Sample records for determination non-utility scale

  1. Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ??????. 18 13 Teflon? filter holder (unassembled and assembled)????????.... 21 14 Dissolution experiment setup?????????????????.... 22 15 Curve showing the dissolution profile of barium released from scale... done to determine the solubility of pipe scale in human gastrointestinal fluid (Raabe 1996). Through this work and others, it has been shown that barium sulfate scale is extremely insoluble, even in harsh acidic environments. Based on these results...

  2. Trace contaminant determination in fish scale by laser ablation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, I.; Coutant, C.C.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation on rings of fish scale has been used to analyze the historical accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in striped bass in the Watts Bar Reservoir. Rings on a fish scale grow in a pattern that forms a record of the fish`s chemical intake. In conjunction with the migration patterns of fish monitored by ecologists, relative PCB concentrations in the seasonal rings of fish scale can be used to study the PCB distribution in the reservoir. In this study, a tightly-focused laser beam from a XeCl excimer laser was used to ablate and ionize a small portion of a fish scale placed in a vacuum chamber. The ions were identified and quantified by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Studies of this type can provide valuable information for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) off-site clean-up efforts as well as identifying the impacts of other sources to local aquatic populations.

  3. CX-003281: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Utility Scale Renewable Energy - Sandywood HomesCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/10/2010Location(s): Tiverton, Rhode IslandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-004410: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Utility Scale Renewable Energy - Sandywood HomesCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 11/09/2010Location(s): Tiverton, Rhode IslandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Electrolyte Stability Determines Scaling Limits for Solid-State 3D Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Electrolyte Stability Determines Scaling Limits for Solid-State 3D Li Ion Batteries Dmitry Ruzmetov, all-solid-state Li ion batteries (LIBs) with high specific capacity and small footprint are highly to their high-energy density, Li ion batteries (LIBs) are attractive for these applications, and all-solid-state

  6. Spatial and temporal scale issues in determining biomass burning regimes in Bolivia and Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial and temporal scale issues in determining biomass burning regimes in Bolivia and Peru A. V and Bolivia to analyse the spatial distribution of burning and its intra- and inter-annual variability Santa Cruz, Bolivia and in north-west Peru). Particular attention was paid to biomass burning in high

  7. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  8. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  9. Determination of energy scales in few-electron double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubert, D.; Ludwig, S. [Center for NanoScience and Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 Muenchen (Germany); Schuh, D. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacitive couplings between gate-defined quantum dots and their gates vary considerably as a function of applied gate voltages. The conversion between gate voltages and the relevant energy scales is usually performed in a regime of rather symmetric dot-lead tunnel couplings strong enough to allow direct transport measurements. Unfortunately, this standard procedure fails for weak and possibly asymmetric tunnel couplings, often the case in realistic devices. We have developed methods to determine the gate voltage to energy conversion accurately in the different regimes of dot-lead tunnel couplings and demonstrate strong variations of the conversion factors. Our concepts can easily be extended to triple quantum dots or even larger arrays.

  10. CX-005440: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island Non-utility Scale Renewable Energy ProgramCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 03/22/2011Location(s): North Kingstown, Rhode IslandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-006284: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island Non-utility Scale Renewable Energy ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1Date: 08/01/2011Location(s): Middletown, Rhode IslandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. Determination of Interfacial Adhesion Strength between Oxide Scale and Substrate for Metallic SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in SOFC operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  13. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

  14. Determinants and Role of Trust in E-Business: A Large Scale Empirical Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultan, Fareena

    2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigates the determinants and role of consumer trust in e-business. It examines consumer perceptions of trust in a Web site and addresses the following key ...

  15. Andromeda: A mission to determine the gamma-ray burst distance scale F.A. Harrison, W.R. Cook, T.A. Prince, S.M. Schindler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prince, Thomas A.

    Andromeda: A mission to determine the gamma-ray burst distance scale F.A. Harrison, W.R. Cook, T was submitted to the STEDI program, and will also be proposed as a NASA Small Explorer. Keywords: bursts, gamma-rays, small missions 1 SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES 1.1 Gamma-ray Bursts Gamma-ray bursts GRBs were discovered

  16. Unification of Dynamical Determination and Bare Minimal Phenomenological Constraints in No-Scale F-SU(5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the construction of the viable parameter space of No-Scale F-SU(5), a model built on the F-lipped SU(5)xU(1)_X gauge group, supplemented by a pair of F-theory derived vector-like multiplets at the TeV scale, and the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity. Employing an updated numerical algorithm and a substantially upgraded computational engine, we significantly enhance the scope, detail and accuracy of our prior study. We sequentially apply a set of "bare-minimal" phenomenological constraints, consisting of i) the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity, ii) consistent radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, iii) precision LEP constraints on the light supersymmetric mass content, iv) the world average top-quark mass, and v) a light neutralino satisfying the 7-year WMAP cold dark matter relic density measurement. The overlap of the viable parameter space with key rare-process limits on the branching ratio for b to s gamma and the muon anomalous magnetic moment is identified as the "golden strip" of F-SU(5). A cross check for top-down theoretical consistency is provided by application of the "Super No-Scale" condition, which dynamically selects a pair of undetermined model parameters in a manner that is virtually identical to the corresponding phenomenological (driven primarily by the relic density) selection. The predicted vector-like particles are candidates for production at the future LHC, which is furthermore sensitive to a distinctive signal of ultra-high multiplicity hadronic jets. The lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass is predicted to be 120+3.5-1 GeV, with an additional 3-4 GeV upward shift possible from radiative loops in the vector-like multiplets. The predominantly bino flavored lightest neutralino is suitable for direct detection by the Xenon collaboration.

  17. Determination of Landau Fermi-liquid parameters of strongly interacting fermions by means of a nonlinear scaling transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji-sheng Chen

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonlinear transformation approach is formulated for the correlated fermions' thermodynamics through a medium-scaling effective action. An auxiliary implicit variable-effective chemical potential is introduced to characterize the non-Gaussian fluctuations physics. By incorporating the nonlocal correlation effects, the achieved grand partition function is made of coupled highly nonlinear parametric equations. Analytically, the low temperature expansions for the strongly interacting unitary Fermi gas are performed for the adiabatic compressibility-sound speed and specific heat with the Sommerfeld lemma. The expressions for the Landau Fermi-Liquid parameters $F_0^s$ and $F_1^s$ of the strongly interacting fermion system are obtained. As a universal constant, the effective fermion mass ratio is $m^*/m={10/9}$ at unitarity.

  18. 2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve3. LightingImports35 2013 Flow5

  19. 2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve3. LightingImports35 2013 Flow5Revenue

  20. 2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve3. LightingImports35 2013

  1. DETERMINATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL PROPERTIES OF STRIPA GRANITE FROM TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN THE FULL-SCALE HEATER EXPERIMENTS: METHOD AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffry, J.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical Properties of Granite:Stripa, Sweden. TerraTekStorage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P. A. Witherspoon, P.Discontinuities in the Strira Granite -- Time-Scale Heater

  2. Methodology to determine the technical performance and value proposition for grid-scale energy storage systems : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Loose, Verne William; Donnelly, Matthew K. [Montana Tech of The University of Montana, Butte, MT; Trudnowski, Daniel J. [Montana Tech of The University of Montana, Butte, MT

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the amount of renewable generation increases, the inherent variability of wind and photovoltaic systems must be addressed in order to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of the nation's electricity grid. Grid-scale energy storage systems are uniquely suited to address the variability of renewable generation and to provide other valuable grid services. The goal of this report is to quantify the technical performance required to provide di erent grid bene ts and to specify the proper techniques for estimating the value of grid-scale energy storage systems.

  3. Determination of silica scale deposition rates and thresholds applied toward protection of injection reservoirs. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program objective aims to identify the highest temperature at which silica scale will develop from partially evaporated and significantly cooled geothermal liquid. The approach involves tracking deposition of silica scale by monitoring the apparent electrical conductivity of the geothermal liquid in an isolation chamber. A decrease in apparent conductivity occurs because silica deposited on electrode surfaces is less conductive than the geothermal liquid. The major technical hurdle is building a conductivity monitoring system that is sensitive enough to distinguish between no silica deposition and almost no silica deposition, while accounting for other factors which also affect conductivity, such as temperature and varying fluid composition.

  4. Identifying Product Scaling Principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Angel 1986-

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    shows how laws of similarity were determined for wind turbine rotors in order for ease of optimization when scaling to the desired level (Peterson, 1984). The study depicts how certain scaling laws for varying changes such as rotational speed, radius... and scale the physical shape and features of the fin in order to produce wind turbine blades for producing electricity. A similar study takes the fins propulsion motion and converts it into a mechanical system for swimming robots and submarines...

  5. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  6. CX-009338: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-009338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost-Effective Treatment of Produced Water Using Co-Produced Energy Sources Phase II: Field Scale Demonstration and...

  7. CX-009340: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-009340: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost-Effective Treatment of Produced Water Using Co-Produced Energy Sources Phase II: Field Scale Demonstration and...

  8. CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining...

  9. CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Evaporator Scale Sample CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08102010 Location(s): Aiken,...

  10. CX-004129: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-004129: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Generation Transformer for Megawatt-Scale Wind Turbines using Alternating Current-Link CX(s) Applied:...

  11. CX-002474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Full Scale Testing Characterization, System Optimization, Demonstration of Grid Connected Wind Turbines and Wind Powered Water Desalination...

  12. PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    TOTAL SCORE: ADD INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT SCORES TO DETERMINE THE TOTAL PAIN SCORE. TOTAL THE 5 CATEGORIES FOR TOTAL PAIN SCORE. MAXIMUM SCORE = 10/10. Reference: Merkel SJ, et al. The FLACC: A Behavioral Pain Scale or groan. Low level speech with a negative or disapproving quality. Repeated troubled calling out. Loud

  13. Scale invariability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omerbashich, M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a forced mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance causes tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses, critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". I propose that reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators where permanent energy decay of all oscillation naturally forb...

  14. Non-Utility Generation and Transmission Access in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panjavan, S.; Adib, P.

    system is a key factor in promoting competition in power generation. With changes in the Federal law, wholesale customers and NUGs are working with state legislators and regulators to open up the transmission system for opportunities in the wholesale...

  15. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment ofEnergyBeowawe7:forOFFICE 0Program

  16. "2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49.Customers" "(Data from

  17. "2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49.Customers" "(Data

  18. "2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49.Customers"

  19. How to calibrate the jet energy scale?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatakeyama, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Top quarks dominantly decay into b-quark jets and W bosons, and the W bosons often decay into jets, thus the precise determination of the jet energy scale is crucial in measurements of many top quark properties. I present the strategies used by the CDF and D0 collaborations to determine the jet energy scale. The various cross checks performed to verify the determined jet energy scale and evaluate its systematic uncertainty are also discussed.

  20. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  1. Scale invariability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Omerbashich

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance forces tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes, and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". Thus the derived equation is that of levitation. Reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators, where permanent energy decay of all oscillation forbids constancy of known "physical constants". This hyperresonator concept explains the magnetism (as every forced oscillator feature), as well as the gravitation (as forward propagation of mechanical vibrations along the aether i.e. throughout the vacuum structure). To test my claim I propose a Space mission to collect on site measurements of eigenperiods of the Sun, its planets, and their satellites. The levitation equitation enables propulsionless Space travel via gravity sailing: Space vehicle hull ought to be engineered so as to automatically adjust its grave mode, to the vehicle instant gravitational surroundings, akin to trout up swimming.

  2. SMART Scale

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 Roadmap forDKT.Awards and IncentivesSHARPofofSMART Scale

  3. CX-003202: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass and Algae Residues via Integrated Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydroconversion CX(s)...

  4. CX-008514: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008514: Categorical Exclusion Determination Corrosion and Scale at Extreme Temperature and Pressure CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07...

  5. Determining $?$ from cluster correlation function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kashlinsky

    1998-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown how data on the cluster correlation function can be used in order to reconstruct the density of the pregalactic density field on the cluster mass scale. The method is applied to the data on the cluster correlation amplitude -- richness dependence. The spectrum of the recovered density field has the same shape as the density field derived from data on the galaxy correlation function which is measured as function of linear scales. Matching the two amplitudes relates the mass to the comoving scale it contains and thereby leads to a direct determination of $\\Omega$. The resultant density parameter turns out to be $\\Omega$=0.25.

  6. Utilization of pyrolysis oil in industrial scale boilers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redfern, Kyle D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The performance of pyrolysis oil in a large-scale combustion system is investigated to determine the feasibility of displacing fuel oil or natural gas in current… (more)

  7. Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

  8. CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09252013...

  9. CX-002357: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002357: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9 Date: 05132010 Location(s): New...

  10. CX-006900: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Scale-Up of Low-Cost Zero-Emissions Magnesium by Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies Electrolysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09...

  11. CX-006895: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Scale-Up of Low-Cost Zero-Emissions Magnesium by Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies Electrolysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09...

