Sample records for determination modeling wildlife

  1. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

  2. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  3. Wildlife Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    with the Federal Aviation Administration and commercial and military airports to reduce wildlife hazards to aircraft. ? Protecting facilities, structures and other property from damage caused by rats, mice, raccoons, skunks, opossums, squirrels, beavers, birds...'s health, safety and prop- erty from damage caused by wildlife. Wildlife Services accomplishes this goal as a member of the cooperative Texas Wildlife Services Program. This cooperative federal, state and private program includes the Wildlife Services...

  4. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  5. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Population and Habitat Assessment Branch, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Veit R.R., T.P. White, M. Martin, and M.J. Steinkamp. 2010. At-Sea...

  6. Vegetational analyses and the determination of range condition classes on selected areas of the Welder Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Thadis W

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , professor of Range and Forestry, for theix many helpful suggestions thxoughout the study. The writer is highly indebted. to the administration of the Rob and Bessie @elder Wi14life Foundation, which provided funds to make this study possible. ~pecial... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ 4 4 96 rXST 0R Plmaxa 1 ~ Nap of the Rob and. Bessie Welder Wildlife Reiuge showing the r-lation of the study area to the Refuge? ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ? ~ ~ ? ~ ? ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ? ? ? ? 14 2 Soil capability map of the study area on the Welder Wi ldl i f...

  7. Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

  8. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

  9. Applications of Data-driven Modeling to Infectious Diseases in Africa: Anthrax in Wildlife and HIV in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Steven Edward

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating wind turbine-caused bird mortality. Journal ofestimation of wildlife mortality due to wind farms (Flint etsurveillance of mortality due to disease, wind farms,

  10. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is a “Shut-down”WholeWildlife Studies Studying

  11. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  12. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. Final Report of the...

  13. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  14. Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

  15. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  16. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  17. Wildlife Photography Market Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Miles

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Private landowners who are considering offering fee-based wildlife photography opportunities on their land as a way to diversify their income will be interested in the results of this 2007 pilot survey of members of the North American Nature...

  18. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

  20. Determinant Formulas for Matrix Model Free Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Vasiliev

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper contains a new non-perturbative representation for subleading contribution to the free energy of multicut solution for hermitian matrix model. This representation is a generalisation of the formula, proposed by Klemm, Marino and Theisen for two cut solution, which was obtained by comparing the cubic matrix model with the topological B-model on the local Calabi-Yau geometry $\\hat {II}$ and was checked perturbatively. In this paper we give a direct proof of their formula and generalise it to the general multicut solution.

  1. Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills Opportunity Areas #12;#12;Energy Development and Impacts on Wildlife #12;Allocation of Water Resources · Cost/Share #12;Canby Ferry Muddy Creek Green Island Mt Pisgah, Sorenson Meadows South Pasture

  2. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  3. Biosolids and Wildlife Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biosolids and Wildlife Sally Brown University of Washington People sometimes express concern that while using biosolids for restoration or for forest fertilization can provide the necessary nutrients for plant growth, contaminants in the biosolids can pose a danger to wildlife that will use these treated

  4. Resource Portfolio Model's Determination of Conservation's Cost-Effectiveness1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,008 average megawatts of conservation8. The electricity price forecast used for this initial estimResource Portfolio Model's Determination of Conservation's Cost- Effectiveness1 The regional Resource Portfolio Model (RPM) finds large amounts of conservation cost effective. The cost of some

  5. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  6. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to corn at reducing wildlife damage to row crops rely on information concerning the spatial nature of wildlife damage at local and landscape scales. In this study we explored spatial patterns of wildlife damage within

  7. SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

  8. albeni falls wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES A. MARTIN, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries 5 Wildlife Landscape Ecology -Syllabus FS599 Fall Term 2010 Geosciences Websites Summary: 1 Wildlife Landscape Ecology -...

  9. The impact of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction on student self-determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Williams-Diehm, Kendra; Little, Todd D.; Boulton, Aaron Jacob

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multifaceted construct and interventions that achieve the best outcomes are multicomponent interventions. The SDLMI (Wehmeyer et al., 2000) is a model of teaching (i.e., intended for teachers as end users to guide and direct instruction) that supports teachers... the impact of the SDLMI (Wehmeyer et al., 2000) on self-determination. Project personnel contacted school districts, and districts that agreed to participate ( < 20) identi- fied high school campuses {n < 39) to participate. Next, the primary district...

  10. A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran Jane

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    agency mission and record-keeping, as well as public demand for information and agency response concerning non-traditional wildlife issues, including: conflicts between humans and wildlife; human health and safety; attracting wildlife; viewing wildlife...

  11. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  12. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes discussion groups, Choice experiments, Fellowships / Placements, Newsletters

  13. Wildlife Category Review: Planning Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    budget and scope adjustments, project durations, and the results from the science review) categorical projects for up to eight years. Periodic budget and performance check-ins would occur duringWildlife Category Review: Planning Introduction Category and Geographic Reviews To implement

  14. Nanostructure Determination by Co-Refining Models to Multiple Datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinge, Simon

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the work are contained in the publications resulting from the grant (which are listed below). Here I summarize the main findings from the last period of the award, 2006-2007: Published a paper in Science with Igor Levin outlining the Nanostructure Problem, our inability to solve structure at the nanoscale. Published a paper in Nature demonstrating the first ever ab-initio structure determination of a nanoparticle from atomic pair distribution function (PDF) data. Published one book and 3 overview articles on PDF methods and the nanostructure problem. Completed a project that sought to find a structural response to the presence of the so-called intermediate phase in network glasses which appears close to the rigidity percolation threshold in these systems. The main result was that we did not see convincing evidence for this, which drew into doubt the idea that GexSe1-x glasses were a model system exhibiting rigidity percolation.

  15. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  16. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  17. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X December 2, 2014 8:00AM MST to December 4, 2014 5:00PM MST Broomfield, Colorado The biennial Wind Wildlife...

  18. USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

  19. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  20. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  1. Multiscale Assessment of Wildlife Sustainability in Switchgrass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiscale Assessment of Wildlife Sustainability in Switchgrass Biofuel Feedstock Production Jun 29 2015 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM Chris Lituma, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville...

  2. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  3. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1980 a s outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994.Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOEEA-1023)...

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

  6. The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

  7. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  8. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest Total Annual Average Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions1/ 226 5 24 41 8 310 137 750 1/ FY 2012 White Sturgeon. These actions may include such things as dredging, restoration of channel complexity

  9. Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook Wildland fire safeTy Course Module Revised from the "Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Forest Harvesting and Silviculture." Jeff Mc contributions to this current course workbook. #12;Danger Tree Assessor's Course July 2010 ii Library

  10. Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook Forest Harvesting and Silviculture: Ministry of Forests and Range Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook: Forest Harvesting and Silviculture Module May 2008 iii DANGEROUS TREE ASSESSMENT IN BRITISH

  11. Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walleye Smallmouth bass Northern pike Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12; At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control Implement

  12. Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University

  13. Determining Identifiable Parameterizations for Large-scale Physical Models in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    /Novem (Dutch Government). ISAPP (Integrated Systems Approach to Petroleum Production) is a joint project as applied in the field of petroleum reservoir engineering. Starting from a large-scale, physics-based model models in petroleum reservoir engineering. Petroleum reservoir engineering is concerned with maximizing

  14. Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

  15. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cumulative Impacts to Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the clock to protect and rescue wildlife that is at risk from the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill Impacts to Wildlife and Actions to Protect Wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico The Deepwater Horizon/BP Oil Spill Response Protection Strategy The Unified Area Command's Wildlife Branches, staffed by experts from

  16. Climate Determinism Revisited: Multiple Equilibria in a Complex Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, David

    Multiple equilibria in a coupled oceanatmospheresea ice general circulation model (GCM) of an aquaplanet with many degrees of freedom are studied. Three different stable states are found for exactly the same set of ...

  17. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  18. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  19. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

  20. Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  1. FISHERY LEAFLET 260 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INTERIOR #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, J. A. ICn;ig, Secretary Fish and Wildlife LEGISLATION Compiled by MILTOK J. LIHDNEE Aquatic Biologist, Office of Foreign Activities and Chief, United

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  3. 6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

  4. Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narolski, Steven W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

  5. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  6. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  7. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):214223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):214­223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada geese Columbus Avenue, Sandusky, OH 44870, USA Abstract: Overabundant populations of Canada geese (Branta these concerns. The objective of this study was to determine if captive Canada geese exhibited a foraging

  8. Empirical model determines energy required to clean sand from well bore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appah, D.; Ichara, M. (Univ. of Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An empirical hydraulic model has been developed for determining the energy required for cleaning a vertical and nearly vertical well bore plugged with sand particles. The model considers pressure losses and cleanout time and compares sand cleanout time during direct and reverse circulation of water. Good agreement was obtained between the model and experimental results.

  9. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  10. Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folsom, Wendy Ann

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this bi-national study was to determine the type, nature, and extent of existing extension and technology-transfer activities provided to livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers in south ...

  11. CX-009209: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09042012 Location(s): Washington...

  12. CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for Purchase of the Perry Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date:...

  13. CX-003622: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-003622: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2010 Secure and Restore Fish and Wildlife Habitat CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08162010 Location(s): Sanders County,...

  14. A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollineni, Prasanthi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compound undergoes when subjected to composting. The purpose of this thesis is to define these processes and develop a model for determining the fate of organic compounds in waste during in-vessel composting Volatilization and biodegradation are found...

  15. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  16. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terra-Berns, Mary

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

  17. Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

  18. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  19. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  20. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  1. Transport parameter determination and modeling of sodium and strontium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londergan, John Thomas

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSPORT PARAMETER DETERMINATION AND MODELING OF SODIUM AND STRONTIUM PLUMES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS LONDERGAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Geophysics TRANSPORT PARAMETER DETERMINATION AND MODELING OF SODIUM AND STRONTIUM PLUMES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS LONDERGAN Approved...

  2. A conceptual model for determining yield loss due to drought stress in sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Paul Robert

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A Thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair of Committee...

  3. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:Governor s Energy Office Jump to:Parks and Wildlife

  4. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

  5. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  6. Riparian Buffers for Wildlife Benefits of Riparian Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    , develop- ment, and recreation. Losing these buffers has negatively affected wildlife habitat and water the information you will need to create an effective riparian buffer for wildlife while pro- tecting water quality for wildlife; but they also improve water quality for humans. In general, the wider and more diversely planted

  7. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

  8. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

  9. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013Management Program JumpWebpage |

  11. An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Co). In addition, an automated vehicle should also self-assess its own perception abilities, and not only perceive this idea, cybercars were designed as fully automated vehicles [3], thought since its inception as a new

  12. Determination of Peptide Amide Configuration in a Model Amyloid Fibril by Solid-State NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    -42, with sequence LMVGGVVIA) forms a structured aggregate which is classified as an amyloid fibril based primarilyDetermination of Peptide Amide Configuration in a Model Amyloid Fibril by Solid-State NMR P. R these aggregates form. The primary constituent of the amyloid plaques characteristic of AD are a family of 39

  13. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  14. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind L-5508 11/08 Kenneth A. Cearley, Extension Wildlife Specialist, The Texas A&M System; and Chuck Kowaleski, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department T he Conservation...

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  16. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  17. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

  18. Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Calispell Creek Watershed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Calispell Creek watershed in Pend Oreille County, Wash. BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key...

  19. antibiotics threaten wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daszak et al., 2000; Friend et Ambiente, Gran Via de San Francisco 4, 28005 Madrid, Spain. Summary The impact on wildlife health and the effects of bacterial antibiotic...

  20. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  2. EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOEEIS-0246SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch...

  3. Deductive-reductive determination of the model of our observed Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Skalsky

    2000-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the observations, in our expansive and isotropic relativistic Universe for the gravitational phenomena in a Newtonian approximation the Newtonian non-modified relations are valid. The Friedmann general equations of isotropic and homogeneous universe dynamics describe an infinite number of models of expansive and isotropic relativistic universe in the Newtonian approximation, but only in one of them the Newtonian non-modified relations are valid. These facts give - till now not considered - possibility for unambiguous deductive-reductive determination of the Friedmannian model, which describes our observed Universe.

