Sample records for determination ocean thermal

  1. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  6. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

  13. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  16. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  17. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  20. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

  1. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedSands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment. 1978. Renewable ocean energy sources, Part I.on aquaculture and ocean energy systems for the county of310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversion

  5. Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft

  7. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. , and M.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)

  8. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirka, Gerhard H.

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

  11. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites toassessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  12. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  13. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

  14. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites tooperation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  15. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  16. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  17. Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection Energy Conversion The immense size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTECOcean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources off

  18. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

  19. NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

  20. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega · Floating Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC: Georges Claude (Open Cycle OTEC) · 1928 Ougree Experiment, France: Factory Water Outflow (33 °C) & Meuse

  1. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergyTheJump to:Ocean

  2. August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data prompted ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology to be re-considered for use in Hawaii for OTEC development. Keywords- Ocean thermal energy conversion, OTEC, renewable energy, Hawaii

  3. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (FROH A PROPOSED OCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:

  4. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  5. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Sponsored byApplications Division of Ocean Energy Systems Contract W-nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  7. E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)M.S. et al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco-

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in-

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco- logical

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYcruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)at Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

  15. 2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion COUNTRY NOTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion 573 and personal communication. Valuable inputs were provided by Don Lennard of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion organisation. Australia At an ocean energy workshop held in Townsville, northern Queensland in September 2005

  16. Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverthorne, Katherine E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

  17. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental of the Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. ,of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference. Sponsored by the

  19. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to:

  1. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thefishery resources at potential OTEC sites. At this time, thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperational

  2. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  3. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  4. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Luis A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) by Luis A. Vega, Ph.D. Published by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Chapter 7 of "Ocean Energy Recovery: The State of the Art" 1992 #12;Published in Ocean Energy Recovery, pp 152-181, ASCE (1992) ii Table of Contents Tables /Figures

  5. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense New Ventures #12;What is OTEC? OTEC B fiOTEC Benefits: Large Renewable Energy Source 3-5 Terawatts Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

  6. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  7. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sheet] map I - 732). General Electric Company. Ocean thermalby Washom et al. General Electric (1977), Francis (1977),selected is based on General Electric estimated the ammonia

  9. Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

  10. USE OF MIXTURES AS WORKING FLUIDS IN OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan Zafar Iqbal; Kenneth E. Starling

    Mixtures offer potential advantages over pure compounds as working fluids in ocean thermal energy conversion cycles. Power plant capital costs per unit of energy output can be reduced using mixtures because of increased thermal efficiency and/or decreased heat exchanger size requirements. Mixtures

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11 JulyOceanOcean

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean » Ocean

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

  14. Heat exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) - electronics subsystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.F.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronics systems supporting the development of biofouling countermeasures for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) are described. Discussed are the thermistor/thermopile amplifiers, heaters, flowmeters, temperature measurement, control systems for chlorination, flow driven brushes, and recirculating sponge rubber balls. The operation and troubleshooting of each electronic subsystem is documented.

  15. atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Baroclinic Adjustment...

  16. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean »

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical conditions of the site must be determined. An engineering test plan for evaluation of plant design

  18. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

  19. Mesoscale distribution of zooplankton biomass in the northeast Atlantic Ocean determined with an Optical Plankton Counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale distribution of zooplankton biomass in the northeast Atlantic Ocean determined Available online 2 June 2009 Keywords: Zooplankton Biomass Size distribution Mesoscale eddies Optical plankton counter Pelagic environment Northeast Atlantic Ocean a b s t r a c t We examined the mesoscale

  20. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

  1. Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

  2. Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, David J. (David James)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

  3. Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids by the Transient Grating Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room. The experiments give thermal diffusivities from which thermal conductivities can be determined, sound speeds not only on the sound speed but also on the thermal diffusivity and acoustic damping of the RTILs

  4. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai?¢????i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofBiofoul- ing and Corrosion of OTEC plants ~ Selected Sites.Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  6. An approach to determining nearshore bathymetry using remotely sensed ocean surface dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    of the hydrodynamic coupling between the water depth and the wave kinematics, methods which would determine the ocean-dimensional algorithm developed to estimate water depths from remotely sensed information of the water surface, using. Wave conditions including monochromatic and irregular waves are simulated in the model. Mean flow

  7. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  8. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wastedenergy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heatthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  9. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  10. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving a predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7% to 60% of dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 9 to 35 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20% to 60%. The dependence of oxygen desorption with flow rate could not be determined. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures when flashing occurred, 75% to 95% of dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The uncertainty in results is larger than one would desire. These uncertainties are attributed to the uncertainties and difficulties in the dissolved oxygen measurements. Methods to improve the measurements for future gas desorption studies for warm surface and cold deep seawater under OC-OTEC conditions are recommended. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Primer L. A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is estimated that, in an annual basis, the amount solar energy absorbed by the oceans is equivalent to at least amount of ocean solar energy does not pose an adverse environmental impact we must first identify of U.S. companies produced more than 50 kW of gross power, with a net output of up to 18 kW from

  12. Method And Apparatus For Determining Health Of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Devitt, John William (Clifton Park, NY); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Brewer, Luke Nathaniel (Clifton Park, NY)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises providing a photoluminescent ("PL") material in the TBC, directing an exciting radiation at the TBC, measuring the intensity of a characteristic peak in the emission spectrum of the PL material, and correlating the intensity of the characteristic peak or another quantity derived therefrom to an amount of a new phase that has been formed as a result of the exposure of the component to extreme temperatures. An apparatus for carrying out the method comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of the emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of the new phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component.

  13. Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commins, M. L; Duncan, C. P.; Estrella, D. J.; Frisch, J. D.; Horne, A. J.; Jones, K.; Johnson, P. W.; Oldson, J. C.; Quinby-Hunt, M. S.; Ryan, C. J.; Sandusky, J. C.; Tatro, M.; Wilde, P.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

  14. Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    August 8, 2002 Present Address: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC,Victoria BC, Canada, V8P 5C2 0 #12;Abstract A reformulation of the simple model

  15. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States Department of Energy W-7405-ENG-48. under contractof Energy undf3r Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER ThisOcean Energy Systems Contract W-7405-ENG-48 August 1980 This

  16. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department of Energy,aspects of the screens for OTEC intake systems. U.S. Energy

  17. Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission, Tempe Abstract. The modal mineralogies of 20 mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks were determined from mineralogical information from thermal infrared emission spectra of bulk rock samples. Furthermore, convolution

  18. Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Baroclinic Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghil, Michael

    oscillatory modes dominate. As the two layers become nearly equal, antisymmetric oscillatory modes become of the atmospheric marine boundary layer (AMBL) to oceanic fronts has been studied in observations, as well's dynamics depends on the layer-depth ratio. When the model is nearly equivalent-barotropic, symmetric

  19. Applications of radon distribution and radon flux for the determination of oceanic mixing and air-sea gas exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Robert Lewis

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATIONS OF RADON DISTRIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERS 1INATION Ol OCEANIC IvfIXING AND AIR -SEA GAS EXCHA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT I. EWIS BREWER Submitted to the Graduate College oi T e xa s A '4 I'. 1 Univ c r s i ty in partial... luiiillment of the requirement for the degree of KIASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Oceanography APPLICATIONS OF RADON DIS TBIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERMINATION OF OCEANIC MIXING A ND AIR ? SEA GAS EXCIdA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT LEWIS...

  20. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  1. Thermal metamorphism in the lesser Himalaya of Nepal determined from Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    Thermal metamorphism in the lesser Himalaya of Nepal determined from Raman spectroscopy of central and far-western Nepal, including data from near the MCT zone, where a comparison with conventional on the thermal evolution of the Himalaya in Nepal using the RSCM method. This emblematic geological setting

  2. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph and we will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply. This situation justifies re-evaluating OTEC should begin to implement the first generation of OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine

  3. Mass, heat and nutrient fluxes in the Atlantic Ocean determined by inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rintoul, Stephen R. (Stephen Rich)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse methods are applied to historical hydrographic data to address two aspects of the general circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. The method allows conservation statements for mass and other properties, along with a ...

  4. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  5. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

  6. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

  7. The evolution of upper ocean thermal structure at 10?N, 125?W during 1997-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, J. Thomas (John Thomas), 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I have endeavored to determine the factors and physical processes that controlled SST and thermocline depth at 10?N, 125?W during the Pan Amer- ican Climate Study (PACS) field program. Analysis based on the ...

  8. DETERMINING THE OPTIMUM PLACEMENT OF A PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS (PCM) THERMAL SHIELD INSIDE FRAME WALLS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reshmeen, Silvia

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This thesis presents the results of an experimental study to determine the optimum placement and the thermal performance of a Phase Change Materials (PCMs) thermal shield incorporated into frame wall insulation systems for the purpose...