  12. CX-006897: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Scale-Up of Low-Cost Zero-Emissions Magnesium by Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies Electrolysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09...

  13. CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09232010 Location(s): Aiken, South...

  14. Thermodynamics and scale relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

  15. Silica Scaling Removal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits:...

  16. Transition physics and scaling overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlstrom, T.N.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of recent experimental progress towards understanding H-mode transition physics and scaling. Terminology and techniques for studying H-mode are reviewed and discussed. The model of shear E x B flow stabilization of edge fluctuations at the L-H transition is gaining wide acceptance and is further supported by observations of edge rotation on a number of new devices. Observations of poloidal asymmetries of edge fluctuations and dephasing of density and potential fluctuations after the transition pose interesting challenges for understanding H-mode physics. Dedicated scans to determine the scaling of the power threshold have now been performed on many machines. A dear B{sub t} dependence is universally observed but dependence on the line averaged density is complicated. Other dependencies are also reported. Studies of the effect of neutrals and error fields on the power threshold are under investigation. The ITER threshold database has matured and offers guidance to the power threshold scaling issues relevant to next-step devices.

  17. Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

  18. THE EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCE SCALE WITHOUT CEPHEIDS. IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hislop, Lachlan; Mould, Jeremy [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Vic 3010 (Australia); Schmidt, Brian; Bessell, Michael S.; Da Costa, Gary; Francis, Paul; Keller, Stefan; Tisserand, Patrick; Rapoport, Sharon; Casey, Andy, E-mail: jmould@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cepheid period-luminosity relation is the primary distance indicator used in most determinations of the Hubble constant. The tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) is an alternative basis. Using the new Australian National University (ANU) SkyMapper Telescope, we calibrate the Tully-Fisher relation in the I band. We find that the TRGB and Cepheid distance scales are consistent.

  19. The Improbability scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, David J.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Improbability Scale (IS) is proposed as a way of communicating to the general public the improbability (and by implication, the probability) of events predicted as the result of scientific research. Through the use of the Improbability Scale, the public will be able to evaluate more easily the relative risks of predicted events and draw proper conclusions when asked to support governmental and public policy decisions arising from that research.

  20. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  1. Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra N.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine...

  3. Concurrent Validity of the "Working with Others Scale" of the ICIS Employment Interview System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassidy, Martha Ward

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Concurrent Validity of the "Working with Others Scale" of the ICIS Employment Interview System Martha W. Cassidy ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine if the Working with Others Scale from the American ...

  4. Accelerated Least Squares Multidimensional Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeuw, Jan de

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x(make_x(36,2)) xACCELERATED SCALING R EFERENCES I.ACCELERATED LEAST SQUARES MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING JAN DEare simpler to write. ACCELERATED SCALING It is shown in De

  5. Accelerated Least Squares Multidimensional Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Leeuw

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x(make_x(36,2)) xACCELERATED SCALING R EFERENCES I.ACCELERATED LEAST SQUARES MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING JAN DEare simpler to write. ACCELERATED SCALING It is shown in De

  6. Scaling of fracture length and distributed damage Vladimir Lyakhovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Scaling of fracture length and distributed damage Vladimir Lyakhovsky The Institute of Earth space scaling except linear relations between fracture length and displacements and thus the determination theoretically of the strength of a body or structure directly. Self-similarity of a fracture

  7. Characteristic Spatial Scales in Earthquake Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Zoeller; R. Engbert; S. Hainzl; J. Kurths

    1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique in order to quantify the dynamics of spatially extended systems. Using a test on the existence of unstable periodic orbits, we identify intermediate spatial scales, wherein the dynamics is characterized by maximum nontrivial determinism. This method is applied to earthquake catalogues containing time, coordinates and magnitude. As a result we extract a set of areas with significant deterministic and low-dimensional dynamics from the data. Finally, a simple model is used to show that these scales can be interpreted as local spatial coupling strengths.

  8. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  9. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  10. Mathematics Achievement Scale Score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Croatia 490 New Zealand 486 Spain 482 Romania 482 Poland 481 Turkey 469 Azerbaijan 463 Chile 462 Thailand Romania 505 Spain 505 Poland 505 TIMSS Scale Centerpoint 500 New Zealand 497 Kazakhstan 495 Norway 494 Kazakhstan 487 Sweden 484 Ukraine 479 Norway 475 Armenia 467 Romania 458 United Arab Emirates 456 Turkey 452

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic scale analysis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    determine the atomic-scale structure of nanocrystals in detail... -energy XRD and atomic PDF ... Source: Petkov, Valeri - Department of Physics, Central Michigan University...

  12. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  13. Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

  14. Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

  15. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

  16. Robot calibration without scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ives, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Je rinkle (Member) arry Hogan (Member) eorge P. Peterson (Head of Department) May 1995 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering 111 ABSTRACT Robot Calibration without Scaling. (May 1995) Thomas W. Ives, B. S. , The University of Texas... robot. Researchers at Texas A6tM University found that convergence can be achieved simply by converting the original translational parameters fiom millimeters to inches. While this is nice and convenient for this particular case, it does not prove...

  17. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  18. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

  19. Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 1 Cloud-Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 1 Cloud-Scale Datacenters #12;Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 2, and operating datacenters. When software applications are built as distributed systems, every aspect brief will explore how cloud workloads have changed the way datacenters are designed and operated

  20. The San Jose Scale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conradi, Albert F.

    1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for controlling the scale. The most important spray mixtures in use are lime-sulphur salt, lime-sulphur, whale oil soap, kero? sene, crude petroleum, Kero-water, and kerosene or crude oil emulsions. All these preparations are mainly winter sprays, being applied... applied while cold, however, it clogs the apparatus and causes considerable inconven? ience in getting it on the tree. It is more expensive than the Lime- Sulphur wash. i I o . B I 3 I 2 In some States coal oil or kerosene has been experimented...

  1. ATLAS Jet Energy Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Schouten; A. Tanasijczuk; M. Vetterli; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jets originating from the fragmentation of quarks and gluons are the most common, and complicated, final state objects produced at hadron colliders. A precise knowledge of their energy calibration is therefore of great importance at experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, while is very difficult to ascertain. We present in-situ techniques and results for the jet energy scale at ATLAS using recent collision data. ATLAS has demonstrated an understanding of the necessary jet energy corrections to within \\approx 4% in the central region of the calorimeter.

  2. Pore Scale Micromodels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenterYou areConstructionAPore Scale

  3. Silica Scaling Removal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShift EndSidneyChemistry » Silica Scaling

  4. Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite dissolution kinetics and filter fouling are reported elsewhere (see Table S.1). The primary goal of scale-up testing was to examine how filter length influenced permeate flux rates. To accomplish this, the existing cells unit filter system, which employs a 2-ft-long, 0.5-in. (inner) diameter sintered stainless steel filter element, was redesigned to accommodate an 8-ft. sintered stainless steel filter element of the same diameter. Testing was then performed to evaluate the filtration performance of waste simulant slurries. Scale-up testing consisted of two separate series of filtration tests: 1) scale-up axial velocity (AV)/transmembrane pressure (TMP) matrix tests and 2) scale-up temperature tests. The AV/TMP matrix tests examined filtration performance of two different waste simulant slurries in the 8-ft. cells unit filter system. Waste simulant slurry formulations for the 8-ft. scale-up test was selected to match simulant slurries for which filtration performance had been characterized on the 2-ft CUF. For the scale-up temperature tests, the filtration performance at three test temperatures (i.e., 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C) was determined to evaluate if filter flux versus temperature correlations developed using the 2-ft filters were also valid for the 8-ft filters.

  5. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  6. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  7. Scaling of Decoherence Effects in Quantum Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Dalton

    2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling of decoherence rates with the number of q-bits is studied for a simple quantum computer model. Two state q-bits are localised around well-separated positions via trapping potentials, but vibrational motion of q-bits centre of mass motion occurs. Coherent one and two q-bit gating processes are controlled by external classical fields and facilitated by a high Q cavity mode. Decoherence due to q-bit and cavity mode coupling to a bath of spontaneous emission modes, cavity decay modes and to the vibrational modes is treated. A non-Markovian treatment of the short time behaviour of the fidelity is presented, enabling time scales for decoherence to be determined, together with their dependence on q-bit number for the case where the q-bit/cavity mode system is in a pure state and the baths are in thermal states.

  8. Transition from Large-Scale to Small-Scale Dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponty, Y. [Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, Nice cedex 04 (France); Plunian, F. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamo equations are solved numerically with a helical forcing corresponding to the Roberts flow. In the fully turbulent regime the flow behaves as a Roberts flow on long time scales, plus turbulent fluctuations at short time scales. The dynamo onset is controlled by the long time scales of the flow, in agreement with the former Karlsruhe experimental results. The is governed by a generalized {alpha} effect, which includes both the usual {alpha} effect and turbulent diffusion, plus all higher order effects. Beyond the onset we find that this generalized {alpha} effect scales as O(Rm{sup -1}), suggesting the takeover of small-scale dynamo action. This is confirmed by simulations in which dynamo occurs even if the large-scale field is artificially suppressed.

  9. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

  10. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  11. Scaling of structural failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  12. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  13. Implicit Scaling in Ecological Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    - sion, and abstruse structures, such as communities and ecosystems. The diversity of organisms and eco. It was our supposition that the often unrecognized relation- ship between organism/concept and scale should- ination, we hope to raise ecologists' awareness of scale-dependent rela- tionships among organisms and eco

  14. EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    : Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

  15. Scaling of the electron dissipation range of solar wind turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahraoui, F; De Patoul, J; Belmont, G; Goldstein, M L; Retino, A; Robert, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Canu, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron scale solar wind turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Clear evidences have been given from the Cluster data that turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale but continues cascading down to the electron scales. However, the scaling of the energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 years of the Cluster search-coil magnetometer (SCM) waveforms measured in the solar wind and perform a statistical study of the magnetic energy spectra in the frequency range [$1, 180$]Hz. We show that a large fraction of the spectra exhibit clear breakpoints near the electon gyroscale $\\rho_e$, followed by steeper power-law like spectra. We show that the scaling below the electron breakpoint cannot be determined unambiguously due to instrumental limitations that will be discussed in detail. We compare our results to recent ones reported in other studies and discuss their implication on the physical...

  16. Method and apparatus for determination of mechanical properties of functionally-graded materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giannakopoulos, Antonios E. (Somerville, MA); Suresh, Subra (Wellesley, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for the determination of mechanical properties of homogenous or functionally-graded materials from indentation testing are presented. The technique is applicable to indentation on the nano-scale through the macro-scale including the geological scale. The technique involves creating a predictive load/depth relationship for a sample, providing an experimental load/depth relationship, comparing the experimental data to the predictive data, and determining a physical characteristic from the comparison.

  17. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  18. Hydranet: network support for scaling of large scale servic es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Hamesh

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the explosive growth of demand for services on the Internet, the networking infrastructure (routers 7 protocols, servers) is under considerable stress. Mechanisms are needed for current and future IP services to scale in a client transparent...

  19. Mechanical analysis and simulation of in-motion vehicle scales. Final report/project accomplishments summary, CRADA Number 95-KCP-1013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, B.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanical analysis and simulation was conducted on a weigh-in-motion vehicle scale used to weight motor trucks traveling at speeds of 2 to 45 mph. The objective of this project was to develop a detailed understanding of weigh-in-motion vehicle scale operation and system response to dynamic loading. AlliedSignal FM and T worked together with Cardinal Scale Manufacturing Company as a design team to determine the scale structure`s resonant frequency, determine a relationship between static and dynamic weights, determine variables that have significant influence on the accuracy of the scale, and design an algorithm that can be used to optimize the performance and simulate the operation of the scale. This project provided a detailed understanding of the weigh-in-motion scale operation and system response to dynamic loading. Weigh-in-motion scale engineers will use this knowledge to improve current scales and design new, improved scales. The project was completed as scheduled.

  20. Large-scale biomass plantings in Minnesota: Scale-up and demonstration projects in perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroll, T. [Minnesota Univ., St. Paul, MN (United States). Forestry Div.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale-up projects are an important step toward demonstration and commercialization of woody biomass because simply planting extensive acreage of hybrid poplar will not develop markets. Project objectives are to document the cost to plant and establish, and effort needed to monitor and maintain woody biomass on agricultural land. Conversion technologies and alternative end-uses are examined in a larger framework in order to afford researchers and industrial partners information necessary to develop supply and demand on a local or regional scale. Likely to be determined are risk factors of crop failure and differences between establishment of research plots and agricultural scale field work. Production economics are only one consideration in understanding demonstration and scale-up. Others are environmental, marketing, industrial, and agricultural in nature. Markets for energy crops are only beginning to develop. Although information collected as a result of planting up to 5000 acres of hybrid poplar in central Minnesota will not necessarily be transferable to other areas of the country, a national perspective will come from development of regional markets for woody and herbaceous crops. Several feedstocks, with alternative markets in different regions will eventually comprise the entire picture of biofuels feedstock market development. Current projects offer opportunities to learn about the complexity and requirements that will move biomass from research and development to actual market development. These markets may include energy and other end-uses such as fiber.