  4. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  5. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(2), 2005, pp. 291297 Wildlife Disease Association 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    of northern California and southern Oregon (USA), the Texas Panhandle, and the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska Department, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Current address: U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 204 Russell Lab

  6. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline Introduction Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif Impacts on wildlife Guidelines Future directions References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

  7. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a system of economic incentives and develop cost effective solutions to agricultural and wildlife issues#12;ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the Potential for Use of Economic and Associated Floodplains prepared by Richard M. Porter for Socio-Economic Section Sustainability Division

  8. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  9. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

  10. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  11. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutron LogWildlife Jump

  12. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation,

  13. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  14. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):198203, Fall 2011 Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973, Blokpoel 1976). Since the inception of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NationalHumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):198203, Fall 2011 Commentary Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi concerns to the aviation industry worldwide. Recent events such as the ditching of US Airways Flight 1549

  15. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  16. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  17. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

  18. iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK 98501-1091 Prepared by Pat E. Fowler, District Wildlife Biologist January 2001 Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Date #12;iiJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife TABLE OF CONTENTS

  19. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  20. FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

  1. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  2. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

  4. A Classic Model in a Low Fertility Context: The Proximate Determinants of Fertility in South Korea and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guarneri, Christine E.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    John Bongaarts' proximate determinants model of fertility has accounted for over 90 percent of variation in the total fertility rate (TFR) of primarily developing nations and historical populations. Recently, dramatically low fertility rates across...

  5. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  7. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  8. alaska linking wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Research Report--2011 Environmental Sciences and...

  9. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  10. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  11. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablys...

  12. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

    2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

  13. Dynamical coupled-channels model of $K^- p$ reactions (I): Determination of partial-wave amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kamano; S. X. Nakamura; T. -S. H. Lee; T. Sato

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels model of K^- p reactions, aiming at extracting the parameters associated with hyperon resonances and providing the elementary antikaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes that can be used for investigating various phenomena in the strangeness sector such as the production of hypernuclei from kaon-nucleus reactions. The model consists of (a) meson-baryon (MB) potentials v_{M'B',MB} derived from the phenomenological SU(3) Lagrangian, and (b) vertex interactions Gamma_{MB,Y*} for describing the decays of the bare excited hyperon states (Y*) into MB states. The model is defined in a channel space spanned by the two-body barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, and K Xi states and also the three-body pi pi Lambda and pi barK N states that have the resonant pi Sigma* and barK* N components, respectively. The resulting coupled-channels scattering equations satisfy the multichannel unitarity conditions and account for the dynamical effects arising from the off-shell rescattering processes. The model parameters are determined by fitting the available data of the unpolarized and polarized observables of the K^- p --> barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, K Xi reactions in the energy region from the threshold to invariant mass W=2.1 GeV. Two models with equally good chi^2 fits to the data have been constructed. The partial-wave amplitudes obtained from the constructed models are compared with the results from a recent partial-wave analysis by the Kent State University group. We discuss the differences between these three analysis results. Our results at energies near the threshold suggest that the higher partial waves should be treated on the same footing as the S wave if one wants to understand the nature of Lambda(1405)1/2^- using the data below the barK N threshold, as will be provided by the J-PARC E31 experiment.

  14. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  15. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  16. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  17. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  18. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the above mentioned EISs and RODs. Pursuant to its obligations under the Endangered Species Act, BPA has made a determination of whether its proposed project will have any effects on any listed species under the jurisdiction of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). A species list was obtained from USFWS on June 12, 2003, identifying bald eagles, Canada lynx, and bull trout as potentially occurring in the project area. A site assessment was conducted on July 15, 2003 to determine if these species were present and the potential effects of project activities. A ''No Effect'' determination was made for all ESA-listed species. There were no listed species under the jurisdiction of NOAA Fisheries present in the project area. As management activities proceed in the future, BPA will annually re-assess potential effects of planned activities on listed species. The Burns-Paiute Tribe conducted a literature search for historic and archaeological sites on the property on January 11, 1999. No known sites were identified. Further site-specific surveys will be conducted for individual ground disturbing activities. The results of these surveys will be sent to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and BPA. BPA will annually summarize and submit a report to the State Historic Preservation Office. On December 29, 1999, Fred Walasavage of BPA completed a Phase I Site Assessment and concluded that the site did not reveal any environmental factors that would pose a significant liability for remedial action or cleanup under the Comprehensive Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act. A public meeting was held when the property was initially acquired where the property acquisition and proposed activities were discussed. Subsequent public involvement was conducted on July 23, 2002 for commenting on the proposed Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan.

  19. Model ecosystem determination of the metabolic and environmental fate of tetrachloro-DDT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.B.; Metcalf, R.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A potential hazardous waste site investigation was conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency to determine whether ground water, surface water, or area soils and sediments were contaminated as a result of waster water discharges or improper solid waste disposal practices of a pesticide manufacturer. One of the compounds discharged into the environment was 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane, commonly referred to as tetrachloro-DDT. Unlike a great many of the DDT analogs, tetrachloro-DDT has come under only limited scrutiny, mainly because it was dismissed as having poor insecticidal properties relative to DDT and other analogs. Its metabolism in ingesting organisms, and degradative pathways in the environment have consequently been left uncertain. This model ecosystem study was undertaken to examine the unanswered questions concerning the metabolic and environmental fate of tetrachloro-DDT. The relevance of this study pertains to disposal practices of pesticide manufacturers who use tetrachloro-DDT as a product precursor.

  20. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  1. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  2. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  3. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  4. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  5. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  6. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  7. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  8. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  9. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  10. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  11. INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995 to 6 percent by 2015 to rebuild weak fish and wildlife populations, the Council's program calls for participation and funding funding and staffing fish and wildlife rebuilding measures, or run the almost certain risk

  12. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife.............................................................................................................. 1 Integrating the Fish and Wildlife Program and Power Planning Under the Northwest Power Act 2 Power Resource Planning that Accommodates the Power System Effects of the Fish and Wildlife Program

  13. Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Development of model evaluation criteria. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to examine the usefulness and effectiveness of currently existing models that simulate the release of uranium hexafluoride from UF{sub 6}-handling facilities, subsequent reactions of UF{sub 6} with atmospheric moisture, and the dispersion of UF{sub 6} and reaction products in the atmosphere. The study evaluates screening-level and detailed public-domain models that were specifically developed for UF{sub 6} and models that were originally developed for the treatment of dense gases but are applicable to UF{sub 6} release, reaction, and dispersion. The model evaluation process is divided into three specific tasks: model-component evaluation; applicability evaluation; and user interface and quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) evaluation. Within the model-component evaluation process, a model`s treatment of source term, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion are considered and model predictions are compared with actual observations. Within the applicability evaluation process, a model`s applicability to Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis, and to site-specific considerations are assessed. Finally, within the user interface and QA/QC evaluation process, a model`s user-friendliness, presence and clarity of documentation, ease of use, etc. are assessed, along with its handling of QA/QC. This document presents the complete methodology used in the evaluation process.

  14. Geosynchronous orbit determination using space surveillance network observations and improved radiative force modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyon, Richard Harry, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correct modeling of the space environment, including radiative forces, is an important aspect of space situational awareness for geostationary (GEO) spacecraft. Solar radiation pressure has traditionally been modeled using ...

  15. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Dony, E-mail: donypermana@students.itb.ac.id [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia and Statistics Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padang State University (Indonesia); Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S. [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  16. Method of and apparatus for determining the similarity of a biological analyte from a model constructed from known biological fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Kenneth J. (Albuquerque, NM); Eaton, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a biological fluid sample having an analyte are determined from a model constructed from plural known biological fluid samples. The model is a function of the concentration of materials in the known fluid samples as a function of absorption of wideband infrared energy. The wideband infrared energy is coupled to the analyte containing sample so there is differential absorption of the infrared energy as a function of the wavelength of the wideband infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample. The differential absorption causes intensity variations of the infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample as a function of sample wavelength of the energy, and concentration of the unknown analyte is determined from the thus-derived intensity variations of the infrared energy as a function of wavelength from the model absorption versus wavelength function.

  17. Determination of fluid viscosities from biconical annular geometries: Experimental and modeling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rondon, Nolys Javier

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of viscosity of flow streams is essential for the design and operation of production facilities, drilling operations and reservoir engineering calculations. The determination of the viscosity of a reservoir fluid at downhole conditions...

  18. Determination of Retrofit Savings Using a Calibrated Building Energy Simulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, S. N.; Hunn, B. D.; Hood, D. B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of a methodology to determine retrofit energy savings in buildings when few measured preretrofit data are available. Calibration of the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program for a 250,000 ft2 building...

  19. Determination of Retrofit Savings Using a Calibrated Building Energy Simulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, S. N.; Hunn, B. D.; Hood, D. B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of a methodology to determine retrofit energy savings in buildings when few measured preretrofit data are available. Calibration of the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program for a 250,000 ft2 building...

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon. Title to the land will be held by The Nature Conservancy, who will convey permanent mitigation rights to BPA in the form of a conservation easement. These newly acquired parcels will become part of the existing 330-acre Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Area. Passive management practices may take place on the land until a wildlife mitigation and management plan is developed and approved for the property. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Cathy MacDonald with The Nature Conservancy and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive wildlife mitigation and management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the proposed acquisition of the subject property. Through contact with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Oregon Natural Heritage Program, staff from The Nature Conservancy identified a number of federal and state listed species that have the potential to occur at the project site. ESA Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and The Nature Conservancy, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. A cultural resource survey was conducted at the Eugene Wetlands Phase II site on July 9, 2001. No prehistoric or historic cultural materials were observed during the survey and no landforms considered likely to be archaeological sites were noted. The nearest recorded archeological find consists of two prehistoric sites that are located within a mile of the project area along Willow Creek. Based on the findings of this survey, BPA concluded that there would be no effect on prehistoric or historic artifacts associated with the Eugene Wetlands acquisition project. The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office concurred with BPA's determination on September 18, 2001. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that may occur on the site, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Phase I Environmental Site Assessments were conducted on the Eugene wetland site by staff from The Nature Conservancy and Hahn and Associates, Inc. The surveys did not reveal evidence of recognized environmental conditions in conjunction with the subject properties. Fred Walasavage an Environmental Specialist with BPA reviewed the Phase I assessments and reported to The Nature Conservancy on May 14, 2001 that he concurred with these findings. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations. Public response from the solicitation indicated general support for the project. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  1. Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Model evaluation report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Radonjic, Z.R.; Coutts, P.T.; Lewis, C.J.; Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three uranium hexafluoride-(UF{sub 6}-) specific models--HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6}, Science Application International Corporation, and RTM-96; three dense-gas models--DEGADIS, SLAB, and the Chlorine Institute methodology; and one toxic chemical model--AFTOX--are evaluated on their capabilities to simulate the chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion of UF{sub 6} released from accidents at nuclear fuel-cycle facilities, to support Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis. These models are also evaluated for user-friendliness and for quality assurance and quality control features, to ensure the validity and credibility of the results. Model performance evaluations are conducted for the three UF{sub 6}-specific models, using field data on releases of UF{sub 6} and other heavy gases. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} and SAIC models are within an order of magnitude of the field data, but the SAIC model overpredicts beyond an order of magnitude for a few UF{sub 6}-specific data points. The RTM-96 model provides overpredictions within a factor of 3 for all data points beyond 400 m from the source. For one data set, however, the RTM-96 model severely underpredicts the observations within 200 m of the source. Outputs of the models are most sensitive to the meteorological parameters at large distances from the source and to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters at distances close to the source. Specific recommendations are being made to improve the applicability and usefulness of the three models and to choose a specific model to support the intended analyses. Guidance is also provided on the choice of input parameters for initial dilution, building wake effects, and distance to completion of UF{sub 6} reaction with water.

  2. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  3. DETERMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PERFORMANCE, AND THERMO-MECHANICALCHEMICAL STABILITY OF SOFCS FROM DEFECT MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachsman, E.D.; Duncan, K.L.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to: provide fundamental relationships between SOFC performance and operating conditions and transient (time dependent) transport properties; extend models to thermo-mechanical stability, thermo-chemical stability, and multilayer structures; incorporate microstructural effects such as grain boundaries and grain-size distribution; experimentally verify models and devise strategies to obtain relevant material constants; and assemble software package for integration into SECA failure analysis models.

  4. Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness interest in the future of forestry? · Do you feel there should be changes made to forest practices? · Do at www.unbc.ca/forestry BSc Natural Resources Management Forest Ecology and Management #12;Some Career

  5. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence Caroline Jezierski Nebraska Wind #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 30m http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/30m_US_Wind.jpg #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 50m http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/US-50m-wind-power-map.jpg #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 80m

  6. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

  7. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  8. ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M of acoustic pollution in the oceans and effects on marine mammals Where do we go from here? #12;4/17/2011 2 ON ACOUSTIC POLLUTION Anthropogenic sound generation Transportation Army/Navy Research Commercial Birds

  9. Estimation of wildlife populations using the quadrat method of sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hribar, John Richard

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    area under consideration) into squares of equal area. Appendix A illustrates such a pattern. It is an actual map of the Rob aud. Bessie Welder Wildlife Refuge in Southern Texas and will be used. extensively for the purpose of examples and sample...

