is controlled by the composition of the groundwater through multicomponent effects and several rock properties. The porosities of the samples studied ranged from about 0.1 to 0.4. The constrictivity-tortuosity parameter ranged from 0.1 and 0.3 and effective matrix-diffusion coefficients were measured to be between 2 to 17. x 10{sup -7} c,{sup 2}/s for sodium halides and sodium pentafluorobenzoate. Total porosity was found to be the principle factor accounting for the variation in effective diffusion coefficients. The constrictivity-tortuosity factor was found to have a fair correlation (r = 0.75) with the median pore diameters measured by mercury intrusion. Measurements of bulk-rock electrical impedance changes with frequency indicate that the constrictivity factor has a maximum value of 0.8 to 1, but may be smaller. If the larger values are correct, then the diffusion paths in tuff are more tortuous than in granular media. Computation of the full diffusion-coefficient matrix for various tracers in J-13 well water from the NTS indicates coupling of the diffusion fluxes of all ionic species. These effects are being incorporated into a numerical model of multicomponent-matrix diffusion.

Walter, G.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the feasibility study showed that several factors can greatly affect, both positively and negatively, the "per kg" cost of hydrogen. After a September 15, 2005, meeting to evaluate the advisability of funding Phase II of the project DOE concurred with BEPC that Phase I results did warrant a "go" recommendation to proceed with Phase II activities. The hydrogen production system was built by Hydrogenics and consisted of several main components: hydrogen production system, gas control panel, hydrogen storage assembly and hydrogen-fueling dispenser The hydrogen production system utilizes a bipolar alkaline electrolyzer nominally capable of producing 30 Nm3/h (2.7 kg/h). The hydrogen is compressed to 6000 psi and delivered to an on-site three-bank cascading storage assembly with 80 kg of storage capacity. Vehicle fueling is made possible through a Hydrogenics-provided gas control panel and dispenser able to fuel vehicles to 5000 psi. A key component of this project was the development of a dynamic scheduling system to control the wind energy's variable output to the electrolyzer cell stacks. The dynamic scheduling system received an output signal from the wind farm, processed this signal based on the operational mode, and dispatched the appropriate signal to the electrolyzer cell stacks. For the study BEPC chose to utilize output from the Wilton wind farm located in central ND. Site design was performed from May 2006 through August 2006. Site construction activities were from August to November 2006 which involved earthwork, infrastructure installation, and concrete slab construction. From April - October 2007, the system components were installed and connected. Beginning in November 2007, the system was operated in a start-up/shakedown mode. Because of numerous issues, the start-up/shakedown period essentially lasted until the end of January 2008, at which time a site acceptance test was performed. Official system operation began on February 14, 2008, and continued through the end of December 2008. Several issues continued to prevent consistent operation, resulting in operation o

Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

A test program to determine the structural properties of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry walls at the DOE Oak Ridge plants  

SciTech Connect

A recent Department of Energy (DOE) General Design Criteria'' has emphasized the importance of determining the adequacy and safety of both new and existing facilities to natural phenomenon hazards. Many of the buildings at the DOE Oak Ridge facilities are constructed with unreinforced masonry hollow clay tile infill walls -- in some cases these walls comprise a substantial part of the lateral force resistance for a building. In order to perform a realistic assessment of the strength of the buildings to seismic events it is important to accurately predict the behavior of these walls. Very little information is currently available on hollow clay tile masonry, its structural properties and behavior. As the in-situ condition of these walls throughout the plants is suspect due to their age and exposure to numerous chemicals, a test program was initiated at the Oak Ridge plants to obtain material properties for use in the natural phenomena hazards analysis. This paper presents the preliminary results of that testing program. The following tests on clay-tile walls, units, and panels were performed: (1) in-situ mortar bed shear strength, (2) compression strength, (3) splitting tensile strength, and (4) diagonal tension (shear) strength of panels which had been removed from existing walls. The testing program is ongoing, is being expanded, and will include not only in-plane tests, but out-of-plane bending testing as well. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool...

319

NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program DOE Researchers Eligible to Apply for Resources, Expertise April 12, 2012...

320

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LBNL's GEOSEQ project is a key participant in the Frio IIbrine pilot studying geologic sequestration of CO2. During During theinjection phase of the Frio-II brine pilot, LBNL collected multiple datasets including seismic monitoring, hydrologic monitoring and geochemicalsampling. These data sets are summarized in this report including allCASSM (continuous active source seismic monitoring) travel time data,injection pressure and flow rate data and gaseous sampling and tracerdata. Additional results from aqueous chemistry analysis performed by theU. S. Geological Survey (USGS) are summarized. Post injectionmodification of the flow model for Frio II is shown. Thesemodificationsare intended to facilitate integration with the monitoring data andincorporation of model heterogeneity. Current activities of LBNL's GEOSEQproject related to the Frio II test are shown, including development of anew petrophysical model for improved interpretation of seismic monitoringdata and integration of this data with flow modeling.

Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

A pilot study of energy efficient air cleaning for ozone  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory pilot study has been undertaken with the material that showed the most promise (high capacity and low pressure drop) based on the literature review and associated calculations. The best-performing air cleaner was a commercially available pleated filter that contained a thin layer of small activated carbon particles between two sheets of non-woven fibrous webbing. We will refer to this unit as the ''ozone filter'' although it is marketed for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile passenger compartments. This pilot study strongly suggests that ozone air cleaning can be practical in commercial air handling systems; however, further tests are needed to assess air cleaner performance under a wider range of conditions.

