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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

2

Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and slopes found on Gus Engeling Wildlife Management Area (GEWMA) and Richland Creek Wildlife Management Area (RCWMA). The resulting model output was displayed as a map, depicting the spatial distribution of habitat suitability for each of the 3 species...

Daugherty, Brad Ellis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

4

Determining the effects of fluctuating lake levels on wildlife habitat using GIS and remote sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water level fluctuations in the Lake Granger Corps of Engineers (COE) reservoir project are the result of flood control management of the lower Brazos River basin. These fluctuations periodically submerge wildlife habitat surrounding the lake...

Sabella, Raymond Jacob

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Wildlife Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Services, part of Texas Cooperative Extension, is an agency created to assist the public in managing the problems sometimes caused by wildlife. Its objectives are to protect wildlife, crops, livestock, property and human health...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

7

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Population and Habitat Assessment Branch, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Veit R.R., T.P. White, M. Martin, and M.J. Steinkamp. 2010. At-Sea...

8

Vegetational analyses and the determination of range condition classes on selected areas of the Welder Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prai- xies was x'sported, as early as half a century ago by 0offey (1909). He desoribed the vegetation of the Victoria clay series as native grassland that had been invaded by run. "4ng mesquite, He attributed the invasion of the mesquite... grasses. Boils In a reconnaissance soil survey, Coffey (1909) classified the soils of the genex'al area containing the Welder Wildlife Hefuge as part of. the Victoria series. Tue black soils that comprise the Victoxia series were formed from a deposit...

Box, Thadis W

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fish and Wildlife Administrator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

10

Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wildlife Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP SignInWho do IWhyWhy:Wildlife

12

Applications of Data-driven Modeling to Infectious Diseases in Africa: Anthrax in Wildlife and HIV in Humans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating wind turbine-caused bird mortality. Journal ofestimation of wildlife mortality due to wind farms (Flint etsurveillance of mortality due to disease, wind farms,

Bellan, Steven Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program: Wildlife Biology http://www.bw.uaf.edu/ University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Wildlife://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ProspectiveStudents/degrees.htm Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Programs: Wildlife Fisheries Biology http

14

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

15

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

16

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

17

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. Final Report of the...

18

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management Kevin of data grouped by Ecological Site with management and environmental variables to determine mechanisms project goals. Benefits are overlapping and include: · State and Transition Models (STMs): Inference

19

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

20

Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

22

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wildlife Photography Market Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs to reach existing groups such as photography clubs. Joining tourism organizations is also likely to be helpful. Private Landowners? Responses The data gathered from the landowners? survey responses illustrates the limited nature of wildlife... wildlife photography, most have not yet reached the levels desired by operators. This is partly due to a lack of development as a tourism enterprise, which includes marketing and well-defined operational limits.It does seem that satisfaction is very...

Phillips, Miles

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Temperature determination from the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of temperature from experimental data has become important in searches for critical phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Widely used methods are ratios of isotopes (which rely on chemical and thermal equilibrium), population ratios of excited states etc. Using the lattice gas model we propose a new observable: $n_{ch}/Z$ where $n_{ch}$ is the charge multiplicity and $Z$ is the charge of the fragmenting system. We show that the reduced multiplicity is a good measure of the average temperature of the fragmenting system.

S. Das Gupta; J. Pan; M. B. Tsang

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

26

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

27

Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

29

A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

Forcey, Greg, M.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

32

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University Fisheries and Wildlife United States Geological Survey United States Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife of this report in any way is withheld pending specific authorization from the Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish

Thomas, Andrew

33

SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM · determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

34

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

Fritz, R.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

The impact of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction on student self-determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multifaceted construct and interventions that achieve the best outcomes are multicomponent interventions. The SDLMI (Wehmeyer et al., 2000) is a model of teaching (i.e., intended for teachers as end users to guide and direct instruction) that supports teachers... the impact of the SDLMI (Wehmeyer et al., 2000) on self-determination. Project personnel contacted school districts, and districts that agreed to participate ( < 20) identi- fied high school campuses {n < 39) to participate. Next, the primary district...

Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Williams-Diehm, Kendra; Little, Todd D.; Boulton, Aaron Jacob

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness, treaty rights, public involvement in forest policy, or international trade issues? Contact Information · Silviculture · Consulting Company · Urban Forestry · Tourism · GIS · Computer Modeling · Professional Biologist

Northern British Columbia, University of

40

Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics Marc Choisy1,* and Pejman Rohani1 extinction. Surprisingly, infectious diseases have not been accounted for in harvest models, which is a major and harvesting can substantially increase both disease prevalence and the absolute number of infectious

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. *Extension Ecotourism Program Specialist, The Texas A&M University System WILDLIFE Photography Miles Phillips* for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds B-6187 3/06 Types of Blinds Surface blinds Most photographers...

Phillips, Miles

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1980 a s outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994.Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOEEA-1023)...

44

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

Murphy, Michaela Rene

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

48

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

49

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown,...

50

The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation For students entering fall 2010 graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. 1 - Earth Science elective ­ GEO-SCI 100 (f more of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Schweik, Charles M.

52

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester interested in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

53

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective options - BIOL of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

54

Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Walleye Smallmouth bass Northern pike Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12; At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control Implement

55

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

56

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Early Standard Model Measurement and Determination of Standard Model Background for Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva (Switzerland) will go in operation in the coming months and will soon enable us to analyze the highest energy collisions ever produced at an accelerator. Beyond Standard Model searches at LHC require a detailed understanding of the detector performance, reconstruction algorithms and triggering. Precision measurements of Standard Model processes are also mandatory to acquire the necessary knowledge of Standard Model background. Both ATLAS and CMS efforts are hence addressed to determine the best calibration candles and to design a realistic plan for the initial period of data taking.

S. Beauceron

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

60

Determining the focal mechanisms of earthquakes by full waveform modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining the focal mechanism of an earthquake helps us to better characterize reservoirs, define faults, and understand the stress and strain regime. The objective of this thesis is to find the focal mechanism and depth ...

Busfar, Hussam A. (Hussam Abdullah)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Climate Determinism Revisited: Multiple Equilibria in a Complex Climate Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple equilibria in a coupled oceanatmospheresea ice general circulation model (GCM) of an aquaplanet with many degrees of freedom are studied. Three different stable states are found for exactly the same set of ...

Ferreira, David

63

6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

64

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe `snowball' state. Although low-order energy balance models of the climate are known to exhibit-640 Ma ago, e.g. Hoffmann et al. 1998), to a warm-house (no-ice) in the Cretaceous (e.g. Zachos et al

Marshall, John

66

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

Narolski, Steven W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):214223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):214­223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada geese Columbus Avenue, Sandusky, OH 44870, USA Abstract: Overabundant populations of Canada geese (Branta these concerns. The objective of this study was to determine if captive Canada geese exhibited a foraging

69

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Spatial and temporal variation in fruit use by wildlife in a forested landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and temporal variation in fruit use by wildlife in a forested landscape John P. Mc of fruit from 22 common plant species over 2 years in five habitats of a managed landscape in South Carolina (USA). Our long-term goal is to determine the importance of fruit as a resource for vertebrates

McCarty, John P.

71

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

Watson, Craig A.

72

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

Mazzotti, Frank

73

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

74

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Scalar products in models with GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix. Determinant representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study quantum integrable models with the GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. We derive a determinant representation for a special case of scalar products of Bethe vectors. This representation allows one to find a determinant formula for form factor of one of the monodromy matrix entries. We also point out essential difference between form factors in the models with the Gl(3) trigonometric R-matrix and their analogs in GL(3)-invariant models.

N. A. Slavnov

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

78

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

79

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idaho Wildlife Mitigation-Middle Snake #12;2 A. Abstract The Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation project (SIWM) of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) proposes implementation of wildlife mitigation and/or scientific background In both the Mid and Upper Snake Provinces, human development

80

A model to determine financial indicators for organic solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic solar cells are an emerging photovoltaic technology that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, despite low efficiency and stability. A model, named TEEOS (Technical and Economic Evaluator for Organic Solar), is presented that evaluates organic solar cells for various solar energy applications in different geographic locations, in terms of two financial indicators, payback period and net present value (NPV). TEEOS uses SMARTS2 software to estimate broadband (280-4000 nm) spectral irradiance data and with the use of a cloud modification factor, predicts hourly irradiation in the absence of actual broadband irradiance data, which is scarce for most urban locations. By using the avoided cost of electricity, annual savings are calculated which produce the financial indicators. It is hoped that these financial indicators can help guide certain technical decisions regarding the direction of research for organic solar cells, for example, increasing efficiency or increasing the absorptive wavelength range. A sample calculation using solar hats is shown to be uneconomical, but a good example of large-scale organic PV production. (author)

Powell, Colin; Bender, Timothy; Lawryshyn, Yuri [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

82

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wildlife Exclusion Fencing Temporary Hourly Technicians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technical support, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities and mammals that present a threat to aircraft operations. In order to prevent wildlife from burrowing under sponsorship for this position. Candidates must be physical able to conduct repetitive actions; eye, hand

85

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

86

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking: Design Tradeoffs and Early Experiences with ZebraNet Philo Juang Hidekazu Oki Yong Wang Margaret Martonosi Li-Shiuan Peh Dan Rubenstein Dept. of Electrical Princeton University ZebraNet Project VET TES EN NOV TAM TVM Current Tracking Technology Most common: VHF

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

87

A conceptual model for determining yield loss due to drought stress in sorghum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A Thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair of Committee...

Koch, Paul Robert

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT Determining the temperature of an internal surface within cavernous of these internal surfaces. The cavernous target has often been assumed to be a blackbody, but in field experiments

Salvaggio, Carl

89

CX-003622: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-003622: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2010 Secure and Restore Fish and Wildlife Habitat CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08162010 Location(s): Sanders County,...

90

CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for Purchase of the Perry Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date:...

91

CX-009209: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09042012 Location(s): Washington...

92

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2 2013CalhounControlWebpage | Open

93

Determinant representations for form factors in quantum integrable models with GL(3)-invariant R-matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain determinant representations for the form factors of the monodromy matrix entries in quantum integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and possessing $GL(3)$-invariant $R$-matrix. These representations can be used for the calculation of correlation functions in the models of physical interest.

S. Pakuliak; E. Ragoucy; N. A. Slavnov

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

95

The wildlife orientation of selected student populations in Victoria, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Approved as to style and content by...

Kirkpatrick, Phyllis Ann Bradley

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

98

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

99

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

100

EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Model Independent Determination of the Solar Neutrino Spectrum with and without MSW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Besides the opportunity for discovering new neutrino physics, solar neutrino measurements provide a sensitive probe of the solar interior, and thus a rigorous test of solar model predictions. We present model independent determinations of the neutrino spectrum by using relevant flux components as free parameters subject only to the luminosity constraint. (1) Without the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect, the best fit for the combined data is poor. Furthermore, the data indicate a severe suppression of the $^7$Be flux relative to the $^8$B, contradicting both standard and nonstandard solar models in general; the $pp$ flux takes its maximum value allowed by the luminosity constraint. This pathology consistently appears even if we ignore any one of the three data. (2) In the presence of the two-flavor MSW effect, the current constraint on the initial $^8$B flux is weak, but consistent with the SSM and sufficient to exclude nonstandard models with small $^8$B fluxes. No meaningful constraint is obtained for the other fluxes. In the future, even allowing MSW, the $^8$B and $^7$Be fluxes can be determined at the $\\pm$(15 -- 20)\\% level, making competing solar models distinguishable. We emphasize that the neutral current sensitivity for $^7$Be neutrinos in BOREXINO, HELLAZ, and HERON is essential for determining the initial fluxes. The constraints on the MSW parameters in the model independent analysis are also discussed.

Naoya Hata; Paul Langacker

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Determination of Non{Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born{Oppenheimer Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Non{Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born{Oppenheimer Model George A for the time dependent molecular Schrodinger equation in the Born{Oppenheimer limit. We assume the elec- tron. This component is shown to be exponentially small in the square of the Born{Oppenheimer parameter, due

Hagedorn, George A.