  1. Towards the Scale Invariant Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Verma

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An argument is made to show that the singularity in the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) is the expression of a non-Machian feature. It can be avoided with a scale-invariant dynamical theory, a property lacking in GTR. It is further argued that the global non-conservation of energy in GTR also results from the lack of scale-invariance and the field formulation presented by several authors can only resolve the problem in part. A truly scale-invariant theory is required to avoid these two problems in a more consistent approach

  2. Physical meaning of one-machine and multimachine tokamak scalings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N., E-mail: dnyn@nfi.kiae.ru; Danilov, A. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Lysenko, S. E. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation); Ongena, J. [Euratom-Belgium State Association, Laboratory for Plasma Physics (Belgium)] [Euratom-Belgium State Association, Laboratory for Plasma Physics (Belgium)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific features of energy confinement scalings constructed using different experimental databases for tokamak plasmas are considered. In the multimachine database, some pairs of engineering variables are collinear; e.g., the current I and the input power P both increase with increasing minor radius a. As a result, scalings derived from this database are reliable only for discharges in which such ratios as I/a{sup 2} or P/a{sup 2} are close to their values averaged over the database. The collinearity of variables allows one to exclude the normalized Debye radius d* from the scaling expressed in a nondimensional form. In one-machine databases, the dimensionless variables are functionally dependent, which allow one to cast a scaling without d*. In a database combined from two devices, the collinearity may be absent, so the Debye radius cannot generally be excluded from the scaling. It is shown that the experiments performed in support of the absence of d* in the two-machine scaling are unconvincing. Transformation expressions are given that allow one to compare experiments for the determination of scaling in any set of independent variables.

  3. Scale Effects in Crystal Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padubidri Janardhanachar, Guruprasad

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research work is to further the understanding of crystal plasticity, particularly at reduced structural and material length scales. Fundamental understanding of plasticity is central to various challenges facing design...

  4. Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon’s Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

  5. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  6. Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wavelet multiresolution analysis was used to examine the variation in dominant length scales determined from remotely sensed airborne- and satellite-derived surface energy flux data. The wavelet cospectra are computed between ...

  7. Gender determination in populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

  8. long-Term Tritium Transport through Field-Scale Compacted Soil Liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    long-Term Tritium Transport through Field-Scale Compacted Soil Liner Cecile Toupiol1; Thomas W. Daniel7 Abstract: A l3-year study of tritium transport through a field-scale earthen liner sampling) were used to determine the vertical tritium concentration profiles at different times

  9. Turbulence Effects at Small Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Beresnyak; A. Lazarian

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is most natural to assume that mysterious Small Ionized and Neutral Structures (SINS) indiffuse ISM arise from turbulence. There are two obvious problem with such an explanation, however. First of all, it is generally believed that at the small scales turbulence should be damped. Second, turbulence with Kolmogorov spectrum cannot be the responsible for the SINS. We consider, however, effects, that provide spectral index flatter than the Kolmogorov one and allow action at very small scales. These are the shocks that arise in high Mach number turbulence and transfer of energy to small scales by instabilities in cosmic rays. Our examples indicate that the origin of SINS may be discovered through systematic studies of astrophysical turbulence.

  10. Determinants of Meme Popularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, James P; Baños, Raquel A; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online social media have greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what are the fundamental mechanisms driving dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior and analytically show, using techniques from mathematical population genetics, that competition between memes for the limited resource of user attention leads to a type of self-organized criticality, with heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity: a few memes "go viral" but the majority become only moderately popular. The time-dependent solutions of the model are shown to fit empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, and to predict novel scaling features of the data. The presented framework, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  11. Determination of the strong coupling constant at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wengler

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-hadronic events produced in e+e- collisions provide an excellent laboratory to study QCD, the theory of strong interactions, and in particular to determine the strong coupling parameter alpha_s and demonstrate its predicted behavior as a function of the energy scale. Determinations of alpha_s at LEP will be reviewed with emphasis on event shape variables and jet rates in 3-jet and 4-jet events.

  12. Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    226 Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area / Assessment Unit DI Prod. N(eq) Sum Total Cumu subbasin, Washington. Geographic Area / Assessment Unit IntegratedPriorityRestoration Category Habitat% (unscaled results) of the combined protection benefit for summer steelhead within the Methow basin, and 51

  13. Scaling the Web Composing Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Composing Web Services:A QoS View A n Internet application can invoke several ser- vices -- a stock-trading Web service, for example, could invoke a payment service, which could then invoke an authentication service. Such a scenario is called a composite Web service, and it can

  14. Scaling in the quantum Hall regime of graphene Corbino devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Eva C.; Burghard, Marko [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Giesbers, A. J. M. [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Molecular Materials and Nanosystems, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling behavior of graphene devices in Corbino geometry was investigated through temperature dependent conductivity measurements under magnetic field. Evaluation of the Landau level width as a function of temperature yielded a relatively low temperature exponent of ??=?0.16?±?0.05. Furthermore, an unusually large value close to 7.6?±?0.9 was found for the universal scaling constant ?, while the determined inelastic scattering exponent of p?=?2 is consistent with established scattering mechanisms in graphene. The deviation of the scaling parameters from values characteristic of conventional two-dimensional electron gases is attributed to an inhomogeneous charge carrier distribution in the Corbino devices. Direct evidence for the presence of the latter could be gained by spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy away from the charge neutrality point of the devices.

  15. On Local and Global Centrality in Large Scale Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Sima

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating influential nodes in large scale networks including but not limited to social networks, biological networks, communication networks, emerging smart grids etc. is a topic of fundamental interest. To understand influences of nodes in a network, a classical metric is centrality within which there are multiple specific instances including degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality and more. As of today, existing algorithms to identify nodes with high centrality measures operate upon the entire (or rather global) network, resulting in high computational complexity. In this paper, we design efficient algorithms for determining the betweenness centrality in large scale networks by taking advantage of the modular topology exhibited by most of these large scale networks. Very briefly, modular topologies are those wherein the entire network appears partitioned into distinct modules (or clusters or communities), wherein nodes within the module (that likely share highly similar profiles) h...

  16. Visualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    that are now considered the "lenses" for examining large-scale data. THE LARGE-SCALE DATA VISUALIZATIONVisualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data Jason Leigh1 , Andrew Johnson1 , Luc Renambot1 representation of data and the interactive manipulation and querying of the visualization. Large-scale data

  17. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process helped inform potential users of the model what kinds of information would be needed to accurately characterize the system.

  18. Brane World Models Need Low String Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

  19. Emerging universe from scale invariance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Campo, Sergio; Herrera, Ramón [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Guendelman, Eduardo I. [Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Labraña, Pedro, E-mail: sdelcamp@ucv.cl, E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: ramon.herrera@ucv.cl, E-mail: plabrana@ubiobio.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Bío Bío, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a scale invariant model which includes a R{sup 2} term in action and show that a stable ''emerging universe'' scenario is possible. The model belongs to the general class of theories, where an integration measure independent of the metric is introduced. To implement scale invariance (S.I.), a dilaton field is introduced. The integration of the equations of motion associated with the new measure gives rise to the spontaneous symmetry breaking (S.S.B) of S.I. After S.S.B. of S.I. in the model with the R{sup 2} term (and first order formalism applied), it is found that a non trivial potential for the dilaton is generated. The dynamics of the scalar field becomes non linear and these non linearities are instrumental in the stability of some of the emerging universe solutions, which exists for a parameter range of the theory.

  20. The scale of cosmic isotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinoni, C.; Bel, J.; Buzzi, A., E-mail: christian.marinoni@cpt.univ-mrs.fr, E-mail: Julien.Bel@cpt.univ-mrs.fr, E-mail: Adeline.Buzzi@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Centre de Physique Théorique, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS UMR 7332, case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most fundamental premise to the standard model of the universe states that the large-scale properties of the universe are the same in all directions and at all comoving positions. Demonstrating this hypothesis has proven to be a formidable challenge. The cross-over scale R{sub iso} above which the galaxy distribution becomes statistically isotropic is vaguely defined and poorly (if not at all) quantified. Here we report on a formalism that allows us to provide an unambiguous operational definition and an estimate of R{sub iso}. We apply the method to galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, finding that R{sub iso} ? 150h{sup ?1}Mpc. Besides providing a consistency test of the Copernican principle, this result is in agreement with predictions based on numerical simulations of the spatial distribution of galaxies in cold dark matter dominated cosmological models.

  1. Ultratrace determination of curium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitz, J.V.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a method for detection of curium at near single atom levels is being undertaken as a part of the Advanced Concepts Project at Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. Ultratrace determination of curium, with the ability to quantify the fraction that is curium-242, provides a signature method of detecting clandestine reprocessing of recently irradiated uranium targets. Curium initially present in any of a variety of materials such as air filters, solid or liquid process waste, soil, flora, or fauna can be recovered via current chemical separations processing techniques. Using the ultratrace method being developed, such recovered curium will be quantified with thousand-fold higher sensitivity than the best currently available method which is alpha counting. This high sensitivity arises because, on average, a given trivalent curium (Cm{sup 3+}) ion can emit a very large number of fluorescence photons before alpha decay occurs.

  2. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  3. Research-scale melter test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

  4. Holographic Superconductors with Lifshitz Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Brynjolfsson; U. H. Danielsson; L. Thorlacius; T. Zingg

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes in asymptotically Lifshitz spacetime provide a window onto finite temperature effects in strongly coupled Lifshitz models. We add a Maxwell gauge field and charged matter to a recently proposed gravity dual of 2+1 dimensional Lifshitz theory. This gives rise to charged black holes with scalar hair, which correspond to the superconducting phase of holographic superconductors with z > 1 Lifshitz scaling. Along the way we analyze the global geometry of static, asymptotically Lifshitz black holes at arbitrary critical exponent z > 1. In all known exact solutions there is a null curvature singularity in the black hole region, and, by a general argument, the same applies to generic Lifshitz black holes.

  5. Scale Models & Wind Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 RoadmapProgram| Department ofat ThisasScale Models and

  6. Introduction to the time scale problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As motivation for the symposium on extended-scale atomistic methods, I briefly discuss the time scale problem that plagues molecular dynamics simulations, some promising recent developments for circumventing the problem, and some remaining challenges.

  7. Small-Scale Energy Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) - created in 1981 after voters approved a constitutional amendment authorizing the sale of bonds to finance small-scale, local energy projects - is...

  8. Determination of solid fractiontemperature relation and latent heat using full scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    on five such corrosion resistant alloys: superaustenitic stainless steel CN3MN, duplex stainless steels CD available. The alloys selected consist of three stainless steels (super- austenitic CN3MN and duplexes CD3MN, Latent heat, Stainless steels, Nickel based alloys Introduction Casting simulation is routinely used

  9. Developing governmental decision strategies for determining involvement in highly uncertain, large-scale capital investment projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Robert J

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the project. Finally, in order to test the model's applicability in assisting governmental decision-makers to rationally allocate resources, the model has been empirically tested by a Westinghouse proposal (concerning offshore floating nuclear power.... INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem . Purpose of Study . Order of the Study: Scope and Limitations UNCERTAINTY'S EFFECT ON PUBLIC-PRIVATE SECTOR RESOURCE ALLOCATION Background Rationale for Private Sector Resource Allocation . Rationale for Public...

  10. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

  11. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  12. CX-002139: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Solar InstallationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/29/2010Location(s): Manitowoc, WisconsinOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. CX-011452: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/12/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-008970: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil Fleet Transition with Fuel Changes and Large Scale Variable Renewable Integration CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): Spain Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-008002: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  16. CX-008004: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Siting, Construction, Modifying, and Operating Small-Scale Structures CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  17. CX-009361: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective FT Synthesis CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/19/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-007045: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Arbuckle Saline AquiferCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 09/20/2011Location(s): Lawrence, KansasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-011842: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NuScale SMR Design Development and Certification Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/22/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  20. CX-006131: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench and Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Processing ConditionsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/21/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-011846: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Research Projects & Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/26/2014 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Princeton Site Office

  2. CX-012209: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Research and Development Projects Using Nanoscale Materials, 300 Area CX(s) Applied: B3.15 Date: 05/21/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  3. CX-009695: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Small-Scale Mercury Spill Cleanup CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 12/05/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  4. CX-010540: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Research and Development Projects Using Nanoscale Materials, 300 Area, Richland, Washington CX(s) Applied: B3.15 Date: 06/24/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  5. CX-010955: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-010958: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-010956: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-010957: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Development and Test of Aerogel Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-012421: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Low-Leakage Shaft End Seals for Utility-Scale SCO2 Turbo Expanders CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 41880 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-009268: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Development and Scale-Up for New and Retrofit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/11/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-003977: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Production of Fuels and Feeds from Marine MicroalgaeCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 09/22/2010Location(s): HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. CX-010277: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Screening of Low Cost Ferritic Steel Designs for AUSC Boiler CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/22/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-004680: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Scale Demonstration of Cowboy Coal Upgrading ProcessCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/08/2010Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-012256: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/11/2014 Location(s): Norway Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-011103: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale-up of Algal Biofuel Production Using Waste Nutrients CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-008010: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Research and Development Projects Using Nanoscale Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.15 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  17. CX-009372: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-009362: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective FT Synthesis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/19/2012 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-008515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corrosion and Scale at Extreme Temperature and Pressure CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07/13/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. A parallel scaled conjugate-gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aykanat, Cevdet

    . The scaled conjugate- gradient method is a powerful technique for solving large sparse linear systems for form-factor computation. Key words: Gathering radiosity -- Scaled conjugate-gradient method -- Parallel, the Gauss--Jacobi (GJ) method is used in the solution phase. The scaled conjugate-gradient (SCG) method

  1. Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar introduces the “Large Scale Renewable Energy Guide." The webinar will provide an overview of this important FEMP guide, which describes FEMP's approach to large-scale renewable energy projects and provides guidance to Federal agencies and the private sector on how to develop a common process for large-scale renewable projects.