Gundel, Lara A.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Katsapov, Gregory Y.; Fisk, William J.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

CX-007065: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Slipstream Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel Amine-Based Post-Combustion Technology for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182011...

324

CX-008923: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Slipstream Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel Amine-Based Post-Combustion Technology for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08242012...

325

CX-007099: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Slipstream Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel Amine-Based Post-Combustion Technology for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 10132011...

326

CX-001472: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Creation of a United States Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Lighting Panel Pilot Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04022010...

327

CX-001474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Creation of a United States Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Lighting Panel Pilot Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04022010...

328

CX-006263: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-006263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Eddy-Redmond and Redmond-Pilot Butte Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07072011 Location(s): Wasco County,...

329

CX-008162: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-008162: Categorical Exclusion Determination Redmond-Pilot Butte Number 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 04132012 Location(s): Oregon...

330

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory July 11, 2011 CX-006187: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s): Alvin, Texas...

331

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Creation of a United States Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Lighting Panel Pilot Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04022010...

332

Advanced engineering environment pilot project.  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a concurrent engineering concept that enables real-time process tooling design and analysis, collaborative process flow development, automated document creation, and full process traceability throughout a product's life cycle. The AEE will enable NNSA's Design and Production Agencies to collaborate through a singular integrated process. Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) are working together on a prototype AEE pilot project to evaluate PTC's product collaboration tools relative to the needs of the NWC. The primary deliverable for the project is a set of validated criteria for defining a complete commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution to deploy the AEE across the NWC.

Schwegel, Jill; Pomplun, Alan R.; Abernathy, Rusty (Parametric Technology Corporation, Needham, MA)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Pilot plant environmental conditions (OPDD Appendix C)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is Appendix C to the Pilot Plant Overall Plant design description document for the 10-MW pilot central receiver plant to be located at Barstow, California. The environmental design criteria to be used for plant design day performance, operational limits, and survival environmental limits are specified. Data are presented on insolation, wind, temperature, and other meteorological conditions. (WHK)

Randall, C.M.; Whitson, M.E.; Coggi, J.V.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

CX-004592: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004592: Categorical Exclusion Determination Re-Utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 11/23/2010 Location(s): Wooster, Ohio Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory This project is innovative process for Carbon Capture and Sequestration (carbon dioxide) from a coal-fired industrial source to grow algae in an open-ponds. Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Center designs, constructs and tests bench and pilot scale Anaerobic Digesters. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004592.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-004591: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004590: Categorical Exclusion Determination

335

NREL Test-to-Failure Protocol (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presentation describes the test-to-failure protocol that was developed and piloted at NREL, stressing PV modules with multiple applications of damp heat (with bias) and thermal cycling until they fail.

Hacke, P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Peat-Gasification Pilot-Plant Program. Final report, April 9, 1980-March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities included the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. After shakedown of the new feed preparation equipment (drying, screening, and crushing) was successfully completed, the first integrated pilot plant test was conducted in April 1981 to provide solids flow data and operating experience with the new PEATGAS gasifier configuration. Three gasification tests were subsequently conducted using the existing slurry feed system. The lockhopper feed system, capable of providing a continuous, measured flow of 1 to 4 tons of dry feed at pressures up to 500 psig, was then successfully integrated with the gasifier. Two gasification tests were conducted, expanding the data to more economical operating conditions. The operation of the PEATGAS pilot plant has confirmed that peat is an excellent raw material for SNG production. Peat conversions over 90% were consistently achieved at moderate gasification temperatures and at sinter-free conditions. A large data base was established for Minnesota peat at pressure 1.0. The technical feasibility of the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated. However, an economic assessment of the peat gasification process indicates that the cost of the peat feedstock delivered to a plant site has a significant effect on the cost of the product SNG. 28 figures, 36 tables.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Arsenic pilot plant operation and results - Socorro Springs, New Mexico - phase 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The first pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Socorro New Mexico between January 2005 and July 2005. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Socorro Springs site obtained arsenic removal performance data for five different adsorptive media under constant ambient flow conditions. Well water at Socorro Springs has approximately 42 ppb arsenic in the oxidized (arsenate-As(V)) redox state with moderate amounts of silica, low concentrations of iron and manganese and a slightly alkaline pH (8). The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Near the end of the test the feedwater pH was lowered to assess the affect on bed capacity and as a prelude to a controlled pH study (Socorro Springs Phase 2).

Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E. Jr; Wright, Jeremy B.; Dwyer, Brian P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2011 9, 2011 CX-005683: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Test Reactor Canal AFIP-7 Channel Gap Probe Installation Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Nuclear Energy, Idaho Operations Office April 19, 2011 CX-005638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Extended Pilot-Scale Testing of the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne Compact Reformer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 19, 2011 CX-005634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Hydrocarbon Samples and/or Qualitative/Quantitative Analysis of Hydrocarbon Mixtures CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

339

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.4 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.4 Existing Regulations B3.4: Transport packaging tests for radioactive or hazardous material Drop, puncture, water-immersion, thermal, and fire tests of transport packaging for radioactive or hazardous materials to certify that designs meet the applicable requirements (such as 49 CFR 173.411 and 173.412 and 10 CFR 71.73). Previous Regulations Categorical Exclusion Determinations dated before November 14th, 2011 were issued under previous DOE NEPA regulations. See the Notice of Final Rulemaking (76 FR 63763, 10/13/2011) for information changes to this categorical exclusion. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 3, 2013 CX-010707: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor, Small-and Pilot-Scale Research and Development

340

CX-009543: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Categorical Exclusion Determination 43: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009543: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sopogy Subcontract CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 11/28/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. DOE is proposing to provide federal funding to the Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture (PICHTR) to develop and test technologies that create viable renewable energy systems and to develop policies to promote those systems in the State of Hawaii. PICHTR proposes to make a sub-award to Sopogy to conduct research, development and pilot project demonstration activities to advance Micro-scaled Concentrating Solar Power Technologies (MicroCSP) by demonstrating and testing Sopogy's new SopoTitan MicroCSP collector design. CX-009543.pdf More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

CX-008822: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

822: Categorical Exclusion Determination 822: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008822: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Power Group, Inc. Docket EA-383 CX(s) Applied: B4.2 Date: 05/18/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Pilot Power Group, Inc. has applied to the Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability for an electricity export authorization which will allow it to export electricity to Mexico pursuant to the Federal Power Act. CX-008822.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-383 Pilot Power Group, Inc EA-383 Pilot Power Group Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-383 Pilot Power Group Inc

343

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DENVER, CO DENVER, CO WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES O.W. EATON MANAGER, EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OPENING OF NEW ROUTES COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 102 579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL 102-579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL ACT OF 1992 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 *MERRTT 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 MERRTT *INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *MEDICAL EXAMINER DISPATCHER (BETA) *DISPATCHER (BETA) RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR FOR FOR FOR HOSPITAL PERSONNEL HOSPITAL PERSONNEL Based on FEMA Course G-346 iNTRODUCTION 4 Hazardous Materials Accidents Part 1 WIPP EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EXERCISES CONDUCTED E ercise Location Date Exercise Location Date TRANSAX 90 Colorado Springs, Colorado November 8, 1990 1

345

Monument Valley Phytoremediation Pilot Study:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1.8 1.8 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Monument Valley Ground Water Remediation Work Plan: Native Plant Farming and Phytoremediation Pilot Study August 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0015-10-000 Document Number U0029501 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Note: Some of the section page numbers in the Table of Contents may not correspond to the page on which the section appears when viewing them in Adobe Acrobat. Document Number U0029501 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Monument Valley Ground Water Remediation Work Plan August 1998 Page v Contents Page Acronyms .

346

Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project has demonstrated the compatibility of biodiesel technology and economics on a local scale. The project has been committed to making homegrown biodiesel a viable form of community economic development. The project has benefited by reducing risks by building the facility gradually and avoiding large initial outlays of money for facilities and technologies. A primary advantage of this type of community-scale biodiesel production is that it allows for a relatively independent, local solution to fuel production. Successfully using locally sourced feedstocks and putting the fuel into local use emphasizes the feasibility of different business models under the biodiesel tent and that there is more than just a one size fits all template for successful biodiesel production.

Doon, Ben; Quintana, Dan

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Pilot School Bus Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Pilot Program The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles will approve up to three participants for a pilot program to operate Type II school buses that are

348

Nortel CallPilot A-Style Command Comparison Card  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Welcome to CallPilot. This card helps you to learn CallPilot by showing you the key differences between Welcome to CallPilot. This card helps you to learn CallPilot by showing you the key differences between CallPilot and your previous messaging system. For example, in CallPilot, you don't need a main menu. When you log in, you are at your first new message right away. To play your messages, compose new messages, or change mailbox settings, you use standard commands that are common to all features. Prompts guide you whenever you pause, and Help is always there when you need it - just press *. For further information, refer to the CallPilot Multimedia Messaging User Guide. Features CallPilot Previous system These keypad diagrams show the frequently used message commands in CallPilot and your previous system. In CallPilot, the following commands are

349

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant April 22, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - April 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities November 28, 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant September 28, 2011 Independent Activity Report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - September 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [HIAR-WIPP-2011-09-07] October 2, 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at

350

Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect

The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir zones and 3 flow-interior/caprock intervals were performed during drilling and immediately following reaching the final borehole drilling depth (i.e., 4,110 ft). In addition, six of the 12 basalt interflow zones were selected for detailed hydrochemical characterization. Results from the detailed hydrologic test characterization program provided the primary information on basalt interflow zone transmissivity/injectivity, and caprock permeability characteristics.

B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Enforcement Letter issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies associated with the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter Non-Destructive Assay System Refurbishment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 8, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC, related to Radiological Uptakes at the Mobile Visual Examination and Repackaging Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, December 22, 2005 (EA-2005-08) - Washington TRU Solutions, LLC - Press Release, December 22, 2005 Enforcement Letter issued to Diversified Metal Products, Inc. related to Transportainer Fabrication Deficiencies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, October 28, 2004

352

Solar Pilot Plant: Phase I. Final report, July 1, 1975--July 1, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell was given a 2-year contract by the Energy Research and Development Administration on 1 July 1975 to develop a preliminary design for a 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant of the central receiver type. The program culminated in mid-1977 with delivery of a pilot plant preliminary design, estimates for its cost, and performance, and cost estimates for a 100-MW(e) plant, which will be detailed during the operation of and built as a follow-on to the pilot plant. The pilot plant preliminary design evolved through three iterations, which were verified and refined by analysis and experimentation. Subsystem research experiments (SREs) were conducted on the collector subsystem and the steam generator portion of the receiver subsystem. A lesser amount of testing was done on a latent-heat storage subsystem before a sensible-heat storage subsystem was incorporated at the direction of ERDA. All test results and analyses pointed to the feasibility of the pilot plant, and by extension to commercial-scale plants. On that basis and in light of the worsening energy situation, Honeywell recommended that Phase II of the program be undertaken as quickly as practical.