  9. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

  10. Field test of a new method for determining soil formation thermal conductivity and borehole resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Beck, J.V.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of determining soil thermal properties from in-situ tests has been developed. Based on a one-dimensional numerical heat transfer model, the method uses parameter estimation techniques to determine soil thermal conductivity and borehole resistance from field-collected data. This paper presents the results of analysis of data from three tests performed in Lincoln, Nebraska, in order to validate the method. The one-dimensional method was found to agree well with line source and cylindrical source thermal conductivity estimates derived from the same data sets. The method was also able to measure the resistance of the three borehole heat exchangers. The measured resistances lie within the expected range of resistances for the given grouting materials. A further benefit of the method is its relative insensitivity to changes in power input caused by short-term voltage fluctuations.

  11. NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes. Potential Impact

  12. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  13. MODEL FOR DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PARTICLE BEDS WITH HIGH SOLID-TO-GAS THERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    -TO-GAS THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY RATIO A.R. Raffray, Z. Gorbis, A. Badawi, M.S. Tillack, A.Y. Ying, and M. A. Abdou

  14. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Performance of Tracking Concentrating Solar Collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of thermal performance of tracking concentrating solar collectors that heat fluids for use in thermal systems. 1.2 This test method applies to one- or two-axis tracking reflecting concentrating collectors in which the fluid enters the collector through a single inlet and leaves the collector through a single outlet, and to those collectors where a single inlet and outlet can be effectively provided, such as into parallel inlets and outlets of multiple collector modules. 1.3 This test method is intended for those collectors whose design is such that the effects of diffuse irradiance on performance is negligible and whose performance can be characterized in terms of direct irradiance. Note 1For purposes of clarification, this method shall apply to collectors with a geometric concentration ratio of seven or greater. 1.4 The collector may be tested either as a thermal collection subsystem where the effects of tracking errors have been essentially removed from t...

  15. Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Stuckey, J.

    1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC{sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3(f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly effect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for fill-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

  16. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  17. Thermal conductivity profile determination in proton-irradiated ZrC by spatial and frequency scanning thermal wave methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, C. [GRESPI, Multiscale Thermophysics Lab., Universit de Reims Champagne-Ardenne URCA, Moulin de la Housse BP 1039, Reims 51687 (France) [GRESPI, Multiscale Thermophysics Lab., Universit de Reims Champagne-Ardenne URCA, Moulin de la Housse BP 1039, Reims 51687 (France); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States); Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Antoniow, J. S.; Pron, H. [GRESPI, Multiscale Thermophysics Lab., Universit de Reims Champagne-Ardenne URCA, Moulin de la Housse BP 1039, Reims 51687 (France)] [GRESPI, Multiscale Thermophysics Lab., Universit de Reims Champagne-Ardenne URCA, Moulin de la Housse BP 1039, Reims 51687 (France); Ban, H. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States)

    2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using complementary thermal wave methods, the irradiation damaged region of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is characterized by quantifiably profiling the thermophysical property degradation. The ZrC sample was irradiated by a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 600 C to a dose of 1.75 displacements per atom. Spatial scanning techniques including scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), lock-in infrared thermography (lock-in IRT), and photothermal radiometry (PTR) were used to directly map the in-depth profile of thermal conductivity on a cross section of the ZrC sample. The advantages and limitations of each system are discussed and compared, finding consistent results from all techniques. SThM provides the best resolution finding a very uniform thermal conductivity envelope in the damaged region measuring ?52 2 ?m deep. Frequency-based scanning PTR provides quantification of the thermal parameters of the sample using the SThM measured profile to provide validation of a heating model. Measured irradiated and virgin thermal conductivities are found to be 11.9 0.5 W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} and 26.7 1 W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1}, respectively. A thermal resistance evidenced in the frequency spectra of the PTR results was calculated to be (1.58 0.1) 10{sup ?6} m{sup 2} K W{sup ?1}. The measured thermal conductivity values compare well with the thermal conductivity extracted from the SThM calibrated signal and the spatially scanned PTR. Combined spatial and frequency scanning techniques are shown to provide a valuable, complementary combination for thermal property characterization of proton-irradiated ZrC. Such methodology could be useful for other studies of ion-irradiated materials.

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of the dimethylsulfide to chlorophyll ratio in the surface ocean: an assessment based on phytoplankton group dominance determined from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (1982 to 1996): Evidence ofover the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 112,iron- induced Northeast Pacific Ocean bloom, Geophys. Res.

  19. Holographic formula for the determinant of the scattering operator in thermal AdS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo E. Daz

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A 'holographic formula' expressing the functional determinant of the scattering operator in an asymptotically locally anti-de Sitter(ALAdS) space has been proposed in terms of a relative functional determinant of the scalar Laplacian in the bulk. It stems from considerations in AdS/CFT correspondence of a quantum correction to the partition function in the bulk and the corresponding subleading correction at large N on the boundary. In this paper we probe this prediction for a class of quotients of hyperbolic space by a discrete subgroup of isometries. We restrict to the simplest situation of an abelian group where the quotient geometry describes thermal AdS and also the non-spinning BTZ instanton. The bulk computation is explicitly done using the method of images and the answer can be encoded in a (Patterson-)Selberg zeta-function.

  20. assessing cumulative thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models which can be expressed via Ceragioli, Francesca 9 Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion MIT - DSpace Summary: Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a...

  1. Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

  2. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  3. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

  4. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal or ground-source heat pump (GHP) has been shown to be a very efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. GHPs exchange (reject or extract) heat with the earth by way of circulating water, rather than by use of circulating outdoor air, as with an air-source heat pump. The temperature of water entering a GHP is generally cooler than that of outdoor air when space cooling is required, and warmer than that of outdoor air when space heating is required. Consequently, the temperature lift across a GHP is less than the lift across an air-source heat pump. The lower temperature lift leads to greater efficiency, higher capacity at extreme outdoor air temperatures, and better indoor humidity control. These benefits are achieved, however, at the cost of installing a ground heat exchanger. In general, this cost is proportional to length of the heat exchanger, and for this reason there is an incentive to install the minimum possible length such that design criteria are met. The design of a ground heat exchanger for a GHP system requires, at a minimum, the operating characteristics of the heat pumps, estimates of annual and peak block loads for the building, and information about the properties of the heat exchanger: the size of the U-tubes, the grouting material, etc. The design also requires some knowledge of the thermal properties of the soil, namely thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and undisturbed soil temperature. In the case of a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) these properties generally vary with depth; therefore, in the design, effective or average thermal properties over the length of the borehole are usually sought. When the cost of doing so can be justified, these properties are measured in an in situ experiment: a test well is drilled to a depth on the same order as the expected depth of the heat pump heat exchangers; a U-tube heat exchanger is inserted and the borehole is grouted according to applicable state and local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short-term variations in heat input. Also, since the model is accurate even for short times, there is no n

  5. atlantic ocean samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  6. atlantic ocean woce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  7. atlantic ocean bottom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  8. Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

  9. Thermal environment in indoor spaces with under-floor air distribution systems: 2. Determination of design parameters (1522-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Thermal environment in indoor spaces with under-floor air distribution systems: 2. Determination of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA 2 Building Energy and Environment Engineering LLP, Lafayette, Indiana 47905, USA 3 School of Environmental Science and Engineering

  10. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

  11. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  12. Separate determination of the amplitude of thermal vibrations and static atomic displacements in titanium carbide by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khidirov, I., E-mail: khidirov@inp.uz; Parpiev, A. S. [Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The amplitude of thermal (dynamic) atomic vibrations and meansquare static atomic displacements in titanium carbide TiC{sub x} (x = 0.97, 0.88, 0.70) have been separately determined by measuring neutron diffraction patterns at two temperatures (T{sub 1} = 300 K and T{sub 2} = 80 K). The static lattice distortions in stoichiometric titanium carbide are experimentally found to be negligible. In the TiC{sub x} homogeneity range, the amplitude {radical}u{sup 2}{sub dyn} of thermal atomic vibrations significantly increases with a decrease in the carbon concentration. The Debye temperature has been determined for the first time in the TiC{sub x} homogeneity range at both room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures.

  13. Infrared-based NDE methods for determining thermal properties and defects in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Steckenrider, J.S. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Koch, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites are currently being developed for various high temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. In the material classes of interest for such applications, i.e., silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC{sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3 (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, etc., the condition of the interface between the fibers and matrix is critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of each component. A nondestructive evaluation method developed at Argonne National Laboratory uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. By applying digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, the authors have achieved acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density, and variations in fiber coatings in a full array of test specimens.