103

Determination of Non--Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born--Oppenheimer Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Non--Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born--Oppenheimer Model George A molecular Schr?odinger equation in the Born--Oppenheimer limit. We assume the elec­ tron Hamiltonian has to be exponentially small in the square of the Born--Oppenheimer parameter, due to the Landau­Zener mechanism

104

Determination of Peptide Amide Configuration in a Model Amyloid Fibril by Solid-State NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-42, with sequence LMVGGVVIA) forms a structured aggregate which is classified as an amyloid fibril based primarilyDetermination of Peptide Amide Configuration in a Model Amyloid Fibril by Solid-State NMR P. R these aggregates form. The primary constituent of the amyloid plaques characteristic of AD are a family of 39

Griffin, Robert G.

105

An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Co). In addition, an automated vehicle should also self-assess its own perception abilities, and not only perceive this idea, cybercars were designed as fully automated vehicles [3], thought since its inception as a new

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

106

HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):311326, Fall 2012 An investigation into the use of road drain-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- age structures by wildlife in Maryland, USA JAMES L. SPARKS JR., University of Maryland Center, targeting a restricted number of culverts, time periods, or locales (Foster and Humphrey 1995, Rodriguez et) to determine the effect of culvert and land-use and land-cover (LULC) characteristics on use (Rodriguez et al

107

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 40(3), 2004, pp. 493500 Wildlife Disease Association 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pepper,1 Thomas R. Rainwater,1 Steven G. Platt,2 Jennifer A. Dever,3 Todd A. Anderson,1 and Scott T. Mc and cost associated with CAM collection and the specific life history traits of the wildlife species. Key often involves killing animals for collection and analysis of various biologic samples (e.g., internal

Dever, Jennifer A.

108

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(2), 2005, pp. 291297 Wildlife Disease Association 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of northern California and southern Oregon (USA), the Texas Panhandle, and the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska Department, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Current address: U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 204 Russell Lab

Mladenoff, David

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - atoll national wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Changed Pupping and Hauling Summary: . Atoll Research Bulletin 103. 3 pp. US.Fish and Wildlife Service. 1986. Hawaiian IslandsNational Wildlife... Islands National...

110

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Trains, Grains, and Grizzly Bears: Reducing Wildlife Mortality on Railway Tracks in Banff National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the causes and solutions to train-wildlife collisions. Whilepopulations, relatively few trains strike wildlife on thegrizzlies were struck by CPR trains, and none of the five

Pissot, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWoodWildlife Fund Jump to:

113

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a system of economic incentives and develop cost effective solutions to agricultural and wildlife issues#12;ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the Potential for Use of Economic and Associated Floodplains prepared by Richard M. Porter for Socio-Economic Section Sustainability Division

115

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

116

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

117

Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

New Hampshire, University of

118

Model independent determination of the spin of the {sup 180}Ta naturally occurring isomer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hyperfine structures of the 33715.27 cm{sup -1} and 33706.47 cm{sup -1} transitions from the ground state of singly ionized Ta have been measured by collinear laser spectroscopy. The structures were found to contain a large second order contribution. From fitting the observed hyperfine components for both {sup 181}Ta and the {sup 180}Ta naturally occurring isomer it was possible to determine the first and second order hyperfine structure coefficients. As no model independent determination of the nuclear spin of the {sup 180}Ta isomer has been performed, fitting was attempted for a range of spins. A clear chi-squared minimum is obtained for a nuclear spin of 9, in agreement with model dependent measurements.

Bissell, M. L.; Baczynska, K.; Forest, D. H.; Gardner, M. D.; Tungate, G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Tordoff, B. [Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Moore, I. D.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo computation and Bayesian model determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for Bayesian computation have until recently been restricted to problems where the joint distribution of all variables has a density with respect to some xed standard underlying measure. They have therefore not been available for application to Bayesian model determination, where the dimensionality of the parameter vector is typically not xed. This article proposes a new framework for the construction of reversible Markov chain samplers that jump between parameter subspaces of di ering dimensionality, which is exible and entirely constructive. It should therefore have wide applicability in model determination problems. The methodology is illustrated with applications to multiple change-point analysis in one and two dimensions, and toaBayesian comparison of binomial experiments.

Peter J. Green

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

123

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

124

HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):250259, Fall 2013 Winter habitat use by juvenile greater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 S. W. Williston Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA The historic range

125

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

126

Determinant representation of correlation functions for the U{sub q}(gl(1 vertical bar 1)) free Fermion model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the help of the factorizing F-matrix, the scalar products of the U{sub q}(gl(1 vertical bar 1)) free fermion model are represented by determinants. By means of these results, we obtain the determinant representations of correlation functions of the model.

Zhao Shaoyou; Yang Wenli; Zhang Yaozhong [Department of Mathematics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Mathematics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Institute of Modern Physics, Northwest University, Xian 710069 (China); Department of Mathematics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablys...

130

EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

131

EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

132

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

134

A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT A National Assessment of Wildlife Information Transfer to the Public. (August 2003) Kieran Jane Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clark E. Adams A self-administered questionnaire was developed using... A NATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF WILDLIFE INFORMATION TRANSFER TO THE PUBLIC A Thesis by KIERAN JANE LINDSEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Lindsey, Kieran Jane

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

Howerton, Jack

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Classic Model in a Low Fertility Context: The Proximate Determinants of Fertility in South Korea and the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John Bongaarts' proximate determinants model of fertility has accounted for over 90 percent of variation in the total fertility rate (TFR) of primarily developing nations and historical populations. Recently, dramatically low fertility rates across...

Guarneri, Christine E.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A model for determining shelf life, estimating terminal body composition, yield grade and quality grade of feedlot cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as to style and content by: F. M. Byers (Chairman of Co m ttee) James McGrann (Member) ~&~& G. T. Schelling (Member) December 1986 ABSRACT A Model for Determining Shelf Life, Estimating Terminal Body Composition, Yield Grade and Quality Grade... of Feedlot Cattle. (December 1985) Richard Jay Perry, B, S. , Texas AlkM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F, M. Byers A model for determining shelf life and estimating carcass fat (kg), yield grade and quality grade was developed. Shelf...

Perry, Richard Jay

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

143

Dynamical coupled-channels model of $K^- p$ reactions (I): Determination of partial-wave amplitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a dynamical coupled-channels model of K^- p reactions, aiming at extracting the parameters associated with hyperon resonances and providing the elementary antikaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes that can be used for investigating various phenomena in the strangeness sector such as the production of hypernuclei from kaon-nucleus reactions. The model consists of (a) meson-baryon (MB) potentials v_{M'B',MB} derived from the phenomenological SU(3) Lagrangian, and (b) vertex interactions Gamma_{MB,Y*} for describing the decays of the bare excited hyperon states (Y*) into MB states. The model is defined in a channel space spanned by the two-body barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, and K Xi states and also the three-body pi pi Lambda and pi barK N states that have the resonant pi Sigma* and barK* N components, respectively. The resulting coupled-channels scattering equations satisfy the multichannel unitarity conditions and account for the dynamical effects arising from the off-shell rescattering processes. The model parameters are determined by fitting the available data of the unpolarized and polarized observables of the K^- p --> barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, K Xi reactions in the energy region from the threshold to invariant mass W=2.1 GeV. Two models with equally good chi^2 fits to the data have been constructed. The partial-wave amplitudes obtained from the constructed models are compared with the results from a recent partial-wave analysis by the Kent State University group. We discuss the differences between these three analysis results. Our results at energies near the threshold suggest that the higher partial waves should be treated on the same footing as the S wave if one wants to understand the nature of Lambda(1405)1/2^- using the data below the barK N threshold, as will be provided by the J-PARC E31 experiment.

H. Kamano; S. X. Nakamura; T. -S. H. Lee; T. Sato

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Collaboratives for Wildlife-Wind Turbine Interaction Research: Fostering Multistakeholder Involvement (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster highlights the various wildlife-wind collaboratives (specific to wildlife-wind turbine interaction research) that currently exist. Examples of collaboratives are included along with contact information, objectives, benefits, and ways to advance the knowledge base.

Sinclair, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

148

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

149

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

150

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

151

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

152

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

153

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

154

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

155

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

156

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron Fish and Wildlife Service -760/431-9440 ext. 205  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron ­ Fish and Wildlife Service - 760/431-9440 ext. 205 Jan Bedrosian ­ Bureau of Land Management ­ 916/978-4614 Timothy J. DiCintio ­ National Fish and Wildlife. The REAT is comprised of representatives of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management

157

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Will Clements in fish, wildlife and conservation biology. The course format will include lectures, group discussion Assignments and Homework......................................... 15% #12;FW 370- DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

158

TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH VALLEY by Kim Cherie: Tourism Product Development: A Case Study of Wildlife Viewing In the Squamish Valley PROJECT: 284 #12;iii ABSTRACT Wildlife viewing is an increasingly important form of tourism in British Columbia

159

Model ecosystem determination of the metabolic and environmental fate of tetrachloro-DDT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A potential hazardous waste site investigation was conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency to determine whether ground water, surface water, or area soils and sediments were contaminated as a result of waster water discharges or improper solid waste disposal practices of a pesticide manufacturer. One of the compounds discharged into the environment was 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane, commonly referred to as tetrachloro-DDT. Unlike a great many of the DDT analogs, tetrachloro-DDT has come under only limited scrutiny, mainly because it was dismissed as having poor insecticidal properties relative to DDT and other analogs. Its metabolism in ingesting organisms, and degradative pathways in the environment have consequently been left uncertain. This model ecosystem study was undertaken to examine the unanswered questions concerning the metabolic and environmental fate of tetrachloro-DDT. The relevance of this study pertains to disposal practices of pesticide manufacturers who use tetrachloro-DDT as a product precursor.

Cole, R.B.; Metcalf, R.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M of acoustic pollution in the oceans and effects on marine mammals Where do we go from here? #12;4/17/2011 2 ON ACOUSTIC POLLUTION Anthropogenic sound generation Transportation Army/Navy Research Commercial Birds

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

Gray, Matthew

162

Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation Great Lakes Natural Resource Center Ann Arbor context #12;2 Source: Cassedy and Grossman, Introduction to Energy, 1998 #12;3 Coal Ranks · Anthracite ­ highest rank, high energy content · Bituminous ­ second highest rank, high energy content; typically

O'Donnell, Tom

163

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

164

Volunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hampshire Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer University of New Hampshire, UVolunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter Term: One Year Duties; (2) Actively publicize the availability of SFW presentations in your community; (3) For field walks

New Hampshire, University of

165

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

166

Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Development of model evaluation criteria. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the usefulness and effectiveness of currently existing models that simulate the release of uranium hexafluoride from UF{sub 6}-handling facilities, subsequent reactions of UF{sub 6} with atmospheric moisture, and the dispersion of UF{sub 6} and reaction products in the atmosphere. The study evaluates screening-level and detailed public-domain models that were specifically developed for UF{sub 6} and models that were originally developed for the treatment of dense gases but are applicable to UF{sub 6} release, reaction, and dispersion. The model evaluation process is divided into three specific tasks: model-component evaluation; applicability evaluation; and user interface and quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) evaluation. Within the model-component evaluation process, a model`s treatment of source term, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion are considered and model predictions are compared with actual observations. Within the applicability evaluation process, a model`s applicability to Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis, and to site-specific considerations are assessed. Finally, within the user interface and QA/QC evaluation process, a model`s user-friendliness, presence and clarity of documentation, ease of use, etc. are assessed, along with its handling of QA/QC. This document presents the complete methodology used in the evaluation process.

Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

Casey, Daniel

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

Permana, Dony, E-mail: donypermana@students.itb.ac.id [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia and Statistics Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padang State University (Indonesia); Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S. [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geosynchronous orbit determination using space surveillance network observations and improved radiative force modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correct modeling of the space environment, including radiative forces, is an important aspect of space situational awareness for geostationary (GEO) spacecraft. Solar radiation pressure has traditionally been modeled using ...