  10. Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

  11. A comparison of polar cap ionospheric velocity determined from a digital ionosonde model and the DICM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    , and the IZMEM/DMSP model was constructed using ground-magnetometer measurements and calibrated against DMSP ion. These convection models must accommodate a raft of geo- physical conditions, particularly IMF orientation, solar and Maynard, 1987; Rich and Maynard, 1989) and sup- ported the two cell convection pattern predicted

  12. Determination of the proper operating range for the CAFCA IIB fuel cycle model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warburton, Jamie (Jamie L.)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel cycle simulation tool, CAFCA II was previously modified to produce the most recent version, CAFCA IIB. The code tracks the mass distribution of transuranics in the fuel cycle in one model and also projects costs ...

  13. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a States Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a states nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the models efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  14. Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  16. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  17. Determination of the Controls on Permeability and Transport in Shale by Use of Percolation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Ian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    : (Wolfram, 2012) We look again at the 2D set of overlapping spheres and recognize that each set of overlapping spheres has the individual pore geometry show above in Figure 3.2. By using the basic Poiseuille equation governing pressure drop through a... ............. 6 3.1 Model Example Showing Uniform, Overlapping Spheres .................................... 13 3.2 Pipe Flow Geometry Between Two Overlapping Spheres .................................... 14 3.3 Path Connecting Pipes from Sphere to Sphere...

  18. Quantum method of determination of penetrability in FRW model with radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei P. Maydanyuk

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In paper the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model with quantization in presence of the positive cosmological constant, radiation and Chaplygin gas is studied. For analysis of tunneling probability for birth of an asymptotically deSitter, inflationary Universe as a function of the radiation energy a new definition of a "free" wave propagating inside strong fields is introduced. Vilenkin's tunneling boundary condition is corrected, penetrability and reflection are calculated in fully quantum stationary approach.

  19. Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Brad Ellis

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Locus t (Gleditsia triacanthos) 7 10 9 G reen A s h (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) - Ceda r Elm - Suga r Hackbe r ry 2 2 3 Honey Locus t - C e d a r E lm - Haw tho rne (Crataegus laevigata) - Dec iduous Hol ly (Ilex verticillata) 7 7 8 P laner T ree...

  20. Unbiased estimators of wildlife population densities using aural information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durland, Eric Newton

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peters' Data . 3. 4 Suggestions for Improvements DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 18 20 22 25 28 BIBLIOGRAPHY. VITA. . . . ~ 4. 1 Situation I. 4. 2 Situation II 4. 3 Situation III. . ~ . . ~ ~ - . ~ 4. 4 Combining Aural and Visual Information 4. 5... with much promise among people in wildlife when compared with other methods of estimation. Peters [15] found that the call-count index of mourning doves seems to be sub)ect to less variation than road count data. The Southeastern Association [18] found...

  1. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service Fishery Leaflet 99 Chicago 54. fact. and the eVident nec.eulty for maxImum vllamln recovery from eXI.tlng re- .o\\!r ~c: the F..h 4"J ue. All cooks wen" made with live steam , the cooking time be n g of tc n minutes dUfa tion

  2. Determination of Electrochemical Performance and Thermo-Mechanical-Chemical Stability of SOFCs from Defect Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was focused on two distinct but related issues. The first issue concerned using defect modeling to understand the relationship between point defect concentration and the electrochemical, thermo-chemical and mechano-chemical properties of typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) materials. The second concerned developing relationships between the microstructural features of SOFC materials and their electrochemical performance. To understand the role point defects play in ceramics, a coherent analytical framework was used to develop expressions for the dependence of thermal expansion and elastic modulus on point defect concentration in ceramics. These models, collectively termed the continuum-level electrochemical model (CLEM), were validated through fits to experimental data from electrical conductivity, I-V characteristics, elastic modulus and thermo-chemical expansion experiments for (nominally pure) ceria, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with consistently good fits. The same values for the material constants were used in all of the fits, further validating our approach. As predicted by the continuum-level electrochemical model, the results reveal that the concentration of defects has a significant effect on the physical properties of ceramic materials and related devices. Specifically, for pure ceria and GDC, the elastic modulus decreased while the chemical expansion increased considerably in low partial pressures of oxygen. Conversely, the physical properties of YSZ remained insensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure within the studied range. Again, the findings concurred exactly with the predictions of our analytical model. Indeed, further analysis of the results suggests that an increase in the point defect content weakens the attractive forces between atoms in fluorite-structured oxides. The reduction treatment effects on the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of pure ceria were also evaluated at room temperature. The results reveal that the flexural strength decreases significantly after heat treatment in very low oxygen partial pressure environments; however, in contrast, fracture toughness is increased by 30-40% when the oxygen partial pressure was decreased to 10{sup -20} to 10{sup -22} atm range. Fractographic studies show that microcracks developed at 800 oC upon hydrogen reduction are responsible for the decreased strength. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, electrical impedance spectra from symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells was de-convoluted to obtain the key electrochemical components of electrode performance, namely charge transfer resistance, surface diffusion of reactive species and bulk gas diffusion through the electrode pores. These properties were then related to microstructural features, such as triple-phase boundary length and tortuosity. From these experiments we found that the impedance due to oxygen adsorption obeys a power law with pore surface area, while the impedance due to charge transfer is found to obey a power-law with respect to triple phase boundary length. A model based on kinetic theory explaining the power-law relationships observed was then developed. Finally, during our EIS work on the symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells a technique was developed to improve the quality of high-frequency impedance data and their subsequent de-convolution.

  3. Ambiguity in the Determination of the Free Energy for a Model of the Circle Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian G. Kenny; Tony W. Dixon

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a simple model to describe the widths of the mode locked intervals for the critical circle map. Using two different partitions of the rational numbers, based on Farey series and Farey tree levels respectively, we calculate the free energy analytically at selected points for each partition. It is found that the result of the calculation depends on the method of partition. An implication of this is that the generalized dimensions $D_q$ are different for each partition except when $q=0$, i.e. only the Hausdorff dimension is the same in each case.

  4. A model for determining body composition of steers fed in a variety of nutritional management programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmund, John William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to a period of time instead of a given point in time. A steer's mean weight was calculated by adding the starting and ending EBW and dividing by two. The growing phase OPG model was as follows: DPG (kg)= . 7414 ? . 1157(lnMWT) + . 0766(lnDEBG) + 2... across levels of the second factor. Figure 2 is a representation of the effects of OPG interacting with IC across rates of OEBG. Byers (1980c) and Lemieux et al. (1984) demonstrated that anabolic implants repartition energy from fat storage to lean...

  5. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  6. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  7. Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Tommie L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sharing Texas Resources: Interpretation Handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tommie L. Herrick Nay 1994 Record of Study SHARZNG TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK POR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT A... Department Natural Resources Development SHARING TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK FOR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTNENT A Professional Paper by Tommie L. Herrick Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Edward H. Heath (Chairman...

  8. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  9. Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

  10. Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

  11. Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic edges and other observables.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; White, Martin J

    ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 08 14 3v 2 3 0 A ug 2 00 5 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION CAV-HEP-2005-15 ATL-PHYS-PUB-2005-013 ATL-COM-PHYS-2005-033 Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic... edges and other observables. Christopher G. Lester, Michael A. Parker and Martin J. White Cavendish Laboratory. Madingley Road. Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK Abstract: We address the problem of mass measurements of supersymmetric par- ticles at the Large Hadron...

  12. A model for determining shelf life, estimating terminal body composition, yield grade and quality grade of feedlot cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Richard Jay

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. 5 percentage units less fat (21. 64% vs 26, 1% carcass fat) than non-implanted steers of the same carcass weight and rate of gain (350 kg and ADG of 1. 0 kg/d). Fat as a percentage of gain averaged 67. 85, 52. 05 and 39. 59 for non... model which can be used for projecting changes in yield grade and quality grade with performance of cattle in the feedlot over time. The primary objectives of this research were: 1) To determine the "shelf life" of a steer in the feedlot. 2...

  13. Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic edges and other observables.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; White, Martin J

    ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 08 14 3v 2 3 0 A ug 2 00 5 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION CAV-HEP-2005-15 ATL-PHYS-PUB-2005-013 ATL-COM-PHYS-2005-033 Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic... been used to map the interesting region of the parameter space with fewer points than would be required in a scan in order to obtain similar performance. To demonstrate this, consider the following. There are four and a half parameters 14 in the m...

  14. Solubility of carbon dioxide in tar sand bitumen; Experimental determination and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.D.; Wang, C.J.; Hanson, F.V. (Dept. of Fuels Engineering, Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on an understanding of the solubility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in tar sand bitumen that is essential for the development of in situ processes in the recovery of bitumen from tar and deposits. The solubility of CO{sub 2} in the Tar Sand Triangle (Utah), the PR Spring Rainbow I (Utah), and the Athabasca (Canada) tar sand bitumens was determined with the use of a high-pressure microbalance at temperatures of 358.2 and 393.2 K and pressures up to 6.2 MPa. As expected, the solubilities increased with pressure at a given temperature and decreased with increases in temperature. The Peng--Robinson and the Schmidt--Wenzel equations of state were used to match the experimentally observed solubilities. Correlations for the interaction parameters between CO{sub 2} and the bitumen were developed for both equations of state, wherein the interaction parameter could be obtained by using specific gravity and the UOP {ital K} factor for the bitumen. The correlations were developed with the optimum interaction parameters obtained for each of the samples at each temperature.

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

  16. Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derek Anthony

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

  17. Determining the Effect of Concerted Elimination Reactions in the Pyrolysis of Lignin Using Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, D.; Clark, J.; Nimlos, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin pyrolysis is a significant impediment in forming liquid fuel from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at a higher temperature than other biomass components (ie cellulose, hemicellulose) and tends to form radicals which lead to cross linking and ultimately char formation. A primary step in advances biomass-to-fuel technology will be to discover mechanisms that can disassemble lignin at lower temperatures and depolymerize lignin into more stable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin ({beta}-O4, {alpha}-O4, {beta}-{beta}, {beta}-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to the usually-assumed bond homolysis reactions, we have investigated a variety of concerted elimination pathways that will tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

  18. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  19. Professional internship with the Houston Lighting and Power Company Radiological Services: wildlife collection manual report and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Tina Borghild

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    game wardens, wildlife refuge managers in Texas, and who to contact about specific animal species or trapping techniques. An Equipment Sources Appendix and Literature Cited and Available in Wildlife Documents File were also included. This file...

  20. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  1. Wildlife Society Bulletin 2005, 33(2):745748 Peer refereed Distance sampling from roads is a common pop-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    on the Matador Wildlife Management Area (WMA) (352.4 km2), located northwest of Paducah in Cottle County along

  2. FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics The Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville invites applications have at least one degree in Forestry from an SAF-accredited program. Demonstrated experience in field

  3. New Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    preservation and other activities associated with traditional game management. Fortunately, much of the knowledge and techniques developed for game #12;management can be transferred to considerations of wildlifeNew Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1 Tamsie

  4. INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

  5. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 to Columbia River Basin fish and wildlife by hydropower development and operations in the past. But the future drainage basins that contain important anadromous fish habitat. However, most new hydroelectric development

  6. HumanWildlife Conflicts 5(2):204209, Fall 2011 Using dietary analyses to reduce the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reported to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) during 1990 to 2008 (Dolbeer et al. 2009 (wildlife strikes) pose a serious safety risk to aircraft and cost civil aviation >$614 million annually, Dolbeer and Wright 2009). Analyzing information from the FAA's National Wildlife Strike Database regarding

  7. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):3138, Spring 2014 Integrating mammalian hazards with man-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wildlife collisions (i.e., incident) frequencies taken from Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) National Wildlife) or general aviation (GA; Federal Aviation Administration 2012). Certificated airports are those that receive required by the Federal Aviation Administrator to hold a certificate (Federal Aviation Administration 2012

  8. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  9. Wildlife Category Review. NWPCC. Final Recommendation to BPA. July 2009 Attachment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years of proposed funding by the project sponsors. A five-year planning budget allows Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and the sponsor flexibility in contracting and spending fluctuations over the five Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Project Funding Recommendations for the Wildlife

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia Erika Alacs for effective regulation of legitimate commercial trade and effective policing of illegal trade is likely and fauna are endemic and it is this very attribute that attracts traders of illegal wildlife worldwide

  11. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):58, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):5­8, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural.O. Box 5496-30100, Eldoret, Kenya nsifuna@ yahoo.com Key words: human­wildlife conflicts, Kenya Wildlife depredation in Laikipia, Kenya Kenya's Laikipia District is located on the equator in the central part

  13. A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system for use in wildlife capture are described, including the standard 3-rocket system, are presented. Keywords: Rocket net, wildlife capture, trapping, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Arizona

  14. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy)Peteforsyth JumpWzeng JumpWildlife Resources

  15. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | DepartmentDepartment of Energy LewisDepartmentEnergy Wildlife Fund

  16. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A. [University of Washington Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  17. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

  18. Determining the Mechanical Constitutive Properties of Metals as Function of Strain Rate and temperature: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Robertson

    2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain-rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions. To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be integrated fully with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experiment is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models. One aspect of the program involves the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an experimental and modeling viewpoint. In addition, our approach will minimize the need to fit model parameters to experimental data to obtain convergence. These are critical steps to reach the primary objective of simulating and modeling material performance under extreme loading conditions. During this project, the following achievements have been obtained: 1. Twins have been observed to act as barriers to dislocation propagation and as sources of and sinks to dislocations. 2. Nucleation of deformation twins in nitrogen strengthened steel is observed to be closely associated with planar slip bands. The appearance of long twins through heavily dislocated microstructures occurs by short twins nucleating at one slip band, propagating through the dislocation-free region, and terminating at the next slip band. This process is repeated throughout the entire grain. 3. A tamped-laser ablation loading technique has been developed to introduce high strain rate, high stress and low strains. 4. Both dislocation slip and twinning are present in high strain-rate deformed zirconium, with the relative contribution of each mode to the deformation depending on the initial texture. 5. In situ IR thermal measurements have been used to show that the majority of plastic work is dissipated as heat even under conditions in which twinning is the dominant deformation mode.