  2. Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C = 3. #12;nuclear reactions & scaling arguments 2 3. Frequently, we approximate nuclear reaction rates

  3. Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C rate for something like p + p D scales like n2 p. Think in microscopic terms. #12;nuclear reactions

  4. 6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

  5. Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Malm

    1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

  6. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  7. Gradient flow and scale setting on MILC HISQ ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazavov, A; Brown, N; DeTar, C; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a scale determination with gradient-flow techniques on the $N_f=2+1+1$ HISQ ensembles generated by the MILC collaboration. The ensembles include four lattice spacings, ranging from approximately 0.15 to 0.06 fm, and both physical and unphysical values of the quark masses. The scales $\\sqrt{t_0}/a$ and $w_0/a$ and their tree-level improvements, $\\sqrt{t_{0,{\\rm imp}}}$ and $w_{0,{\\rm imp}}$, are computed on each ensemble using Symanzik flow and the cloverleaf definition of the energy density $E$. Using a combination of continuum chiral perturbation theory and a Taylor-series ansatz for the lattice-spacing and strong-coupling dependence, the results are simultaneously extrapolated to the continuum and interpolated to physical quark masses. We determine the scales $\\sqrt{t_0} = 0.1416({}_{-5}^{+8})$ fm and $w_0 = 0.1717({}_{-11}^{+12})$ fm, where the errors are sums, in quadrature, of statistical and all systematic errors. The precision of $w_0$ and $\\sqrt{t_0}$ is comparable to or more precise than...

  8. Scale Setting Using the Extended Renormalization Group and the Principle of Maximal Conformality: the QCD Coupling at Four Loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Wu, Xing-Gang; /SLAC /Chongqing U.

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is to set the proper renormalization scale of the running coupling. The extended renormalization group equations, which express the invariance of physical observables under both the renormalization scale- and scheme-parameter transformations, provide a convenient way for estimating the scale- and scheme-dependence of the physical process. In this paper, we present a solution for the scale-equation of the extended renormalization group equations at the four-loop level. Using the principle of maximum conformality (PMC)/Brodsky-Lepage-Mackenzie (BLM) scale-setting method, all non-conformal {beta}{sub i} terms in the perturbative expansion series can be summed into the running coupling, and the resulting scale-fixed predictions are independent of the renormalization scheme. Different schemes lead to different effective PMC/BLM scales, but the final results are scheme independent. Conversely, from the requirement of scheme independence, one not only can obtain scheme-independent commensurate scale relations among different observables, but also determine the scale displacements among the PMC/BLM scales which are derived under different schemes. In principle, the PMC/BLM scales can be fixed order-by-order, and as a useful reference, we present a systematic and scheme-independent procedure for setting PMC/BLM scales up to NNLO. An explicit application for determining the scale setting of R{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}(Q) up to four loops is presented. By using the world average {alpha}{sub s}{sup {ovr MS}}(MZ) = 0.1184 {+-} 0.0007, we obtain the asymptotic scale for the 't Hooft associated with the {ovr MS} scheme, {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}}{sup 'tH} = 245{sub -10}{sup +9} MeV, and the asymptotic scale for the conventional {ovr MS} scheme, {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}} = 213{sub -8}{sup +19} MeV.

  9. CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office The DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection propose to conduct indoor bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, and small-scale...

  10. Advanced Robotics Journal, Vol. X, No. Y, 2002 (to appear) SCALED TELEOPERATION SYSTEM FOR NANO SCALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitti, Metin

    Advanced Robotics Journal, Vol. X, No. Y, 2002 (to appear) SCALED TELEOPERATION SYSTEM FOR NANO for teleoperated nano scale object interaction and manipulation. Design specifications for a bilateral scaled system, initial experiments are realized for interacting with nano scale surfaces. It is shown that fine

  11. Bridging from particle to macroscopic scales in uniaxial magnetic gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas M. Menzel

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Connecting the different length scales of characterization is an important, but often very tedious task for soft matter systems. Here we carry out such a procedure for the theoretical description of anisotropic uniaxial magnetic gels. The so-far undetermined material parameters in a symmetry-based macroscopic hydrodynamic-like description are determined starting from a simplified mesoscopic particle-resolved model. This mesoscopic approach considers chain-like aggregates of magnetic particles embedded in an elastic matrix. Our procedure provides an illustrative background to the formal symmetry-based macroscopic description. There are presently other activities to connect such mesoscopic models as ours with more microscopic polymer-resolved approaches; together with these activities, our study complements a first attempt of scale-bridging from the microscopic to the macroscopic level in the characterization of magnetic gels.

  12. Scaling exponents of Forced Polymer Translocation through a nano-pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniket Bhattacharya; William H. Morrison; Kaifu Luo; Tapio Ala-Nissila; See-Chen Ying; Andrey Milchev; Kurt Binder

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate several scaling properties of a translocating homopolymer through a thin pore driven by an external field present inside the pore only using Langevin Dynamics (LD) simulation in three dimension (3D). Specifically motivated by several recent theoretical and numerical studies that are apparently at odds with each other, we determine the chain length dependence of the scaling exponents of the average translocation time, the average velocity of the center of mass, $$, the effective radius of gyration during the translocation process, and the scaling exponent of the translocation coordinate ($s$-coordinate) as a function of the translocation time. We further discuss the possibility that in the case of driven translocation the finite pore size and its geometry could be responsible that the veclocity scaling exponent is less than unity and discuss the dependence of the scaling exponents on the pore geometry for the range of $N$ studied here.

  13. Method and appartus for converting static in-ground vehicle scales into weigh-in-motion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for converting in-ground static weighing scales for vehicles to weigh-in-motion systems. The apparatus upon conversion includes the existing in-ground static scale, peripheral switches and an electronic module for automatic computation of the weight. By monitoring the velocity, tire position, axle spacing, and real time output from existing static scales as a vehicle drives over the scales, the system determines when an axle of a vehicle is on the scale at a given time, monitors the combined weight output from any given axle combination on the scale(s) at any given time, and from these measurements automatically computes the weight of each individual axle and gross vehicle weight by an integration, integration approximation, and/or signal averaging technique.

  14. Full-scale tests help improve reliability of DST tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringgenberg, P. [Halliburton Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States); Self, J.C. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint-industry project set up procedures and full scale tests to determine the reliability and integrity of drill stem test (DST) tools for use in difficult high pressure, high temperature wells. These DST tool tests helped determine changes needed to address reliability in high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) conditions and has demonstrated that DST tools could maintain integrity in this type of environment. Eleven major operators and service/testing companies in the Norway/U.K. area undertook a joint industry study to address these problems and to determine methods to increase the reliability of DST operations in HPHT well testing. Emphasis was placed on the selection of the downhole equipment used for the HPHT drill stem tests and design of the full scale testing of the North-Sea-area field tools in use. Additionally, an investigation was to be made to establish methods that could be used to verify and increase equipment reliability. The project also included design parameters for contingency conditions that were not normally present during equipment operations but could exist in emergency situations. Eleven tools, including tester valves, multiple-cycle circulating valves, bypass valves, and safety/circulating valves, from different service company/suppliers were rigorously tested. The paper describes the project, the tools tested, test methods, and results.

  15. Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

  16. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

  17. DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

  18. Scaled Tests and Modeling of Effluent Stack Sampling Location Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barnett, J. M.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code to evaluate the mixing at a sampling system location of a research and development facility. The facility requires continuous sampling for radioactive air emissions. Researchers sought to determine whether the location would meet the criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration as prescribed in the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requires that the sampling location be well-mixed and stipulates specific tests (e.g., velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity and cyclonic flow angle) to verify the extent of mixing.. The exhaust system for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory was modeled with a CFD code to better understand the flow and contaminant mixing and to predict mixing test results. The CFD results were compared to actual measurements made at a scale-model stack and to the limited data set for the full-scale facility stack. Results indicated that the CFD code provides reasonably conservative predictions for velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity. Cyclonic flow predicted by the code is less than that measured by the required methods. In expanding from small to full scale, the CFD predictions for full-scale measurements show similar trends as in the scale model and no unusual effects. This work indicates that a CFD code can be a cost-effective aid in design or retrofit of a facility’s stack sampling location that will be required to meet Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999.

  19. Scaling Rules for Pre-Injector Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Schwarz; Dan Amidei

    2003-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed designs of the prebunching system of the NLC and TESLA are based on the assumption that scaling the SLC design to NLC/TESLA requirements should provide the desired performance. A simple equation is developed to suggest a scaling rule in terms of bunch charge and duration. Detailed simulations of prebunching systems scaled from a single design have been run to investigate these issues.

  20. Scaling in the Lattice Gas Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; M. D'Agostino

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A good quality scaling of the cluster size distributions is obtained for the Lattice Gas Model using the Fisher's ansatz for the scaling function. This scaling identifies a pseudo-critical line in the phase diagram of the model that spans the whole (subcritical to supercritical) density range. The independent cluster hypothesis of the Fisher approach is shown to describe correctly the thermodynamics of the lattice only far away from the critical point.

  1. Sapphire Energy, Inc. Demonstration-Scale Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and run the facility. The success of this project will demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the algae-to- fuels process for commercial-scale biorefineries....

  2. Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Community-Scale Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants...

  3. CX-004449: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench Scale Testing to Provide Data on Precipitation Control in the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery ProcessCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 10/15/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. CX-012400: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Pilot Study and Potential Full-Scale Sub-Slab Depressurization System Design/Build for Building 100 at the Pinellas County, Florida Site in Largo, Florida CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B6.1, B6.2 Date: 07/10/2014 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Legacy Management

  5. CX-011548: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lower Length Scale Characterization and Validation of Formation and Stability of Helium Bubbles in Nano-structured Ferritic Alloys under Irradiation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  6. CX-000248: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Techno-Economic Modeling of the Integration of 20 Percent Wind and Large-Scale Energy Storage in Electric Reliability Council of Texas by 2030CX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/17/2009Location(s): TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  7. CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-011421: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/12/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-011447: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/13/2013 Location(s): Delaware Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-010922: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, Other: Bench Scale Laboratory Research Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-002508: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid State Batteries for Grid-Scale Energy StorageCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A1Date: 06/01/2010Location(s): Van Nuys, CaliforniaOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-005276: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil FuelsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/18/2011Location(s): Highland Heights, OhioOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-008478: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.3 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-011048: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Enhanced Coalbed Methane Test CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.3, B5.5, B5.13 Date: 09/09/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-008477: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7, B5.3, B5.13 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-009413: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company - Small-scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  17. CX-012329: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PNNL Projects Involving Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects in the 300 Area CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/03/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  18. CX-010538: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects in the 300 Area - 2013 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  19. CX-010369: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alterations to Existing Buildings Construction of Small-Scale Support Structures and Relocation of Machinery and Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.11; B1.15; B1.31 Date: 11/09/2012 Location(s): Tennessee, California, Virginia Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  20. CX-009658: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects under 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/05/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  1. CX-011595: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects under 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B, B3.6 for Calendar Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/02/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  2. CX-009685: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington River Protection Solutions & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International- Proposed Actions - Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  3. CX-009647: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alterations to Existing Buildings, Construction of Small-Scale Support Structures, and Relocation of Machinery and Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.11, B1.15, B1.31 Date: 11/19/2012 Location(s): Tennessee, California, California, Virginia Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office