Lyon, Richard Harry, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Model evaluation report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three uranium hexafluoride-(UF{sub 6}-) specific models--HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6}, Science Application International Corporation, and RTM-96; three dense-gas models--DEGADIS, SLAB, and the Chlorine Institute methodology; and one toxic chemical model--AFTOX--are evaluated on their capabilities to simulate the chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion of UF{sub 6} released from accidents at nuclear fuel-cycle facilities, to support Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis. These models are also evaluated for user-friendliness and for quality assurance and quality control features, to ensure the validity and credibility of the results. Model performance evaluations are conducted for the three UF{sub 6}-specific models, using field data on releases of UF{sub 6} and other heavy gases. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} and SAIC models are within an order of magnitude of the field data, but the SAIC model overpredicts beyond an order of magnitude for a few UF{sub 6}-specific data points. The RTM-96 model provides overpredictions within a factor of 3 for all data points beyond 400 m from the source. For one data set, however, the RTM-96 model severely underpredicts the observations within 200 m of the source. Outputs of the models are most sensitive to the meteorological parameters at large distances from the source and to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters at distances close to the source. Specific recommendations are being made to improve the applicability and usefulness of the three models and to choose a specific model to support the intended analyses. Guidance is also provided on the choice of input parameters for initial dilution, building wake effects, and distance to completion of UF{sub 6} reaction with water.

Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Radonjic, Z.R.; Coutts, P.T.; Lewis, C.J.; Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Method of and apparatus for determining the similarity of a biological analyte from a model constructed from known biological fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The characteristics of a biological fluid sample having an analyte are determined from a model constructed from plural known biological fluid samples. The model is a function of the concentration of materials in the known fluid samples as a function of absorption of wideband infrared energy. The wideband infrared energy is coupled to the analyte containing sample so there is differential absorption of the infrared energy as a function of the wavelength of the wideband infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample. The differential absorption causes intensity variations of the infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample as a function of sample wavelength of the energy, and concentration of the unknown analyte is determined from the thus-derived intensity variations of the infrared energy as a function of wavelength from the model absorption versus wavelength function.

Robinson, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Kenneth J. (Albuquerque, NM); Eaton, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Determination of Retrofit Savings Using a Calibrated Building Energy Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the development of a methodology to determine retrofit energy savings in buildings when few measured preretrofit data are available. Calibration of the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program for a 250,000 ft2 building...

Reddy, S. N.; Hunn, B. D.; Hood, D. B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Determination of fluid viscosities from biconical annular geometries: Experimental and modeling studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge of viscosity of flow streams is essential for the design and operation of production facilities, drilling operations and reservoir engineering calculations. The determination of the viscosity of a reservoir fluid at downhole conditions...

Rondon, Nolys Javier

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

DETERMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PERFORMANCE, AND THERMO-MECHANICALCHEMICAL STABILITY OF SOFCS FROM DEFECT MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to: provide fundamental relationships between SOFC performance and operating conditions and transient (time dependent) transport properties; extend models to thermo-mechanical stability, thermo-chemical stability, and multilayer structures; incorporate microstructural effects such as grain boundaries and grain-size distribution; experimentally verify models and devise strategies to obtain relevant material constants; and assemble software package for integration into SECA failure analysis models.

Wachsman, E.D.; Duncan, K.L.; Ebrahimi, F.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The socioeconomic determinants of correlations between stock market returns as revealed by a gravity model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Economic variants of Newton's law of universal gravitation have been used to model the flow of trade between two countries as proportional to the attraction (more)

Yang, Danni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

Calkins, Brian

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Predator Control as a Tool in Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the individual predator profiles beginning on page 11). For example, coyote scat is generally cigar shaped and smaller than that of a domestic dog. Game monitoring systems can be useful in studying game and predator species. Managers can view wildlife via video... containing chicken eggs) to measure depredation. Then a strategic predator management plan can be developed to address specific problems (for example, only raccoons) or areas (for example, around deer feeders). Camera systems range in price from about $200...

Rollins, Dale

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Lawswith Wildlife

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Determination of the proper operating range for the CAFCA IIB fuel cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fuel cycle simulation tool, CAFCA II was previously modified to produce the most recent version, CAFCA IIB. The code tracks the mass distribution of transuranics in the fuel cycle in one model and also projects costs ...

Warburton, Jamie (Jamie L.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Numerical model to determine the composition of H2ONaClCaCl2 fluid inclusions based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical model to determine the composition of H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 fluid inclusions based 2010 Abstract Natural fluids approximated by the H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 system are common in a wide range the compositions of fluid inclusions in the H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 sys- tem based on microthermometric and microanalytical

Bodnar, Robert J.

184

Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a States Nuclear Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a states nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the models efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Tiger and the Sun: Solar Power Plants and Wildlife Sanctuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss separate and integrated approaches to building scalable solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries. Both solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries need a lot of land. We quantify some of the requirements using various estimates of the rate of solar power production as well as the rate of adding wildlife to a sanctuary over the time range 2010-2050. We use population dynamics equations to study the evolution of solar energy and tiger populations up to and beyond 2050.

McGuigan, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - abu wildlife sanctuary Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FORESTRY SECTOR IN GHANA Ben N. Donkor Summary: wildlife sanctuaries and one strict nature reserve (Figure 1.7). Management plans based on biological... and sociological surveys...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration wildlife mitigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IntroductionI. Introduction The Northwest Power Act of Summary: , mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, on the Columbia... to...

189

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

Smith, Derek Anthony

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Model independent determination of the light-cone wave functions for exclusive processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method to compute, by numerical simulations of lattice QCD, the light-cone wave functions which enter exclusive processes at large momentum transfer, such as electromagnetic elastic scatterings, or exclusive semi-leptonic decays as B -> pi (B -> rho) and radiative decays as B -> K* gamma. The method is based on first principles and does not require any model assumption.

Aglietti, U; Corb, G; Franco, E; Martinelli, G; Silvestrini, L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

194

Transport parameter determination and modeling of sodium and strontium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

finite-element method to model a case of chromium contamination with some success. Bobcrtson, '1974~ used au iterative, alternating- direction. inrplicit finite-difference scheme to solve the groundwater flow equation and a. nrodified method... the location of the INEL and generalized groundwater flow lines of the Snake River Plain aquifer [from Barraclough et al. , 1981). . 12 3. Map showing the major facilities and surface water features at the INEL [from Robertson et al. , 1974]. 4. Volcanic...

Londergan, John Thomas

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quantification and utilization of subjectively determined data in the construction of mathematical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Justification of the Use of Expertise Previous Uses of Expertise in Fore- casting The DELPHI Method PATTERN Improvement of Existing Methods. A NEW METHOD . Introduction Collection of Data. Analysis of Data and Decision Conclusion. 1 I 2 3 4 6 7... III. A SAMPLE PROBLEM 54 REFERENCES 85 CHAPTER I THE STATE OF THE ART Introduction The building of models designed to assist in the description of future events has often encountered a very serious limitation. This is due to the methods...

Haynes, Grady Lee

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Determination of Electrochemical Performance and Thermo-Mechanical-Chemical Stability of SOFCs from Defect Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was focused on two distinct but related issues. The first issue concerned using defect modeling to understand the relationship between point defect concentration and the electrochemical, thermo-chemical and mechano-chemical properties of typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) materials. The second concerned developing relationships between the microstructural features of SOFC materials and their electrochemical performance. To understand the role point defects play in ceramics, a coherent analytical framework was used to develop expressions for the dependence of thermal expansion and elastic modulus on point defect concentration in ceramics. These models, collectively termed the continuum-level electrochemical model (CLEM), were validated through fits to experimental data from electrical conductivity, I-V characteristics, elastic modulus and thermo-chemical expansion experiments for (nominally pure) ceria, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with consistently good fits. The same values for the material constants were used in all of the fits, further validating our approach. As predicted by the continuum-level electrochemical model, the results reveal that the concentration of defects has a significant effect on the physical properties of ceramic materials and related devices. Specifically, for pure ceria and GDC, the elastic modulus decreased while the chemical expansion increased considerably in low partial pressures of oxygen. Conversely, the physical properties of YSZ remained insensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure within the studied range. Again, the findings concurred exactly with the predictions of our analytical model. Indeed, further analysis of the results suggests that an increase in the point defect content weakens the attractive forces between atoms in fluorite-structured oxides. The reduction treatment effects on the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of pure ceria were also evaluated at room temperature. The results reveal that the flexural strength decreases significantly after heat treatment in very low oxygen partial pressure environments; however, in contrast, fracture toughness is increased by 30-40% when the oxygen partial pressure was decreased to 10{sup -20} to 10{sup -22} atm range. Fractographic studies show that microcracks developed at 800 oC upon hydrogen reduction are responsible for the decreased strength. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, electrical impedance spectra from symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells was de-convoluted to obtain the key electrochemical components of electrode performance, namely charge transfer resistance, surface diffusion of reactive species and bulk gas diffusion through the electrode pores. These properties were then related to microstructural features, such as triple-phase boundary length and tortuosity. From these experiments we found that the impedance due to oxygen adsorption obeys a power law with pore surface area, while the impedance due to charge transfer is found to obey a power-law with respect to triple phase boundary length. A model based on kinetic theory explaining the power-law relationships observed was then developed. Finally, during our EIS work on the symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells a technique was developed to improve the quality of high-frequency impedance data and their subsequent de-convolution.

Eric Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista Capital LLCFish, Wildlife

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solubility of carbon dioxide in tar sand bitumen; Experimental determination and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on an understanding of the solubility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in tar sand bitumen that is essential for the development of in situ processes in the recovery of bitumen from tar and deposits. The solubility of CO{sub 2} in the Tar Sand Triangle (Utah), the PR Spring Rainbow I (Utah), and the Athabasca (Canada) tar sand bitumens was determined with the use of a high-pressure microbalance at temperatures of 358.2 and 393.2 K and pressures up to 6.2 MPa. As expected, the solubilities increased with pressure at a given temperature and decreased with increases in temperature. The Peng--Robinson and the Schmidt--Wenzel equations of state were used to match the experimentally observed solubilities. Correlations for the interaction parameters between CO{sub 2} and the bitumen were developed for both equations of state, wherein the interaction parameter could be obtained by using specific gravity and the UOP {ital K} factor for the bitumen. The correlations were developed with the optimum interaction parameters obtained for each of the samples at each temperature.

Deo, M.D.; Wang, C.J.; Hanson, F.V. (Dept. of Fuels Engineering, Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Professional internship with the Houston Lighting and Power Company Radiological Services: wildlife collection manual report and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

game wardens, wildlife refuge managers in Texas, and who to contact about specific animal species or trapping techniques. An Equipment Sources Appendix and Literature Cited and Available in Wildlife Documents File were also included. This file...

Graves, Tina Borghild

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic edges and other observables.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 08 14 3v 2 3 0 A ug 2 00 5 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION CAV-HEP-2005-15 ATL-PHYS-PUB-2005-013 ATL-COM-PHYS-2005-033 Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic... with the endpoint mea- surements. Note that p(m|eobs) is the equivalent of the P ?(x) defined later on in equation (A.2), as it is defined only up to an unknown normalisation constant. So, in order to plot the probability distribution, one follows the following...

Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; White, Martin J

205

Numerical determination of OPE coefficients in the 3D Ising model from off-critical correlators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a general method for the numerical evaluation of OPE coefficients in three dimensional Conformal Field Theories based on the study of the conformal perturbation of two point functions in the vicinity of the critical point. We test our proposal in the three dimensional Ising Model, looking at the magnetic perturbation of the $$, $$ and $$ correlators from which we extract the values of $C^{\\sigma}_{\\sigma\\epsilon}=1.07(3)$ and $C^{\\epsilon}_{\\epsilon\\epsilon}=1.45(30)$. Our estimate for $C^{\\sigma}_{\\sigma\\epsilon}$ agrees with those recently obtained using conformal bootstrap methods, while $C^{\\epsilon}_{\\epsilon\\epsilon}$, as far as we know, is new and could be used to further constrain conformal bootstrap analyses of the 3d Ising universality class.

Caselle, M; Magnoli, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia Erika Alacs* and Arthur Georges Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia Australian flora and fauna are highly sought for the international black market in wildlife. Within Australia

Canberra, University of

209

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

210

wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Biology Biology and several local offices of the federal and state conservation agencies. These agencies often--Wildlife Diseases................................................................3 WLF F433--Conservation

Hartman, Chris

211

FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics The Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville invites applications have at least one degree in Forestry from an SAF-accredited program. Demonstrated experience in field

Tennessee, University of

212

Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa) Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experi- mentally

Hutchens, John

213

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

Bedrossian, Karen L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Visitors to Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia--their characteristics, attitudes, satisfactions and preferences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's influence. (7) Wildlife and wild-lands oriented recreation: Activities which permit people to enjoy wildlife and wild-lands. This recre- ation, whether on-site or off-site, is derived or generated on or from the refuge and its resources. (81 W'1dl...