  19. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  20. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

  1. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  2. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  3. 1995 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys performed at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) from January through December of 1995 as compared with results from previous years. These surveys were performed as part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and describing fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in species using RFETS. The NRPCP provides support to the Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as Natural Resource Trustee, and provides data essential to accomplishing the goal of preserving the unique ecological values of RFETS in keeping with the Rocky Flats Vision presented in the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Public Comment Draft. Wildlife population densities vary due to natural pressures and human influences, and only long-term monitoring can verify which factors influencing wildlife populations are the consequence of natural fluctuations, and which are due to human influences. The wildlife monitoring described in this report provides qualitative data that give an indication of the ecological health of RFETS. Monitoring numbers, habitat affinities, and apparent health of the wildlife populations makes it possible to evaluate the overall ecological health of the site. Monitoring and surveys such as those carried out by the NRPCP can indicate trends of this sort, and act as an {open_quotes}early warning system{close_quotes} for impending ecological problems.

  4. Determining the effects of fluctuating lake levels on wildlife habitat using GIS and remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabella, Raymond Jacob

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition: Intermediates Elm/Hackbeny Forest Unimproved Range Cedar elm (Bmus Honey mestuite (Pmsopis era ssllblia) gland uiosa) Netleaf hackberry (CeNs Osag~range (Maclura reticulate) pomlfera ) Hawthorn (Crataegus sp. ) Ash juniper (Juniperus...

  5. How does the public process impact the selection of a nuisance wildlife management plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Julianne (Julianne Susan)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1950s the human relationship with wildlife in the United States shifted dramatically; from primarily consumptive to primarily recreational. Over the same time period a trend of humans moving into suburban communities ...

  6. Loxahatchee Non-profit Sends Mobile Wildlife Laboratory to Island of Dominica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gear, veterinary supplies, and wildlife monitoring and surveillance equipment, and can support six Dominica. The national bird is revered as the icon of Dominica, adorning the nation's flag and coat

  7. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the wave conditions in the channel in order to evaluate the respective energies...

  8. Assessing Variation in Wildlife Biodiversity in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan Using Ancillary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Assessing Variation in Wildlife Biodiversity in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan Using of Kyrgyzstan and assessed their usefulness for biodiversity surveys of larger animal species. The study: Camera-trapping; biodiversity; conservation; mammals; protected areas; Tien Shan Mountains; Kyrgyzstan

  9. The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Etienne Samuel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

  10. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  11. Fact Sheet - Acquisition of 0.5 acre wildlife habitat in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Falls Dam. The 0.5-acre parcel will be owned and managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for the purpose of wildlife mitigation. A fee in lieu of taxes will be paid to...

  12. Lake Chelan Fishery Management Plan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................... Monitoring changes in cutthroat and rainbow trout management........ Creel survey methods1 Appendix D Lake Chelan Fishery Management Plan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife 2002 #12;2 LAKE CHELAN FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  13. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  14. SampleSize 1.1 Sample Size Calculations for Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208-3621 Project of design variables. This project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, US Department of Energy

  15. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road ClosingsPermitting...

  16. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):206211, Fall 2008 Evaluation of physical barriers to prevent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -footed ferret programs (M. Brennan, biologist, Boulder County, personal communication). However, resource ludovicianus) colonies on public and private lands can result in damage to property. Physical barriers, wildlife damage management Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) pose many challenges

  17. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  18. Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Regulatory Oversight of Commercial Wildlife Control Activities in the United States. (August 2007) Kieran J. Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Commite: Dr. Clark E. Adams Urbanization decreases... PRIVATIZATION AND REGULATORY OVERSIGHT OF COMERCIAL WILDLIFE CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES A Disertation by KIERAN J. LINDSEY Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  19. Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : b - Butterflies, bees and other insects STP - South Texas Plains i - White-tailed deer EP - Edwards Plateau o - Small mammals (e.g. squirrels, rabbits) B - Songbirds F - Game birds (quail, turkey, doves) Table 1. Classes of wildlife...Woody Plants and Wildlife Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily...

  20. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VEGETATION RESPONSE TO BURNING THICKETIZED LIVE OAK SAVANNAH ON THE ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesi. s by DAVID MITCHELL KELLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 6 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... irma f Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( lambe-) (Member) Memos Memoerl '. !ay 98O ABSTRACT Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (May 1980) David Mitchell Kelley, B. S...

  1. Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Rveillre, Jrmy Rohmer, Frdric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

  2. State-Of-The-Art in Permeability Determination From Well Log Data: Part 2-Verifiable, Accurate Permeability Predictions, the Touch-Stone of All Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 30979 State-Of-The-Art in Permeability Determination From Well Log Data: Part 2- Verifiable prediction from well log data, is accurate and verifiable prediction of permeability for wells from which only the well log data is available. So far all the available models and techniques have been tried

  3. be explained by the indirect aerosol cloud effect. The use of a parcel model to determine the cloud droplet number concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    cloud properties and their effect on the surface radiation budget: selected cases from FIRE ACE. Jbe explained by the indirect aerosol cloud effect. The use of a parcel model to determine the cloud droplet number concentration enables us to separate the effects of the cloud LWP and cloud droplet number

  4. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  6. A Model for Parent-Teacher Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination in Young Children With Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Suk-Hyang; Palmer, Susan B.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Powers et al., 1996; Warger, 2001). Provide parents with opportuni- ties to examine their behefs about self-determination and cultural values for their children (Luft, 2001). Many parents want their children to become more self-determined, so teach- ers...-determination of students with disdhilities. Korean Journal of Special Education, 38(4], 369-390. Luft, P. (2001). Multicultural competence in transition planning processes. In R- W. Flexer, T. J. Simmons, P. Luft, & R. M. Baer (Eds.), TYansition planning for sec- ondary...

  7. Robust Growth Determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doppelhofer, Gernot; Weeks, Melvyn

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the robustness of determinants of economic growth in the presence of model uncertainty, parameter heterogeneity and outliers. The robust model averaging approach introduced in the paper uses a flexible and parsimonious...

  8. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  9. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drais, Gregory

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

  10. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  11. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  12. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  13. UNBC Continuing Studies -WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9 TEL: 250-960-5980 FAX: 250-960-5984 TOLL FREE: 1-866-843-8061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Continuing Studies - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 form. Name Telephone Number Email Address COURSE INFORMATION - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE ASSESSOR

  14. The determination of regionalised wind roses for the UK, for use with the HARM acid depositional model.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalfe Dr. Claire Jarvis & Dr. Jim Nicholson #12;Abstract- The Hull acid rain (HARM) depositional model of Geography) is not permitted. #12;1 INTRODUCTION The Hull acid rain (HARM) Lagrangian receptor depositional, 2002, p1 & 6). Other acid rain models that use the Lagrangian receptor technique such as the original

  15. CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  16. CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  17. CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  18. CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate...

  19. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  20. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  1. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  2. Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  3. Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 60 (2013) LAKEWATCH Continues to be a Large Part of Florida Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a largemouth bass during a sampling event for the long-term fish monitoring program Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Long-Term Fish Monitoring Program in their water bodies. Focusing more on fish and wildlife (biological integrity

  4. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  5. A multiconductor model for determining the response of power transmission and distribution lines to a high altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calculation model for electromagnetic pulse coupling to transmission and transmission line is discussed. Sample calculations for a 345 kV transmission line are given. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  7. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in running RCMs over Greenland to produce high-qualityoutlet glaciers. For Greenland, this detail is specificallyCurrently, no coupled Greenland Ice Sheet model experiment

  8. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  9. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  10. PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 APPENDIX L Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife Plans and Programs This inventory was conducted in the spring of 2003 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under contract to WRI. The following pages are printed from the spreadsheet used in the inventory

  11. Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Wildlife, Fish of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in Environmental Conservation (ECo) and is designed

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):210217, Fall 2011 Using radar cross-section to enhance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D; Brand 2010a) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA; FAA 2010, Herricks et al. 2010). The testing, airfield management, alert, aviation safety, BASH, bird strike, human wildlife conflicts, radar, radar cross-section, situational awareness, wildlife hazard Birds pose a threat to aviation safety and cost

  13. Use of molecular modeling to determine the interaction and competition of gases within coal for carbon dioxide sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular modeling was employed to both visualize and probe our understanding of carbon dioxide sequestration within a bituminous coal. A large-scale (>20,000 atoms) 3D molecular representation of Pocahontas No. 3 coal was generated. This model was constructed based on a the review data of Stock and Muntean, oxidation and decarboxylation data for aromatic clustersize frequency of Stock and Obeng, and the combination of Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry data with HRTEM, enabled the inclusion of a molecular weight distribution. The model contains 21,931 atoms, with a molecular mass of 174,873 amu, and an average molecular weight of 714 amu, with 201 structural components. The structure was evaluated based on several characteristics to ensure a reasonable constitution (chemical and physical representation). The helium density of Pocahontas No. 3 coal is 1.34 g/cm{sup 3} (dmmf) and the model was 1.27 g/cm{sup 3}. The structure is microporous, with a pore volume comprising 34% of the volume as expected for a coal of this rank. The representation was used to visualize CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity, and the role of moisture in swelling and CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity reduction. Inclusion of 0.68% moisture by mass (ash-free) enabled the model to swell by 1.2% (volume). Inclusion of CO{sub 2} enabled volumetric swelling of 4%.

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  15. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  16. A model for determining shelf life, estimating terminal body composition, yield grade and quality grade of feedlot cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Richard Jay

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) To determine the influence of time on feed, rate of gain, sex, breed, nature size ~ iaplanting scheaes and dietary energy levels on shelf life. 3) To evaluate the changes in body coaposition and yield and quality grades with the above i'actors. 4... industry needs a method of predicting yield and quality grade of cattle and how they change as time on feed and weight increase. The basis for this research is to evaluate the effect of these factors and develop such a method. In this way, feeders...

  17. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  18. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POTENTIAL NA7ARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WI~ DLIFE WHEN USED IN TliE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AfM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Wild'life and Fisheries Sciences POTENTIAL HAZARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WILDLIFE WHEN USED IN THE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Approved as to style...

  19. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POTENTIAL NA7ARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WI~ DLIFE WHEN USED IN TliE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AfM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Wild'life and Fisheries Sciences POTENTIAL HAZARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WILDLIFE WHEN USED IN THE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Approved as to style...

  20. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  1. A novel method to develop an otolith microchemistry model to determine striped bass habitat use in the San Francisco Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillis, C C; Ostrach, D J; Gras, M; Yin, Q; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G; Weber, P K

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Otolith Sr/Ca has become a popular tool for hind casting habitat utilization and migration histories of euryhaline fish. It can readily identify habitat shifts of diadromous fish in most systems. Inferring movements of fish within estuarine habitat, however, requires a model of that accounts of the local water chemistry and the response of individual species to that water chemistry, which is poorly understood. Modeling is further complicated by the fact that high marine Sr and Ca concentrations results in a rapid, nonlinear increase in water Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between fresh and marine waters. Here we demonstrate a novel method for developing a salinity-otolith Sr/Ca model for the purpose of reconstructing striped bass (Morone saxatilis) habitat use in the San Francisco Bay estuary. We used correlated Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios measurements from adult otoliths from striped bass that experienced a range of salinities to infer striped bass otolith Sr/Ca response to changes in salinity and water Sr/Ca ratio. Otolith {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr can be assumed to accurately record water {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr because there is no biological fractionation of Sr isotopes. Water {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr can in turn be used to estimate water salinity based on the mixing of fresh and marine water with known {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. The relationship between adjacent analyses on otoliths of Sr/Ca and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr by LA-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS (r{sup 2} = 0.65, n = 66) is used to predict water salinity from a measured Sr/Ca ratio. The nature of this non-linear model lends itself well to identifying residence in the Delta and to a lesser extent Suisun Bay, but does not do well locating residence within the more saline bays west of Carquinez Strait. An increase in the number of analyses would improve model confidence, but ultimately the precision of the model is limited by the variability in the response of individual fish to water Sr/Ca.