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

CX-008674: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Categorical Exclusion Determination 74: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008674: Categorical Exclusion Determination ATK - A High Efficiency Inertial Carbon Dioxide Extraction System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 07/01/2011 Location(s): New York, Pennsylvania Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Funding will support small-scale laboratory research, design, fabrication and pilot-scale testing of the Inertial Carbon Dioxide Extraction System (ICES), an aero-thermodynamic inertial separation device for use in carbon capture processes. Funding will also support computational and performance modeling, economic modeling, and commercialization/transition planning for the ICES system under development. CX-008674.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

354

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Other Location | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Location Other Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Other Location Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in other locations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 24, 2013 CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 09/24/2013 Location(s): Multiple States, China, Canada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 21, 2013 CX-010781: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Geomechanical Model for Gas Shales Based on Integration of Stress CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/21/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 16, 2013

355

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 15, 2012 May 15, 2012 CX-008246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.1, B5.19 Date: 05/15/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office May 15, 2012 CX-008240: Categorical Exclusion Determination Franklyn Center - North Saint Paul CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.1, B5.19 Date: 05/15/2012 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): Golden Field Office May 15, 2012 CX-008238: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Colorado State Capitol Building Geothermal Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.1, B5.19 Date: 05/15/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office May 14, 2012 CX-008271: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Flowback Water

356

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2012 3, 2012 CX-008950: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Frac Flowback Water CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/13/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 13, 2012 CX-008949: Categorical Exclusion Determination Novel Materials for Robust Repair of Leaky Wellbores in Carbon Dioxide Storage Formations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 13, 2012 CX-008884: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rattlesnake Butte Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/13/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 13, 2012 CX-008879: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pearl-Marion No.1 Line Tower 21/1 Bank Repair Project

357

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Pilot Study for the Replication of the Draper Study of Leukemia, Brain Tumors, and Distance to Power Lines in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005, a study in the United Kingdom, referred to in this report as the Draper study, reported a positive association between residential proximity to overhead transmission lines and childhood leukemia. This report describes a pilot study that was performed to determine the feasibility of replicating this study in California. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify potential difficulties with performing this type of an evaluation in California and to design a rigorous and cost-effective methodo...

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Remotely piloted vehicles; A selective bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This report is a bibliography from the International Aerospace Abstracts and the Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts on remotely piloted vehicles. Most of the applications of these RPV`s are military in nature.

Farley, R. [comp.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Mercury Oxidation Across SCR Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements were conducted to evaluate the mercury chemical reactions using a pilot-scale SCR operating on flue gas slipstream from an eastern bituminous (~1.75% sulfur, ~750 ppm Cl) coal-fired power plant. Tests were conducted by the Western Kentucky University (WKU) to evaluate the impact of flue gas constituents (HCl, Cl2, SO2, SO3, NH3:NOx) as well as two commercially-available SCR catalysts. The results and data were reviewed by Reaction Engineering International, who prepared this technical update...

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Mercury Oxidation Across SCR Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effects of addition of various acid gas species on the oxidation of elemental mercury across two commercial SCR catalysts in a pilot SCR reactor operating on a slipstream from a Powder River Basin coal-fired power plant. Tests were conducted by the Western Kentucky University (WKU) to evaluate the impact of flue gas constituents (HCl, HF, HBr, HI, SO3, NH3:NO), operating conditions, and catalyst design on mercury oxidation. The results and data were reviewed by Reaction Engineer...

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

HUD PowerSaver Pilot Loan Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HUD PowerSaver Pilot Loan Program HUD PowerSaver Pilot Loan Program Title HUD PowerSaver Pilot Loan Program Publication Type Policy Brief Authors Zimring, Mark, Ian M. Hoffman, and Merrian C. Fuller Tertiary Authors Borgeson, Merrian Secondary Title Clean Energy Program Policy Brief Publisher LBNL Place Published Berkeley Year of Publication 2010 Pagination 6 Date Published 12/2010 Abstract The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently announced the creation of a pilot loan program for home energy improvements. The PowerSaver loan program is a new, energy-focused variant of the Title I Property Improvement Loan Insurance Program (Title I Program) and is planned for introduction in early 2011. The PowerSaver pilot will provide lender insurance for secured and unsecured loans up to $25,000 to single family homeowners. These loans will specifically target residential energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. HUD estimates the two-year pilot will fund approximately 24,000 loans worth up to $300 million; the program is not capped. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), HUD"s mortgage insurance unit, will provide up to $25 million in grants as incentives to participating lenders. FHA is seeking lenders in communities with existing programs for promoting residential energy upgrades.