Fowler, Ronald Lynn

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

Firestone, Jeremy

216

Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman, and Joshua D. Stafford Abstract Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

217

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

218

Determining the Effect of Concerted Elimination Reactions in the Pyrolysis of Lignin Using Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin pyrolysis is a significant impediment in forming liquid fuel from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at a higher temperature than other biomass components (ie cellulose, hemicellulose) and tends to form radicals which lead to cross linking and ultimately char formation. A primary step in advances biomass-to-fuel technology will be to discover mechanisms that can disassemble lignin at lower temperatures and depolymerize lignin into more stable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin ({beta}-O4, {alpha}-O4, {beta}-{beta}, {beta}-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to the usually-assumed bond homolysis reactions, we have investigated a variety of concerted elimination pathways that will tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

Robichaud, D.; Clark, J.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system for use in wildlife capture are described, including the standard 3-rocket system, are presented. Keywords: Rocket net, wildlife capture, trapping, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Arizona

220

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):100­105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for cavity-nesting birds WILLIAM C. PITT, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center elevation areas of the Alakai Plateau. Puaiohi nest primarily on steep streamside cliffs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):58, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):5­8, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural.O. Box 5496-30100, Eldoret, Kenya nsifuna@ yahoo.com Key words: human­wildlife conflicts, Kenya Wildlife depredation in Laikipia, Kenya Kenya's Laikipia District is located on the equator in the central part

222

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

Calkins, Brian

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A conceptual model of the roles of price, quality, and intermediary constructs in determining behavioral intention to visit a festival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model 1???????.... 96 The Second Revised Structural Model 1??????? 99 The Final Revised Structural Model 1???????... 102 Initial Structural Model 2????????????... 106 The Revised Structural Model 2??????????. 109... The Initial Structural Model 2?...???????????... 105 FIGURE 12 The Revised Structural Model 2????????????... 108 FIGURE 13 Final Structural Model and Standardized Parameter Estimates of Model 1??????????????.?????.?.. 115 FIGURE 14 Final...

Lee, So Yon

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

Calkins, Brian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

WTP Calculation Sheet: Determining the LAW Glass Former Constituents and Amounts for G2 and Acm Models. 24590-LAW-M4C-LFP-00002, Rev. B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to determine the LAW glass former recipe and additives with their respective amounts. The methodology and equations contained herein are to be used in the G2 and ACM models until better information is supplied by R&T efforts. This revision includes calculations that determines the mass and volume of the bulk chemicals/minerals needed per batch. Plus, it contains calculations (for the G2 model) to help prevent overflow in LAW Feed Preparation Vessel.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

Houze, Jr., Robert A. [University of Washington Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

Dioxin hazards to fish, wildlife, and invertebrates: a synoptic review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs) are present as trace impurities in various manufactured chemicals and in combustion products. The chemical and environmental stability of PCDDs and their tendency to accumulate in fatty tissues have resulted in their widespread detection throughout the global ecosystem. The most toxic and extensively studied PCDD isomer is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Accidental contamination of the environment by 2,3,7,8-TCDD has resulted in deaths in many species of birds, wildlife, and domestic animals, and in the closing of rivers to fishing due to high residues in fish, i.e., >50 parts per trillion (ppt) wet weight. Laboratory studies with birds, mammals, aquatic organisms, and other species have conclusively demonstrated that exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD can be associated with acute and delayed mortality, carcinogenic, teratogenic, reproductive, mutagenic, histopathologic, and immunotoxic effects.

Eisler, R.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Determining the Mechanical Constitutive Properties of Metals as Function of Strain Rate and temperature: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain-rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions. To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be integrated fully with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experiment is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models. One aspect of the program involves the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an experimental and modeling viewpoint. In addition, our approach will minimize the need to fit model parameters to experimental data to obtain convergence. These are critical steps to reach the primary objective of simulating and modeling material performance under extreme loading conditions. During this project, the following achievements have been obtained: 1. Twins have been observed to act as barriers to dislocation propagation and as sources of and sinks to dislocations. 2. Nucleation of deformation twins in nitrogen strengthened steel is observed to be closely associated with planar slip bands. The appearance of long twins through heavily dislocated microstructures occurs by short twins nucleating at one slip band, propagating through the dislocation-free region, and terminating at the next slip band. This process is repeated throughout the entire grain. 3. A tamped-laser ablation loading technique has been developed to introduce high strain rate, high stress and low strains. 4. Both dislocation slip and twinning are present in high strain-rate deformed zirconium, with the relative contribution of each mode to the deformation depending on the initial texture. 5. In situ IR thermal measurements have been used to show that the majority of plastic work is dissipated as heat even under conditions in which twinning is the dominant deformation mode.

Ian Robertson

2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

234

Reprinted from Wildlife Society Bulletin Volume 27, Number I, Spring 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B/7-tJ Reprinted from Wildlife Society Bulletin Volume 27, Number I, Spring 1999 Estimation of ring magnetic field and measuring the impedance change in the radiating coil (EM-SCAN Inc. 1993

235

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - albeni falls wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Future 1. Population-specific goals Summary: -specific goals should be adopted for fish and wildlife affected by hydropower in the Columbia River Basin... in order to improve...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska linking wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Sciences Summary: of the state and federal agencies in Alaska (e.g. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Department of Fish... in FY08, close to 75 percent are...

238

Fact Sheet - Acquisition of 0.5 acre wildlife habitat in the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Falls Dam. The 0.5-acre parcel will be owned and managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for the purpose of wildlife mitigation. A fee in lieu of taxes will be paid to...

239

HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Department that the density of animals in a habitat #12;MEASURING HABITAT QUALITY · Johnson Trans. W. Sect. Wildl. Soc. 41

Johnson, Matthew

240

Loxahatchee Non-profit Sends Mobile Wildlife Laboratory to Island of Dominica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gear, veterinary supplies, and wildlife monitoring and surveillance equipment, and can support six Dominica. The national bird is revered as the icon of Dominica, adorning the nation's flag and coat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

Benson, Etienne Samuel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

How does the public process impact the selection of a nuisance wildlife management plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the 1950s the human relationship with wildlife in the United States shifted dramatically; from primarily consumptive to primarily recreational. Over the same time period a trend of humans moving into suburban communities ...

Siegel, Julianne (Julianne Susan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):206211, Fall 2008 Evaluation of physical barriers to prevent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-footed ferret programs (M. Brennan, biologist, Boulder County, personal communication). However, resource ludovicianus) colonies on public and private lands can result in damage to property. Physical barriers, wildlife damage management Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) pose many challenges

245

After the Conservation Reserve Program: Economic Decisions with Wildlife in Mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on lands that have never been cultivated and up to 75 percent of the cost of restoring grasslands that were previously cropped. Income Potential on Wildlife Land Land managed for wildlife can provide additional income sources, such as nature tourism..., camping, and hiking?depends on the natural amenities of an area. Driving this market is the desire of many to experience nature, and observe plant and animal life. Nature-based tourism provides economic incentives for landowners to conserve...

Cearley, Kenneth A.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Warminski , Patrick; Jones, DeDe

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conser- vation Service office about the Environmental Quality Incentive Program, which offers cost-share funding for cross-fencing, watering, controlling brush, managing grazing and prescribed burning. Carefully consider wild- life needs when managing... brush. Landowners who want to provide habitat for rare or declining species should check on cost-share funding for these practices. The Natural Resources Conservation Service?s Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Regulatory Oversight of Commercial Wildlife Control Activities in the United States. (August 2007) Kieran J. Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Commite: Dr. Clark E. Adams Urbanization decreases... PRIVATIZATION AND REGULATORY OVERSIGHT OF COMERCIAL WILDLIFE CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES A Disertation by KIERAN J. LINDSEY Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Lindsey, Kieran J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

Drais, Gregory

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Model for Parent-Teacher Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination in Young Children With Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Powers et al., 1996; Warger, 2001). Provide parents with opportuni- ties to examine their behefs about self-determination and cultural values for their children (Luft, 2001). Many parents want their children to become more self-determined, so teach- ers...-determination of students with disdhilities. Korean Journal of Special Education, 38(4], 369-390. Luft, P. (2001). Multicultural competence in transition planning processes. In R- W. Flexer, T. J. Simmons, P. Luft, & R. M. Baer (Eds.), TYansition planning for sec- ondary...

Lee, Suk-Hyang; Palmer, Susan B.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

258

Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

259

Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

260

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 60 (2013) LAKEWATCH Continues to be a Large Part of Florida Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a largemouth bass during a sampling event for the long-term fish monitoring program Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Long-Term Fish Monitoring Program in their water bodies. Focusing more on fish and wildlife (biological integrity

Jawitz, James W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dynamic Jiles-Atherton Model for Determining the Magnetic Power Loss at High Frequency in Permanent Magnet Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BH curves at frequencies up to several kilohertz. B. Application of the Dynamic Jiles-Atherton Model to the Magnetic Loss of a PMSM (BLDC motor) According to Guos review paper, empirical formulae have been derived to model the magnetic properties... of the conventional time stepped FEM [11], [26], [27] to utilize the proposed dynamic Jiles-Atherton model to estimate the magnetic power loss in a PMSM. More mathematical work needs to be done to make the dynamic Jiles-Atherton model and time stepped FEM...

Du, Ruoyang; Student Member; IEEE; Robertson, Paul

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

263

PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 APPENDIX L Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife Plans and Programs This inventory was conducted in the spring of 2003 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under contract to WRI. The following pages are printed from the spreadsheet used in the inventory

264

HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

265

Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

266

Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

268

The determination of regionalised wind roses for the UK, for use with the HARM acid depositional model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metcalfe Dr. Claire Jarvis & Dr. Jim Nicholson #12;Abstract- The Hull acid rain (HARM) depositional model of Geography) is not permitted. #12;1 INTRODUCTION The Hull acid rain (HARM) Lagrangian receptor depositional, 2002, p1 & 6). Other acid rain models that use the Lagrangian receptor technique such as the original

269

Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillère, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in running RCMs over Greenland to produce high-qualityoutlet glaciers. For Greenland, this detail is specificallyCurrently, no coupled Greenland Ice Sheet model experiment

Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Use of molecular modeling to determine the interaction and competition of gases within coal for carbon dioxide sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular modeling was employed to both visualize and probe our understanding of carbon dioxide sequestration within a bituminous coal. A large-scale (>20,000 atoms) 3D molecular representation of Pocahontas No. 3 coal was generated. This model was constructed based on a the review data of Stock and Muntean, oxidation and decarboxylation data for aromatic clustersize frequency of Stock and Obeng, and the combination of Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry data with HRTEM, enabled the inclusion of a molecular weight distribution. The model contains 21,931 atoms, with a molecular mass of 174,873 amu, and an average molecular weight of 714 amu, with 201 structural components. The structure was evaluated based on several characteristics to ensure a reasonable constitution (chemical and physical representation). The helium density of Pocahontas No. 3 coal is 1.34 g/cm{sup 3} (dmmf) and the model was 1.27 g/cm{sup 3}. The structure is microporous, with a pore volume comprising 34% of the volume as expected for a coal of this rank. The representation was used to visualize CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity, and the role of moisture in swelling and CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity reduction. Inclusion of 0.68% moisture by mass (ash-free) enabled the model to swell by 1.2% (volume). Inclusion of CO{sub 2} enabled volumetric swelling of 4%.

Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs air pollution, urban sprawl, intro- duced insects and diseases, catastrophic weather events, demand. With expanding world-wide trade and transport (50% of the toys sold in the U.S. come from China) natural barriers

New Hampshire, University of

274

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):242250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Conflicts 3(2):242­250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada geese near, Castleton, NY 12033-9653, USA Abstract: Canada geese (Branta canadensis) often cause significant damage when. We placed alpha-numeric neck collars on 300 Canada geese within 8 km of both John F. Kennedy

275

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs with mineral-rich bedrock, at the base of cliffs and steep slopes, or in ravines--places that accumulate is a GPS unit. Global positioning systems (GPS) are used in the field to record the location of plant

New Hampshire, University of

276

Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife Caitlin Kight by anthropogenic noise pollution, which is often louder, has a different frequency emphasis, and may occur over a different temporal scale, than natural noise. Although a handful of studies have indicated that acoustically

Shaw, Leah B.