  14. Subsidence of the Arctic stratosphere determined from thermal emission of hydrogen fluoride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to cool and its pressure to drop. In this picture, a polar low-pressure system develops, outside air A. Traub, Kenneth W. Jucks, David G. Johnson and Kelly V. Chance Harvard-Smithsonian Center measurements of the column density of hydrogen fluoride, using a rotational line in thermal emission. The data

  15. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    . NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

  16. Apparatus for determining past-service conditions and remaining life of thermal barrier coatings and components having such coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Devitt, John William (Clifton Park, NY); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Brewer, Luke Nathaniel (Rexford, NY)

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC to excite a photoluminescent ("PL") material contained therein, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of an emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of a crystalline phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component or the TBC.

  17. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  18. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  19. Determining Adaptability Performance of Artificial Neural Network-Based Thermal Control Logics for Envelope Conditions in Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Jin Woo; Chang, Jae D.; Kim, Sooyoung

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the performance and adaptability of Artificial Neural Network (ANN)-based thermal control strategies for diverse thermal properties of building envelope conditions applied to residential buildings. The thermal performance using...

  20. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

  1. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jarrett A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofouling and Corrosion of OTEC Plants at Selected Sites.the Placement of a Moored OTEC Plant. Atlantic OceanographicThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  3. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters DOE AWARD NO. DE sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) uses large flowsFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  4. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

  5. andean uplift ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 419 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  6. antartic ocean radiocarbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 362 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  7. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apreutesei, Mihai [Centro de Fsica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal and MATEIS Laboratory-INSA de Lyon, Bt. B. Pascal, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco, E-mail: fmacedo@fisica.uminho.pt [Centro de Fsica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Borges, Joel [Centro de Fsica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal and SEG-CEMUC Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  8. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  9. Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Raymond W.

    Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

  10. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  11. CX-000917: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Converter Life Cycle Cost Analysis Date: 02/25/2010Location(s): VirginiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. The Energetics of Ocean Heat Transport ANAND GNANADESIKAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    between mechanical energy supply and thermal energy transport associated with the ocean circulation modeling studies of ocean tide generation and energy conversion (Simmons et al. 2004; Arbic et al. 2004a of recent papers have argued that the mechanical energy budget of the ocean places constraints on how

  13. Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various decomposition of ocean heat transport into thermal wind, gyre, and Ekman components for a rough estimateTransport across 48°N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic

  14. 786 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 32, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2007 Peer-Reviewed Technical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    acknowledged as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity gradients have been suggested. Ocean thermal energy conversion is possible in locations with large temperature

  15. Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd. Lewis, R. Arnone, and R. Brewin (2013), Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans

  16. Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Tropical Cyclone Forecast Models Using GODAE Nowcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

    in available thermal energy associated with energetic boundary currents and ocean eddies require their accurate temperature (SST) cooling. The potential for the ocean to support intensification depends on the thermal energy available to the storm, which in turn depends on both the temperature and thickness of the upper-ocean

  17. Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    's coasts great danger. As ocean is the energy source for intensification [Emanuel, 1999; Shay et al., 2000; Lin et al., 2005, 2008; Wu et al., 2007; I.-I. Lin et al., Upper ocean thermal structure to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

  18. Experimental investigations and theoretical determination of thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015 (India); Chandra Bose, A. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015 (India)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental investigations and theoretical determination of effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O nanofluid are reported in this paper. The nanofluid was prepared by synthesizing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles using microwave assisted chemical precipitation method, and then dispersing them in distilled water using a sonicator. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid with a nominal diameter of 43 nm at different volume concentrations (0.33-5%) at room temperature were used for the investigation. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are measured and it is found that the viscosity increase is substantially higher than the increase in thermal conductivity. Both the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids increase with the nanoparticle volume concentration. Theoretical models are developed to predict thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids without resorting to the well established Maxwell and Einstein models, respectively. The proposed models show reasonably good agreement with our experimental results. (author)

  19. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  20. 11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Chris

    , and individual seafarers for better knowledge of the ever-changing conditions in the sea. SST is an ocean, anditisneededasakeyinputtoforecastingsystemstoconstrainthemodeledupper- ocean circulation and thermal structure, and for the exchange of energy SSTs off the East Asian

  1. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  2. A comparison of the values of thermal conductivity of a dry porous material determined by various laboratory methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fluker, Billie J

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Accepted Standazd Values of Rhombic Sulphur Therxml Conductivity with Temperature . ~ ~. . . . . . . . . 40 Introduction There are three possibilities of obtaining numerical data for thermal conductivity of porous materials One is by the use.... It uas also necessary that tbe material selected be such that the preparation of teat specimens could be completed in the laboratory uithout specialiaed technique. Hhambic sulphur uas selected for test since it embodied each of these features...

  3. aircraft-and satellite-based ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 339 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  4. Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  6. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. (UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar[sub xs] Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ([+-]0.6[per thousand]) [mu]m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9[+-]3[degrees]C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ([+-]25[degrees]C) of the measured values of 200[degrees] (Al) and 150[degrees]C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 [mu]m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  7. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar{sub xs} Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ({+-}0.6{per_thousand}) {mu}m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9{+-}3{degrees}C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ({+-}25{degrees}C) of the measured values of 200{degrees} (Al) and 150{degrees}C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 {mu}m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  8. Melt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia M.

    We examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a ...

  9. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    l l,eve l Ventil.u:ion ( el OTEC H . . ard Level (f) Type ofW.E. and R.N. Manley, 1979. OTEC Commercialization Analysis.Assessment for Operational OTEC Platforms A Progress Report.

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Production, however, is peaking and humanity will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply and higher make available to its customers. Baseload plant An energy plant devoted to the production of baseload generated by the production of electricity that are not included in the price charged to consumers

  12. CX-004536: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subtask 2.4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Facility - University of HawaiiCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 11/24/2010Location(s): HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. Thermal neutron diffraction determination of the magnetic structure of EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowan-Weetaluktuk, W. N.; Ryan, D. H., E-mail: dhryan@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, and Centre for the Physics of Materials, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Lemoine, P. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, UMR 6508 CNRS, 6 Boulevard du Marchal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); Cadogan, J. M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra BC 2610 (Australia)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic structure of EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} has been determined by flat-plate neutron powder diffraction. Two magnetic phases are present in the neutron diffraction pattern at 3.5?K. They have the same moment, within error, and a common transition temperature. Both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu Mssbauer spectroscopy show that the two magnetic phases belong to the same crystallographic phase. Both phases can be modelled by planar helimagnetic structures: one with a propagation vector of [0.654(1), 0, 0], the other with a propagation vector of [0.410(1), 0.225(1), 0].

  14. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  15. Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Ethan H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean namely the thickness and concentration of perennial ice coverage is crucial in allowing the water column to retain thermal energy

  16. Improving simulations of the upper-ocean by inclusion of4 surface waves in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence scheme5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean33 via wave breaking and non-breaking wave35 upper-ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each other using36 one. The behaviors of the Mellor-Yamada39 scheme, as well as the simulated upper-ocean thermal structure

  17. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  18. Experiments and Simulations of the Use of Time-Correlated Thermal Neutron Counting to Determine the Multiplication of an Assembly of Highly Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David L. Chichester; Mathew T. Kinlaw; Scott M. Watson; Jeffrey M. Kalter; Eric C. Miller; William A. Noonan

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments and numerical simulations using thermal-neutron time-correlated measurements has been performed to determine the neutron multiplication, M, of assemblies of highly enriched uranium available at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiments used up to 14.4 kg of highly-enriched uranium, including bare assemblies and assemblies reflected with high-density polyethylene, carbon steel, and tungsten. A small 252Cf source was used to initiate fission chains within the assembly. Both the experiments and the simulations used 6-channel and 8-channel detector systems, each consisting of 3He proportional counters moderated with polyethylene; data was recorded in list mode for analysis. 'True' multiplication values for each assembly were empirically derived using basic neutron production and loss values determined through simulation. A total of one-hundred and sixteen separate measurements were performed using fifty-seven unique measurement scenarios, the multiplication varied from 1.75 to 10.90. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and discusses differences among the various cases.

  19. THE ROLE OF METHANOL IN THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF TITAN'S PRIMORDIAL OCEAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschamps, Frederic [Institute of Geophysics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Mousis, Olivier [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Sanchez-Valle, Carmen [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lunine, Jonathan I., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@erdw.ethz.c [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key parameter that controls the crystallization of primordial oceans in large icy moons is the presence of anti-freeze compounds, which may have maintained primordial oceans over the age of the solar system. Here we investigate the influence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze candidate, on the crystallization of Titan's primordial ocean. Using a thermodynamic model of the solar nebula and assuming a plausible composition of its initial gas phase, we first calculate the condensation sequence of ices in Saturn's feeding zone, and show that in Titan's building blocks methanol can have a mass fraction of {approx}4 wt% relative to water, i.e., methanol can be up to four times more abundant than ammonia. We then combine available data on the phase diagram of the water-methanol system and scaling laws derived from thermal convection to estimate the influence of methanol on the dynamics of the outer ice I shell and on the heat transfer through this layer. For a fraction of methanol consistent with the building blocks composition we determined, the vigor of convection in the ice I shell is strongly reduced. The effect of 5 wt% methanol is equivalent to that of 3 wt% ammonia. Thus, if methanol is present in the primordial ocean of Titan, the crystallization may stop, and a sub-surface ocean may be maintained between the ice I and high-pressure ice layers. A preliminary estimate indicates that the presence of 4 wt% methanol and 1 wt% ammonia may result in an ocean of thickness at least 90 km.