363

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY REPORT. II. PILOT PLANT WORK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the gross solubility of U in digestions of Mallinokrodt feed materials, studies of variables affecting U purity in a TBP hexane extraction cycle, low-acid flowsheet for TBP--hexane extraction process based on a 440 g U/liter in lM HNO/sub 3/ digest liquor, hacking studies in the pilot plant pumperdecanter system, recovery of U from residues from the dingot process, lowering the H level in dingot metal, forging of dingot bar stock, dingot extrusion, fubrication of UO/sub 2/ fuel elements, and the determination of H content of derby and ingot metal. (W.L.H.)

Kuhlman, N. ed.

1957-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury ConcentrationsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

365

CX-004708: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pilot-Scale Mercury Testing for Advanced Fuel Research, IncorporatedCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 12/14/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

366

CX-006498: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Frac Flowback WaterCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/30/2011Location(s): Plymouth, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

367

CX-009319: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Study and Pilot Test of Preformed Particle Gel Conformance Control Combined with Surfactant Treatment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

368

A study of the use of the laptop XO in Brazilian pilot schools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a study on the perception of 63 students and 15 teachers of two Brazilian public school, which took part in the pilot test of the OLPC educational laptop XO. For the students, the XO turned classes more attractive mainly because ... Keywords: Digital inclusion, Education, Laptop XO, User's perception

Lia Buarque De Macedo Guimarăes, Jose Luis Duarte Ribeiro, Marcia Elisa Echeveste, Jocelise Jacques De Jacques

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pilot Test of Bauxite Residue Carbonation With Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of bauxite residue in water with flue gas, produced from direct oil burning. ... New Development Model for Bauxite Deposits - Dedicated Compact Refinery.

370

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center (DRRC) performed a technology evaluation for the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Emerging Technologies Programs. This report summarizes the design, deployment,...

371

VARI-RO (TM) Desalting Pilot Plant Testing and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VARI-RO(TM) is a promising pumping and energy recovery technology for the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process. VARI-RO can offer certain operational benefits over existing RO methods; for example, it may reduce energy consumption.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of the North Burbank Unit tertiary recovery pilot test  

SciTech Connect

A review of the performance of the Phillips North Burbank micellar-polymer flood has been completed. The projected ultimate recovery is estimated to be ca 300,000 bbl, which is approximately one-half of the initial prediction made by Phillips. Although oil recovery has been less than expected, sufficient additional oil has been recovered to consider the project technically successful. The lower-than-expected oil recovery is attributed principally to high sulfonate losses. Loss of the sulfonate appears to be the result of significant adsorption to the oil-wet pore surfaces and mixing of micellar fluids with in-place water, which is of high salinity and hardness. Contact of the sulfonate with the high concentration of calcium ions creates calcium sulfonate, which either precipitates as an insoluble phase or partitions into the oil phase. Sulfonate partitioning would have created an upper-phase microemulsion, which cannot be displaced easily by water due to the relatively high interfacial tension. 11 references.

Tracy, G.W.; Dauben, D.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

NETL: Pilot Test of a Nanoporous, Super-hydrophobic Membrane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFC, while a CO2 selective solvent, Hitachi's advanced H3-1, flows on the other side. Carbon dioxide permeates through the hollow fiber membrane pores and is chemically...

374

e-government procurement observatory model, design and pilot testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Establishing the maturity level of public procurement portals is useful, as it allows the members of any government procurement network to identify those areas for joint action and it fosters knowledge-sharing among the governments in Latin American ... Keywords: e-procurement, maturity model, measurement, observatory

Gaston Concha; Miguel Porrúa; Carlos Pimenta

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A PILOT HEATER TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, or the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company.Division, Ext. 6782 Swedish Nuclear Fuel S;! lpply Co. Fackfinanced by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Safety Program operated

Carlsson, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Microsoft Word - Indoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3767X_final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct indoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities, laboratory operations, and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced computing, advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, manufacturing, nanotechnology, national security, neutron sciences, chemical sciences, and nuclear physics including but not limited to developing, evaluating and testing: materials and their properties; systems; equipment; instrumentation; renewable energy systems; and

377

Microsoft Word - Outdoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3768X_final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outdoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3768X) Outdoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3768X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct outdoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, and national security including but not limited to collecting samples and analyzing ecosystem and atmospheric field data; developing, evaluating and testing equipment, materials and components; and

378

Aflatoxin Test Kit Laboratory Proficiency Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab proficiency testing for Aflatoxin test kit to determine Total Aflatoxins.Samples include Peanut Paste, Corn Meal, Milk. Aflatoxin Test Kit Laboratory Proficiency Testing Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists

379

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fossil Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 30, 2011 August 30, 2011 CX-006498: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Frac Flowback Water CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2011 Location(s): Plymouth, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 29, 2011 CX-006503: Categorical Exclusion Determination B83 1st Floor Renovation - Phase II Completion CX(s) Applied: B1.29, B1.31, B2.1, B2.2 Date: 08/29/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 25, 2011 CX-006544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 84 Laboratory Renovation CX(s) Applied: A11, B1.15, B3.6 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

380

CX-005988: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005988: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Technology Acceleration Center - Solar Thermal Energy Storage Test Facility CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.15, B3.6 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Denver, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This project would establish a facility for evaluating the performance of pilot-scale advanced thermal energy storage systems. The project would begin construction in May-June 2011 using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. The project would take place at the Solar Technology Acceleration Center located near Denver International Airport at Aurora Energy Campus. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005988.pdf More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CX-004912: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