277

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

278

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

279

Marine Conservation UK's national charity dedicated to the protection of marine wildlife.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will urge all troops in Iraq to uphold international law and will welcome "the firm commitmentMarine Conservation UK's national charity dedicated to the protection of marine wildlife. Public Discussion Contact Us Sitemap Japan-EU summit in Tokyo to focus on enlargement, investment 20 June 2004

280

Perth & Kinross Red Squirrel Group update for SSG National Lottery: Community Wildlife fund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perth & Kinross Red Squirrel Group ­ update for SSG National Lottery: Community Wildlife fund PKRSG's Red squirrel conservation efforts were significantly boosted by receipt of a funding award from and 23rd ) and with the help of the Royal Mail some 36,470 `Reds on your doorstep' leaflets were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

282

ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix D STAFF ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS During the course. This report provides the results of the biological analysis of the adopted actions. The package was termed

283

Wildlife conservation and reduced emissions from deforestation in a case study of Nantu National Park,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more effective than the PAs without international investment. In contrast with the recent hopes Park, Sulawesi 1. The effectiveness of forest protection--many measures, one goal Ewan A. Macdonald a o Published on line 3 April 2011 Keywords: Protected area Sulawesi REDD Wildlife conservation

Malhi, Yadvinder

284

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):315320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):315­320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement in South% in 2006 and 80% in 2007, but the timing was important. Fields where abatement practices were applied early in the growing season had less damage than fields where they were applied later. Abatement practices that were

285

RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

286

Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

287

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(1):89, Spring 2009 The Soap Box  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of controlling wildlife were (1) the field success of poison against meadow mice during a Nevada mouse plague not be transmissible to other vertebrates. Because this was not successful, it searched for a poison bait or lethal gas that any accurate knowledge of the food habits of such pests and effective means for reducing their numbers

288

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

290

As I travel across the country talking with wildlife professionals about leadership and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that many wildlife professionals still lack basic people skills. We obviously have historically understood skills is the type of people our pro- fession attracts; we simply don't attract many people, relative our profession. Unfortunately, many of us lack an under- standing of how to develop better people

291

Spatial and Temporal Survey of Feral Pig Ectoparasites in Three Texas Wildlife Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wildlife districts. This is the first report of these fleas on feral pigs. Lice and ticks were collected from all gender and age classes of feral pigs from all sample sites. Only hog lice, Haematopinus suis, were collected at all three sample sites. Seven...

Schuster, Anthony

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):299312, Fall 2013 Do artificial nests simulate nest success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):299­312, Fall 2013 Do artificial nests simulate nest success State University, Logan, UT 84322- 5230, USA Abstract: Artificial nests have been used to study factors affecting nest success because researchers can manipulate them more than natural bird nests. Many

293

HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

294

MAPS Stations on National Wildlife Refuges in the USFWS Pacific Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPS Stations on National Wildlife Refuges in the USFWS Pacific Region Current Status and Future ............................................................................................. 3 Capture Rates of Adult Birds at MAPS Stations on NWR Lands .................... 3 Identifying ................................................................................. 4 Identifying Gaps in the Distribution of MAPS Stations in the Pacific Region ...... 5 Assessing

DeSante, David F.

295

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):251256, Fall 2009 Burrowing owl and other migratory bird  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), including the burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hazard, burrowing owl, Edwards Air Force Base, human­wildlife conflicts, Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Dolbeer 2006). Most are federally protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) of 1918, which

296

Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

297

Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL 1 Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife progress. Subbasin assessments provide technical information upon which subbasin plans and other planning but are separate and distinct technical exercises. Assessments help to estimate the resource potential of each

298

Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project of potential risk to the species. #12;Corn Snake ­ Fairly common in Delaware, but is not likely to be present

Firestone, Jeremy

299

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):216225, Fall 2009 Personal and corporate liability in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

managers and operators are being sued personally for human injuries and death, as well as property damage, state, and provincial wildlife management programs have contributed to population increases in large that airport operators and managers must address the issues of organizational and personal liability. Airport

300

Comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs - Continuum through...

302

CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

303

CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

304

CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

305

CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

306

CX-003618: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and foothills wildlife. The property is located in an area identified as a priority area for fish and wildlife and, in combination with over 3000 acres of adjacent public...

307

Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

Miller, Karl V.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A novel method to develop an otolith microchemistry model to determine striped bass habitat use in the San Francisco Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Otolith Sr/Ca has become a popular tool for hind casting habitat utilization and migration histories of euryhaline fish. It can readily identify habitat shifts of diadromous fish in most systems. Inferring movements of fish within estuarine habitat, however, requires a model of that accounts of the local water chemistry and the response of individual species to that water chemistry, which is poorly understood. Modeling is further complicated by the fact that high marine Sr and Ca concentrations results in a rapid, nonlinear increase in water Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between fresh and marine waters. Here we demonstrate a novel method for developing a salinity-otolith Sr/Ca model for the purpose of reconstructing striped bass (Morone saxatilis) habitat use in the San Francisco Bay estuary. We used correlated Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios measurements from adult otoliths from striped bass that experienced a range of salinities to infer striped bass otolith Sr/Ca response to changes in salinity and water Sr/Ca ratio. Otolith {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr can be assumed to accurately record water {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr because there is no biological fractionation of Sr isotopes. Water {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr can in turn be used to estimate water salinity based on the mixing of fresh and marine water with known {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. The relationship between adjacent analyses on otoliths of Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr by LA-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS (r{sup 2} = 0.65, n = 66) is used to predict water salinity from a measured Sr/Ca ratio. The nature of this non-linear model lends itself well to identifying residence in the Delta and to a lesser extent Suisun Bay, but does not do well locating residence within the more saline bays west of Carquinez Strait. An increase in the number of analyses would improve model confidence, but ultimately the precision of the model is limited by the variability in the response of individual fish to water Sr/Ca.

Phillis, C C; Ostrach, D J; Gras, M; Yin, Q; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G; Weber, P K

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Vacancy diffusion in colloidal crystals as determined by dynamical density-functional theory and the phase-field-crystal model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-dimensional crystal of repulsive dipolar particles is studied in the vicinity of its melting transition by using Brownian dynamics computer simulation, dynamical density functional theory and phase-field crystal modelling. A vacancy is created by taking out a particle from an equilibrated crystal and the relaxation dynamics of the vacancy is followed by monitoring the time-dependent one-particle density. We find that the vacancy is quickly filled up by diffusive hopping of neighbouring particles towards the vacancy center. We examine the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant and find that it decreases with decreasing temperature in the simulations. This trend is reproduced by the dynamical density functional theory. Conversely, the phase field crystal calculations predict the opposite trend. Therefore, the phase-field model needs a temperature-dependent expression for the mobility to predict trends correctly.

Sven van Teeffelen; Cristian Vasile Achim; Hartmut Lwen

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

312

Infusing self-determination into 18-21 services for students with intellectual or developmental disabilities: A multi-stage, multiple component model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

educational services in enviro'nments that are age-appropriate for these students and that allow them to interact with same-age peers. Such environments needed to provide the op- portunity for students to become socially in- cluded in their communities... to 21 program. This evaluation was designed to determine if students who were involved in the model could achieve ed- ucationally relevant goals across transition-re- lated areas using a self-directed process, and to examine the impact of such activities...

Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Garner, Nancy; Danna, Yeager; Lawrence, Margaret; Davis, Anna Kay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Description and analysis of vehicle and train collisions with wildlife in Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada, 1951-1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures that have been used in Jasper National Park is alsoCOLLISIONS WITH WILDLIFE IN JASPER NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTANational Park Warden, Jasper National Park, 780-852-6235,

Bertwistle, Jim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3910, Forestry and Natural Resources Practicum, the intern must complete

Hall, Daniel

315

Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3900, Forestry and Natural Resources Internship, the intern must work

Hall, Daniel

316

Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat appiness Zero Carbon Zero Waste Sustainable Transport Sustainable Materia munity Equity & Local Economy Health & Happiness Zero Carbon Zero Was Water Land Use

Netoff, Theoden

317

HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):139149, Spring 2014 Evaluation of foliar sprays to reduce crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the anthraquinone-based product, Avipel (44 minutes/day) than on reference plots (132 minutes/day; P and economical in the field. Key words: anthraquinone, Canada geese, crop damage, human­wildlife conflicts

318

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Model independent determination of the CKM phase $?$ using input from $D^0-\\bar{D}^0$ mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new, amplitude model-independent method to measure the CP violation parameter $\\gamma$ in $B^- \\to DK^-$ and related decays. Information on charm interference parameters, usually obtained from charm threshold data, is obtained from charm mixing. By splitting the phase space of the $D$ meson decay into several bins, enough information can be gained to measure $\\gamma$ without input from the charm threshold. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with a simulation study of $B^- \\to DK^-$ with $D \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. We compare the performance of our novel approach to that of a previously proposed binned analysis which uses charm interference parameters obtained from threshold data. While both methods provide useful constraints, the combination of the two by far outperforms either of them applied on their own. Such an analysis would provide a highly competitive measurement of $\\gamma$. Our simulation studies indicate, subject to assumptions about data yields and the amplitude structure of $D^0 \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, a statistical uncertainty on $\\gamma$ of $\\sim 13^{\\circ}$ with existing data and $4^{\\circ}$ for the LHCb-upgrade.

Samuel Harnew; Jonas Rademacker

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

DETERMINATION OF AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISPOSITION OF 2-BUTOXYETHANOL AND ITS METABOLITES IN MICE AND RATS TO IMPROVE PBPK MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is the most widely used glycol ether solvent. BE's major metabolite, butoxyacetic acid (BAA), causes hemolysis with significant species differences in sensitivity. Several PBPK models have been developed over the past two decades to describe the disposition of BE and BAA in male rats and humans to refine health risk assessments. More recent efforts by Lee et al. (1998) to describe the kinetics of BE and BAA in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) chronic inhalation studies required the use of several assumptions to extrapolate model parameters from earlier PBPK models developed for young male rats to include female F344 and both sexes of B6C3F1 mice and the effects of aging. To replace these assumptions, studies were conducted to determine the impact of age, gender and species on the metabolism of BE, and the tissue partitioning, renal acid transport and plasma protein binding of BAA. In the current study, the Lee et al. PBPK model was updated and expanded to include the further metabolism of BAA and the salivary excretion of BE and BAA which may contribute to the forestomach irritation observed in mice in the NTP study. The revised model predicted that peak blood concentrations of BAA achieved following 6-hr inhalation exposures are greatest in young adult female rats at concentrations up to 300 ppm. This is not the case predicted for old (>18 months) animals, where peak blood concentrations of BAA in male and female mice were similar to or greater than female rats. The revised model serves as a quantitative tool for integrating an extensive pharmacokinetic and mechanistic database into a format that can readily be used to compare internal dosimetry across dose, route of exposure and species.

Corley, Rick A.; Grant, Donna M.; Farris, Elizabeth; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Thrall, K D.; Poet, Torka S.

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

Bickman, John W. [Purdue University

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Wildlife conservation education efforts by Information and Education (I&E) divisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Wende Swank (Member) 3LI , J hn K. Thomas (Member) Da id Schmidly (Department Head) December 1987 ABSTRACT Wildlife Conservation Education Efforts by Information and Education Divisions (I&E) (December 1987) Richard Alan Stone, B. S.... John K. Thomas in the construction and interpretation of the survey. Not to be forgotten are the survey respondents whose time spent on the surv ey and patience with me on the phone proves that there are commited individuals in conserv ation...

Stone, Richard Alan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Incorporating risk into the feasibility assessment of alternative brush management strategies for the Welder Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be produced from it over time. Historically, the significant revenue source from rangelands has been grazing domestic animals for the production of consumer goods. More recently, a growing ecotourism industry, which includes hunting, hiking, bird watching... or failure is significant. Precautions must also be taken when developing a cost-effective brush management scheme to ensure that wildlife habitat disturbance is minimized if ecotourism rents are a desired goal. Problem Statement The purpose...