  4. CX-008601: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-Produced in Geothermal Fluids: Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.15 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Nevada, Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-011591: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company - Small-scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects, November 2013 to November 2014 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  6. CX-012473: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercialization of Iron-Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping for Power Prod-Lab & Pilot-Scale Testing CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 41870 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-003543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High PressureCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Champaign, IllinoisOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-003550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High PressureCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): San Ramon, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-009265: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Development and Scale-Up for New and Retrofit CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/11/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-004104: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program Conductor Optimized Rotary Energy Mega-Watt Scale Direct Wind GeneratorCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 09/29/2010Location(s): Ronan, MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  11. CX-011393: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Build and Test of a Novel, Commercial-Scale Wave Energy Direct0Drive Rotary Power Take-Off Under Realistic Open-Ocean Conditions CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 12/16/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Virginia, Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-007120: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-Scale Mercury Control Demonstrations: Information Collection Request Sampling with Mercury ControlCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 10/04/2011Location(s): Aurora, Saint Louis County, MissouriOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-004438: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale Resistant Heat Exchangers for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power PlantCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 11/16/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  14. CX-006181: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construct and Operate a 100 ton per day Ceramic Membrane Oxygen Separation Pilot Scale Unit -Phase IIICX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 07/11/2011Location(s): Convent, LouisianaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-011566: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mechanical Behavior of Uranium Oxide (UO2) at Sub-grain Length Scales: Quantification of Elastic, Plastic and Creep Properties via Microscale Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/18/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  16. CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury ConcentrationsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-007121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-Scale Mercury Control Demonstrations: Information Collection Request Sampling with Mercury Control ElementsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 10/04/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-011577: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Impacts of Pore-Scale Physical and Chemical Heterogeneities on the Transport of Radionuclide-Carrying Colloids CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  19. CX-001191: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Ground Source Heat Pumps as Alternative Energy for American Farmers: Technical Demonstration and Business ApproachCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 03/23/2010Location(s): MissouriOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  20. CX-008560: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-produced in Geothermal Fluids CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.2, B5.15 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-003680: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost, High-Energy-Savings, Solid State Dynamic Windows (Lab Scale Tasks)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/01/2010Location(s): Maltipas, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-008475: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7, B5.3 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-008474: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B3.6, B5.2 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-008476: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.15, B3.1, B3.7, B5.3, B5.13 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, R.S.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 11 figs.

  6. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means.

  7. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means.

  8. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, R.S.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide a means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus cosists of a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 17 figs.

  9. Setting the Renormalization Scale in QCD: The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; Di Giustino, Leonardo; /SLAC

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale {mu} of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}): The purpose of the running coupling in any gauge theory is to sum all terms involving the {beta} function; in fact, when the renormalization scale is set properly, all non-conformal {beta} {ne} 0 terms in a perturbative expansion arising from renormalization are summed into the running coupling. The remaining terms in the perturbative series are then identical to that of a conformal theory; i.e., the corresponding theory with {beta} = 0. The resulting scale-fixed predictions using the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme - a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC is also the theoretical principle underlying the BLM procedure, commensurate scale relations between observables, and the scale-setting method used in lattice gauge theory. The number of active flavors nf in the QCD {beta} function is also correctly determined. We discuss several methods for determining the PMC/BLM scale for QCD processes. We show that a single global PMC scale, valid at leading order, can be derived from basic properties of the perturbative QCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increase the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of collider experiments to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  10. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 ± 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 ± 0.20 and averaged 1.18 ± 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

  11. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  12. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  13. Dynamic method to measure calcium carbonate scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zidovec, D. [Ashland Chemical, Boonton, NJ (United States)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to measure scaling rate and the effect of scale control agents are discussed. It is based on calcium carbonate growth under controlled conditions in a capillary stainless steel column. The efficacy of blended compositions can be predicted when the response of individual components is known.

  14. OVERVIEW OF SCALE 6.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL; Dunn, Michael E [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL] [ORNL; Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL] [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Havluj, Frantisek [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez, Czech Republic] [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez, Czech Republic; Skutnik, Steven [The University of Tennessee] [The University of Tennessee; Dugan, Kevin [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE is an industry-leading suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a plug-and-play framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that are selected based on the desired solution. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 provides several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded CE Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. A brief overview of SCALE capabilities is provided with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  15. Scale invariance, unimodular gravity and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Shaposhnikov; Daniel Zenhausern

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the combination of the ideas of unimodular gravity, scale invariance, and the existence of an exactly massless dilaton leads to the evolution of the universe supported by present observations: inflation in the past, followed by the radiation and matter dominated stages and accelerated expansion at present. All mass scales in this type of theories come from one and the same source.

  16. Fermilab Energy Scaling Workshop April 27, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Richard

    Fermilab Energy Scaling Workshop April 27, 2009 Rick Field ­ Florida/CDF/CMS Page 1 11stst Workshop-bias" collisions and the "underlying event" in Run 1 at CDF. Rick's View of Hadron Collisions Fermilab 2009 Studying the "associated" charged particle densities in "min-bias" collisions. #12;Fermilab Energy Scaling

  17. Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

  18. February 2002 Grid Scale Oscillations in MICOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    are the implications of the grid scale oscillation on ­ Surface Fluxes that drive THC ­ Heat transport ­ MeridionalFebruary 2002 Grid Scale Oscillations in MICOM Balasubramanya T. Nadiga Los Alamos National Model · 3o displaced pole grid. 16 layers · Kraus-Turner Bulk Mixed Layer · Explicit diapycnal

  19. USING ECOLOGICALLY SCALED LANDSCAPE INDICES TO ASSESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Robert K. "Rob"

    81 6 USING ECOLOGICALLY SCALED LANDSCAPE INDICES TO ASSESS BIODIVERSITY CONSEQUENCES OF LAND-USE DECISIONS Robert K. Swihart and Jana Verboom CHAPTER OVERVIEW If maintenance of biological diversity the utility of ecologically scaled landscape indices (ESLIs) as measures of relative suitability of proposed

  20. 4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3 /yr for the climateHESSD 4, 4069­4124, 2007 Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler System Sciences Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler Institute

  1. Large-Scale in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States ASSESSMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States ASSESSMENT Energy, Office of Wind and Water Power Technologies for their financial and technical support

  2. Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra Narayan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area...

  3. Bare Higgs mass at Planck scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kin-ya Oda

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute one- and two-loop quadratic divergent contributions to the bare Higgs mass in terms of the bare couplings in the Standard Model. We approximate the bare couplings, defined at the ultraviolet cutoff scale, by the MS-bar ones at the same scale, which are evaluated by the two-loop renormalization group equations for the Higgs mass around 126GeV in the Standard Model. We obtain the cutoff scale dependence of the bare Higgs mass, and examine where it becomes zero. We find that when we take the current central value for the top quark pole mass, 173GeV, the bare Higgs mass vanishes if the cutoff is about 10^{23}GeV. With a 1.3 sigma smaller mass, 170GeV, the scale can be of the order of the Planck scale.

  4. Design of a Small-Scale Biodiesel Production System Jeffrey Anderson, Jessica Caceres, Ali Khazaei, Jedidiah Shirey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of a Small-Scale Biodiesel Production System Jeffrey Anderson, Jessica Caceres, Ali Khazaei acreage and biodiesel output. Monte Carlo Simulation Objective: 1) Biodiesel Production Simulation: Determines biodiesel yield and Net Energy Ration of each crop alternative 1) Business Simulation: Determines

  5. EEHG Performance and Scaling Laws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penn, Gregory

    2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This note will calculate the idealized performance of echo-enabled harmonic generation performance (EEHG), explore the parameter settings, and look at constraints determined by incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) and intrabeam scattering (IBS). Another important effect, time-of-flight variations related to transverse emittance, is included here but without detailed explanation because it has been described previously. The importance of ISR and IBS is that they lead to random energy shifts that lead to temporal shifts after the various beam manipulations required by the EEHG scheme. These effects give competing constraints on the beamline. For chicane magnets which are too compact for a given R56, the magnetic fields will be sufficiently strong that ISR will blur out the complex phase space structure of the echo scheme to the point where the bunching is strongly suppressed. The effect of IBS is more omnipresent, and requires an overall compact beamline. It is particularly challenging for the second pulse in a two-color attosecond beamline, due to the long delay between the first energy modulation and the modulator for the second pulse.

  6. Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    . Shaw Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA The radiated energy coming271 Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling Bruce E of elucidat- ing their radiated energy-moment scaling. We find, contrary to expectations, that apparent stress

  7. Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Kastens, Terry L.; Outlaw, Joe

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Many crop producers rely heavily on rented land in their farming operations. With this publication, they can learn more about determining crop shares and the principles of crop share leases....

  8. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. National Mining Association Experimental Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Mining Association Experimental Determination of Radon Fluxes over Water #12;Introduction research funded by the National Mining Association (NMA) regarding radon fluxes from water surfaces surfaces at uranium recovery operations are insignificant and approximate background soil fluxes for most

  10. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  11. CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coupled Thermo-Mechanical and Photo-Chemical Degradation Mechanisms that Determine the Reliability and...

  12. The effects of He I 10830 on helium abundance determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aver, Erik; Skillman, Evan D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of helium and hydrogen emission lines from metal-poor extragalactic H II regions provide an independent method for determining the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. Traditionally, the emission lines employed are in the visible wavelength range, and the number of suitable lines is limited. Furthermore, when using these lines, large systematic uncertainties in helium abundance determinations arise due to the degeneracy of physical parameters, such as temperature and density. Recently, Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014) have pioneered adding the He 10830 infrared emission line in helium abundance determinations. The strong electron density dependence of He 10830 makes it ideal for better constraining density, potentially breaking the degeneracy with temperature. We revisit our analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007) and incorporate the newly available observations of He 10830 by scaling them using the observed-to-theoretical Paschen-gamma ratio. The solutions are b...

  13. Large Scale Structures a Gradient Lines: the case of the Trkal Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libin, Alexander S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A specific asymptotic expansion at large Reynolds numbers (R)for the long wavelength perturbation of a non stationary anisotropic helical solution of the force less Navier-Stokes equations (Trkal solutions) is effectively constructed of the Beltrami type terms through multi scaling analysis. The asymptotic procedure is proved to be valid for one specific value of the scaling parameter,namely for the square root of the Reynolds number (R).As a result large scale structures arise as gradient lines of the energy determined by the initial conditions for two anisotropic Beltrami flows of the same helicity.The same intitial conditions determine the boundaries of the vortex-velocity tubes, containing both streamlines and vortex lines

  14. Large Scale Structures a Gradient Lines: the case of the Trkal Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander S. Libin

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A specific asymptotic expansion at large Reynolds numbers (R)for the long wavelength perturbation of a non stationary anisotropic helical solution of the force less Navier-Stokes equations (Trkal solutions) is effectively constructed of the Beltrami type terms through multi scaling analysis. The asymptotic procedure is proved to be valid for one specific value of the scaling parameter,namely for the square root of the Reynolds number (R).As a result large scale structures arise as gradient lines of the energy determined by the initial conditions for two anisotropic Beltrami flows of the same helicity.The same intitial conditions determine the boundaries of the vortex-velocity tubes, containing both streamlines and vortex lines

  15. Effective Darcy-scale contact angles in porous media imbibing solutions of various surface tensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Effective Darcy-scale contact angles in porous media imbibing solutions of various surface tensions was to develop and test a methodology to determine whether these surface tension effects predictably alter of 25° for the NaNO3 solution solely on the basis of surface tension contrast. The results of this study

  16. Seven League Boots: A New Metaphor for Augmented Locomotion through Moderately Large Scale Immersive Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interrante, Victoria

    Seven League Boots: A New Metaphor for Augmented Locomotion through Moderately Large Scale boots. The key characteristic of this method is that it involves determining a user's intended direction virtual hallway, participants overwhelmingly preferred the seven league boots method to the other methods

  17. Multiphysics modeling of a micro-scale Stirling refrigeration system Dongzhi Guo a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    of thermoelectric energy conversion is determined by the thermo- electric material's figure of merit, ZT, which Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890, USA b Department of Electrical-scale coolers have a wide range of potential applica- tions, such as cooling chip- and board-level electronics

  18. Datacenter Scale Evaluation of the Impact of Temperature on Hard Disk Drive Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    Datacenter Scale Evaluation of the Impact of Temperature on Hard Disk Drive Failures SRIRAM SANKAR rely heavily on their datacenters to serve end users. A large datacenter facility incurs increased, there is very little understanding on the major determinants of disk failures in datacenters. In this work, we

  19. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  20. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  1. CX-010025: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratory (EDL) in particular, have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (ESS and 2cm) and full-scale V-5 (Strip Bank) and V-10 (Extraction Bank) contactor tests...

  2. Leaching scale effect for radioactive wastes encapsulated in cement, bitumen or polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomine, J.C.; Ferriot, J.F. [CEA Centre d`Etude de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, J.; Montigon, J.F. [CEA Centre d`Etude de Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective method to determine of the radioactive waste package s acceptable for a final disposal and in accordance with the requirements is by leaching tests. For many reasons the leaching tests are conducted on small size samples rather than full scale blocks. Nevertheless, it is necessary to demonstrate that laboratory or cored samples are representative of real form-scale embedding (in accordance with the specific activity, the chemical composition of the waste, the matrix and structure) for the leaching tests. This paper gives the results of studies on the leaching behavior of waste embeddings in three different cases (hydraulic binder, bitumen and polymer matrices). For cesium, even if no scale effect on its leaching mechanism has been shown, it is difficult to prove before testing that small samples are representative of the real waste forms. For cobalt, results on bitumen or polymer embedded waste show no scale effect on its leaching mechanism.