  20. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  1. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  2. Standard test method for determination of uranium or plutonium isotopic composition or concentration by the total evaporation method using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This method describes the determination of the isotopic composition and/or the concentration of uranium and plutonium as nitrate solutions by the thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) total evaporation method. Purified uranium or plutonium nitrate solutions are loaded onto a degassed metal filament and placed in the mass spectrometer. Under computer control, ion currents are generated by heating of the filament(s). The ion beams are continually measured until the sample is exhausted. The measured ion currents are integrated over the course of the run, and normalized to a reference isotope ion current to yield isotopic ratios. 1.2 In principle, the total evaporation method should yield isotopic ratios that do not require mass bias correction. In practice, some samples may require this bias correction. When compared to the conventional TIMS method, the total evaporation method is approximately two times faster, improves precision from two to four fold, and utilizes smaller sample sizes. 1.3 The tot...

  3. Influence of upper-ocean stratification on tropical cyclone-induced surface cooling in the Bay of Bengal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in oceanic stratification rather than to differences in TC wind energy input. During the postmonsoon season, a deeper thermal stratification combined with a considerable upper-ocean freshening strongly inhibits that TCs primarily draw their energy from evaporation at the ocean surface [Riehl, 1950]. TCs generally

  4. Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

  5. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  6. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earths climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  7. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  8. CX-003102: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    coast of Florida. Their goals are to further the assessment of hydrokinetic and thermal ocean-energy resources off the east coast of Florida and to advance the development of those...

  9. CX-005490: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005490: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal Analysis of Radioactive Materials by Thermagravimetric Analysis, Differential Scanning...

  10. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  11. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

  12. OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE OAH'U REGIONAL OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) site off the south coast of Oah'u as well as the circulation of Mamala analyses of the observing systems were conducted at the outflow plume depth of a potential pilot Ocean

  13. The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Roger

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 146 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at two sites to determine its nature and whether free gas is present beneath it. At all drill site Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research

  15. Direct numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigate the conversion of gravitational energy into viscous heating and the thermal equilibration betweenDirect numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean H. Ichikawa,1,2 S. Labrosse,1 and K of metal in a magma ocean. The model, using a fully Lagrangian approach called the moving particle semi

  16. Ocean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal agitation -internal energy of the fluid is typically 10 orders of magnitude greater thanOcean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics P.B. Rhines & S. Häkkinen #12;· Many basic tenets of ocean circulation are being challenged, and they relate

  17. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiji, Ashok

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

  18. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  19. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  20. Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR.,* L. K. SHAY, AND J. K. BREWSTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides the thermal energy for intensification, errors and biases in the ocean compo- nent of coupled TCEvaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR December 2009) ABSTRACT An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea

  1. Thermal conductivity of Na/sub 3/(U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/)O/sub 4/: A preliminary in-pile determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Odo, T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach (RBCB) operation in an oxide LMR, the performance of a breached fuel element is intimately associated with the formation of fuel-sodium reaction product (FSRP), Na/sub 3/(U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/)O/sub 4/. In-pile experiments coupled with destructive examinations of breached fuel have consistently revealed noticeable changes in fuel structure accompanying FSRP formation at the fuel surface. Previous analyses have also indicated a significant impact of FSRP on fuel centerline temperature. Successful modeling of breached fuel thermal behavior therefore requires a reasonably accurate knowledge of the thermal properties of the FSRP, especially its thermal conductivity. But laboratory investigations have been scarce and limited to the Na/UO/sub 2/ system because of the toxicity of plutonium and hygroscopicity of the FSRP. Hence, post-irradiation observations of fuel samples remain the most amenable way of deriving the thermal conductivity of the FSRP. Such work is a spin-off of the RBCB program in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), a program jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan.

  2. Thermal conductivity of Na/sub 3/(U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/O/sub 4/: a preliminary in-pile determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Odo, T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) operation in an oxide liquid metal breeder, the performance of a breached fuel element is intimately associated with the formation of fuel/sodium reaction product (FSRP), Na/sub 3/(U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/)O/sub 4/. In-pile experiments coupled with destructive examinations of breached fuel have consistently revealed noticeable changes in fuel structure accompanying FSRP formation at the fuel surface. Previous analyses have also indicated a significant impact of FSRP on fuel centerline temperature. Successful modeling of breached fuel thermal behavior therefore requires a reasonably accurate knowledge of the thermal properties of the FSRP, especially its thermal conductivity. But laboratory investigations have been scarce and limited to the Na/UO/sub 2/ system because of the toxicity of plutonium and hygroscopicity of the FSRP. Hence, postirradiation observations of fuel samples remain the most amenable way of deriving the thermal conductivity of the FSRP. Such work is a spin-off of the RBCB program in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), a program jointly sponsored by the US Dept. of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan.

  3. Water and Climate 2. Circulation of ocean and atmosphere; climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to high latitude and part of that thermal energy is FW: latent heat Gill Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics integrated vertically (annual mean) ERA40 Atlas ECMWF HIGH: ICTZ, monsoon regions, Amazon.... convergent March 2005 from satellite radiometer AMSR-E. Ranges up to 6.5 cm FW in tropics #12;#12;Relative humidity

  4. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the states Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  5. Ocean Sci., 3, 291298, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/291/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Scaling aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack on the ice pack. The revealed decrease of the fractal dimension as a result of large-scale fragmentation pack. 1 Introduction Two continuous processes determine, mainly, the mechani- cal behavior of the ice

  6. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  7. CX-005011: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent WatersCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 01/13/2011Location(s): West Oahu, HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  8. CX-004741: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Cold Water Pipe-Platform Subsystem Dynamic Interaction ValidationCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 12/14/2010Location(s): Manassas, VirginiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. CX-005746: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Potential Impacts of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HawaiiCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, B3.6Date: 05/02/2011Location(s): Kauai, HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  10. CX-007394: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Potential lmpacts of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, Hawaii CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3, B3.6 Date: 12/21/2011 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-002278: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Potential Impacts of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HawaiiCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9Date: 05/13/2010Location(s): Kauai, HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ACPD 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  13. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  14. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  15. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    point · Warm/hot ocean · Water-saturated atmosphere · Consumption of liquid water · hydration: continents and oceans Hot oceanic water Quartz Hydrated, oxidized rock Partially altered rock Unaltered rock · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds

  16. CX-003479: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-003479: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Open-Ocean Energy Laboratory CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1, B3.3, B3.6 Date: 08182010 Location(s):...

  17. Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benot Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho proponents (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benoît Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho the inventory of global thermal, chemical and associated biological fluxes. Drilling an ultra-deep hole, and into the uppermost mantle is a long-standing goal of scientific ocean drilling; it remains critical to answer many

  18. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transports from ocean to land and global energy ?ows inof Earth energy imbal- ance, ocean warming, and thermostericthe ther- mal energy of the ocean, it remains a challenging

  19. Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrateaccumulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gasmolecules are lodged within the lattices of ice crystals. Vast amounts ofCH4 are trapped in gas hydrates, and a significant effort has recentlybegun to evaluate hydrate deposits as a potential energy source. Class 3hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer(HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids.The base of the HBL in Class 3 deposits may occur within or at the edgeof the zone of thermodynamic hydrate stability.In this numerical study oflong-term gas production from typical representatives of unfracturedClass 3 deposits, we determine that simple thermal stimulation appears tobe a slow and inefficient production method. Electrical heating and warmwater injection result in very low production rates (4 and 12 MSCFD,respectively) that are orders of magnitude lower than generallyacceptable standards of commercial viability of gas production fromoceanic reservoirs. However, production from depressurization-baseddissociation based on a constant well pressure appears to be a promisingapproach even in deposits characterized by high hydrate saturations. Thisapproach allows the production of very large volumes ofhydrate-originating gas at high rates (>15 MMSCFD, with a long-termaverage of about 8.1 MMSCFD for the reference case) for long times usingconventional technology. Gas production from hydrates is accompanied by asignificant production of water. However, unlike conventional gasreservoirs, the water production rate declines with time. The lowsalinity of the produced water may require care in its disposal. Becauseof the overwhelming advantage of depressurization-based methods, thesensitivity analysis was not extendedto thermal stimulation methods. Thesimulation results indicate that depressurization-induced gas productionfrom oceanic Class 3 deposits increases (and the corresponding waterto-gas ratio decreases) with increasing hydrate temperature (whichdefines the hydrate stability), increasing intrinsic permeability of theHBL, and decreasing hydrate saturation although depletion of the hydratemay complicate the picture in the latter case.