912: Categorical Exclusion Determination 912: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004912: Categorical Exclusion Determination Architectural Applications -Innovative Building-Integrated Ventilation Enthalpy Recovery CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/03/2010 Location(s): Berkeley, California Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support laboratory research and bench and pilot-scale testing of a building-integrated, membrane-based enthalpy recovery ventilation system designed to increase the efficiency of vapor compression air conditioning units in buildings. The proposed work is consistent with the goal of Building Energy Efficiency Through Innovative Thermodevices: to develop energy-efficient building cooling technologies that will reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Proposed work consists

382

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2010 14, 2010 CX-004708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Mercury Testing for Advanced Fuel Research, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/14/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 14, 2010 CX-004701: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actualistic and Geomechanical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, Carbon Dioxide, and Formation Flue Interaction CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 12/14/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 14, 2010 CX-004699: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Distributed Energy Leadership Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 12/14/2010 Location(s): Arizona

383

CX-004140: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

140: Categorical Exclusion Determination 140: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004140: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Permanent Magnets for Advanced Motors CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/14/2010 Location(s): Landisville, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The overall objective of this program is to develop high performance permanent magnets with improved Proposed Action or Project Description American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: magnetic properties at temperatures up to 240 in advanced motor applications, and low cost. For Phase III, Electron Energy Corporation proposes to dedicate further optimization of the identified feasible approaches, development of standard grades of high resistivity magnets, pilot production and beta site testing. Cost reduction

384

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 CX-005656: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Schwan?s Home Service CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Flint, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 28, 2011 CX-005655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Schwan?s Home Service CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Wakarusa, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 28, 2011 CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury Concentrations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/28/2011

385

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 Existing Regulations A11: Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 24, 2013 CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6

386

CX-001196: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001196: Categorical Exclusion Determination High-Potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/21/2010 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office General Electric Global Research (GE) would evaluate novel working fluids and advanced cycle combinations for use in Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and would optimize the overall economics for an EGS plant including power plant and drilling costs, A pilot scale test setup would be used to experimentally validate the performance predictions. All work would take place at the GE Global Research Center campus, an Occupational Safety and Health Voluntary Protection Program Star

387

CX-004960: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4960: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4960: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004960: Categorical Exclusion Determination Boeing Research and Technology -Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/13/2010 Location(s): Kent, Washington Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support laboratory and bench-scale research and development, and pilot scale testing of a low-cost, flywheel-based energy storage system. The proposed work is consistent with the goal of Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittently Dispachable Storage (GRIDS): development of new technologies to enable the widespread deployment of cost-effective, grid-scale energy storage. Work consists entirely of research, development, and demonstration to be completed at the Boeing Research and Technology

388

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2012 17, 2012 CX-008749: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reactor Power Up Rate, Compressor Replacement, Neutron Radiography Restore, Liquid Scintillation Counter - Texas Agricultural & Mechanical University CX(s) Applied: B2.2, B3.6 Date: 05/17/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office May 17, 2012 CX-008756: Categorical Exclusion Determination Equipment Upgrade for the University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor - University of New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B2.2, B3.6 Date: 05/17/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office May 14, 2012 CX-008271: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Flowback Water CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 05/14/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

389

Arizona Public Service - Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has promise to be the fuel of the future. Its use as a chemical reagent and as a rocket propellant has grown to over eight million metric tons per year in the United States. Although use of hydrogen is abundant, it has not been used extensively as a transportation fuel. To assess the viability of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the viability of producing hydrogen using off-peak electric energy, Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (PNW) and its electric utility subsidiary, Arizona Public Service (APS) designed, constructed, and operates a hydrogen and compressed natural gas fueling station—the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant. This report summarizes the design of the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and presents lessons learned from its design and construction. Electric Transportation Applications prepared this report under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

James E. Francfort

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pilot-scale production of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) and filtrate recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant is introducing the use of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (DCHP) into the Molten Salt Extraction Process (MSE). DCHP (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) extracts americium from molten plutonium metal into a molten calcium chloride matrix. The DCHP is produced by precipitating plutonium (IV) from hydrochloric acid with cesium chloride. Before production of the DCHP began, we performed a pilot-scale test to determine yields, track impurities, and test filtrate recovery for the proposed process. In the course of this study, we determined that impure plutonium oxide (0.80 g/g) dissolved in concentrated HCl is an acceptable source of plutonium for the DCHP. We also determined that dissolved oxide and chloride anion exchange eluate can be mixed for DCHP preparation. We found that DCHP yields average 92-95% at 8M total chloride and are independent of sparging rate and time. Furthermore, we found that drying at 150/degree/C for 5 hr gives <0.1% water in the DCHP only if it is preceeded by extensive air drying. Finally, we proved the efficiency of chloride anion exchange for the recovery of above-discard plutonium from the filtrate. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Stevens, J.R.; Killion, M.E.; Valdez, J.D.; Ames, R.L.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status and Plans - 2010 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Overview of WIPP presented by Dr. Dave Moody. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 More...