  3. Method and system for small scale pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the field of small scale pumping and, more specifically, to a method and system for very small scale pumping media through microtubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for small scale pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more microtubes, the one or more tubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more tubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the tubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the tube.

  4. Nuclear Scaling and the EMC Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Higinbotham; J. Gomez; E. Piasetzky

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of recent EMC effect measurements and nuclear scaling measurements have both been attributed to local nuclear density effects and not properties of the bulk nuclear system. This lead us to the phenomenological observation that the ratio of the slopes in the 0.3 EMC data scale as the ratio of the x_B > 1 nuclear scaling plateaus. Using this correlation, we developed a phenomenological relation which reproduces the general trends and features of the EMC effect for nuclei from 3He to 56Fe.

  5. Hub Synchronization in Scale-Free Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiago Pereira

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterogeneity in the degree distribution is known to suppress global synchronization in complex networks of symmetrically coupled oscillators. Scale-free networks display a great deal of heterogeneity, containing a few nodes, termed hubs, that are highly connected, while most nodes receive only a few connections. Here, we show that a group of synchronized nodes may appear in scale-free networks: hubs undergo a transition to synchronization while the other nodes remain unsynchronized. This general phenomenon can occur even in the absence of global synchronization. Our results suggest that scale-free networks may have evolved to complement various levels of synchronization.

  6. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  7. Small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in a turbulent convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Rogachevskii; N. Kleeorin

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the nonlinear drift velocities of the mean magnetic field and nonlinear turbulent magnetic diffusion in a turbulent convection. We show that the nonlinear drift velocities are caused by the three kinds of the inhomogeneities, i.e., inhomogeneous turbulence; the nonuniform fluid density and the nonuniform turbulent heat flux. The inhomogeneous turbulence results in the well-known turbulent diamagnetic and paramagnetic velocities. The nonlinear drift velocities of the mean magnetic field cause the small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in the turbulent convection. These phenomena are different from the large-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects which are due to the effect of the mean magnetic field on the large-scale density stratified fluid flow. The small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping can be stronger than these large-scale effects when the mean magnetic field is smaller than the equipartition field. We discuss the small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in the context of the solar and stellar turbulent convection. We demonstrate also that the nonlinear turbulent magnetic diffusion in the turbulent convection is anisotropic even for a weak mean magnetic field. In particular, it is enhanced in the radial direction. The magnetic fluctuations due to the small-scale dynamo increase the turbulent magnetic diffusion of the toroidal component of the mean magnetic field, while they do not affect the turbulent magnetic diffusion of the poloidal field.

  8. CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development Date: 04022010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North...

  9. CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transforming Photovoltaic Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied:...

  10. CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Revised Narrative Information Worksheet for Energy Efficiency Program for...

  11. CX-006275: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Audit; Efficiency Improvements; and Renewable Energy Installations; Township of...

  12. CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Air Quality VIII: An International Conference on Carbon Management, Mercury, Trace Elements,...

  13. CX-004791: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004791: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project? Automated Intake Cleaning Equipment and Materials...

  14. CX-001276: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001276: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Photovoltaic Roof System, Energy Efficiency Retrofits, Building Audits, and Hire a Committee...

  15. CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

  16. CX-011016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011016: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

  17. CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

  18. CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

  19. CX-001714: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001714: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vehicle Test Location at Bone Yard; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tracking Number...

  20. CX-005153: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005153: Categorical Exclusion Determination United States-China Advanced Coal Technologies Consortium - West Virginia University Research Corporation...

  1. CX-006226: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006226: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  2. CX-000621: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000621: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Alternative Fuel...

  3. CX-003353: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003353: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  4. CX-001996: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001996: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Washita...

  5. CX-004060: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004060: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  6. CX-001998: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Shawnee...

  7. CX-004730: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004730: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  8. CX-001096: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001096: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant National...

  9. CX-007573: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007573: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  10. CX-003498: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003498: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Newman Memorial...

  11. CX-005432: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005432: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  12. CX-000619: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000619: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Metropolitan Tulsa...

  13. CX-006227: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006227: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  14. CX-008602: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008602: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program- Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Large Systems Request AO...

  15. CX-007412: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007412: Categorical Exclusion Determination OKLAHOMA State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  16. CX-009009: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009009: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  17. CX-010176: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-010176: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiation Heat Transfer and Turbulent Fluctuations in Internal Combustion Engines - Toward...

  18. CX-010175: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-010175: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiation Heat Transfer and Turbulent Fluctuations in Internal Combustion Engines - Toward...

  19. CX-001608: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-001608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant City of Jacksonville: 6) Metropolitan Government Clean Transportation...

  20. CX-000669: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    69: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000669: Categorical Exclusion Determination Illinois Energy Conservation Plan for State Facilities - Capital Development Board Projects...

  1. CX-001074: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001074: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chicago, Illinois American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

  2. CX-000670: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    70: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000670: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant State of Illinois Categorical Exclusion...

  3. CX-004469: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004469: Categorical Exclusion Determination Forest County Potawatomi Community - Community Renewable Energy Deployment - Solar Hot Water...

  4. CX-002686: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    686: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002686: Categorical Exclusion Determination Forest County Potawatomi Community- Community Renewable Energy Deployment - Centralized...

  5. CX-001110: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001110: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fracture Network and Fluid Flow Imaging for Engineered Geothermal Systems Applications from...

  6. CX-005022: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005022: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Center, Canyon Texas; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking...

  7. CX-003523: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-003523: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Center Kansas State University; National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  8. CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs - Continuum through...

  9. CX-002132: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002132: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below...

  10. CX-000616: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000616: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Wind Resource Assessment at Naval Station Newport; National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  11. CX-008582: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-008582: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium, Photovoltaic (PV) Manufacturing Initiative - Core Subawards CX(s)...

  12. CX-001915: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    15: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Vision Community Energy Program and Evergreen Municipal Energy Efficiency Program-...

  13. CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Green Jobs Training Program -...

  14. CX-011555: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-011555: Categorical Exclusion Determination Managing Zirconium Chemistry and Phase Compatibility in Combined Process Separations for Minor Actinide...

  15. CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Rock...

  16. CX-009311: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009311: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Champaign)...

  17. CX-005490: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005490: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal Analysis of Radioactive Materials by Thermagravimetric Analysis, Differential Scanning...

  18. CX-011320: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-011320: Categorical Exclusion Determination Continuous Regional Methane Emissions Estimates in Northern Pennsylvania Gas Field Using Atmospheric Inversions...

  19. CX-011319: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-011319: Categorical Exclusion Determination Continuous Regional Methane Emissions Estimates in Northern Pennsylvania Gas Field Using Atmospheric Inversions...

  20. CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination Streamlining Solar Standards & Processes: The Southern California Rooftop Solar Challenge CX(s)...

  1. CX-004643: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004643: Categorical Exclusion Determination Colorado State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Renewable Ready Grant -...

  2. CX-004707: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004707: Categorical Exclusion Determination Colorado State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Commercial Buildings -...

  3. CX-006872: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006872: Categorical Exclusion Determination Colorado State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Renewable Energy...

  4. CX-009383: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Rotor Compression for Multiphase and Liquids-Rich Wellhead Production Applications...

  5. CX-005745: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005745: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Cost High Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation? University of...

  6. CX-005385: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Cost High Concentration Photovoltaic Power Systems for Utility Power Generation -Sandia...

  7. CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  8. CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  9. CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  10. CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  11. External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can detect scale buildup in pipes to 1-2 m accuracy. Radiography has also detected corrosion in piping. Development of this technique is shown to be useful of monitoring...

  12. Small-Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: On July 10, 2013, the Clean Energy Development Fund Board approved changes to the Small Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program, effective October 1, 2013. Beginning in October, wind...

  13. Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

    2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

  14. Extragalactic jets on subpc and large scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Tavecchio

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Jets can be probed in their innermost regions (d~0.1 pc) through the study of the relativistically-boosted emission of blazars. On the other extreme of spatial scales, the study of structure and dynamics of extragalactic relativistic jets received renewed impulse after the discovery, made by Chandra, of bright X-ray emission from regions at distances larger than hundreds of kpc from the central engine. At both scales it is thus possible to infer some of the basic parameters of the flow (speed, density, magnetic field intensity, power). After a brief review of the available observational evidence, I discuss how the comparison between the physical quantities independently derived at the two scales can be used to shed light on the global dynamics of the jet, from the innermost regions to the hundreds of kpc scale.

  15. Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

  16. Predictions From High Scale Mixing Unification Hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Rahul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with 'High Scale Mixing Unification' hypothesis, we investigate the renormalization group evolution of mixing parameters and masses for both Dirac and Majorana type neutrinos. Following this hypothesis, the PMNS mixing parameters are taken to be identical to the CKM ones at a unifying high scale. Then, they are evolved to a low scale using MSSM renormalization-group equations. For both type of neutrinos, the renormalization group evolution 'naturally' results in a non-zero and small value of leptonic mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. One of the important predictions of this analysis is that, in both cases, the mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ turns out to be non-maximal for most of the parameter range. We also elaborate on the important differences between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos within our framework and how to experimentally distinguish between the two scenarios. Furthermore, for both cases, we also derive constraints on the allowed parameter range for the SUSY breaking and unification scales, for which th...

  17. Large scale prediction models and algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsch, Matthieu (Matthieu Frederic)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 90% of the data available across the world has been produced over the last two years, and the trend is increasing. It has therefore become paramount to develop algorithms which are able to scale to very high dimensions. ...

  18. Integrating Fermentation and Transesterification Industrial Scale Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Integrating Fermentation and Transesterification Industrial Scale Processes in the Lower l d CO2 hanol, acetic acid etc. from CO2 Algae growth for use as biomass M lti it i O ti i ti P bl

  19. Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation...

  20. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Katharina; /JILA, Boulder /Fermilab; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  1. Determining solar abundances using helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

  2. Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, D; Cook, A

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

  3. Phenomenology of SUSY with intermediate scale physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Biggio

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of fields at an intermediate scale between the Electroweak and the Grand Unification scale modifies the evolution of the gauge couplings and consequently the running of other parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, such as gauginos and scalar masses. The net effect is a modification of the low energy spectrum which affects both the collider phenomenology and the dark matter relic density.

  4. Preferred hierarchy scales from the product landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Songlin Lv; Zheng Sun; Lina Wu

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The product landscape method has been recently proposed to solve hierarchy problems such as the cosmological constant problem. We suggest that the parameter distribution on logarithmic scales should be used as a benchmark for hierarchy, and the preferred hierarchy scales can be obtained from the distribution peak. It is shown that generating hierarchy from purely product distribution is very inefficient. To achieve a reasonably acceptable efficiency, other effects such as accumulation of weak hierarchy in the effective theory should be incorporated.

  5. Acoustofluidics 10: Scaling laws in acoustophoresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of sound c0 in a liquid scales like the density r0 of the liquid to the power minus one-half, written as c0 in a microfluidic system scales like the pressure drop Dp to the power one, written as Q f Dp, and the speed), as well as density r0 and viscosity h of the liquid. We know the full answer to be1 Q ¼ pa4 8hL Dp

  6. Standard Model scales from warped extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard Riley

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    If in the Randall and Sundrum RS1 model the inverse of the compactification radius, the AdS curvature scale, and the five and four-dimensional Planck scales are equal in size, as is natural, then the warp factor at the location of the low energy brane is of value 1/pi. So that all scales derive from locations in the space, we identify the extra dimension with the infinite covering space of the S1/Z2 orbifold. The extra dimension is then essentially a series of connected line intervals, punctuated by branes. Scales on successive branes in the extra dimension descend from Planck scale in a geometric sequence of common ratio 1/pi. Evidence is provided for such a sequence within the spectrum of particle masses, and of a second geometric sequence, of common ratio 2/pi, which suggests that the AdS spacetime is six-dimensional and doubly warped. The scales of the Standard Model lie at coincident levels within the two sequences. A third sequence, of common ratio 1/e, provides a symmetrical framework for the Standard Model and points to a warped product spacetime.