  20. Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermalstresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we evaluate the response of oceanicsubsurface systems to thermal stresses caused by the flow of warm fluidsthrough noninsulated well systems crossing hydrate-bearing sediments.Heat transport from warm fluids, originating from deeper reservoirs underproduction, into the geologic media can cause dissociation of the gashydrates. The objective of this study is to determine whether gasevolution from hydrate dissociation can lead to excessive pressurebuildup, and possibly to fracturing of hydrate-bearing formations andtheir confining layers, with potentially adverse consequences on thestability of the suboceanic subsurface. This study also aims to determinewhether the loss of the hydrate--known to have a strong cementing effecton the porous media--in the vicinity of the well, coupled with thesignificant pressure increases, can undermine the structural stability ofthe well assembly.Scoping 1D simulations indicated that the formationintrinsic permeability, the pore compressibility, the temperature of theproduced fluids andthe initial hydrate saturation are the most importantfactors affecting the system response, while the thermal conductivity andporosity (above a certain level) appear to have a secondary effect.Large-scale simulations of realistic systems were also conducted,involving complex well designs and multilayered geologic media withnonuniform distribution of properties and initial hydrate saturationsthat are typical of those expected in natural oceanic systems. Theresults of the 2D study indicate that although the dissociation radiusremains rather limited even after long-term production, low intrinsicpermeability and/or high hydrate saturation can lead to the evolution ofhigh pressures that can threaten the formation and its boundaries withfracturing. Although lower maximum pressures are observed in the absenceof bottom confining layers and in deeper (and thus warmer and morepressurized) systems, the reduction is limited. Wellbore designs withgravel packs that allow gas venting and pressure relief result insubstantially lower pressures.

  1. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

  2. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  3. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  4. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  5. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  6. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  7. CX-011510: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011510: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal-Chemical Decomposition of Graphite CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10172013 Location(s):...

  8. Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    -on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

  9. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMFAlaskaNews from theOceanic

  10. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale ElectricOcean Flow

  11. Changes in the ocean mixed layer following extraordinary atmospheric forcing. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mettlach, T.R.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional ocean planetary boundary-layer model is used to predict the evolution of the thermal structure of the ocean mixed layer at six locations in the ocean following the hypothetical effects on the atmosphere of a major nuclear war. The inputs to the ocean model are the heat and momentum fluxes computed from a 3D climate model designed to simulate nuclear winter effects in the atmosphere. The experiment gives evidence that the summertime mixed layer can cool 5 C within 30 days and that the effect of increased wind along coastal regions due to sudden ocean-land temperture differences will deepen the mixed layer 20 to 30 meters. The scientific literature on the subject of nuclear winter is reviewed and interpreted to trace the evolution of the nuclear winter hypothesis and to assess the quality of the results of the mixed layer experiment.

  12. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    generates an upwelling internal wave at 30N with a positive deviation in interface height of size 30m. What long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? c) At the same time that the wave passesOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves Due: Thursday, March 1 1. A two layer

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

  14. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  15. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near-inertial energy in an eddying ocean channel model. Geo-maximum integrated kinetic energy when the ocean was forcedto the the transfer of energy in the ocean from large scales

  16. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  17. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  18. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  19. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  20. The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

  1. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland) Institut National des Sciences de l States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University

  2. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  3. Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

  4. ab initio determination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    introduce the multiscale approach to determination of thermal properties and changes in free energy. With this approach one can perform thermal ... Engeness, Torkel Dyrbaek,...

  5. Thermal Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

  6. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS UAV Ocean optics, Biological Laser penetration New opportunity Insitu Sensors (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCENARIO . . . . . . . . . . OTEC RESOURCE REGIONALC-1 ILLUSTRATIONS Number Title OTEC Systems Development Gulfof Mexico Moored OTEC Resource Area . . . . . . . . . . .

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Assessment OTEC Pilot Plant. Prepared forDraft Environmental Assessment Mini-OTEC Second Deployment.matic EA are within the OTEC technology and include the

  9. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringthermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants by mid-1980 1 s.distributiion at potential OTEC sites. p. 7D-4/1-4/5. In

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by liquifaction and fractional distillation of air (EPA, Thefractional elements nitrogen pure form. Nitrogen \\'lill be extracted from the atmosphere by means of liquefaction and distillation,

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

  12. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds. During E weather small craft anchor 0.5 mile offshorewinds, and 100-cm sec surface currents. Living quarters will be provided in offshore

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds. During E weather small craft anchor 0.5 mile offshoreOffshore of Bahia de Tallaboa a current of 0.5 knot has been observed setting :\\E across and against the E wind.winds, and 100 em sec (2 knot) surface currents. Living quarters will be provided in offshore

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial users. Costs and per kWh increased from to 2.7rf-30, 1978, the average cost per kWh was 6.09i for residential

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KILOMETERS () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTKaupo o () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTSea o = o FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING

  16. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working Fluid Process Product Process Requirement FuelNo fuel in a conventional sense 1S used. working fluid is

  17. Wave-Turbulence Mixing for Upper Ocean Multifractal Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    ) width ~ 0.8 km #12;Data Observation Coastal Monitoring Buoy (CMB) - U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office) Frequency is around 4 CPH #12;Isopycnal Displacement turbulence-Dominated (00-05 GMT Aug 1) #12;Power depth #12;Structure Function (Power Law) IW-T type #12;Structure Function (Power Law) T type #12

  18. Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mass of water produced from the gravel pack (M W ).Wellbore designs with gravel packs that allow gas ventingattributed to a sand or gravel pack emplaced during drilling

  19. Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report includes summaries of the following tasks: (1) OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; (2) OTEC methanol; (3) management decision requirements for OTEC construction; (4) hybrid geothermal - OTEC (GEOTEC) power plant performance estimates; and (5) supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  20. Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report summarizes work of the following tasks as of March 31, 1982: OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential Navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical- generating Thus, the population affected by an facility offshore may expose the plant to power outages

  2. The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Fisheries; Edward P. Myers; Donald E. Hoss; Walter M. Matsumoto; David S. Peters; Michael P. Seki; Richard N. Uchida; John D. Ditmars; Robert A. Paddock

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major responsibilities of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) are to monitor and assess the abundance and geographic distribution of fishery resources, to understand and predict fluctuations in the quantity and distribution of these resources, and to establish levels for their optimum use. NMFS is also charged with the development and implementation of policies for managing national fishing grounds, development and enforcemeJlt of domestic fisheries regulations, surveillance of foreign fishing off United States coastal waters, and the development and enforcement of international fishery agreements and policies. NMFS also assists the fishing industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel cunstruction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry.

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    skipjack tuna, Katsuwonnus pelamis, in an offshore area oflittle tuna), Katsuwonus pelamis (skipj ack), spp. ,

  4. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM Policy AcquisitionWeatherizationDepartment of Energy

  5. Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c) aqueous, gas and hydrate phase saturations, (d) waterIntrinsic Rate of Methane Gas Hydrate Decomposition, Chem.Western Nankai Trough, in Gas Hydrates: Challenges for the

  6. List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea

  7. CX-100012: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Build and Test of a Novel, Commercial-Scale Wave Energy Direct0Drive Rotary Power Take-Off Under Realistic Open-Ocean Conditions CX(s)...

  8. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  9. Peter C. Chu Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    , such as using the wind tunnel, we present a new efficient and low cost method to determine the drag, liftPeter C. Chu Chenwu Fan Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory, Naval Postgraduate School, and no fin and no-tail section) conducted at the SRI test site. The cost of this method is much lower than

  10. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

  11. 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  15. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  17. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and lithosphere evolution, earthquake source mechanisms, oceanic crustal structure, tsunami warning and monitoring

  19. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

  20. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

  1. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  2. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  3. The role of the geothermal heat flux in driving the abyssal ocean circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mashayek, A.

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the geothermal heat flux (GHF) from the solid Earth into the ocean plays a non-negligible role in determining both abyssal stratification and circulation strength. Based ...