Schumann, Keith D.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

N /A

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe SecondInformation 3 - Wildlife

327

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARATIVE SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION PROGRAM ORGANIZATION TO DETERMINE BEST-FIT PROGRAM MODEL: A CASE STUDY OF THE NORTH WEST AND SOUTH WEST REGIONS OF CAMEROON A Dissertation by GWENDOLINE NA-AH NYAMBI... A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon Copyright 2012 Gwendoline Na-ah Nyambi A COMPARATIVE...

Nyambi, Gwendoline

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

N /A

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

managemen t Lyons, R. K. and T. F. Ginnett. 1998. Integrat- ing Deer, Quail, and Tu rkey Habitat. L-5196, Te xas Agri c u lt u ral Ext en si o n Service. Lyons, R. K., M. K. Owens, and R. V. Machen. 1998. Juniper biology and management in Texas. B-6074...Woody Plants and Wildlife Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily...

Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of live oak stems by height class in February, April, and July of 1976 after burning on several dates on the Aransas National Wildife Refuge near Austwell, Texas, ~ . . . ~ . . . ~ ~ ~ 48 15 Canopy cover (/) of live oak, grass, and f orbs in February... 1977 on areas burned at various dates on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge near Austwell, Texas. . 49 16 Total Standing crop and new growth (kg/ha) of live oak and standing crop increase (/) represented by new growth in April and July, 1976...

Kelley, David Mitchell

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

N /A

2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-34)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

N /A

2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

N /A

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

N /A

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Production Test (Phase III - AdministrativePlanningModeling Tasks) CX(s) Applied: A2,...

339

CX-000630: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000630: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Partnership Model to Build Solar Training Capacity in the Midwest CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 0121...

340

CX-008646: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-008646: Categorical Exclusion Determination Metal Accumulation in Model Plants - Radioactive Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05222012 Location(s): South...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CX-000267: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000267: Categorical Exclusion Determination A New Analytic-Adaptive Model for Enhanced Geothermal System Assessment, Development and Management Support CX(s)...

342

CX-005201: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Southern Nevada CX(s) Applied: A9,...

343

CX-009327: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009327: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

344

CX-009329: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009329: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

345

CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

346

CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

347

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the U.S. Department of Energy that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one and wildlife mitigation. Also, direct-funding payments to the other federal agencies for theERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act

348

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Concerns and Recommendations Our specific comments on the Council's draft recommendations address several issues, broadly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power needs of the people of the Pacific Northwest. In our perspective it is one of your most Balancing the Fish and Wildlife Program under the Northwest Power Act.Instead of reanalyzing the projects for the Fish and Wildlife Program was established by the Bonneville Power Administration in their electricity

349

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Discussion: Survey methods, design, and coordination * Methodologies for collecting data (including issues such as: cross-platform comparison, detectability, capturing...

350

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Cetaceans, seals, sea turtles, ocean sunfish and basking sharks. Other sharks and fish are recorded opportunistically. Data collection methods: Line-transect methods that...

351

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrialEnergyFinal FY 2009 NEUP RD AwardsDepartmentGridData |

352

FW370 -Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects -Spring 2012 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 10-11:40, Wagar 107 (Lecture & Discussion) or NR 232, CLL West (Lab)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FW370 - Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects - Spring 2012 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 10 of this course is to introduce you to the principles of conducting sound scientific research in fish, wildlife of the scientific method in fish, wildlife, and conservation biology research (from asking good questions

353

FW370 Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects Spring 2011 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 1011:40, Wagar 107 (Lecture & Discussion) or NR 232, CLL West (Lab)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FW370 Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects Spring 2011 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 1011 is to introduce you to the principles of conducting sound scientific research in fish, wildlife, and conservation of the scientific method in fish & wildlife research (from asking good questions to designing experiments

354

CX-003628: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW?s) acquisition of a conservation easement on 5 parcels of the...

355

CX-004602: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Resources Program, Environmental Program, Wildlife and Fisheries Program, the Forestry Program, and the Conservation Enforcement Program. There would also be a Tribal Court...

356

Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Buck: Wildlife Monitoring on Shrublands of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers 3,561 km2 and extends over portions of both the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts. The resulting diverse and complex flora and fauna exhibit elements of both deserts. There are 20 vegetation associations, composed primarily of shrubs, nested within 10 vegetation alliances. Of the more than 1,200 invertebrate and 339 vertebrate species found in these shrubland habitats, 267 are considered sensitive or protected/regulated by federal or state laws. Wildlife and wildlife habitat monitoring ensures NTS activities comply with all federal and state laws enacted for the protection of these valuable biological resources and provides ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and current activities on these resources. This paper describes the monitoring approach used at this large site. Monitoring strategies include conducting preactivity surveys, proactively monitoring sensitive species, monitoring long-term population trends, and collaborating with other agencies and biologists. Ways to make monitoring more efficient and examples of successful monitoring and collaborations are discussed.

Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

N /A

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Wildlife Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stages. At first there are ?flu-like? symptoms such as fatigue, fever, sore throat, nausea and cough- ing. According to the Texas Department of Health, many of those infected develop a small red lesion around the site of the tick or flea bite...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Protecting Wildlife  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bees as Indicators of Radionuclide Contamination (pdf) Great Horned Owls at the Los Alamos Environmental Research Park: Population Survey, Nesting Biology, and Management...

362

Protecting Wildlife  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for Plutonium CleanupProposalTeam:RightsProtecting

363

GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat impacts, and then examine other anthropogenic sources of avian mortality. Next, we provide a broad

Firestone, Jeremy

364

United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fishes. S..::aleless warm- water fish are particularly susceptible. High water temperature decreases fish resistance to this disease. RANGE Best known in America. Excessively hot summer temperatures are favorable and Wildlife INTRODUCTION Columnaris disease attacks many species of fresh -water fishes. Also known as "Cotton

365

Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service A National Streamflow Network Gap Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2013 13039500, Henrys Fork near Lake, Idaho; photograph by Nathan Jacobson, USGS. USGS streamgage 10336660, Emily B. Osborne, and Ken Eng Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Scientific

Fleskes, Joe

366

On the merits and feasibility of wildlife monitoring for conservation: a case study from Katavi National Park,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wildlife populations, it is currently carried out in surprisingly few protected areas in Africa. Here, data, are presented. These data provide information on large mammal densities, identify declines in populations of sev managers especially in identifying population declines; counts should be employed more often in East Africa

Caro, Tim

367

Improving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Conservation Biology Vietnam is a tropical country rich in biodiversity. However, biodiversity in Vietnam has forests. Improving the conservation of biodiversity in Vietnam is a contemporary issue of concern. MyImproving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife

368

Modeling of the Phase behavior of light (C2 & C3) olefins in liquid phase epoxidation systems and experimental determination of gas/liquid mass transfer coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been developed by the researchers at Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis (CEBC), employing environmentally benign substances (catalyst methyltrioxorhenium, oxidant aqueous H2O2) dissolved in a suitable solvent (determined to be methanol...

Ghanta, Madhav

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Correlations Among Gender, Career Interests, Conservation Issues, And Curriculum Choice By Students In Wildlife And Fisheries Sciences At Texas A&M University From 2000 To 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enrolled in a mandatory class, Conservation and Management (WFSC 201). Among other questions, the survey asked students to provide information about their curriculum choice, agreement with value statements about wildlife and conservation issues, career...

Woldhagen, Ashley N.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Spatial and temporal patterns of Lycium carolinianum Walt., the Carolina Wolfberry, in the salt marshes of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which are utilized by the cranes each winter. Past research indicates that the Carolina wolfberry (Lycium carolinianum) contributes 21-52% of crane energy intake early in the wintering period (Chavez 1996...

Butzler, Rachel Elizabeth

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

Davis, Amber Marie

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

Multicritical points and crossover mediating the strong violation of universality: Wang-Landau determinations in the random-bond d=2 Blume-Capel model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of bond randomness on the phase diagram and critical behavior of the square lattice ferromagnetic Blume-Capel model are discussed. The system is studied in both the pure and disordered versions by the same ...

Malakis, A.

373

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical...

374

Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the others in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

CX-012287: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-012287: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Reduced-Order Model for Gas-Solid Flow Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06...

376

CX-012288: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-012288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Reduced-Order Model for Gas-Solid Flow Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06...

377

ANALYTICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR MODELLING THE LONG--TERM BEHAVIOUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reliability theory, one might wish to determine the distribution of the residual lifetime of a system at 1980 of stochastic systems arising in areas as diverse as wildlife management, chemical kinetics and reliability. In finite­state systems the existence of a quasistationary distribution is guaranteed. However

Pollett, Phil

378

CX-006311: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Acquisition of Properties near the Naches River in Yakima County, Washington for Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.25 Date: 07212011...

379

Model-independent determination of the 12C(p,p')12C*(15.11 MeV, 1+, T=1) transition amplitude at 200 MeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data obtained through simultaneous measurements of (p,p') spin-transfer observables and (p,p'gamma) coincident spin observables, we have made a model-independent determination of the complete scattering amplitude for the 15.11 MeV, 1+, T=1 state in 12C at an incident proton energy of 200 MeV, for four center of mass proton scattering angles ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 degrees. At each angle, 16 different observables were determined, whereas only 11 independent quantities are required to specify the transition amplitude for this state. It had been shown previously that the set of observables measured span the allowed space; hence the system is overdetermined, which allowed us to extract, in a model-independent fashion, each of the individual spin-operator amplitudes that characterize the reaction. Additional insight into the physical mechanisms that drive this transition is obtained by mapping out the momentum-transfer dependence of these amplitudes. We also compare the magnitudes and phases determined for each of the spin-operator amplitudes to the predictions of calculations performed in both relativistic and nonrelativistic frameworks, and discuss the physics content of these comparisons.

Steven P. Wells; Scott W. Wissink

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft, and In-Ocean Observations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CX-000643: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied: A9,...

382

Central Moloney: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4702) ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination to Central Moloney, Inc. finding that liquid-immersed distribution transformer basic models 30300150 and 32500095 do not comport with the energy conservation...

383

Heat Controller: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-15004)...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Heat Controller, Inc. finding that the room air conditioner distributed in commerce by Heat Controller as Comfort Aire brand models...

384

Ecosystem and Wildlife Implications of Brush: Management System Designed to Improve Water Runoff and Percolation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................................................... 11 Participants............................................................................................................................................... 11 Introduction................................................................................................................................................. 11 Methods ................................................................................................................................................... 11 Model Inputs...

Arrington, D. Albrey; Conner, Richard; Dugas, William; Hejl, Sallie; Magness, Dawn; Muttiah, Ranjan; Olenick, Keith; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Zinn, Michele; Wilkins, Neal; Amonett, Carl; Bednarz, Steve; Dybala, Tim; Griffith, Rebecca; Jarboe, Hank

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A model study of the effect of bucket dentations on a ski-jump spillway jet: with a mathematical analysis of critical bucket radius determination.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigations have not shown this high a degree of success, however, the reduction is con- siderable in most cases. 10 The problem of cavitation must be dealt with any time there is an abrupt change of direction of flow of a high speed stream. lnas- rnuch... as rounding of sharp corners has a tendency to reduce cavita- tion it can be seen that dentations with rounded crowns have a dual advantage. The problem of cavitation will not become evident in the normal spillway model tests. Relative Velocit of Jet...

Gladwell, John Stuart

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Author manuscript, published in "International Conference on Information Fusion (2013)" An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Co-Driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AbstractFull autonomy of ground vehicles is a major goal of the ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) community. However, reaching such highest autonomy level in all situations (weather, traffic,...) may seem difficult in practice, despite recent results regarding driverless cars (e.g., Google Cars). In addition, an automated vehicle should also self-assess its own perception abilities, and not only perceive its environment. In this paper, we propose an intermediate approach towards full automation, by defining a spectrum of automation layers, from fully manual (the car is driven by a driver) to fully automated (the car is driven by a computer), based on an ontological model for representing knowledge. We also propose a second ontology for situation assessment (what does the automated car perceive?), including the sensors/actuators state, environmental conditions and drivers state. Finally, we also define inference rules to link the situation assessment ontology to the automation level one. Both ontological models have been built and first results are presented. I.