  7. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. CX-008738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Microstructure and Chemical State Changes in Ion-Irradiated Fuels and Structural Components with a High Kinetic Energy Electron Detector – Illinois Institute of Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  9. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  10. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  11. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David [U.S. Geological Survey; Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines; Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State; Binley, Andrew [Lancaster University; Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  12. Revisiting No-Scale Supergravity Inspired Scenarios: Updated Theoretical and Phenomenological Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amine Benhenni; Jean-Loic Kneur; Gilbert Moultaka; Sean Bailly

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider no-scale inspired supergravity scenarios, where the gravitino mass and related soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters are determined dynamically by radiative corrections to an essentially flat tree-level potential in the supersymmetry breaking hidden sector. We examine the theoretical and phenomenological viability of such a mechanism, when including up-to-date calculations of the low energy sparticle spectrum and taking into account the latest LHC results and other experimental constraints. We (re)emphasize the role of the scale-dependent vacuum energy contribution to the effective potential, in obtaining realistic no-scale electroweak minima, examining carefully the impact of boundary conditions and of variants of the minimization procedure. We also discuss and implement the B_0 (soft breaking Higgs mixing parameter) input boundary condition at high scale, therefore fixing tan beta(B_0) at low scales. For general high scale boundary conditions with non-vanishing B_0, m_0..., our analysis provides theoretical correlations among the supersymmetric, soft and vacuum energy parameters and related phenomenological consequences at the LHC. For instance, a zero vacuum energy at the GUT scale would lead to a decoupled supersymmetric spectrum, together with a light standard model-like Higgs boson at the electroweak scale. Given the experimental exclusion limits, a substantial class of the boundary conditions, and in particular the strict no-scale with m_0=A_0=B_0=0, are only compatible with a stau being the lightest MSSM particle. Then an enlarged allowed parameter space emerges when assuming a gravitino LSP to account for the observed dark matter relic density.

  13. Spatial distribution of non-native invasive plants following large-scale wind damage at LaRue Pine Hills - Otter Pond Research Natural Area, Union County, Illinois.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Anthony John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The objective of this study was to determine if a large-scale wind disturbance facilitated the invasion of forest interiors by non-native invasive plant species. The… (more)

  14. Inclusive-jet photoproduction at HERA and determination of alphas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; M. Forrest; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; K. Horton; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononeko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; U. Noor; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Oliver; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; C. Zhou; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in the reaction ep->e+jet+X for photon virtuality Q2 energies in the region 142 energy, ETjet, and pseudorapidity, etajet, for jets with ETjet > 17 GeV and -1 energy-scale dependence of the coupling was determined. The value of alphas(Mz) extracted from the measurements based on the kT jet algorithm is alphas(Mz) = 0.1206 +0.0023 -0.0022 (exp.) +0.0042 -0.0035 (th.); the results from the anti-kT and SIScone algorithms are compatible with this value and have a similar precision.

  15. Citizen implementation of sustainability measures at the neighborhood scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heilke, Ingrid (Ingrid Elizabeth)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is the potential for citizens to make a profound impact on the sustainability of cities at the neighborhood scale. This is the scale that people relate to spatially, economically, and socially. It is also a scale ...

  16. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii Contents Introduction

  17. Quantum Coherence Arguments for Cosmological Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindesay, James; /SLAC

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneity and correlations in the observed CMB are indicative of some form of cosmological coherence in early times. Quantum coherence in the early universe would be expected to give space-like phase coherence to any effects sourced to those times. If dark energy de-coherence is assumed to occur when the rate of expansion of the relevant cosmological scale parameter in the Friedmann-Lemaitre equations is no longer supra-luminal, a critical energy density is immediately defined. It is shown that the general class of dynamical models so defined necessarily requires a spatially flat cosmology in order to be consistent with observed structure formation. The basic assumption is that the dark energy density which is fixed during de-coherence is to be identified with the cosmological constant. It is shown for the entire class of models that the expected amplitude of fluctuations driven by the dark energy de-coherence process is of the order needed to evolve into the fluctuations observed in cosmic microwave background radiation and galactic clustering. The densities involved during de-coherence which correspond to the measured dark energy density turn out to be of the electroweak symmetry restoration scale. In an inflationary cosmology, this choice of the scale parameter in the FL equations directly relates the scale of dark energy decoherence to the De Sitter scales (associated with the positive cosmological constants) at both early and late times.

  18. Toeplitz determinants with merging singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Claeys; I. Krasovsky

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study asymptotic behavior for determinants of $n\\times n$ Toeplitz matrices corresponding to symbols with two Fisher-Hartwig singularities at the distance $2t\\ge0$ from each other on the unit circle. We obtain large $n$ asymptotics which are uniform for $0gas, and a conjecture of Fyodorov and Keating on the second moment of powers of the characteristic polynomials of random matrices.

  19. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas D. (Port Matilda, PA); Burgard, Anthony R. (State College, PA); Pharkya, Priti (State College, PA)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  20. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  1. Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S. H.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford?s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

  2. Determining boiler-water makeup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beecher, J.; Herman, K. [Ashland Chemical Co., Boonton, NJ (United States). Drew Industrial Div.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In boiler operations, it is desirable to determine blowdown--and, thus, the feedwater`s concentration cycles--because it enables operators to calculate the theoretical concentrations of iron, copper or dispersant in the system. These calculations are important for maintaining boiler cleanliness. In practice, however, it isn`t always feasible to determine blowdown. For example, if the steam, feedwater and blowdown flows are not measured in a system, or if the measurements are not accurate, the blowdown and feedwater concentration cycles cannot be accurately determined. Also, if demineralized makeup water with very-low silica concentrations is mixed with essentially silica-free condensate, the ratio of silica in the boiler water to the silica in the feedwater may not yield accurate values for the concentration cycle. This method for calculating concentration cycles is accurate to within 5%, when the accuracy of the parameters measured are within the following limits: steam flow (2%); phosphate, residual (5%); micro calcium (50%); micro iron (25%); and phosphate, feed (10%).

  3. Scaling test of two-flavor O(a)-improved lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Della Morte; Patrick Fritzsch; Harvey B. Meyer; Hubert Simma; Rainer Sommer; Shinji Takeda; Oliver Witzel; Ulli Wolff

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a scaling test of several mesonic observables in the non-perturbatively O(a) improved Wilson theory with two flavors of dynamical quarks. The observables are constructed in a fixed volume of 2.4fm x (1.8fm)^3 with Schroedinger functional boundary conditions. No significant scaling violations are found. Using the kaon mass determined in \\cite{cernI}, we update our estimate of the Lambda parameter to Lambda^(2)_{msbar}/m_K = 0.52(6).

  4. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  5. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  6. Infrared renormalization in non-relativistic QED and scaling criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Chen

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a spin-$\\frac12$ electron in a translation-invariant model of non-relativistic Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). Let $H(\\vp,\\sig)$ denote the fiber Hamiltonian corresponding to the conserved total momentum $\\vp\\in\\R^3$ of the Pauli electron and the photon field, regularized by a fixed ultraviolet cutoff in the interaction term, and an infrared regularization parametrized by $00$, and all values of the finestructure constant $\\gs<\\gs_0$, with $\\gs_0\\ll1$ sufficiently small and {\\em independent} of $\\sig$, we prove the existence of a ground state eigenvalue of multiplicity two at the bottom of the essential spectrum. Moreover, we prove that the renormalized electron mass satisfies $1determines a scaling-critical renormalization group problem of endpoint type, in which the interaction is strictly marginal (of scale-independent size). The main achievement of this paper is the development of a method that provides rigorous control of the renormalization of a {\\em strictly marginal} quantum field theory characterized by a {\\em non-trivial scaling limit}.

  7. Cryogenic Control Architecture for Large-Scale Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Hornibrook; J. I. Colless; I. D. Conway Lamb; S. J. Pauka; H. Lu; A. C. Gossard; J. D. Watson; G. C. Gardner; S. Fallahi; M. J. Manfra; D. J. Reilly

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state qubits have recently advanced to the level that enables them, in-principle, to be scaled-up into fault-tolerant quantum computers. As these physical qubits continue to advance, meeting the challenge of realising a quantum machine will also require the engineering of new classical hardware and control architectures with complexity far beyond the systems used in today's few-qubit experiments. Here, we report a micro-architecture for controlling and reading out qubits during the execution of a quantum algorithm such as an error correcting code. We demonstrate the basic principles of this architecture in a configuration that distributes components of the control system across different temperature stages of a dilution refrigerator, as determined by the available cooling power. The combined setup includes a cryogenic field-programmable gate array (FPGA) controlling a switching matrix at 20 millikelvin which, in turn, manipulates a semiconductor qubit.

  8. PLT scaling laws for thermonuclear fusion power multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisham, L.R.; Strachan, J.D.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While present experiments are evaluated on the basis of confinement time, it is the fusion power multiplication factor, Q, and the fusion power which will be the parameters that measure the performance of ignition experiments and fusion reactors. We have determined the relationship of Q to tau/sub E/ and the Lawson number, n tau/sub e/, for ohmically heated plasmas from the Princeton Large Tokamak (PLT). Q, tau/sub E/, and n tau/sub E/ all increase with density at low densities. Above anti n/sub e/ approx. = 4 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, tau/sub Ee/ approx. = 30 msec, or anti n/sub e/ tau/sub Ee/ approx. = 1.5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/s, Q saturates. Q scaling has also been obtained on PLT as a function of toroidal magnetic field, plasma current, and auxiliary heating power.

  9. Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project Development Watch the DOE Office of Indian Energy advanced course...

  10. Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project Development Watch the DOE Office of Indian Energy renewable energy course...

  11. 2013 Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop Presentations and Agenda 2013 Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable...

  12. Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations:...

  13. Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Facility Scale Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Facility Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Facility Scale Project Development Watch the DOE Office of Indian Energy renewable energy course...

  14. Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Breakout Session 2A-Conversion...

  15. EBRD-Sustainable Energy Initiative: Scaling Up Finance for Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scaling Up Finance for Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EBRD-Sustainable Energy Initiative: Scaling Up Finance for Climate...

  16. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design, April 2013 Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

  17. Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide. Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide. Abstract:...

  18. Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis of Magnesium: Scale-Up...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis of Magnesium: Scale-Up Research and Engineering for Light-Weight Vehicles Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis of Magnesium: Scale-Up Research...

  19. Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  20. Large Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale GSHP as Alternative...

  1. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

  2. Algenol Biofuels Inc., Integrated Pilot-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Integrated Pilot- Scale Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae Algenol Biofuels Inc., together with its partners, will construct an integrated pilot-scale...

  3. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume Rendering at Large Scale Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale volrend-swes.png We studied the performance and scalability characteristics of hybrid''...

  4. Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance...

  5. Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  6. Parsec-Scale Jet-Environment Interactions in AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew L. Lister

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations made with the VLBA have led to fundamental advances in our understanding of how radio jets in AGN evolve from parsec-scales out to distances exceeding several hundred kiloparsecs. In this review I discuss current models of young radio source evolution, as well as the observational evidence for a rapid change in jet properties on scales of ~1 kpc. A central topic of current debate is the relative importance of intermittent jet fueling versus jet-environment interactions in causing a drop-off in powerful radio sources at this critical evolutionary stage. Recent 3-D hydrodynamical jet simulations suggest that dense environments and cloud collisions can temporarily stifle, but not completely halt powerful relativistic jets. Several VLBA studies of jet-ISM interactions in both blazars and weak Seyfert jets have indicated that collimated outflows are indeed possible in dense environments. At present, the bulk of the evidence favors intermittent AGN accretion as the dominant factor in determining the evolutionary path of large numbers of AGN jets.

  7. A regional-scale particle-tracking method for nonstationary fractured media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohman, Johan; Niemi, Auli; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional scale transport model is introduced that is applicable to non-stationary and statistically inhomogeneous fractured media, provided that hydraulic flow, but not necessarily solute transport, can be approximated by equivalent continuum properties at some block scale. Upscaled flow and transport block properties are transferred from multiple fracture network realizations to a regional model with grid elements of equal size to that found valid for continuum approximation of flow. In the large-scale model, flow is solved in a stochastic continuum framework, whereas the transport calculations employ a random walk procedure. Block-wise transit times are sampled from distributions linked to each block-conductivity based on its underlying fracture network. To account for channeled transport larger than the block scale, several alternatives in sampling algorithm are introduced and compared. The most reasonable alternative incorporates a spatial persistence length in sampling the particle transit times; this tracer transport persistence length is related to interblock channeling, and is quantified by the number N of blocks. The approach is demonstrated for a set of field data, and the obtained regional-scale particle breakthroughs are analyzed. These are fitted to the one-dimensional advective-dispersive equation to determine an effective macroscale dispersion coefficient. An interesting finding is that this macroscale dispersion coefficient is found to be a linear function of the transport persistence, N, with a slope equal to a representative mean block-scale dispersion coefficient and a constant that incorporates background dispersion arising from the regional heterogeneous conductivity field.

  8. An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard; Moeglein, William AM; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space and time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.

  9. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  10. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  11. The Intermediate Scale Branch of the Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Dine

    2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Three branches of the string theory landscape have plausibly been identified. One of these branches is expected to exhibit a roughly logarithmic distribution of supersymmetry breaking scales. The original KKLT models are in this class. We argue that certain features of the KKLT model are generic to this branch, and that the resulting phenomenology depends on a small set of discrete choices. As in the MSSM, the weak scale in these theories is tuned; a possible explanation is selection for the dark matter density.