  2. Mathematical transport modeling for determination of effectiveness of Kepone clean up activities in the James River estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of 1966-1975, a highly chlorinated pesticide, Kepone, was discharged to the environment around Hopewell, Virginia. Much of the Kepone that reached the James River estuary was adsorbed by river sediment, becoming a long-term source of pollution. In order to identify an optimal location to remove Kepone from the river bed and to assess the effectiveness of the clean up activities to reduce the Kepone level in the river, the mathematical simulation of sediment and Kepone transport in the James River estuary was performed by applying the sediment-containment transport model, FETRA, to an 86-km river reach between Bailey and Burwell Bays. The FETRA code is an unsteady, two-dimensional, finite element interactions. The submodels are: (1) a sediment transport submodel, (2) a dissolved contaminant transport submodel, and (3) a particulate contaminant (contaminant adsorbed by sediment) transport submodel. FETRA also predicts changes in river bed conditions of sediment and contaminant. The value of applying models to dredging activity goes beyond this specific example. Through the sensitivity analysis, one can employ models to predict the most cost effective strategy for dredging. Properly constructed strategies will take advantage of river and coastal water dynamics to reduce the total volume of sediments to be dredged. Results of the simulation can also be used to predict subsequent environmental impacts.

  3. Hungry Horse Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project: Long-Term Habitat Management Plan, Elk and Mule Deer Winter Range Enhancement, Firefighter Mountain and Spotted Bear Winter Ranges.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals are to rehabilitate 1120 acres of big game (elk and mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus) winter range on the Hungry Horse and Spotted Bear Districts of Flathead National Forest lands adjacent to Hungry Horse Reservoir. This project represents the initial phase of implementation toward the mitigation goal. A minimum of 547 acres Trust-funded enhancements are called for in this plan. The remainder are part of the typical Forest Service management activities for the project area. Monitor and evaluate the effects of project implementation on the big game forage base and elk and mule deer populations in the project area. Monitor enhancement success to determine effective acreage to be credited against mitigation goal. Additional enhancement acreage will be selected elsewhere in the Flathead Forest or other lands adjacent'' to the reservoir based on progress toward the mitigation goal as determined through monitoring. The Wildlife Mitigation Trust Fund Advisory Committee will serve to guide decisions regarding future enhancement efforts. 7 refs.

  4. 2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  5. USE OF MOLECULAR MODELING TO DETERMINE THE INTERACTION AND COMPETITION OF GASES WITHIN COAL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made progress in carrying out large scale molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMM force field in order to refine our coal/guest interactions. There have been two issues facing us over the last year. First, we have had to create a completely new topology and parameter definition for coal. Since we are using a classical force field, we have adopted the strategy of treating coal composed of individual common fragments based upon a distribution of mass, composition, and bonding. Our procedure is similar to treating a protein as being composed of the discrete set of amino acids. Second, we have had to incorporate the quality CO{sub 2} parameters that we have developed over the last two years. There are the geometric and arithmetic procedures, which we have successfully implemented. We have utilized computational molecular modeling to generate a state-of-the-art large scale structural representation of a bituminous coal of low volatile bituminous rank. This structure(s) has been used to investigate the molecular forces between the bituminous coal structure (or idealized pores) and the molecular species CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. We are close to carrying out molecular dynamics simulations, which will allow us to explore and test the newly created model of coal.

  6. As I travel across the country talking with wildlife professionals about leadership and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that many wildlife professionals still lack basic people skills. We obviously have historically understood skills is the type of people our pro- fession attracts; we simply don't attract many people, relative our profession. Unfortunately, many of us lack an under- standing of how to develop better people

  7. Indicators of sustainable forestry: The association between wildlife species and forest structure in Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Indicators of sustainable forestry: The association between wildlife species and forest structure et al., 2008). Today forests should be managed according to the principles of sustainable forestry and Forestry, 2008). The implementation of economic and ecological sustainability goals is a challenging task

  8. Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign 61820 ABSTRACT.--Brush pile creation is a common habitat of brush pile creation and the indirect effects of brush piles on multi-species interactions. Here we

  9. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTENSIVELY MANAGED FORESTS TO THE SUSTAINABILITY OF WILDLIFE COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Mike

    Sciences, 11 West Jones Street, Raleigh, NC 27601-1029 (JAG); Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken University, Box 8002, Raleigh, NC, 27695-8002 (RAL); Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken, SC, 29802 to sustaining wildlife communities in the South. National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc., PO Box

  10. Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

  11. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):235244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animalvehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):235244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animalvehicle collisions, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People's Re- public of China, 100083 Abstract: Animalvehicle collisions (AVCs) cause animal death, human injury, and vehicle damage. Uncovering the general patterns

  13. ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix D STAFF ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS During the course. This report provides the results of the biological analysis of the adopted actions. The package was termed

  14. FY 2006 Council Recommended Fish and Wildlife Start of Year budgets Province Subbasin Project # Title Sponsor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project # Title Sponsor BPA Project Manager FY 2005 Council SOY Budget Budget Request July memo issue, Joe $175,000 3 $175,000 Washington Wildlife Agreement project.Base O&M until management plan Province Subbasin Project # Title Sponsor BPA Project Manager FY 2005 Council SOY Budget Budget Request

  15. Spatial and Temporal Survey of Feral Pig Ectoparasites in Three Texas Wildlife Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Anthony

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Two hundred fifty six fleas, Pulex porcinus (Jordan and Rothschild), were collected from all gender and age classes of feral pigs at the South Texas Plains wildlife district. No fleas were collected at either the Hill Country or Post Oak Savannah...

  16. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):257265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):257265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition to North Dakota's program. Therefore, we analyzed fragmentation patterns and lead deposition in carcasses fragments and lead deposits throughout the entire abdominal cavity of carcasses. We also used 2 types

  17. Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

  18. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):242250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 3(2):242­250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada geese near, Castleton, NY 12033-9653, USA Abstract: Canada geese (Branta canadensis) often cause significant damage when. We placed alpha-numeric neck collars on 300 Canada geese within 8 km of both John F. Kennedy

  19. RWU 4201 Wildlife Ecology in Rocky Mountain Landscapes Wolverine Population Assessment in Glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RWU 4201 Wildlife Ecology in Rocky Mountain Landscapes Wolverine Population Assessment in Glacier. Beckwith, Missoula, MT 59801 Problem Statement Glacier National Park (GNP) is one of the few National Parks patterns of Glacier NP wolverine. Trapping will continue through the winter of 2004 and will focus

  20. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):186198, Fall 2009 Developing bird-strike risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , YO41 1LZ Abstract: Mineral extraction sites that are restored to open water can increase bird that attract wildlife are planned for mineral extraction sites near airports. These conflicts arises primarily-strike risk if they are planned near airports. This can generate conflict between the minerals industry

  1. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs with mineral-rich bedrock, at the base of cliffs and steep slopes, or in ravines--places that accumulate is a GPS unit. Global positioning systems (GPS) are used in the field to record the location of plant

  2. SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

  3. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):235248, Fall 2011 Increasing trend of damaging bird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2005; 2008; Dolbeer, unpublished data). The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated efforts at airports because various historical analyses of bird-strike data for civil aviation have the U.S. National Wildlife Strike Database for Civil Aviation, 1990 to 2009, indicates that this tenet

  4. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2): Fall 2012 Effects of grassland alteration from mowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Dolbeer et al. 2009). According to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the average annual cost and aircraft (i.e., bird strikes) have occurred since the beginning of aviation and have resulted in human of bird and other wildlife strikes in the United States to the civil aviation industry is estimated

  5. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):261270, Fall 2014 Soil quality manipulation to reduce bird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are a worldwide threat to aviation safety. From 1990 to 2012, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) received Abstract: Aviation safety is an important concern in wildlife management as bird strikes risk human lives. Further, the FAA estimates that only about 20% of bird strikes are reported. The probability of bird

  6. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):296297, Fall 2009 Richard A. Dolbeer: scientist, innovator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a series of interagency agreements with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to conduct research on wildlife hazards to aviation. In collaboration with the FAA, Richard and scientists under his guidance have.S.A. and the FAA Excellence in Aviation Research award. The Air Line Pilots Associationhonoredhimfor

  7. Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife Caitlin Kight by anthropogenic noise pollution, which is often louder, has a different frequency emphasis, and may occur over a different temporal scale, than natural noise. Although a handful of studies have indicated that acoustically

  8. Incorporating risk into the feasibility assessment of alternative brush management strategies for the Welder Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Keith D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    grazed for almost 100 years up until 1954. In that year, a portion of the ranch was designated as the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation and work began to accurately account for the range operations. At this time, it was estimated that the total...

  9. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

  10. Wildlife conservation and reduced emissions from deforestation in a case study of Nantu National Park,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Wildlife conservation and reduced emissions from deforestation in a case study of Nantu National Measures of success a b s t r a c t Discussions on how to reduce carbon emissions from deforestation of the role of protected area (PA) status in reducing tropical deforestation. This study employs a range

  11. COMPARATIVE PROPERTIES OF BAGASSE PARTICLEBOARD School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARATIVE PROPERTIES OF BAGASSE PARTICLEBOARD Qinglin Wu School of Forestry, Wildlife panels (6.35 mm x 1.22 m x 2.44 m in size) were manufactured from hammer milled bagasse. A combination be successfully developed. Keywords: bagasse, laminate floor, particleboard, pMDI, stability, and strength

  12. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  13. Landowners' perceptions on coordinated wildlife and groundwater management in the Edwards Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limesand, Craig Milton

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Land, Water, and Wildlife Habitat Dynamics in Texas............................. 7 Aquifers of the Edwards Plateau.............................................................. .9 Groundwater Conservation Districts... from the Edwards-Trinity and Trinity aquifers in three central Texas counties. ??????????????????............... 11 2. Appraisal list statistics of counties in sample population, grouped by region...

  14. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project of potential risk to the species. #12;Corn Snake ­ Fairly common in Delaware, but is not likely to be present

  15. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):216225, Fall 2009 Personal and corporate liability in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    managers and operators are being sued personally for human injuries and death, as well as property damage, state, and provincial wildlife management programs have contributed to population increases in large that airport operators and managers must address the issues of organizational and personal liability. Airport

  16. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  17. Model independent determination of the CKM phase $?$ using input from $D^0-\\bar{D}^0$ mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Harnew; Jonas Rademacker

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new, amplitude model-independent method to measure the CP violation parameter $\\gamma$ in $B^- \\to DK^-$ and related decays. Information on charm interference parameters, usually obtained from charm threshold data, is obtained from charm mixing. By splitting the phase space of the $D$ meson decay into several bins, enough information can be gained to measure $\\gamma$ without input from the charm threshold. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with a simulation study of $B^- \\to DK^-$ with $D \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. We compare the performance of our novel approach to that of a previously proposed binned analysis which uses charm interference parameters obtained from threshold data. While both methods provide useful constraints, the combination of the two by far outperforms either of them applied on their own. Such an analysis would provide a highly competitive measurement of $\\gamma$. Our simulation studies indicate, subject to assumptions about data yields and the amplitude structure of $D^0 \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, a statistical uncertainty on $\\gamma$ of $\\sim 13^{\\circ}$ with existing data and $4^{\\circ}$ for the LHCb-upgrade.

  18. DETERMINATION OF AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISPOSITION OF 2-BUTOXYETHANOL AND ITS METABOLITES IN MICE AND RATS TO IMPROVE PBPK MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Rick A.; Grant, Donna M.; Farris, Elizabeth; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Thrall, K D.; Poet, Torka S.