  4. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  5. Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  6. Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

  7. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  8. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  9. Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above. The theory predicts that parameter regimes exist for which increased continental insulation has no effect

  10. Factors controlling the variations in the mid-ocean ridge segmentation Eun-seo Choi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Eunseo

    . The driving forces are thermal stresses arising from the cooling of young oceanic crust and extensional the transition from one mode to the other. Besides the amount of stress from each driving force, the rate location of ridge segments are marked by the pairs of gray dashed lines. (b) The ridge-parallel component

  11. Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

  12. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  13. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  14. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling

  15. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

  16. Dynamics of a Submesoscale Surface Ocean Density Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramczyk, Marshall

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominant portion of the ocean energy [Capet et al. , 2008a].are important for the ocean energy budget and biogeochemicalrelevance for the ocean energy budget and nutrient

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  20. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  1. THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: thermal hydraulics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    -fluid modeling of nuclear reactor systems. Thermal-hydraulic analysis codes such as RELAP5-3D ~Ref. 1! and FLICA regions of the system. In fact, the CFD code FLUENT has previously been coupled to RELAP5-3D ~Refs. 3

  2. Solar thermal financing guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

  3. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 72 December 1988 Age Determination Methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries, by Edward P. Myers, Donald E. Hoss, Walter M. Matsumoto, by George A. Swan, Tommy G. Withrow, and Donn L. Park. April 1986, 34 p. 40. Potential impact of ocean

  4. Thermal wake/vessel detection technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

  5. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has STOP (Structural, Thermal, and Optical Performance) analyses of optical systems Thermal engineers lead evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

  6. "What Controls the Structure and Stability of the Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation: Implications for Abrupt Climate Change?"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

    2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The central goal of this research project is to understand the properties of the ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) a topic critical for understanding climate variability and stability on a variety of timescales (from decadal to centennial and longer). Specifically, we have explored various factors that control the MOC stability and decadal variability in the Atlantic and the ocean thermal structure in general, including the possibility abrupt climate change. We have also continued efforts on improving the performance of coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs.

  7. Behaviour and thermal experience of adult sockeye salmon migrating through stratified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    entirely by endogenous energy reserves as individuals cease feeding before leaving the ocean en routeBehaviour and thermal experience of adult sockeye salmon migrating through stratified lakes near water temperatures by utilising thermal refugia in cool-water tributaries (Berman & Quinn 1991; Goniea

  8. Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

  9. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 207 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3E3 Canada -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute

  11. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  12. Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven Robert

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

  13. On the Patterns of Wind-Power Input to the Ocean Circulation FABIEN ROQUET AND CARL WUNSCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    On the Patterns of Wind-Power Input to the Ocean Circulation FABIEN ROQUET AND CARL WUNSCH received 1 February 2011, in final form 12 July 2011) ABSTRACT Pathways of wind-power input into the ocean pumping, with a pattern determined by the wind curl rather than the wind itself. Regions of power

  14. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Technical Report SAF/OSI/CDOP2 #12;SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/199 ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Summary On September 17 launched. For the ASCAT-B scatterometer, corrections are derived with the use of the NWP ocean calibration

  15. AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

  16. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  17. 4 -Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    4 - Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO 2 ? As part of the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP)-sponsored Coastal Ocean Advances in Shelf Transport project (COAST) we laboratory, we developed analytical sys- tems that were capable of measuring nutrient con- centrations and CO

  18. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  19. Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

  20. Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research: The Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is seeking a dynamic individual to lead its Renewable Ocean Energy Program for a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary renewable ocean energy research program. The position

  1. Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/3 of the total tidal energy dissipation, in the ocean basins through "internal" waves breaking, eOcean Sci., 3, 337­344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Unpredictability of internal M2 H. van Haren Netherlands

  2. Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

  3. Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano-Bicocca, Università

    challenges in ocean management Theme 5 ­ Energy Area ENERGY.10.1 Call "The ocean of tomorrow" ­ Joining1 Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" · Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010 · Date of publication: 30, and Biotechnology (KBBE) - EUR 6 million from Theme 5 ­ Energy - EUR 10.5 million from Theme 6 ­ Environment

  4. The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 ? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

  5. CX-003706: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Solar Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

  6. CX-004002: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination Knoxville Solar America Cites - Knox Heritage, Incorporated Solar Photovoltaic and Solar Thermal Demonstration Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09202010...

  7. H A&S 222d/253e Spring 2007 Syllabus and logistics MWF 10.30-11.20 + labs/problem sessions MGH 242 OTB 206 (ocean)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OTB 206 (ocean) This course, Introduction to Energy and Environment (Life Under the Pale Sun) is about of magnitude energy consumption McNeill Environmental film festival UW thermal energy and radiation Mc of env change Web searching for envir physics of energy: mechanical air: McNeill 3 9/13 iv thermal energy

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  13. SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  3. Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

  4. Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

  5. Oceanic Origins of Southwest Tropical Atlantic Biases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhao

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic General Circulation Model POP Parallel Ocean Program ROMS Regional Ocean Modeling System SEC South Equatorial Current SECC South Equatorial Counter Current SETA Southeast Tropical Atlantic SEUC South Equatorial UnderCurrent SLP Sea Level... SST bias ................................................................................... 5 1.3.2 SST bias in SETA ...................................................................................... 8 1.4 Objectives and Approach...

  6. Menghua Wang NOAA STAR Ocean Color Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g., BOUSSOLE, Chesapeake Bay, etc., will be added) Regional ocean color EDR monitoring Hawaii South PacificLw551, and nLw671. #12;VIIRS ocean color EDR regional time- series monitoring at South Pacific Gyre (SPG) #12;Online interactive plot of SPG time-series #12;Global deep-water (>1000 m) ocean color EDR

  7. Thermally switchable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

  8. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  9. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  10. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, E. E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand which results in lower electrical costs. The effectiveness of this 'Thermal Retention System" is determined by its design characteristics, its operational efficiency and comparative system analysis. Today's computer technology has provided...

  11. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

  12. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  13. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  14. asteroid patroclus thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Yarkovsky effect Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Thermal inertia determines the temperature distribution over the surface of an asteroid and therefore governs the magnitude...

  15. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  16. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  17. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  18. Horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernndez-Carrasco, I; Hernndez-Garca, E; Turiel, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

  19. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

  20. Ocean Sci., 10, 281322, 2014 www.ocean-sci.net/10/281/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    28020, Spain 15Department of Solar Energy & Environmental Physics, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes of Environmental Physics, Ocean Physics and Modeling Group, Athens, Greece 12GEOMAR Helmholz Center for Ocean

  1. Thermal conductivity of electroless nickel-phosphorus alloy plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.D.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of specific heat, thermal diffusivity, density, and calculated thermal conductivity have been determined for a modified acid bath electroless nickel-12.7 wt% phosphorus alloy between 298 ad 423 K. Thermal conductivity values are about half those of pure nickel.

  2. Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ting Permissible Concentrations Alternatives to Ocean Oisposal. Deep-well injection. Incineration Land-based storage Land disposal. Rocycling. Advanced treatment Trends 55 56 58 58 61 61 62 65 66 71 83 87 90 91 TABLE OF CONTENTS... of Ocean Disposal. (August 1976) Plarchi Charisse Zapatka, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Roy W. Harm, Jr. The ocean disposal of waste materials is a controversial subject. People d1sagree as to whether this method...

  3. Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TECHNICAL NOTE 11 1989 #12;TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY #12;INTRODUCTION TO THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 11 Anne Gilbert Graham Ocean Drilling Program Texas A

  4. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  5. OceanObs 1999 G GRIFFITHS et al. OceanObs 99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    , telecoms, defence, science, monitoring Hugin, Odyssey, OE X, R-One Robot, Martin, LDUUV, Autosub #12;Ocean

  6. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M . , and Yang, E. , 2007: Mesoscale eddies drive increasedIV The interaction of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1.ocean in presence of mesoscale eddies. Geophysical Research

  7. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: ocean energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ocean energy converters DOE-Sponsored Reference Model Project Results Released On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events,...

  9. Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

  10. Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

  11. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  12. Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

  13. DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Amit

    DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL developed to automatically detect, locate and track mesoscale eddies spatially and temporally. Using an invaluable tool to assess mesoscale oceanic features. Key Words Scientific Visualization, Eddy Detection

  14. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

  15. 2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

  16. Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2 D. M. Sigman suggest that the ocean's deep ventilation is stronger in warm climates than in cold climates. Here we use that a dynamically cold ocean is globally less ventilated than a dynamically warm ocean. With dynamic cooling

  17. ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMaking CloudsMovingOcean

  18. Thermal imaging measurement of lateral thermal diffusivity in continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, J. G.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.

    2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared thermal imaging has become a common technique for nondestructive evaluation and measurement of thermal properties in ceramic specimens. Flash thermal imaging can be used to determine two-dimensional through-thickness thermal diffusivity in a planar specimen. In this study, the authors extended the method to determine lateral, or transverse, thermal diffusivity in the specimen. During the flash thermal imaging test, pulsed heat energy is applied to a specimen's back surface, which is partially shielded, and the change of temperature distribution on the front surface is monitored by an infrared thermal imaging system. The temperature distribution represents the effect of both the normal heat transfer through the specimen's thickness and the lateral heat transfer through the interface between the shielded and unshielded back-surface regions. Those temperature distributions are then fitted with a theoretical solution of the heat transfer process to determine the lateral thermal diffusivity at the interface. This technique has been applied to measure lateral thermal diffusivity in a steel plate and a continuous fiber ceramic composite specimen.