394

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program As part of the Children's Environmental Health Project, the Arizona

395

BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation The Brattle Group was retained by Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) in December 2006 to assist in the design of a dynamic pricing pilot program to develop assessments of the likely impact of a variety of dynamic pricing programs on BGE residential customer load shapes. The residential pilot program, Smart Energy Pricing (SEP) Pilot, was subsequently approved by the Maryland Public Service Commission and successfully implemented in the summer of 2008. This report presents the results from the impact evaluation of the BGE's SEP Pilot in the summer of 2008. BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation More Documents & Publications

396

BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation The Brattle Group was retained by Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) in December 2006 to assist in the design of a dynamic pricing pilot program to develop assessments of the likely impact of a variety of dynamic pricing programs on BGE residential customer load shapes. The residential pilot program, Smart Energy Pricing (SEP) Pilot, was subsequently approved by the Maryland Public Service Commission and successfully implemented in the summer of 2008. This report presents the results from the impact evaluation of the BGE's SEP Pilot in the summer of 2008. BGE's Smart Energy Pricing Pilot Summer 2008 Impact Evaluation More Documents & Publications

397

Results from the Texas Pilot Project on Superior Energy Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation will address the outcomes to date from the Texas Pilot Project on Superior Energy Performance. Five plants in Texas are participating in this national pilot project, which began July 2008.

Ferland, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pilot Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilot Peak Geothermal Project Pilot Peak Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Pilot Peak Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.342266666667°, -118.10361111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.342266666667,"lon":-118.10361111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilots (Kentucky) Pilots (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth's utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), and the Department for Energy Development and Independence (DEDI),

400

HUD PowerSaver Pilot Loan Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently announced the creation of a pilot loan program for home energy improvements. The PowerSaver loan program is a new, energy-focused variant of the Title I Property Improvement Loan Insurance Program (Title I Program) and is planned for introduction in early 2011. The PowerSaver pilot will provide lender insurance for secured and unsecured loans up to $25,000 to single family homeowners. These loans will specifically target residential energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. HUD estimates the two-year pilot will fund approximately 24,000 loans worth up to $300 million; the program is not capped. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), HUD's mortgage insurance unit, will provide up to $25 million in grants as incentives to participating lenders. FHA is seeking lenders in communities with existing programs for promoting residential energy upgrades.

Zimring, Mark; Hoffman, Ian

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education,...

402

Emergency Management Program Review at the Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Emergency Management Program Review at the May 2000 OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......

403

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HYDROPOWER PILOT PROJECT LICENSE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR HYDROPOWER PILOT PROJECT LICENSE Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project-FERC Project No. 12690-005 (DOE/EA-1949) Washington Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Office of Energy Projects Division of Hydropower Licensing 888 First Street, NE Washington, DC 20426 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 January 15, 2013 20130115-3035 FERC PDF (Unofficial) 01/15/2013 i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES ............................................................................................................ iv LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................................... v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................

404

INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Creation of a United States Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Lighting Panel Pilot Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04022010...

406

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant maintenance experience, January 1982-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a description of the maintenance experience at the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California, during the period January 1982 through March 1983. The plant systems are briefly described, and statistical data on maintenance orders, labor requirements, and maintenance costs are presented. The data presented have been extracted from Southern California Edison historical maintenance records accumulated at the plant. Pilot plant systems requiring the most maintenance activity are identified so that efforts to reduce plant maintenance costs can be properly identified. The information is analyzed for the purpose of developing a data base for general use during the economic assessment, design, and staff planning of future solar central receiver plants. However, data presented here from the Pilot Plant should not be used for direct scaling of larger power production plants. The number and size of equipment items for larger plants will not scale, the designs will vary, and the Pilot Plant includes special testing and evaluation equipment which would not be necessary in plants built for the sole purpose of power production. Data taken at the Pilot Plant during the early plant startup and operational phase shows an annual maintenance cost of approximately one perent of the recurring plant capital cost. Similar costs for recent technology steam electric generating plants are estimated to range from 1.5 to 3%. The Pilot Plant maintenance cost will not appear as favorable if based on energy produced during power production due to the small plant size and equipment intensive nature of the plant. The solar-unique systems of the plant required 45% of the total plant maintenance labor and 39% of the total maintenance cost, both percentages being lower than anticipated.

Smith, J.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

408

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Phase I Pilot Project Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Phase I Pilot Project Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The scope of this activity is to establish the technical basis for moving the Used Nuclear Fuel currently stored in L-Basin into a commercial style Dry Storage system. This EEC addresses Phase I of a pilot project to move a limited but diverse selection of UNF currently in L-Basin to dry storage. The pilot system would have instrumented UNF containers to monitor the performance and verify storage parameters are suitable for possible future Dry Storage. DOE-SR supports this pilot as part of a potential long term UNF interim storage option for SRS. This EEC is only concerned with Phase I of the overall proposed project. SRNL will submit a separate EEC for testing performed in the Lab to support this activity

409

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Phase I Pilot Project Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Phase I Pilot Project Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The scope of this activity is to establish the technical basis for moving the Used Nuclear Fuel currently stored in L-Basin into a commercial style Dry Storage system. This EEC addresses Phase I of a pilot project to move a limited but diverse selection of UNF currently in L-Basin to dry storage. The pilot system would have instrumented UNF containers to monitor the performance and verify storage parameters are suitable for possible future Dry Storage. DOE-SR supports this pilot as part of a potential long term UNF interim storage option for SRS. This EEC is only concerned with Phase I of the overall proposed project. SRNL will submit a separate EEC for testing performed in the Lab to support this activity