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is the most widely used glycol ether solvent. BE's major metabolite, butoxyacetic acid (BAA), causes hemolysis with significant species differences in sensitivity. Several PBPK models have been developed over the past two decades to describe the disposition of BE and BAA in male rats and humans to refine health risk assessments. More recent efforts by Lee et al. (1998) to describe the kinetics of BE and BAA in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) chronic inhalation studies required the use of several assumptions to extrapolate model parameters from earlier PBPK models developed for young male rats to include female F344 and both sexes of B6C3F1 mice and the effects of aging. To replace these assumptions, studies were conducted to determine the impact of age, gender and species on the metabolism of BE, and the tissue partitioning, renal acid transport and plasma protein binding of BAA. In the current study, the Lee et al. PBPK model was updated and expanded to include the further metabolism of BAA and the salivary excretion of BE and BAA which may contribute to the forestomach irritation observed in mice in the NTP study. The revised model predicted that peak blood concentrations of BAA achieved following 6-hr inhalation exposures are greatest in young adult female rats at concentrations up to 300 ppm. This is not the case predicted for old (>18 months) animals, where peak blood concentrations of BAA in male and female mice were similar to or greater than female rats. The revised model serves as a quantitative tool for integrating an extensive pharmacokinetic and mechanistic database into a format that can readily be used to compare internal dosimetry across dose, route of exposure and species.

  19. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3910, Forestry and Natural Resources Practicum, the intern must complete

  20. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3900, Forestry and Natural Resources Internship, the intern must work

  1. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):139149, Spring 2014 Evaluation of foliar sprays to reduce crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the anthraquinone-based product, Avipel (44 minutes/day) than on reference plots (132 minutes/day; P and economical in the field. Key words: anthraquinone, Canada geese, crop damage, human­wildlife conflicts

  2. A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyambi, Gwendoline

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION PROGRAM ORGANIZATION TO DETERMINE BEST-FIT PROGRAM MODEL: A CASE STUDY OF THE NORTH WEST AND SOUTH WEST REGIONS OF CAMEROON A Dissertation by GWENDOLINE NA-AH NYAMBI... A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon Copyright 2012 Gwendoline Na-ah Nyambi A COMPARATIVE...

  3. Determining the mechanical constitutive properties of metals as a function of strain rate and temperature: A combined experimental and modeling approach; Progress Report for 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Robertson; A. Beaudoin; J. Lambros

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions (foreign object damage, high-strain rate forging, high-speed sheet forming, deformation behavior during forming, response to extreme conditions, etc.). To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be closely coupled with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experimentation is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models, which will include dislocation-grain boundary interactions for polycrystalline systems. One aspect of the program will involve the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these will indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an experimental and modeling viewpoint. In addition, our approach will minimize the need to fit model parameters to experimental data to obtain convergence. These are critical steps to reach the primary objective of simulating and modeling material performance under extreme loading conditions. To achieve these goals required assembling a multidisciplinary team, see Table 1, with key collaborators at the National Laboratories. One of the major issues for the team members was to learn about the expertise available and how to communicate across disciplines. The communication issue is a challenging one and is being addressed in part with weekly meetings in which the graduate students present lectures on the fundamentals of their respective areas to the entire group. Breakthroughs in science are presented but these, by necessity, assume a tutorial nature; examples of student led meetings can be found at our website http://hrdg.mse.uiuc.edu/. For example, interpreting electron micrographs and understanding what can be achieved by using electron microscopy is challenging for the modeling expert as is comprehending the input and limitations of crystal plasticity codes for an electron microscopist. Significant progress has been made at dissolving these barriers and the students are able to work across the disciplines.

  4. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

  5. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  6. CX-005201: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Southern Nevada CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  7. CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  8. CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  9. Wildlife conservation education efforts by Information and Education (I&E) divisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Richard Alan

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Wende Swank (Member) 3LI , J hn K. Thomas (Member) Da id Schmidly (Department Head) December 1987 ABSTRACT Wildlife Conservation Education Efforts by Information and Education Divisions (I&E) (December 1987) Richard Alan Stone, B. S.... John K. Thomas in the construction and interpretation of the survey. Not to be forgotten are the survey respondents whose time spent on the surv ey and patience with me on the phone proves that there are commited individuals in conserv ation...

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  11. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  12. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  13. Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. CX-004602: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Natural Resources Program, Environmental Program, Wildlife and Fisheries Program, the Forestry Program, and the Conservation Enforcement Program. There would also be a Tribal Court...

  15. CX-012224: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW) purchase of the Coyote Creek property, a 224-acre parcel of land...

  16. CX-003628: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW?s) acquisition of a conservation easement on 5 parcels of the...

  17. Chapter 9: Visions for future research in wildlife epidemiology1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geneticists, immunologists, etc). This is true for both fundamental research problems (for example, the measurement of immunocompetence; 9.3) and the applied questions ( 9.6). In particular, in the modelling.2, see also 9.6.2). The former often needs a better appreciation of the power and especially

  18. FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFAC 04-08-DOECategorical|FSM

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  20. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Concerns and Recommendations Our specific comments on the Council's draft recommendations address several issues, broadly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and power needs of the people of the Pacific Northwest. In our perspective it is one of your most Balancing the Fish and Wildlife Program under the Northwest Power Act.Instead of reanalyzing the projects for the Fish and Wildlife Program was established by the Bonneville Power Administration in their electricity

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-34)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  6. WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah:Information Wildlife Classified as

  7. WAC - 232-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah:Information Wildlife Classified

  8. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yde, Chris A.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

  9. Enlisting the support of the Texas birding community into the wildlife management process, with comparisons to Texas waterfowl hunters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifester, Jason Andrew

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example, habitat damage and disturbance of wildlife often occur due to the actions of large numbers of birders in pursuit of a new or rare species (Wilkes 1977; Boyle and Samson 1985). These activities bear resemblance to consumptive use of wildlife... in their overall effect on habitats. Other actions of recreational birders are much like hunters. Birders stalk their quarry. Many birders also keep lists of the species they have identified. When new birds are seen, they are added to the birders' lists...

  10. Whole-Organism Concentration Ratios for Plutonium in Wildlife from Past US Nuclear Research Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    johansen, M.; Kamboj; Kuhne, W.

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo-media}) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR{sub wo-media} values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR{sub wo-media} values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt.

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  12. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  13. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  14. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cetaceans, seals, sea turtles, ocean sunfish and basking sharks. Other sharks and fish are recorded opportunistically. Data collection methods: Line-transect methods that...

  15. The Cerro Grande Fire - From Wildlife Modeling Through the Fire Aftermath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudell, T. M. (Theresa M.); Gille, R. W. (Roland W.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cerro Grande Fire developed from a prescribed burn by the National Park Service at Bandelier National Monument near Los Alamos, New Mexico. When the burn went out of control and became a wildfire, it attracted worldwide attention because it threatened the birthplace of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Was LANL prepared for a fire? What lessons have been learned?

  16. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Existing Data and Recent Survey Efforts * Atlantic Seabird Survey Compendium (USGS) (Allan O'Connell) * OBIS-SEAMAP (Jesse Cleary) * CetMap (Jesse Cleary) * Ocean Wind Power...

  17. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations inCommittee | Department ofDisseminationGridData |

  18. Infusing self-determination into 18-21 services for students with intellectual or developmental disabilities: A multi-stage, multiple component model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Garner, Nancy; Danna, Yeager; Lawrence, Margaret; Davis, Anna Kay

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 2006, 41(1), 3-13 Division on Developmental Disabilities Infusing Self-Determination into 18 - 21 Services for Students with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities: A Multi-Stage, Multiple... outcomes (Wehmeyer & Palmer, 2003; Wehmeyer & Schwartz, 1997). Infusing Student Involvement and Self- Determination into High Quality 18 - 21 Supports The focus of our work has centered on the final quality indicator, that of promoting stu- dent involvement...

  19. GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat impacts, and then examine other anthropogenic sources of avian mortality. Next, we provide a broad

  20. United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishes. S..::aleless warm- water fish are particularly susceptible. High water temperature decreases fish resistance to this disease. RANGE Best known in America. Excessively hot summer temperatures are favorable and Wildlife INTRODUCTION Columnaris disease attacks many species of fresh -water fishes. Also known as "Cotton

  1. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Kru , Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert 1. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Kru , Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert 1 ............ Wet Reduction Equipment Continuous Cooker Continuous Press Oil Recovery by Centrifuges Direct-Heat Drier. Steam-Tube Drier 2 3 3 5 5 6 6 Pap: Wet Reduction

  2. Wildlife Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    stages. At first there are ?flu-like? symptoms such as fatigue, fever, sore throat, nausea and cough- ing. According to the Texas Department of Health, many of those infected develop a small red lesion around the site of the tick or flea bite...

  3. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological resource publications Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and...

  4. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program90803 ResponsivenessPlasma Physics

  5. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  7. Spatial and temporal patterns of Lycium carolinianum Walt., the Carolina Wolfberry, in the salt marshes of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butzler, Rachel Elizabeth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which are utilized by the cranes each winter. Past research indicates that the Carolina wolfberry (Lycium carolinianum) contributes 21-52% of crane energy intake early in the wintering period (Chavez 1996...

  8. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  9. Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folsom, Wendy Ann

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this study, the numbers of registered UMAs as of April 2001 were as follows: Coahuila, 500; Nuevo Leon, 650; and Tamaulipas, 513 (Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, 2001). Research suggests that many wildlife managers seek outside expertise when making...

  10. MODELS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF QUAKING ASPEN IN GEOGRAPHIC AND POTENTIAL EVAPOTRANSPIRATION SPACES RELEVANT TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, R. Douglas

    MODELS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF QUAKING ASPEN IN GEOGRAPHIC AND POTENTIAL EVAPOTRANSPIRATION SPACES Models for the distribution of quaking aspen concentration in geographic and potential evapotranspiration, and Wildlife Sciences Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed tree species in North America and an asset

  11. CX-006311: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Acquisition of Properties near the Naches River in Yakima County, Washington for Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.25 Date: 07212011...

  12. Perlick: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-14002) | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    finding that refrigerator basic model HP48RR does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing....

  13. Whirlpool: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1420) | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    finding that refrigerator-freezer basic model 8TAR81 does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing....

  14. Bigwall: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-15006) | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ("Bigwall model PACH8000") of room air conditioners do not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing....

  15. Heat Controller: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-15004)...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Heat Controller, Inc. finding that the room air conditioner distributed in commerce by Heat Controller as Comfort Aire brand models...

  16. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the others in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

  17. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

  19. Amino acid nutrition of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus): development of an improved test diet and determination of the total sulfur amino acid requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Hae Young

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AMINO ACID NUTRITION OF THE RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS): DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TEST DIET AND DETERMINATION OF THE TOTAL SULFUR AMINO ACID REQUIREMENT A Thesis by HAE YOUNG MOON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences AMINO ACID NUTRITION OF THE RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS): DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TEST DIET...

  20. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  1. Author manuscript, published in "International Conference on Information Fusion (2013)" An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Co-Driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evangeline Pollard; Fawzi Nashashibi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractFull autonomy of ground vehicles is a major goal of the ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) community. However, reaching such highest autonomy level in all situations (weather, traffic,...) may seem difficult in practice, despite recent results regarding driverless cars (e.g., Google Cars). In addition, an automated vehicle should also self-assess its own perception abilities, and not only perceive its environment. In this paper, we propose an intermediate approach towards full automation, by defining a spectrum of automation layers, from fully manual (the car is driven by a driver) to fully automated (the car is driven by a computer), based on an ontological model for representing knowledge. We also propose a second ontology for situation assessment (what does the automated car perceive?), including the sensors/actuators state, environmental conditions and drivers state. Finally, we also define inference rules to link the situation assessment ontology to the automation level one. Both ontological models have been built and first results are presented. I.

  2. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas D. (Port Matilda, PA); Burgard, Anthony R. (State College, PA); Pharkya, Priti (State College, PA)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  3. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  4. Overview of multivariate methods and their application to studies of wildlife habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multivariate statistical techniques as methods of choice in analyzing habitat relations among animals have distinct advantages over competitive methodologies. These considerations, joined with a reduction in the cost of computer time, the increased availability of multivariate statistical packages, and an increased willingness on the part of ecologists to use mathematics and statistics as tools, have created an exponentially increasing interest in multivariate statistical methods over the past decade. It is important to note that the earliest multivariate statistical analyses in ecology did more than introduce a set of appropriate and needed methodologies to ecology. The studies emphasized different spatial and organizational scales from those typically emphasized in habitat studies. The new studies, that used multivariate methods, emphasized individual organisms' responses in a heterogeneous environment. This philosophical (and to some degree, methodological) emphasis on heterogeneity has led to a potential to predict the consequences of disturbances and management on wildlife habitat. One recent development in this regard has been the coupling of forest succession simulators with multivariate analysis of habitat to predict habitat availability under different timber management procedures.