  12. Peristaltic pumps work in nano scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnoush Farahpour; Mohammad Reza Ejtehadi

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a pump is suggested which is based on well-known peristaltic pumps. In order to simply describe the operation of the proposed pump, an innovative interpretation of low Reynolds number swimmers is presented and thereafter a similar theoretical model would be suggested to quantify the behavior of the pumps. A coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulation is used to examine the theoretical predictions and measure the efficiency of the pump in nano scales. It is shown that this pump with a modest design is capable of being a good option for transport processes in nano scale.

  13. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  14. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lee, Kearn P.; Kelly, Steven E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  15. Regional scale impacts of Tamarix leaf beetles (Diorhabda carinulata) on the water availability of western U.S. rivers as determined by multi-scale remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borevitz, Justin

    Research Station, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA b TimeScience, Salt Lake City, UT, USA c Desert Botanical Garden, 260 S Central Campus Dr, Room 270, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA f Environmental Research Laboratory , Kevin R. Hultine c , Charles van Riper III a , Daniel W. Bean d , Philip E. Dennison e , R. Scott Murray

  16. CX-003940: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Energy Technology Laboratory Recipient proposes to develop laboratory scale pyrolysis capabilities at University of Hawaii to provide a tool to assess biomass...

  17. CX-001736: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    operate a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery that would process one dry ton per day of biomass using pyrolysis and subsequent upgrading to transportation fuels. DOCUMENT(S)...

  18. CX-003827: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  19. CX-000751: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Seismic) CX(s)...

  20. CX-000752: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Pier F Drilling)...

  1. CX-003818: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  2. CX-003825: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  3. CX-000750: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Terminal Island...

  4. CX-003829: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  5. CX-000753: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Literature and...

  6. CX-003814: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9...

  7. CX-008860: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Protection-Richland Operations Office Pacific Northwest National Laboratory proposes to conduct 1) bench-scale research projects, 2) conventional laboratory operations, 3)...

  8. CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date: 06022010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on...

  9. CX-010947: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Media Process and Technology bench-scale dual-stage membrane reactor utilizing real syngas. CX-010947.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010948: Categorical Exclusion...

  10. CX-010018: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operations Office Samples of scale are removed from the 2H Evaporator Pot and its Gravity Drain Line (GDL) for periodic analysis. The characterization supports the development...

  11. CX-008672: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research and demonstration activities involving microbial electrosynthesis of liquid biofuel and biofuel precursors in in-lab and meso-scale bioreactors. CX-008672.pdf More...

  12. CX-011018: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology Laboratory Computational modeling and laboratory-scale experimental analysis of magnesium corrosion. CX-011018.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-011019...

  13. CX-002155: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to provide federal funding to the recipient to complete laboratory scale research and development activities related to sustainable energy production from biomass via anaerobic...

  14. CX-002881: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management, Savannah River Operations Office A blending study will be conducted in the Engineering Development Lab (786-A) using an approximate 110th scale model of a Savannah...

  15. CX-000760: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory Develop a low-cost flywheel system and demonstrate a utility-scale installation to provide the...

  16. CX-004704: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The project will demonstrate the robustness of concentrated piperazine within an absorptionstripping system with solvent regeneration. Subpilot scale operations at existing...

  17. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

  18. Price determination for breeding bulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namken, Jerry Carl

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Oammittee) Ra A. ietrzch C. J ~) Daru. I (Heai of August l987 Price Detezlainatian for Breeding Bulls. (August 1987) Jerry Carl Namkan, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald E. Ferris A study using two different data... sets was conducted to determine the factors affecting the price of zmg~ Hereford hulls. In the first data set, both ~ and lagged national ~ feeder steer, utility cow, and crude oil prices, and net farm income were analyzed in a regzmsion procedure...

  19. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  20. Structure determination of enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (Sentinext)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease but may induce fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 crystallized in a body-centered orthorhombic space group with two particles in general orientations in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Determination of the particle orientations required that the locked rotation function excluded the twofold symmetry axes from the set of icosahedral symmetry operators. This avoided the occurrence of misleading high rotation-function values produced by the alignment of icosahedral and crystallographic twofold axes. Once the orientations and positions of the particles had been established, the structure was solved by molecular replacement and phase extension.

  1. CX-003701: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    701: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003701: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bio-Diesel Cellulosic Ethanol Research Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09162010...

  2. CX-008797: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    797: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008797: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal Pile Basin Project CX(s) Applied: B1.29 Date: 06042012 Location(s): Tennessee...

  3. CX-009105: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009105: Categorical Exclusion Determination 284-H Track Coal Hopper Pit Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 08292012 Location(s): South...

  4. CX-001500: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-001500: Categorical Exclusion Determination Forrest County Geothermal Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04012010 Location(s): Forrest County,...

  5. CX-000940: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000940: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Generation Wind Power at Navy Sites - Second Meteorological tower at Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island;...

  6. CX-012001: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    01: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012001: Categorical Exclusion Determination Meter Installation at Fossil Lake Solar Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 04242014...

  7. CX-012193: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-012193: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Slatt Substation Meter and Communication Equipment Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 05052014...

  8. CX-000016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000016: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ross-Lexington 1 Meter Project CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12172009 Location(s): Vancouver, Washington...

  9. CX-010133: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-010133: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish Digital Density Meter Analytical Capability in 735-A, D-wing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03112013...

  10. CX-010740: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-010740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integration of Behind-the-Meter Photovoltaic Fleet Forecasts into Utility Grid System Operations CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  11. CX-000374: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Novel Sorbents for Emission Control from Coal Combustion CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12112009 Location(s):...

  12. CX-004126: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004126: Categorical Exclusion Determination Machine Shop Equipment Burn CX(s) Applied: B1.12 Date: 08022010 Location(s): New Mexico...

  13. CX-008803: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-008803: Categorical Exclusion Determination Milling Machine Replacement Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05142012 Location(s): Tennessee...

  14. CX-006593: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-006593: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: Renewable Energy Resources CDP-09 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08292011 Location(s):...

  15. CX-011482: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011482: Categorical Exclusion Determination Obtain soil samples for potential D-Area borrow sources CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 11072013...

  16. CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lurance Canyon Burn Site Soil and Groundwater Site Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06142010 Location(s):...

  17. CX-008632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-008632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sampling of Soil Vapor Extraction Wells at the Western Sector Dynamic Underground Stripping System CX(s)...

  18. CX-005672: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    672: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005672: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Systems Integration Facility Excavation Soil Stockpile CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 04...

  19. CX-006710: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006710: Categorical Exclusion Determination Binary Power Unit Test (Recurrent Engineering LLC, Geothermal Test) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08...

  20. CX-009133: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009133: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Program Year 2012 Formula Grants - State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date:...

  1. CX-000935: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000935: Categorical Exclusion Determination Onondaga County, New York Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

  2. CX-002167: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002167: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

  3. CX-002168: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002168: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

  4. CX-001088: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001088: Categorical Exclusion Determination City of New York American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant...

  5. CX-006748: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006748: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

  6. CX-007020: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007020: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

  7. CX-001403: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001403: Categorical Exclusion Determination West New York Energy Efficiency Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04092010 Location(s): West New...

  8. CX-001260: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001260: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Audit, Revolving Loan Program, Mortgage Buy-Down Program, Energy Efficiency Retrofits,...

  9. CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ramgen Supersonic Shock Wave Compression and Engine Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09032010 Location(s):...

  10. CX-009134: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    34: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009134: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wave Energy Technology- New Zealand Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project...

  11. CX-005120: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005120: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wavebob Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01272011 Location(s):...

  12. CX-009553: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009553: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mild Biomass Liquefaction Process for Economic Production of Stabilized Refiner-Ready Bio-Oils...

  13. CX-003518: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-003518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy from Biomass Research and Technology Transfer Program CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08232010...

  14. CX-007003: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-007003: Categorical Exclusion Determination Missile System Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System Component Development CX(s)...

  15. CX-004926: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    926: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004926: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radioactive Waste Management Complex ? Analytical Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.1...

  16. CX-000903: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    903: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000903: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Photovoltaic Pilot CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02242010 Location(s): Illinois...

  17. CX-009151: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009151: Categorical Exclusion Determination Simpson College Boiler Plant De-Centralization CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09242012 Location(s): Iowa...

  18. CX-005200: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-005200: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hull Offshore Wind Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02162011 Location(s): Hull,...

  19. CX-002377: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002377: Categorical Exclusion Determination Offshore Wind Technology Data Collection Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05132010...

  20. CX-007380: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-007380: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10262011...

  1. CX-011651: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011651: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hazard Tree Removal Along the Prescott Peacock 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3...

  2. CX-012077: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-012077: Categorical Exclusion Determination Danger Tree Management on Craig to Hayden 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date:...

  3. CX-005687: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005687: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Cutting Cheyenne Field Office Maintenance Area, Spring 2011 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04...

  4. CX-005747: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-005747: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biobased Materials Automotive Value Chain Market Development Analysis CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05042011...

  5. CX-002864: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002864: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harris County North Bayou Central Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07012010 Location(s):...

  6. CX-004115: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    15: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004115: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harris County North Bayou Central Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09242010 Location(s):...

  7. CX-000733: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000733: Categorical Exclusion Determination Detection and Production of Methane Hydrates CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01222010 Location(s): Austin,...

  8. CX-003805: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003805: Categorical Exclusion Determination Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst CX(s) Applied: A9...

  9. CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination Use of Inedible Energy Crops for Production of Advanced Biofuels with the Mcgyan Process CX(s) Applied:...

  10. CX-005901: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ammonia Production from Electricity, Water, and Nitrogen CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05162011...

  11. CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Production Test (Phase III - AdministrativePlanningModeling Tasks) CX(s) Applied: A2,...

  12. CX-009710: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009710: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spring Creek - Wine County No. 1 Transmission Tower Relocation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11292012...

  13. CX-000571: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Panel Installation (Building 833, TA-I) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12102009...

  14. CX-008563: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-008563: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.14 Date: 06132012...

  15. CX-007873: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-007873: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.14 Date: 01272012...

  16. CX-000653: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000653: Categorical Exclusion Determination Helios - Project: Photovoltaic Crystalline Module Assembly Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01272010 Location(s):...

  17. CX-005993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 05262011...

  18. CX-001393: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-001393: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Penetration of Photovoltaic Generation - Award Number DE-EE0002060 Date: 03212010 Location(s): Arizona...

  19. CX-001654: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-001654: Categorical Exclusion Determination Burlington County Photovoltaic (PV) System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04092010 Location(s): County of Burlington,...

  20. CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09012011 Location(s): Florida...

  1. CX-010855: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-010855: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development for Hydrogen Storage and Neutron Conversion Materials, Lab 152 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07...

  2. CX-005204: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005204: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02162011 Location(s): Nevada...

  3. CX-000199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Agricultural Renewable Energy Conversion Incentive Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11232009 Location(s): Arizona...

  4. CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    378: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Solar Cell Fabrication Alkaline Texturing Process Improvement CX(s) Applied:...

  5. CX-007385: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-007385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9...

  6. CX-011252: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination CX-011252: Categorical Exclusion Determination Concentrating Solar Power Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment CX(s) Applied: A9 Date:...

  7. CX-009038: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009038: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiation-induced Ductility Enhancement in Amorphous Fe and Al2O3+TiO2 Nanostructured Coatings...

  8. CX-008745: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-008745: Categorical Exclusion Determination Equipment for a Radiation Detection and Measurements Laboratory for Education - University of Pittsburgh CX(s)...

  9. CX-003921: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-003921: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mobile Sediment Analysis Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09232010 Location(s): Morgantown,...

  10. CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Procedures for Measuring Energy Efficiency of Consumer Products and Industrial Equipment...

  11. CX-004163: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004163: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mobile Meteorological Equipment CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08022010 Location(s): New Mexico...

  12. CX-003969: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003969: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mobile Plutonium Facility (MPF); Set Up and Test Thermogravimetric Analyzer CX(s) Applied:...

  13. CX-010092: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-010092: Categorical Exclusion Determination Land Mobile Radio - Bi Directional Amplifier (BDA) Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 0321...

  14. CX-005109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005109: Categorical Exclusion Determination Y589, Mobile Digital Radiography Identification System - Station CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 0121...

  15. CX-000489: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Locating Mobile Mini Office Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05052009 Location(s): Aiken, South...

  16. CX-006681: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-006681: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Drilling Location in Section 29 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12232009 Location(s): Casper,...

  17. CX-006682: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-006682: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Drilling Location in Section 29 (Revision 1) CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 06022010 Location(s):...

  18. CX-003888: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-003888: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improved Drilling and Fracturing Fluids for Shale Gas Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09102010...

  19. CX-000855: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-000855: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A5208 - Low-contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical Engineered Geothermal System Wells CX(s) Applied:...

  20. CX-009218: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009218: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Sparge Piping at Bryan Mound Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09202012...