  19. Oceanic alkyl nitrates as a natural source of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Lawler, Michael J; Prather, Michael J; Saltzman, Eric S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during Saga 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics Ain the tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 32,

  20. Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

  1. Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii REQUIREMENTS ............................................... 16 Ocean and Resources Engineering Page 3 #12;Page 4 Ocean and Resources Engineering BACKGROUND Hawaii's unique location, climate and marine

  2. ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation Core course Catalog Description This course aims to provide ocean and resources engineering students with the fundamentals necessary Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core

  3. Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

  4. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  5. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs of work for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) activities and deliverables for the current fiscal

  6. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  7. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vertically, carrying energy into the ocean interior with aas a beam of energy into the ocean interior, observations ofKelvin wave energy from the Indian Ocean bypasses the gap in

  8. Integrated Thermal Analysis of the FRIB Cryomodule Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Xu, M. Barrios, F. Casagrande, M.J. Johnson, M. Leitner, D. Arenius, V. Ganni, W.J. Schneider, M. Wiseman

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal analysis of the FRIB cryomodule design is performed to determine the heat load to the cryogenic plant, to minimize the cryogenic plant load, to simulate thermal shield cool down as well as to determine the pressure relief sizes for failure conditions. Static and dynamic heat loads of the cryomodules are calculated and the optimal shield temperature is determined to minimize the cryogenic plant load. Integrated structural and thermal simulations of the 1100-O aluminium thermal shield are performed to determine the desired cool down rate to control the temperature profile on the thermal shield and to minimize thermal expansion displacements during the cool down. Pressure relief sizing calculations for the SRF helium containers, solenoids, helium distribution piping, and vacuum vessels are also described.

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operations ODP/TAI Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU May 1991 #12;This informal report Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University of Tokyo (Japan) Any

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director ODP

  11. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 2209­2223 Technical Note Pulsatile vortex generators for low-speed maneuvering of small underwater vehicles Kamran Mohseni? Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, science writer). #12;1. Introduction Oceans hold the key to the origin and continuity of life on the Earth

  12. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  13. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquantis Current Plane (C-Plane) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

  16. ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 106 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 ±nuwiLZ" ector ODP Drilling Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3469. In some cases, orders

  1. LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

  2. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT ACTIVE CONTINENTAL EXTENSION IN THE WESTERN WOODLARK BASIN, PAPUA NEW GUINEA Dr. Philippe Huchon CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie ?cole Normale Supérieure and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 2525 Correa Road Honolulu, HI 96822-2285 U.S.A. Dr. Adam Klaus Ocean

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

  5. Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

  6. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  7. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Exploreroceans biological carbon pump (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  8. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

  9. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Washington DC 20005 19 July 2005 #12

  10. arctic ocean expedition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oceans contain a complex mixture of micro Bermingham, Eldredge 5 Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 301 Scientific Prospectus Geosciences Websites Summary: .tamu.edu...

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic

  12. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

  13. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of...

  14. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer,...

  15. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg,...

  16. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  17. Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam....

  18. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  19. Self-adaptive processes for the mitigation of coherent multipath in ocean acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higley, William J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) Universityin Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) by

  20. J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morandini, Andre C.

    J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1 ISSN 1672-5182

  1. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  2. 1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers 2. Designation Core for ocean engineers. Introduction to ocean dynamical processes and general circulation. Ocean measurement Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Program

  3. Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    conduction · Heat conduction in Bose condensates ­ electronic superconductors ­ superfluid helium ­ Bose condensate of magnons #12;Outline--toward perfect thermal insulators · Einstein and minimum thermal directions #12;Gas kinetic equation is a good place to start · Anharmonicity (high T limit) · Point defect

  4. Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    -thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer;Leuchtstoffröhre Plasma-Bildschirm Energiesparlampe #12;electrical engineering light sources textile industry

  5. Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

  6. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  7. 255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    that determine the surface energy budget and the seaice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the oceaniceatmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

  8. Assimilation of Ice Concentration in an IceOcean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    are now available to determine the ice drift velocity. In addition, the drift of the pack ice can CoAssimilation of Ice Concentration in an IceOcean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG Polar Science October 2004, in final form 27 June 2005) ABSTRACT Ice concentration is a critical parameter of the polar

  9. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  10. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  11. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  12. Self-Study Report Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    ABET Self-Study Report for the Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii........................................................................................I-1 #12;1 Self-Study Report Ocean and Resources Engineering Master of Science University of Hawaii of Science (MS) in Ocean and Resources Engineering (formerly Master of Science in Ocean Engineering

  13. ORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Fall Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of this course is to provide the ocean engineering student an understanding of how sound propagates through: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering ProgramORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Syllabus Fall Semester 2014 Tuesday/Thursday 12:00-1:15 PM

  14. The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in controlling ocean chemistry. Better quantification of global

  15. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  16. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  17. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  18. Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone Soup Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 13 Compiled by Elizabeth A. Heise Ocean Drilling Program Texas A orpersonalresearchpurposes; however,republicationof any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling

  19. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  20. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  1. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION CONSORTIUM FOR OCEAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION CONTRACT OCE-0352500 1 OCTOBER 2007­30 SEPTEMBER 2008 #12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ii

  2. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

  3. Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

  4. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Ocean, Estuary and Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and nearshore ocean as critical habitat in the lifecycle of anadromous fish. Various entities recommended

  5. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  6. Ocean heat transport in a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA): structure, mechanisms, and impacts on climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yangxing

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) is primarily controled by the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), particularly in the Atlantic Ocean. The role of variation of temperature on variability of meridional OHT increases in the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Results iv... circulation in the mid-latitude Atlantic reinforces the MOCs, which contribute to a positive trend of OHT. Finaly, in the northern North Atlantic Ocean, a smal increase in meridional OHT and a slight weakening of MOC are detected. The weakening...

  7. association determines parathyroid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of...

  8. The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, Matthew T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the fate of gas hydrates during transit through the oceanVA. (1998), Submarine Gas Hydrates. St. Petersburg. Gornitzgas reservoirs below gas-hydrate provinces, Nature, 427,

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 166 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Director ODP/TAMU _____________________ Jack Baldauf Manager Science Operations ODP Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract of the University of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council

  10. Ocean fertilization : ecological cure or calamity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogilvie, Megan Jacqueline, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The late John Martin demonstrated the paramount importance of iron for microscopic plant growth in large areas of the world's oceans. Iron, he hypothesized, was the nutrient that limited green life in seawater. Over twenty ...

  11. Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Death, R.

    Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

  12. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  13. Uncertainty Quantification in ocean state estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalmikov, Alexander G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying uncertainty and error bounds is a key outstanding challenge in ocean state estimation and climate research. It is particularly difficult due to the large dimensionality of this nonlinear estimation problem and ...

  14. Ocean fronts trigger high latitude phytoplankton blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    Density fronts are ubiquitous features of the upper ocean. Here, numerical simulations show that restratification at fronts inhibits vertical mixing, triggering phytoplankton blooms in low-light conditions. The stability ...

  15. Ocean Fertilization: Science, Policy, and Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Aaron L.

    Over the past 20 years there has been growing interest in the concept of fertilizing the ocean with iron to abate global warming. This interest was catalyzed by basic scientific experiments showing that iron limits primary ...

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings

  17. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  18. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  19. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  20. ALIEN MAPS OF AN OCEAN-BEARING WORLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Meadows, Victoria S.; Robinson, Tyler [Astronomy Department and Astrobiology Program, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Livengood, Timothy A.; Deming, Drake [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, SD/SRE, MP3-E167, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); A'Hearn, Michael F.; Wellnitz, Dennis D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. 54-1626, MA 02139 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: cowan@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When Earth-mass extrasolar planets first become detectable, one challenge will be to determine which of these worlds harbor liquid water, a widely used criterion for habitability. Some of the first observations of these planets will consist of disc-averaged, time-resolved broadband photometry. To simulate such data, the Deep Impact spacecraft obtained light curves of Earth at seven wavebands spanning 300-1000 nm as part of the EPOXI mission of opportunity. In this paper, we analyze disc-integrated light curves, treating Earth as if it were an exoplanet, to determine if we can detect the presence of oceans and continents. We present two observations each spanning 1 day, taken at gibbous phases of 57 deg. and 77 deg., respectively. As expected, the time-averaged spectrum of Earth is blue at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering, and gray redward of 600 nm due to reflective clouds. The rotation of the planet leads to diurnal albedo variations of 15%-30%, with the largest relative changes occurring at the reddest wavelengths. To characterize these variations in an unbiased manner, we carry out a principal component analysis of the multi-band light curves; this analysis reveals that 98% of the diurnal color changes of Earth are due to only two dominant eigencolors. We use the time variations of these two eigencolors to construct longitudinal maps of the Earth, treating it as a non-uniform Lambert sphere. We find that the spectral and spatial distributions of the eigencolors correspond to cloud-free continents and oceans despite the fact that our observations were taken on days with typical cloud cover. We also find that the near-infrared wavebands are particularly useful in distinguishing between land and water. Based on this experiment, we conclude that it should be possible to infer the existence of water oceans on exoplanets with time-resolved broadband observations taken by a large space-based coronagraphic telescope.