410

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 14, 2011 September 14, 2011 CX-006764: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 09/14/2011 Location(s): Haltom City, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 14, 2011 CX-006763: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 09/14/2011 Location(s): Friendswood, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 14, 2011 CX-006762: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 09/14/2011 Location(s): Midland, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

411

Enforcement Documents - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Enforcement Documents - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter, Washington TRU Solutions - September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies associated with the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter Non-Destructive Assay System Refurbishment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant October 28, 2004 Enforcement Letter, Diversified Metal Products, Inc - October 28, 2004 Issued to Diversified Metal Products, Inc. related to Transportainer Fabrication Deficiencies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 30, 2004 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington TRU Solutions, LLC - EA-2004-08 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC,

412

Quasi-Dynamic Rating Pilot Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's DTCR technology, which encompasses a number of software tools, hardware tools, and methodologies, offers near-term solutions to overhead line rating problems. The Quasi-Dynamic Rating (QDR) concepts and tools developed in the 2004 pilot project are presented in this report.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

413

Beyond pilots: keeping rural wireless networks alive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very few computer systems that have been deployed in rural developing regions manage to stay operationally sustainable over the long term; most systems do not go beyond the pilot phase. The reasons for this failure vary: components fail often due to ...

Sonesh Surana; Rabin Patra; Sergiu Nedevschi; Manuel Ramos; Lakshminarayanan Subramanian; Yahel Ben-David; Eric Brewer

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination for NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination for the Addition of a Temporary Locker Facility to the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee (CX-TWPC-IO-0002) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) proposes to install a temporary modular locker facility which would be utilized as a change house for scrubs/dress out only (no restroom or shower facilities would be provided). The TWPC function is to prepare wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for offsite disposal primarily at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and/or the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The proposed action would utilize the current TWPC facility and equipment at a developed site with active utilities and readily accessible roads. The scope of work proposed includes

415

Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives 70th anniversary lecture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives lecture Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives lecture Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives 70th anniversary lecture Col. Paul Tibbets IV, grandson of Enola Gay pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr., talks about his grandfather and his experiences as a U.S. Air Force pilot flying B-1 and B-2 bombers. April 3, 2013 Col. Paul Tibbets IV, right, sits in the cockpit of "Fifi," a B-29 bomber, with his grandfather and Enola Gay pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr., in this October 1998 photo taken in Midland, Texas. Col. Paul Tibbets IV, right, sits in the cockpit of "Fifi," a B-29 bomber, with his grandfather and Enola Gay pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr., in this October 1998 photo taken in Midland, Texas. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Paul Tibbets IV is commander of the Air Force Inspection Agency at Kirtland

416

Smart Metering Pilot Program Inc SMPPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metering Pilot Program Inc SMPPI Metering Pilot Program Inc SMPPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Smart Metering Pilot Program, Inc. (SMPPI) Place Washington, DC Product SMPPI is a non-profit corporation composed of representatives of Pepco, the D.C. Public Service Commission, the D.C. Office of People's Counsel, the D.C. Consumer Utility Board, and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1900. References Smart Metering Pilot Program, Inc. (SMPPI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Smart Metering Pilot Program, Inc. (SMPPI) is a company located in Washington, DC . References ↑ "Smart Metering Pilot Program, Inc. (SMPPI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Smart_Metering_Pilot_Program_Inc_SMPPI&oldid=351192"

417

Design of a pilot polymer flood in the Marmul Field, Oman  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Marmul heavy-oil field is located in South Oman in the province of Dhofar. The main sandstone reservoir consists of glacial deposits of PermoCarboniferous age and contains about 2.5 billion barrels STOIIP of 21/sup 0/ API crude. The field is in the stage of primary development with a current production of 45000 BPD. Oil production by depletion is expected to be low, while a water drive will be adversely affected by the high oil viscosity and high permeability. Thus the Marmul field offers ample scope for EOR techniques. This paper deals with the design of the relevant polymer flood and pilot tests. A suitable mobility ratio is determined from calculated drive efficiencies and related polymer requirements, allowing for polymer retention and for viscosity grading of the polymer flood. Results of laboratory experiments indicate that polyacrylamide emulsion polymers provide attractive properties for application in Marmul. Retention in the highly permeable sands is low and so is the plugging tendency. However, viscoelastic effects cause very high pressure gradients at high flow rates, which may adversely affect polymer injectivity. This can be resolved by subjecting the solution to controlled shear treatment prior to injection.

Teeuw, D.; Martin, J.H.; Rond, D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

CX-009050: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09050: Categorical Exclusion Determination 09050: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009050: Categorical Exclusion Determination Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Phase I Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The scope of this activity is to establish the technical basis for moving the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) currently stored in L-Basin into a commercial style Dry Storage system. This Categorical Exclusion addresses Phase I of a pilot project to move a limited but diverse selection of UNF currently in L-Basin to dry storage. The pilot system would have instrumented UNF containers to monitor the performance and verify storage parameters are suitable for possible future Dry Storage. DOE-SR supports this pilot as part of a potential long term UNF interim storage option for Savannah River

419

Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Exercise to Test Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). "This is an excellent opportunity for emergency responders to test the skills they've learned," said Dale Childers, assistant chief of the Odessa Fire Department and emergency management coordinator for Ector County. "It will also help us determine what improvements,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination pilot testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.