Evangeline Pollard; Fawzi Nashashibi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

388

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a single-fluid diffuse interface model in the ALE-AMR hydrodynamics code to simulate surface tension effects. We show simula- tions and compare them to other surface tension...

389

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sion effects. We show the result of a test case, and compare it to the result without surface tension. The model describes droplet formation nicely. Application The ARRA-funded...

390

Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

Spdtke, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Method for determining gene knockouts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

Maranas, Costas D. (Port Matilda, PA); Burgard, Anthony R. (State College, PA); Pharkya, Priti (State College, PA)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method for determining gene knockouts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

Determination of Dark Energy and Dark Matter from the values of Redshift for the present time, Planck and Trans-Planck epochs of the Big-Bang model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an alternative to the Standard cosmology model we have developed a new modified Freundlich's (quantum relativity) redshift (MFRS) mechanisms, which provide a precise solutions of the Dark Energy and Dark Matter problems. We apply the joint solution of three MFRS equations for concordances quantize bounce Planck hierarchy steps. Simultaneous scaling solutions of MFRS equations in logarithmic scale appropriate to three cosmological epoch's, yields a currently testable predictions regarding the Dark Matter {\\Omega}_{DM} = 0.25, and Dark Energy {\\Omega}_{DE} = 0.75. These predictions coincides with the recent observational data from WMAP and other a key supernovae SNe Ia findings. Thus, the presence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy had already been not only detected observationally, but also confirmed theoretically with the very compelling accuracy. From the WMAP7 and our predicted ages we find a value of the Hubble constant H_0 = 65.6 km * s^{-1} Mpc^{-1} which is excellent agreement with the Planck 2013 results XVI. Compared with the "holographic scenario" results, we find an important coincidence between our new and "holographic" parameters. We discuss the connection hierarchy between the multiverse masses and examine the status of the cosmic acceleration. The product of the age of the Universe into the cosmic acceleration in each cosmological epochs --including present day are constant and precisely corresponds to an possible observable-geophysical parameter g_U = 9.50005264_{265} (exact) * (m/s^2). For the derived by WMAP7 age of the Universe t_{W7} = 13.75(13) * 10^9 yr, we find the relevant acceleration a_{W7} = 6.91(65) * 10^{-10} m/s^2. The predicted value of t_0 = 9.0264_9(51) * 10^2 Gyr is consistent with the background acceleration. a_0 = 1.05246_4(61) * 10^{-11} m/s^2.

Asger G. Gasanalizade; Ramin A. Hasanalizade

2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

BIOLOGY AT NCBS, BANGALORE AND DBS, MUMBAI (PhD/Int-PhD/ M. Sc.-by-Research/ M. Sc. in Wildlife & Conservation)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY AT NCBS, BANGALORE AND DBS, MUMBAI (PhD/Int-PhD/ M. Sc.-by-Research/ M. Sc. in Wildlife & Conservation) (Please check the websites: `Admissions' at www.ncbs.res.in; http at both Bangalore and Mumbai campuses. Internet access, e-mail and bibliography search support are also

Bhalla, Upinder S.

396

FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have fish in the water of a particular stream before their release into that stream. Act -- See Northwest of different elements of the system are better understood. adult equivalent population The number of fish

397

R E V I E W : W I L D L I F E E C O L O G Y Emerging Infectious Diseases of Wildlife--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the persis- tence of rinderpest in eastern Africa contin- ues to threaten bovid populations. Pandemics the emergence of EIDs via increasing population density, especially in urban areas (dengue, cholera epizootiological criteria: (i) EIDs associated with "spill-over" from domestic animals to wildlife populations

Wilmers, Chris

398

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

400

ORIGINAL PAPER Determinants of male reproductive success in American  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Scott R. Creel & Steven T. Kalinowski & Ninh V. Vu & Howard B. Quigley Received: 4 December 2008. Costello :H. B. Quigley Hornocker Wildlife Institute and Wildlife Conservation Society, 301 N Wilson@bresnan.net Present Address: H. B. Quigley Panthera, PO Box 11363, Bozeman, MT 59719, USA Behav Ecol Sociobiol DOI 10

Creel, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Determining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):261272, Fall 2012 A model to predict the likelihood of cliff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

migratory birds that frequently nest on highway structures. Under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Under the act, completed nests cannot be disturbed during the breeding

403

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofofSeptember 12, 2011. RecoveryFinal Design8,2011GridJuly

404

A procedure for determining contents of rabbit stomachs and its application to cottontails on the Gene Howe Wildlife Management Area in midwinter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Su'bto tel 36 T T 22 - 39 29 203 T 0 7 0, 8 0 + le4 + i+4 + 7o2 T T 2+2 T 3a9 2e9 2e3 le9 + 2+4 go. 1 go 2 Ro, No, 3, 6 7 5 3, 0 T T T 11 1 2 3 2. 8 & *9 + 3+5 MTAL 3, 6 7+5 3eO T T llel T lle8 - 2+3 3+9 + 4, E. 100 100 100 100.... :umed by cottontails in the Texas 'anhnndle in midwint'. r. '1'odd (1/2, ) reported co;t ntails ii. :in; 70 species of woody. plants in -, inter. Allen (19~x9) found 2'! -necies of woody plants bein, . used by cottontails in ;inter, Trio-. nsee (if...

Davis, Charles A

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

CX-003713: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3, B3.6 Date: 09092010 Location(s):...

410

CX-004369: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11012010 Location(s): Maine...

411

CX-009425: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination Partial Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: B3.3, B3.16, B5.18 Date: 11052012 Location(s): Maine...

412

CX-002373: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 05132010 Location(s): Gulf of Maine,...

413

Engineered Products: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5401)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Engineered Products Company finding that basic model 15701 of metal halide lamp fixture does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

414

Goodman Manufacturing: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-4301)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Goodman Manufacturing finding that model CPC180XXX3BXXXAA (CPC180*) of commercial package air conditioner does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

415

Determination of Longitudinal Stress in Rails  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to determine the longitudinal stress in rails by using the polarization of Rayleigh waves. Analytical models are developed to describe the effect of applied stress on wave speed and on the polarization of Rayleigh...

Djayaputra, Ferdinand

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mile High: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4501)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Mile High Equipment, LLC finding that Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

417

Philips: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-2605)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. finding that basic model VEL-I S40-SC, a fluorescent lamp ballast, does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

418

Lutron Electronics: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-3796)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. finding that a variety of Class A external power supply basic models do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

419

Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0305)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that a variety of basic models of split-system air conditioning heat pumps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

420

CX-009187: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-009187: Categorical Exclusion Determination (0675 - 1572) DNV - Sensor Enhanced and Model Validated Life Extension of Batteries for Energy Storage CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):283292, Fall 2010 Estimating annual vertebrate mortality on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at wind turbines to estimate the average annual number of vertebrates killed by cars on roads within to scavenging and other factors. We modified an estimator previously developed for determining bird mortality were amphibians and small reptiles, but birds and mammals also were killed in large numbers. The amount

422

Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or private groups, managing existing public and private lands for diversity values, regulating detrimental private land uses, and providing incentives for private habitat protection. Common to all these approaches is a need to determine the specific areas of land that warrant action. Nearly 12 percent of California has

Standiford, Richard B.

423

Cooperative Determination on Cache Replacement Candidates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooperative Determination on Cache Replacement Candidates for Transcoding Proxy Caching Keqiu Li1- mination on cache replacement candidates for transcoding proxies. An original model which determines cache replacement candidates on all can- didate nodes in a coordinated fashion with the objective of minimizing

Chin, Francis Y.L.

424

Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Lower Snake River tributaries Prepared by: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is inadequate. This plan will therefore, serve as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic of known quality (accuracy and precision) #12;- Validate EDT model as a reliable measure of habitat

425

Jointness of Growth Determinants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, then the model space M is the set of all 2K linear models. Each model Mj is 2If the assumption of conditionally homoscedastic residuals is violated, the mean slope coeffi- cients (and therefore also model weights) would be consistently estimated. However... straightforward manner from conditional (model specific) parameter estimates. The mean of the posterior distribution of model parameter ?i, unconditional with respect to space of models M, but conditional on including variable xi, equals E(?i|?i = 1,D) = 2K? j=1 1...

Doppelhofer, Gernot; Weeks, Melvyn

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and by antibiotic resistance determinants. Environ Pollut 157: 28932902. 42. Mandujano S, Escobedo-Morales LA, Palacios-Silva R (2004) Movements of Alouatta Palliata among forest fragments in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. Neotrop Primates 12: 126131. 43. Chaves OM, Stoner... , Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2 Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America, 3 Fundacion Lusara, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract There are a growing number of reports...

Cristbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Dunn, Jacob C.; Day, Jennifer M. W.; Ambile-Cuevas, Carlos F.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Development of a wildlife monitoring system on the proposed Woodlands city site, Montgomery County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Approximate deer densities were assessed by use of the Hahn cruise-line, road strip census, and track count methods. Track count lines were also establi. shed to determine the number of mammals, excluding rodents, crossing per mile of transect. Lakes... monitoring system was developed to detect changes in species density or diversity during and following construction of the city. The study area encompassed approximately 17, 000 acres, most of which was predominantly a pine forest. I A number...

Poche, Richard Michael

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

Das, Rhiju

430

Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-1602)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that indoor unit model AEW244 and outdoor unit model NCPC-424-3010 of residential split system central air conditioning system do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

431

Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

Maynard, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hendee, Shonn P. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohrscheib, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nunez, David (Albuquerque, NM); Alam, M. Kathleen (Cedar Crest, NM); Franke, James E. (Franklin, TN); Kemeny, Gabor J. (Madison, WI)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Sunnyside Wildlife Area Wildlife Area Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary Treatment Morgan Lake Secondary Treatment So. Morgan Wetland- Tertiary New Johnson Wetland;#12;Moist Soil and Wetland Management Giffen LakeRice Paddies Brady Wetland 90-Acre Field #12;Smartweed Seeds #12;#12;#12;#12;N.A. Wetlands Conservation Act Grant (NAWCA) Sulphur Cr. Wasteway Bridgeman Pond

433

Models and Algorithms for Crowdsourcing Discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1954, 12 km northeast of Sinton, Texas. 2.3 Panasonic KX-In Welder Wildlife Foundation, Sinton, Texas. [Blei et al. ,Wildlife Foundation, Sinton, Texas. [Goebel and Gruenwald,

Faridani, Siamak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Midea: Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Noncompliance Determination to Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. finding that basic model HD-146F, a...

435

Westinghouse Lighting: Noncompliance Determination (2010-CE-09/1001)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation finding that various models of incandescent reflector lamps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

436

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

437

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Air and Water Volume 2 Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Gender determination in populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ural-Tweed Bighorn Sheep Wildlife Mitigation Project, 1986 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the project activities from September 1, 1984 to December 31, 1986. To date, habitat treatments have been initiated on eight areas. The treatments include selective slash and burn, prescribed fire and fertilization. Inclement weather precluded the completion of the prescribed burns scheduled during fall 1985 and fall 1986. The lower Stonehill prescribed fire was rescheduled from fall 1985 to spring 1986 with the burn accomplished, producing varied results. Extensive pretreatment vegetative information has been collected from all units scheduled for habitat manipulations. Additionally, future projects have been delineated for other areas frequented by bighorn sheep. Ten adult bighorn sheep (5 ewes and 5 rams) have been fitted with radio transmitters. Systematic aerial and ground surveys were utilized to monitor the movements and seasonal habitat preferences of the instrumented sheep. Age and sex information was gathered whenever possible to aid in the development of a population model, Monthly pallet group collections were initiated in May 1985 to provide samples for 2.6 diaminopimetic acid (DAPA), food habits and lungworm larvae analysis. The majority of the data analysis is ongoing and will be presented in later reports.

Yde, Chris A. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); Summerfield, Bob; Young, Lewis (Kootenai National Forest, Libby, MT)

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A sociobioeconomic fisheries simulation model: the Texas inshore shrimp fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SO CIO BIO EC ONO MIC FISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHORE SHRIMP FISHERY A Thesis JUDITH T ERA UTHA M E R Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SO CIO BIOS COND MIC PISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHO RE SH RIM P FISHER 7 A Thesis by JUDITH T KRAUTHA MER Approved as to style and content by: b'C. ~ Wilham...