  5. Primordial 4He abundance: a determination based on the largest sample of HII regions with a methodology tested on model HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izotov, Y I; Guseva, N G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We verified the validity of the empirical method to derive the 4He abundance used in our previous papers by applying it to CLOUDY (v13.01) models. Using newly published HeI emissivities, for which we present convenient fits as well as the output CLOUDY case B hydrogen and HeI line intensities, we found that the empirical method is able to reproduce the input CLOUDY 4He abundance with an accuracy of better than 1%. The CLOUDY output data also allowed us to derive the non-recombination contribution to the intensities of the strongest Balmer hydrogen Halpha, Hbeta, Hgamma, and Hdelta emission lines and the ionisation correction factors for He. With these improvements we used our updated empirical method to derive the 4He abundances and to test corrections for several systematic effects in a sample of 1610 spectra of low-metallicity extragalactic HII regions, the largest sample used so far. From this sample we extracted a subsample of 111 HII regions with Hbeta equivalent width EW(Hbeta) > 150A, with excitation p...

  6. Determination of Dark Energy and Dark Matter from the values of Redshift for the present time, Planck and Trans-Planck epochs of the Big-Bang model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asger G. Gasanalizade; Ramin A. Hasanalizade

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As an alternative to the Standard cosmology model we have developed a new modified Freundlich's (quantum relativity) redshift (MFRS) mechanisms, which provide a precise solutions of the Dark Energy and Dark Matter problems. We apply the joint solution of three MFRS equations for concordances quantize bounce Planck hierarchy steps. Simultaneous scaling solutions of MFRS equations in logarithmic scale appropriate to three cosmological epoch's, yields a currently testable predictions regarding the Dark Matter {\\Omega}_{DM} = 0.25, and Dark Energy {\\Omega}_{DE} = 0.75. These predictions coincides with the recent observational data from WMAP and other a key supernovae SNe Ia findings. Thus, the presence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy had already been not only detected observationally, but also confirmed theoretically with the very compelling accuracy. From the WMAP7 and our predicted ages we find a value of the Hubble constant H_0 = 65.6 km * s^{-1} Mpc^{-1} which is excellent agreement with the Planck 2013 results XVI. Compared with the "holographic scenario" results, we find an important coincidence between our new and "holographic" parameters. We discuss the connection hierarchy between the multiverse masses and examine the status of the cosmic acceleration. The product of the age of the Universe into the cosmic acceleration in each cosmological epochs --including present day are constant and precisely corresponds to an possible observable-geophysical parameter g_U = 9.50005264_{265} (exact) * (m/s^2). For the derived by WMAP7 age of the Universe t_{W7} = 13.75(13) * 10^9 yr, we find the relevant acceleration a_{W7} = 6.91(65) * 10^{-10} m/s^2. The predicted value of t_0 = 9.0264_9(51) * 10^2 Gyr is consistent with the background acceleration. a_0 = 1.05246_4(61) * 10^{-11} m/s^2.

  7. Development of a real-time quantitative hydrologic forecasting model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John Frank

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data made in each domain. Fit3ur e 1. Lieatner Radar Carr ection Procedures (by drtmatni ( Bussel I et a 1 . , (97EI ) (Weeks and Hebbert, 1980) and the Boughton Model (Weeks and Hebbert, 1980) are but a few. Models range from sophisticated... of hydroelectric power with existing facilities, $73 million, e) benefits to navigation, $2 million and f) more efFective use of recreational facilities and wildlife habitat, $3 million. Total $485 million The resulting expected benefits in 1983 dollars...

  8. American black bear habitat selection in northern lower peninsula, Michigan, USA, using discrete-choice modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Daniel G.

    data better than others; both indicated that locations of bears were negatively associated with water bear harvests, sightings, and nuisance reports. Policy makers and wildlife managers can prepare 19912000 for 20 males and 35 females. We developed Bayesian random effects discrete-choice models

  9. American black bear habitat selection in northern Lower Peninsula, Michigan, USA, using discrete-choice modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    data better than others; both indicated that locations of bears were negatively associated with water bear harvests, sightings, and nuisance reports. Policy makers and wildlife managers can prepare 19912000 for 20 males and 35 females. We developed Bayesian random effects discrete-choice models

  10. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include ??, ZZ, WW, ??, bb, and ?? pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. From the high-resolution ?? and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02\\,+0.26-0.27(stat)+0.14-0.15(syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtainedmorein the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 0.09 (stat), +0.08 -0.07 (theo) 0.07 (syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. No significant deviations are found.less

  11. Correlations Among Gender, Career Interests, Conservation Issues, And Curriculum Choice By Students In Wildlife And Fisheries Sciences At Texas A&M University From 2000 To 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woldhagen, Ashley N.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    due to complying with the law protecting endangered species. PplMnWL People have the right to manage wildlife populations. WLtoAll Wildlife belong to all people, even if found on private land. BredHnt It is ok to breed and raise wildlife (deer...ProN ESReimbA ESReimbD ESReimbN PplMnWLA PplMnWLD PplMnWLN WLtoAllA WLtoAllD WLtoAllN BredHntA BredHntD BredHntN GvRgOcnA GvRgOcnD GvRgOcnN SanctGvA SanctGvD SanctGvN WLPetA WLPetD WLPetN FshCrulA FshCrulD FshCrulN AnRt.PpA AnRt.PpD AnRt.PpN 2000 2008 Male...

  12. Determining solar abundances using helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Determinants of male reproductive success in American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    & Scott R. Creel & Steven T. Kalinowski & Ninh V. Vu & Howard B. Quigley Received: 4 December 2008. Costello :H. B. Quigley Hornocker Wildlife Institute and Wildlife Conservation Society, 301 N Wilson@bresnan.net Present Address: H. B. Quigley Panthera, PO Box 11363, Bozeman, MT 59719, USA Behav Ecol Sociobiol DOI 10

  14. Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

  15. Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

  16. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Baron, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, ecological risk assessment at CERCLA sites [such as the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)], has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source operable unit. Consequently the species that are generally considered are those with home ranges small enough such that multiple individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the contaminated site. This approach is adequate for sites with single, discrete areas of contamination that only provide habitat for species with limited requirements. This approach is not adequate however for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. Because wide-ranging wildlife species may travel between and use multiple contaminated sites they may be exposed to and be at risk from contaminants from multiple locations. Use of a particular contaminated site by wide-ranging species will be dependent upon the amount of suitable habitat available at that site. Therefore to adequately evaluate risks to wide-ranging species at the ORR-wide scale, the use of multiple contaminated sites must be weighted by the amount of suitable habitat on OUs. This reservation-wide ecological risk assessment is intended to identify which endpoints are significantly at risk; which contaminants are responsible for this risk; and which OUs significantly contribute to risk.

  17. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

  18. Mile High: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Mile High Equipment, LLC finding that Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  19. Philips: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-2605)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. finding that basic model VEL-I S40-SC, a fluorescent lamp ballast, does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  20. Goodman Manufacturing: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-4301)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Goodman Manufacturing finding that model CPC180XXX3BXXXAA (CPC180*) of commercial package air conditioner does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  1. Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0305)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that a variety of basic models of split-system air conditioning heat pumps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  2. Lutron Electronics: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-3796)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. finding that a variety of Class A external power supply basic models do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  3. CX-003713: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-003713: Categorical Exclusion Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3, B3.6 Date:...

  4. CX-002373: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 05132010...

  5. CX-009425: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Partial Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: B3.3, B3.16, B5.18 Date:...

  6. CX-004369: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-004369: Categorical Exclusion Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11...

  7. Determination of Longitudinal Stress in Rails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djayaputra, Ferdinand

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to determine the longitudinal stress in rails by using the polarization of Rayleigh waves. Analytical models are developed to describe the effect of applied stress on wave speed and on the polarization of Rayleigh...

  8. Central Moloney: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4702)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Central Moloney, Inc. finding that liquid-immersed distribution transformer basic models 30300150 and 32500095 do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  9. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  10. Team Assembly Mechanisms Determine Collaboration Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Team Assembly Mechanisms Determine Collaboration Network Structure and Team Performance Roger the mechanisms by which creative teams self-assemble determine the structure of these collaboration networks. We propose a model for the self-assembly of creative teams that has its basis in three parameters: team size

  11. Cooperative Determination on Cache Replacement Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Francis Y.L.

    Cooperative Determination on Cache Replacement Candidates for Transcoding Proxy Caching Keqiu Li1- mination on cache replacement candidates for transcoding proxies. An original model which determines cache replacement candidates on all can- didate nodes in a coordinated fashion with the objective of minimizing

  12. FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have fish in the water of a particular stream before their release into that stream. Act -- See Northwest of different elements of the system are better understood. adult equivalent population The number of fish

  13. 4. Transition to integrated regional monitoring and evaluation framework The Fish and Wildlife Program calls for a monitoring program to evaluate whether the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4. Transition to integrated regional monitoring and evaluation framework The Fish and Wildlife for Program funding and plan for a transition for currently funded methods over a specific period of time of the individual project without specific justification. This transition should be accomplished within three years

  14. BIOLOGY AT NCBS, BANGALORE AND DBS, MUMBAI (PhD/Int-PhD/ M. Sc.-by-Research/ M. Sc. in Wildlife & Conservation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalla, Upinder S.

    BIOLOGY AT NCBS, BANGALORE AND DBS, MUMBAI (PhD/Int-PhD/ M. Sc.-by-Research/ M. Sc. in Wildlife & Conservation) (Please check the websites: `Admissions' at www.ncbs.res.in; http at both Bangalore and Mumbai campuses. Internet access, e-mail and bibliography search support are also

  15. A procedure for determining contents of rabbit stomachs and its application to cottontails on the Gene Howe Wildlife Management Area in midwinter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles A

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , ai d 5, I oaiiec tivelg, abo, ~ ti, e l'rtie z'OI&iooid & ttle 'C. t i Col i & au ~ 'tile C, , loridoid "iiragrostoid epid&-. i. bio. &i ?, ure a sbo?&s no&i-distinc ive sto:;, epide-. ni? froN four sp&iciea t!. 't -!io?l, i fit i&&to eit", . :r...

  16. EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    : Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

  17. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maynard, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hendee, Shonn P. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohrscheib, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nunez, David (Albuquerque, NM); Alam, M. Kathleen (Cedar Crest, NM); Franke, James E. (Franklin, TN); Kemeny, Gabor J. (Madison, WI)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  18. Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-1602)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that indoor unit model AEW244 and outdoor unit model NCPC-424-3010 of residential split system central air conditioning system do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  19. Development of a wildlife monitoring system on the proposed Woodlands city site, Montgomery County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poche, Richard Michael

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    different mammals. The information included herein will be applicable in determining corridor width and size of natural areas within Woodlands. Hahn cruise-lines and road-strip censuses were used to attain the relative density of the deer population...

  20. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  1. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  2. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  3. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 Federalof EnergyThorium,8,2011BarriersJuly 24-25,

  4. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  5. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

  6. Midea: Amended Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0110, 2012...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Noncompliance Determination to Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. finding that basic model HD-146F, a...

  7. Sanden Vendo America: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-52002...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    bottled or canned beverage vending machine model Vue30 (with 1128127 cassette refrigeration deck) does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the...

  8. GE Lighting Solutions: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4901)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to General Electric Lighting Solutions finding that various models of traffic signal modules do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  9. Westinghouse Lighting: Noncompliance Determination (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation finding that various models of incandescent reflector lamps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  10. CSIRO PUBLISHING www.publish.csiro.au/journals/wr Wildlife Research, 2008, 35, 409416

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Ababa, Ethiopia. D Corresponding author. Email: paulevan@nrel.colostate.edu Abstract. The use climatic, topographical and vegetative variables. Three model evaluation methods showed a strong performance of the final model with an overall accuracy of 90%, Cohen's maximised of 0.80 and area under

  11. Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar "Trees Adaptation to Mercury Contaminated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in contaminated soil with heavy metals is mainly due to phenotypic plasticity and/or microbial community microscope. Soil Sampling Physio-chemical components of the soil will be determined. pH, water content of mercury is mainly within the below ground components of the tree seedlings. Methodology Growth Chamber

  12. Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    or private groups, managing existing public and private lands for diversity values, regulating detrimental private land uses, and providing incentives for private habitat protection. Common to all these approaches is a need to determine the specific areas of land that warrant action. Nearly 12 percent of California has

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    carbon dioxide (C02), and concentrated solar energy to cost-effectively produce Syngas, a renewable, carbon-neutral fuel. Project activities will include: (1) modeling,...

  14. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  15. Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

  16. Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Lower Snake River tributaries Prepared by: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is inadequate. This plan will therefore, serve as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic of known quality (accuracy and precision) #12;- Validate EDT model as a reliable measure of habitat

  17. Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Dunn, Jacob C.; Day, Jennifer M. W.; Ambile-Cuevas, Carlos F.