  1. Ocean Engineering Two Year Graduate Course Schedule Graduate students from both the ocean and mechanical engineering programs may take courses from either discipline. The current schedule of courses for ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    6934 Ocean Energy Conversion - Dhanak EOC 6515 Hydro Aspects Ship Design** Ananthrakrishnan EOC 6934 Ocean Energy Conversion - Dhanak EOC 6312 Ocean and Seabed Acoustics** Frisk EOC 6312 Ocean and SeabedOcean Engineering Two Year Graduate Course Schedule Graduate students from both the ocean

  2. 156 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 The Structure of Ocean-Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    156 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 The Structure of Ocean engineering applications, notably in the design of ocean outfalls [2] and in the design of tidal power the Ocean Pollution Research Center under Grant R09401. D. A. Chin and S. Chinthamreddy

  3. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

  4. The Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the El Nio/La Nia cycle in the Pacific Ocean and how it impacts the climate of the Southeast UThe Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold dark abyss. The concepts of solar heating of the ocean surface and effects of temperature

  5. Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, J. T., and L. Thompson (2006), Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09604, doi:10.1029/2006GL025784. 1. Introduction [2

  6. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  7. ECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interface #12;1*- Sensible heat flux 6*- Evaporation + int. energy [+ Qlat] ECMWF workshop on Ocean layer) 5- Surface ocean current 7- Surface height 7 1- Continental runoff + internal Energy 8 1*- SurfECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere physical

  8. A New Family of Planets ? "Ocean Planets"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leger; F. Selsis; C. Sotin; T. Guillot; D. Despois; H. Lammer; M. Ollivier; F. Brachet; A. Labeque; C. Valette

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of planets is considered which is between rochy terrestrial planets and gaseous giant ones: "Ocean-Planets". We present the possible formation, composition and internal models of these putative planets, including that of their ocean, as well as their possible Exobiology interest. These planets should be detectable by planet detection missions such as Eddington and Kepler, and possibly COROT (lauch scheduled in 2006). They would be ideal targets for spectroscopic missions such as Darwin/TPF.

  9. Journal of Ocean University of China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) ISSN 1672-5182, October 31,2004, Vol.3, No.2, pp.19t-194

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Stephen Shangxing

    Journal of Ocean University of China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) ISSN 1672-5182, October 31; seafloor asymmetry; mid-ocean ridges; Ailantic Ocean Number ISSN 1672-5182(2004)02-191-04 1 Introduction

  10. CX-002909: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Program- Hawthorne Ridge Solar Thermal CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 07062010 Location(s): East...

  11. CX-004740: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-004740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Amonix Panels at National Solar Thermal Test Facility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11232010 Location(s): New Mexico...

  12. CX-002908: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002908: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Program - Bard College Solar Thermal CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B2.2, A9, B5.1 Date: 07062010 Location(s):...

  13. CX-004190: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Projects at National Solar Thermal Test Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.16, B3.6, B3.11 Date: 07092010...

  14. A synthesis of marine predator migrations, distribution, species overlap, and use of Pacific Ocean Exclusive Economic Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Autumn-Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .month in the North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . .tracked in the Pacific Ocean during 2002-2009. Adapted from

  15. Radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere-ocean system using Monte Carlo techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Paul Andrew

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSFER PROBLEM MONTE CARLO METHOD Assumptions of the Model Photon Pathlength Emulation Techniques Sampling Scattering Functions: Angles and Probabilities Emulation of an Interface Computing the Radiance by Statistical Estimation Determination... of Direction Cosines After Scattering Flux Estimation into Detectors Determination of a New Scattering Point Photon Trajectories Direct Flux and Radiance From the Ocean Bottonr Accounting for Multiple Orders of Scattering With the Bottom Computation...

  16. Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN 0 120E 150 8730' 8800' N M0001Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing OrganizationM0004 180 ESO USIO IODP Phase 1 Drill Sites, Expeditions 301312 #12;Integrated Ocean Drilling

  17. W-320 Project thermal modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

  18. Transient-heat-transfer and stress analysis of a thermal-storage solar cooker module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zengeni, Hazel C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the analysis carried out in Solidworks to determine the best material and configuration of a thermal-storage solar cooker module.The thermal-storage solar cooker utilizes the high-latent-heat lithium ...

  19. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 081103) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 090397) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 012296) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 102192) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 111093) The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 Jan, 1996) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Th

  20. Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

  1. The hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere. Stefan Hagemann and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    substance across the globe, but they also carry along thermal energy in the process ­ albeit hidden into liquid water or freezes to form ice. Conversely, energy input is necessary for ice to melt or sublimeThe hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere

  2. Ocean Sci., 5, 115139, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/115/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is believed to be a primary location of surface ocean mixing as a result of wind energy input December 2008 Published in Ocean Sci. Discuss.: 12 February 2009 Revised: 24 April 2009 Accepted: 8 May response to wind stress forcing are assessed by com- paring surface drifter observations from the Southern

  3. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the oceans thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  4. Eddy correlation measurements of the air/sea flux of dimethylsulfide over the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , 6,in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (1982 to 1996): Evidence ofover the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , Bates,

  5. A Spatial Deconvolution of Molecular Signals in Oceanic Dissolved Organic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  6. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 16, 277and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.

  7. A spatial deconvolution of molecular signals in oceanic dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis Blake

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  8. Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Erinna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominant contributor to the ocean energy dissipation (see dominant contributor to the ocean energy dissipation (see of interest, e.g. the ocean kinetic energy and tidal

  9. Spectral characterization of Ekman velocities in the Southern Ocean based on surface drifter trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elipot, Shane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy input rates across the Southern Ocean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .contributor to the upper ocean mixing energy budget. 1.2 Theenergy input in the Southern Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  10. Effect of ocean mesoscale variability on the mean state of tropical Atlantic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, H; Jochum, M; Murtugudde, R; Miller, A J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean State ofthe effect of oceanic mesoscale features on the mean climatemodel, resolving oceanic mesoscale variability leads to a

  11. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  12. Electrically insulated MLI and thermal anchor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiya, Koji; Furukawa, Masato; Murakami, Haruyuki; Kizu, Kaname; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Koidea, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi [Japan Aerospace Exploration and Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal shield of JT-60SA is kept at 80 K and will use the multilayer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation heat load to the superconducting coils at 4.4 K from the cryostat at 300 K. Due to plasma pulse operation, the MLI is affected by eddy current in toroidal direction. The MLI is designed to suppress the current by electrically insulating every 20 degree in the toroidal direction by covering the MLI with polyimide films. In this paper, two kinds of designs for the MLI system are proposed, focusing on a way to overlap the layers. A boil-off calorimeter method and temperature measurement has been performed to determine the thermal performance of the MLI system. The design of the electrical insulated thermal anchor between the toroidal field (TF) coil and the thermal shield is also explained.

  13. Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, R.L. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  14. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing #12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 and x-ray Ultraviolet Infrared Microwave and radio waves Wavelength in meters (m) Electromagnetic.77 700 red limit 30k0.041 2.48 green500 near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrare refers

  15. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  16. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eere.energy.gov * energy.govsunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving...

  17. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Thermal Control Technologies Advanced Vehicle Systems Technology Transfer Jet Cooling Alternative Coolants TIM Low R Structure Phase Change Spray Cooling Air Cooling...

  18. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  19. Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthonie W. J. Muller

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a silk protein which also has a very high thermal conductivity, I combine and extend the mentioned ideas, and propose the general conjecture that several major transitions of evolution were effected by thermal processes, with four additional partial conjectures: (1) The first organisms used heat engines during thermosynthesis in convection cells; (2) The first eukaryotic cells used MT during thermosynthesis in the thermal gradient above SHV; (3) The first metazoans used transport of water or in water during thermosynthesis above SHV under an ice-covered ocean during the Gaskiers Snowball Earth; and (4) The first mammalian brain used a thermal machinery based on thermal gradients in or across the cortex. When experimentally proven these conjectures, which are testable by the methods of synthetic biology, would significantly enhance our understanding of life.

  20. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.