Krauthamer, Judith T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Determinants of Meme Popularity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online social media have greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what are the fundamental mechanisms driving dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior and analytically show, using techniques from mathematical population genetics, that competition between memes for the limited resource of user attention leads to a type of self-organized criticality, with heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity: a few memes "go viral" but the majority become only moderately popular. The time-dependent solutions of the model are shown to fit empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, and to predict novel scaling features of the data. The presented framework, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

Gleeson, James P; Baos, Raquel A; Moreno, Yamir

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Grainger: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1411)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Grainger International Inc. finding that freezer models, privately labeled as the Dayton 5NTX4, the Dayton 5NTX5, and the Dayton 5NTX6 do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

445

Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

446

Summit Manufacturing: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0303)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Summit Manufacturing, Inc. finding that 4SHP13LE136P + 15001+CA042A964+TDR basic model, a split-system air conditioning heat pump with a heat pump coil, does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

447

Pax Global: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1413)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Pax Global, Inc. finding that freezer basic models (1) Crosley CCF51; (2) Crosley CCF69; (3) Crosley CCF106; and (4) Daewoo DCF-106W do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

448

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

What determines galactic evolution?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are briefly introducing the most important ingredients to study galactic evolution. In particular the roles of star formation, nucleosynthesis and gas flows. Then we are discussing the two different approaches to galactic evolution: the stellar population approach (chemical evolution models) and the hierarchical clustering scenario for galaxy formation. It is shown that there are still some controversial points in the two approaches, as evident in the brief summary of the discussion.

Francesca Matteucci

2002-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Detailed residential electric determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data on residential loads has been collected from four residences in real time. The data, measured at 5-second intervals for 53 days of continuous operation, were statistically characterized. An algorithm was developed and incorporated into the modeling code SOLCEL. Performance simulations with SOLCEL using these data as well as previous data collected over longer time intervals indicate that no significant errors in system value are introduced through the use of long-term average data.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ultratrace determination of curium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a method for detection of curium at near single atom levels is being undertaken as a part of the Advanced Concepts Project at Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. Ultratrace determination of curium, with the ability to quantify the fraction that is curium-242, provides a signature method of detecting clandestine reprocessing of recently irradiated uranium targets. Curium initially present in any of a variety of materials such as air filters, solid or liquid process waste, soil, flora, or fauna can be recovered via current chemical separations processing techniques. Using the ultratrace method being developed, such recovered curium will be quantified with thousand-fold higher sensitivity than the best currently available method which is alpha counting. This high sensitivity arises because, on average, a given trivalent curium (Cm{sup 3+}) ion can emit a very large number of fluorescence photons before alpha decay occurs.

Beitz, J.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Significant Radionuclides Determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

Jo A. Ziegler

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

WILDLIFE REFUGE BACA NATIONAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rio Grande National Forest Rio Grande National Forest San Isabel National Forest Solar Energy Study Great Sand Dunes National Preserve 285 160 160 160 285 Carson National Forest Grand Mesa National Forest Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6/5/2009) BLM Lands Being Analyzed for Solar

Laughlin, Robert B.

455

Wildlife Management Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities at the Metals Reduction Plant 2010 Completed demolition of the East End Smelter 2010 Began operation of the C-400 TCE Source Removal System 2010 Completed removal of...

456

Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 264 miles · 30% decline in small floodplains along tributaries-70% decline of islands in tributaries developments and habitat loss Land matrix: small parcels with high value #12;Willamette Subbasin Plan." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills

457

Chapter 18 Wildlife  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding FriedelIron-Sulfur3-1 November 2012 Words in17-18-1

458

Report Wildlife Encounters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051SoilWindFraud to theReport

459

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A study of the plant composition and utilization by mixed classes of livestock and white-tailed deer on the Kerr Wildlife Management area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ z*\\ ^ z * A A M CULlEGE OF TEXAS A STUDY OF THE PLOT COMPOSITION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES OF LIVESTOCK AND WHITE-TAILED DEER ON THE KERR WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA A MCUULlEGECOF TOlEOF TGX S18cCEEL- EO E2L (lG-1GEL So2OOp Oe E2L... AnlCo1pE1lGp GF- TLo2GFCoGp ;OppLnL Oe )LsGU CF hGlECGp e1peCppcLFE Oe E2L lLa1ClLcLFEU eOl E2L MLnlLL Oe MOoEOl Oe d2CpOUOh2X JGF1GlXP 1959. Major Subject; Range Management A STUDY OF THE PLANT COM?031 ?ION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES...

May, Morton

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Determinants of official OPEC crude prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hypothesis of this paper is that crude oil, like any other unfinished commodity, is valued for the products derived from it; the purpose is to offer an empirical explanation for changes in the crude price charged by the members of OPEC. The model results show that the market-clearing prices reported to prevail for petroleum products on the principal petroleum spot market at Rotterdam are the primary determinants of changes in official crude prices. A systematic relationship between offical and spot prices is argued to have prevailed since 1974. An appendix clarifies five types of data required for the model. 13 references, 4 tables.

Verleger, P.K. Jr.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

AeroSys: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to AeroSys, Inc. finding that basic models THHP-24T* and THDC-30T* do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

463

automated nmr determination: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pre-existing XPLOR program Clore, G. Marius 29 An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Physics Websites Summary: towards full...

464

Requirements for Determining Refrigerant Charge Residential Air Conditioning Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements for Determining Refrigerant Charge Residential Air Conditioning Measures Improved Refrigerant Charge Purpose Component packages require in some climate zones that split system air refrigerant charge. For the performance method, the proposed design is modeled with less efficiency

465

A Fredholm Determinant for Semi-classical Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a new type of approximation to quantum determinants, the ``\\qFd", and test numerically the conjecture that for Axiom A hyperbolic flows such determinants have a larger domain of analyticity and better convergence than the \\qS s derived from the \\Gt. The conjecture is supported by numerical investigations of the 3-disk repeller, a normal-form model of a flow, and a model 2-$d$ map.

Predrag Cvitanovi?; Per E. Rosenqvist; Gbor Vattay; Hans Henrik Rugh

1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

ERDC/CERLTR-05-38 Determining Research Gaps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/CERLTR-05-38 Determining Research Gaps in Disturbance Data for Fort Bliss and a Conceptual-38 November 2005 Determining Research Gaps in Disturbance Data for Fort Bliss and a Conceptual Model Tamara Bliss #12;ABSTRACT Numerous research and outside monitoring efforts have been completed for Fort Bliss

Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

468

Helioseismological Implications of Recent Solar Abundance Determinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that standard solar models are in good agreement with the helioseismologically determined sound speed and density as a function of solar radius, the depth of the convective zone, and the surface helium abundance, as long as those models do not incorporate the most recent heavy element abundance determinations. However, sophisticated new analyses of the solar atmosphere infer lower abundances of the lighter metals (like C, N, O, Ne, and Ar) than the previously widely used surface abundances. We show that solar models that include the lower heavy element abundances disagree with the solar profiles of sound speed and density as well as the depth of the convective zone and the helium abundance. The disagreements for models with the new abundances range from factors of several to many times the quoted uncertainties in the helioseismological measurements. The disagreements are at temperatures below what is required for solar interior fusion reactions and therefore do not significantly affect solar neutrino emission. If errors in thecalculated OPAL opacities are solely responsible for the disagreements, then the corrections in the opacity must extend from 2 times 10^6 K (R = 0.7R_Sun)to 5 times 10^6 K (R = 0.4 R_Sun), with opacity increases of order 10%.

John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; Marc Pinsonneault; Aldo M. Serenelli

2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................ ........................... A rAcomroe~ed procedure for the determination of breaking load......... ..S~ , mary strength studi es .. .. 5 Figur e 2. A typical stress-s train curve for agar gels 7 Fi gure 3. The breaking load of agar gela of graded concentration 12 Fi gure 4. Breaking

470

ORIGINAL PAPER Determinants of male reproductive success in American  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Scott R. Creel & Steven T. Kalinowski & Ninh V. Vu & Howard B. Quigley Received: 4 December 2008. 2002). Communicated by: M. Festa-Bianchet C. M. Costello :H. B. Quigley Hornocker Wildlife Institute, Manhattan, MT 59741, USA e-mail: ccostello@bresnan.net Present Address: H. B. Quigley Panthera, PO Box 11363

Kalinowski, Steven T

471

A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

Costello, Ronald J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix A, Workshop Agenda  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofofSeptember 12, 2011. RecoveryFinal Design8,2011GridJulyA:

473

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix B, Workshop Participants  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofofSeptember 12, 2011. RecoveryFinal Design8,2011GridJulyA:B:

474

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix E, Bibliography of References Provided by Participants  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofofSeptember 12, 2011. RecoveryFinalE: Bibliography of

475

Westinghouse Lighting: Noncompliance Determination (2010-CE-09/1001)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation finding that model F40T12/CWE (Westinghouse product code 07521000), a general service fluorescent lamp, and model 15GLOBE/65/2 (Westinghouse product code 3800400), a medium base compact fluorescent lamp, do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

476

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

479

Helioseismic determination of opacity corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effect of localized opacity modifications on the sound-speed profile of solar models. The sound-speed difference between the Sun and a solar model is used to deduce the opacity correction that would be required to bring the model into agreement with the Sun. We test this procedure on artificial data for a pair of solar models and apply it to the solar sound speed as inferred from inversion of LOWL observed frequencies. We show that a solar model constructed with the appropriately modified opacity has a sound-speed profile very similar to that of the Sun.

S. C. Tripathy; Sarbani Basu; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

480

Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many crop producers rely heavily on rented land in their farming operations. With this publication, they can learn more about determining crop shares and the principles of crop share leases....

Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Kastens, Terry L.; Outlaw, Joe

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

482

National Mining Association Experimental Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Mining Association Experimental Determination of Radon Fluxes over Water #12;Introduction research funded by the National Mining Association (NMA) regarding radon fluxes from water surfaces surfaces at uranium recovery operations are insignificant and approximate background soil fluxes for most

483

Gender determination of avian embryo  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coupled Thermo-Mechanical and Photo-Chemical Degradation Mechanisms that Determine the Reliability and...

485

Criticality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

A. Alsaed

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts, Phase III. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

Leitzinger, E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impact Phase III, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

Leitzinger, Eric J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis sia-chemiluminescence determination...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

first half... of the course will be spent on determining appropriate input to a simulation model, and the last half Source: Leemis, Larry - Department of Mathematics, College of...

490

Resource Portfolio Model's Determination of Conservation's Cost-Effectiveness1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the conservation is above long-term wholesale power market price ("electricity price", "power price" or "market (reductions in electricity use) as well as different prices. There are separate supply curves for lost with a deterministic forecast. Using the Council's adopted medium electricity price forecast leads to about 4

491

A PKN Hydraulic Fracture Model Study and Formation Permeability Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Two different approaches to fluid leak-off are considered, which are the classical Carter's leak-off theory with a constant leak-off coefficient, and Pressure-dependent leak-off theory. Existence of poroelastic effect in the reservoir is also...

Xiang, Jing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

492

An empirical parametric determination for a simulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

set of coefficients for calculation of the required 22 faculty during the ith year, a modified version of the "Sequential Search" described by Glass and Cooper (5) is used. One of the modifications is suggested in Wilde's discussion of "Pattern... while all re- maining perturbations are carried out. This procedure is at variance with Glass and Cooper in that they~erturb the original coefficients in sequence selecting the optimum values but add the optimums only when they are ready to make a...

Russell, Kenneth Ernest

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

including radar studies, bird and bat surveys, etc.; (5) continued analysis of wind, wind turbine, and array design analyses; (6) preliminary site layout design modeling,...

494

OSPREY Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development Date: 04022010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North...

496

CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transforming Photovoltaic Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied:...

497

CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Revised Narrative Information Worksheet for Energy Efficiency Program for...

498

CX-006275: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Audit; Efficiency Improvements; and Renewable Energy Installations; Township of...

499

CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Air Quality VIII: An International Conference on Carbon Management, Mercury, Trace Elements,...

500

CX-004791: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004791: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project? Automated Intake Cleaning Equipment and Materials...