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    and by antibiotic resistance determinants. Environ Pollut 157: 28932902. 42. Mandujano S, Escobedo-Morales LA, Palacios-Silva R (2004) Movements of Alouatta Palliata among forest fragments in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. Neotrop Primates 12: 126131. 43. Chaves OM, Stoner... , Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2 Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America, 3 Fundacion Lusara, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract There are a growing number of reports...

  18. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

  19. Determinants of Meme Popularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, James P; Baos, Raquel A; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online social media have greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what are the fundamental mechanisms driving dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior and analytically show, using techniques from mathematical population genetics, that competition between memes for the limited resource of user attention leads to a type of self-organized criticality, with heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity: a few memes "go viral" but the majority become only moderately popular. The time-dependent solutions of the model are shown to fit empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, and to predict novel scaling features of the data. The presented framework, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  20. Pax Global: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1413)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Pax Global, Inc. finding that freezer basic models (1) Crosley CCF51; (2) Crosley CCF69; (3) Crosley CCF106; and (4) Daewoo DCF-106W do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  1. Sunnyside Wildlife Area Wildlife Area Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primary Treatment Morgan Lake Secondary Treatment So. Morgan Wetland- Tertiary New Johnson Wetland;#12;Moist Soil and Wetland Management Giffen LakeRice Paddies Brady Wetland 90-Acre Field #12;Smartweed Seeds #12;#12;#12;#12;N.A. Wetlands Conservation Act Grant (NAWCA) Sulphur Cr. Wasteway Bridgeman Pond

  2. Determining Pregnancy in Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, A. M. Jr.; Beverly, J. R.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This should not upset the pal- pator. An indication of rectum damage is a sand- paper or gritty feeling. In this case, the mucosa lining the rectum has been rubbed off in the palpation pro- cess. It is best to stop further palpation when this occurs. A... good land- mark, figure 2. After locating the cervix, the pal- pator can move forward to the uterus to determine pregnancy. The paunch, located directly forward and to the left, may feel like the end of a football and be rather soft and mushy...

  3. A sociobioeconomic fisheries simulation model: the Texas inshore shrimp fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauthamer, Judith T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SO CIO BIO EC ONO MIC FISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHORE SHRIMP FISHERY A Thesis JUDITH T ERA UTHA M E R Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SO CIO BIOS COND MIC PISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHO RE SH RIM P FISHER 7 A Thesis by JUDITH T KRAUTHA MER Approved as to style and content by: b'C. ~ Wilham...

  4. What determines galactic evolution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci

    2002-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We are briefly introducing the most important ingredients to study galactic evolution. In particular the roles of star formation, nucleosynthesis and gas flows. Then we are discussing the two different approaches to galactic evolution: the stellar population approach (chemical evolution models) and the hierarchical clustering scenario for galaxy formation. It is shown that there are still some controversial points in the two approaches, as evident in the brief summary of the discussion.

  5. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  6. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Air and Water Volume 2 Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  7. Ural-Tweed Bighorn Sheep Wildlife Mitigation Project, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yde, Chris A. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); Summerfield, Bob; Young, Lewis (Kootenai National Forest, Libby, MT)

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the project activities from September 1, 1984 to December 31, 1986. To date, habitat treatments have been initiated on eight areas. The treatments include selective slash and burn, prescribed fire and fertilization. Inclement weather precluded the completion of the prescribed burns scheduled during fall 1985 and fall 1986. The lower Stonehill prescribed fire was rescheduled from fall 1985 to spring 1986 with the burn accomplished, producing varied results. Extensive pretreatment vegetative information has been collected from all units scheduled for habitat manipulations. Additionally, future projects have been delineated for other areas frequented by bighorn sheep. Ten adult bighorn sheep (5 ewes and 5 rams) have been fitted with radio transmitters. Systematic aerial and ground surveys were utilized to monitor the movements and seasonal habitat preferences of the instrumented sheep. Age and sex information was gathered whenever possible to aid in the development of a population model, Monthly pallet group collections were initiated in May 1985 to provide samples for 2.6 diaminopimetic acid (DAPA), food habits and lungworm larvae analysis. The majority of the data analysis is ongoing and will be presented in later reports.

  8. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  9. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V. [NSTec

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  10. Determinants of official OPEC crude prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verleger, P.K. Jr.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis of this paper is that crude oil, like any other unfinished commodity, is valued for the products derived from it; the purpose is to offer an empirical explanation for changes in the crude price charged by the members of OPEC. The model results show that the market-clearing prices reported to prevail for petroleum products on the principal petroleum spot market at Rotterdam are the primary determinants of changes in official crude prices. A systematic relationship between offical and spot prices is argued to have prevailed since 1974. An appendix clarifies five types of data required for the model. 13 references, 4 tables.

  11. Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

  12. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  13. automated nmr determination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pre-existing XPLOR program Clore, G. Marius 29 An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Physics Websites Summary: towards full...

  14. AeroSys: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to AeroSys, Inc. finding that basic models THHP-24T* and THDC-30T* do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  15. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  16. Protein structure determination using a database of interatomic distance probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, George N. Jr.

    determination and molecular modeling. An energy function, or database potential, is derived from distributionsProtein structure determination using a database of interatomic distance probabilities MICHAEL E for Advanced Science and Technology and National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois

  17. Helioseismological Implications of Recent Solar Abundance Determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; Marc Pinsonneault; Aldo M. Serenelli

    2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that standard solar models are in good agreement with the helioseismologically determined sound speed and density as a function of solar radius, the depth of the convective zone, and the surface helium abundance, as long as those models do not incorporate the most recent heavy element abundance determinations. However, sophisticated new analyses of the solar atmosphere infer lower abundances of the lighter metals (like C, N, O, Ne, and Ar) than the previously widely used surface abundances. We show that solar models that include the lower heavy element abundances disagree with the solar profiles of sound speed and density as well as the depth of the convective zone and the helium abundance. The disagreements for models with the new abundances range from factors of several to many times the quoted uncertainties in the helioseismological measurements. The disagreements are at temperatures below what is required for solar interior fusion reactions and therefore do not significantly affect solar neutrino emission. If errors in thecalculated OPAL opacities are solely responsible for the disagreements, then the corrections in the opacity must extend from 2 times 10^6 K (R = 0.7R_Sun)to 5 times 10^6 K (R = 0.4 R_Sun), with opacity increases of order 10%.

  18. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  19. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  20. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model for Skagit River Estuary for Estuarine Restoration Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Hedong; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Skagit River is the largest river in the Puget Sound estuarine system. It discharges about 39% of total sediment and more than 20% of freshwater into Puget Sound. The Skagit River delta provides rich estuarine and freshwater habitats for salmon and many other wildlife species. Over the past 150 years, economic development in the Skagit River delta has resulted in significant losses of wildlife habitat, particularly due to construction of dikes. Diked portion of the delta is known as Fir Island where irrigation practices for agriculture land over the last century has resulted in land subsidence. This has also caused reduced efficiency of drainage network and impeded fish passages through the area. In this study, a three-dimensional tidal circulation model was developed for the Skagit River delta to assist estuarine restoration in the Fir Island area. The hydrodynamic model used in the study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The hydrodynamic model was calibrated using field data collected from the study area specifically for the model development. Wetting and drying processes in the estuarine delta are simulated in the hydrodynamic model. The calibrated model was applied to simulate different restoration alternatives and provide guidance for estuarine restoration and management. Specifically, the model was used to help select and design configurations that would improve the supply of sediment and freshwater to the mudflats and tidal marsh areas outside of diked regions and then improve the estuarine habitats for salmon migration.

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Determinants of male reproductive success in American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalinowski, Steven T

    & Scott R. Creel & Steven T. Kalinowski & Ninh V. Vu & Howard B. Quigley Received: 4 December 2008. 2002). Communicated by: M. Festa-Bianchet C. M. Costello :H. B. Quigley Hornocker Wildlife Institute, Manhattan, MT 59741, USA e-mail: ccostello@bresnan.net Present Address: H. B. Quigley Panthera, PO Box 11363

  2. Wildlife Management Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities at the Metals Reduction Plant 2010 Completed demolition of the East End Smelter 2010 Began operation of the C-400 TCE Source Removal System 2010 Completed removal of...

  3. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................................................................................. sCienCe FoR ResoURCe management ...................................................2 Contemporary .......................................................................................6 U.S. Geological Survey Initiatives....................................................................8 Site-Specific Research Supporting Federal Resource Management...............................9

  4. Chapter 18 Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCeriumfor the 20122-1

  5. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7 2 x> -

  6. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

  7. Westinghouse Lighting: Noncompliance Determination (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation finding that model F40T12/CWE (Westinghouse product code 07521000), a general service fluorescent lamp, and model 15GLOBE/65/2 (Westinghouse product code 3800400), a medium base compact fluorescent lamp, do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  8. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consisting of AZ road dust and soot in acetonitrile carrier solvent was sprayed onto glass coupons at very brief intervals with a high volume, low pressure pneumatic sprayer....

  9. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  10. A study of the plant composition and utilization by mixed classes of livestock and white-tailed deer on the Kerr Wildlife Management area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Morton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ^ z*\\ ^ z * A A M CULlEGE OF TEXAS A STUDY OF THE PLOT COMPOSITION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES OF LIVESTOCK AND WHITE-TAILED DEER ON THE KERR WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA A MCUULlEGECOF TOlEOF TGX S18cCEEL- EO E2L (lG-1GEL So2OOp Oe E2L... AnlCo1pE1lGp GF- TLo2GFCoGp ;OppLnL Oe )LsGU CF hGlECGp e1peCppcLFE Oe E2L lLa1ClLcLFEU eOl E2L MLnlLL Oe MOoEOl Oe d2CpOUOh2X JGF1GlXP 1959. Major Subject; Range Management A STUDY OF THE PLANT COM?031 ?ION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES...

  11. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  12. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  13. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (CX) Determinations By Date Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date August 25, 2015 CX-012469: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Analysis Services CX(s) Applied:...

  14. Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Kastens, Terry L.; Outlaw, Joe

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements Kevin C. Dhuyvetter, Terry L. Kastens and Joe L. Outlaw * Many crop producers rely heavily on rented land in their farming operations. The rental arrangements between landowners and producers can...

  15. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. CX-008905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    COTTON GIN DUST EXPLOSIBILITY DETERMINATIONS A Thesis by FRANCIS JEROME VANDERLICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... Francis Jerome Vanderlick ii ABSTRACT Following the recent Imperial sugar dust explosion in 2008, a comprehensive survey of past dust explosions was conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to determine potential...

  18. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  19. Helioseismic determination of opacity corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. Tripathy; Sarbani Basu; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of localized opacity modifications on the sound-speed profile of solar models. The sound-speed difference between the Sun and a solar model is used to deduce the opacity correction that would be required to bring the model into agreement with the Sun. We test this procedure on artificial data for a pair of solar models and apply it to the solar sound speed as inferred from inversion of LOWL observed frequencies. We show that a solar model constructed with the appropriately modified opacity has a sound-speed profile very similar to that of the Sun.

  20. A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ronald J.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

  1. CX-000616: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000616: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Wind Resource Assessment at Naval Station Newport; National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  2. CX-008582: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-008582: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium, Photovoltaic (PV) Manufacturing Initiative - Core Subawards CX(s)...

  3. CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Materials Characterization Laboratory & RadiologicalEnvironment, Safety and Health Training...

  4. CX-005367: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    67: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005367: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project T-222 Hazardous Materials Management Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Facility...

  5. DOE Publishes Supplemental Proposed Determination for Miscellaneous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposed Determination for Miscellaneous Residential Refrigeration Products DOE Publishes Supplemental Proposed Determination for Miscellaneous Residential Refrigeration Products...

  6. CX-006275: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Audit; Efficiency Improvements; and Renewable Energy Installations; Township of...

  7. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste...

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Science | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Science Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Science. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 9, 2012 CX-008000:...

  9. CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Air Quality VIII: An International Conference on Carbon Management, Mercury, Trace Elements,...

  10. CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Revised Narrative Information Worksheet for Energy Efficiency Program for...

  11. CX-001276: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-001276: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Photovoltaic Roof System, Energy Efficiency Retrofits, Building Audits, and Hire a Committee...

  12. CX-000477: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000477: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install a Photovoltaic Power Generation Array and Electric Car Charging Stations, Environmental Molecular...

  13. CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Green Jobs Training Program -...

  14. CX-001915: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    15: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Vision Community Energy Program and Evergreen Municipal Energy Efficiency Program-...

  15. CX-005022: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005022: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Center, Canyon Texas; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking...

  16. CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Rock...

  17. CX-009311: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009311: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Champaign)...

  18. CX-005490: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005490: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal Analysis of Radioactive Materials by Thermagravimetric Analysis, Differential Scanning...

  19. CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s)...

  20. CX-002132: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002132: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below...