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1

RELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BY RESONANT RAMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BY RESONANT RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY USING A TUNABLE DYE LASERRESONANT

Mellor-Crummey, John

2

4, 1367, 2007 Modelling carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon overconsumption and extracellular POC formation M. Schartau et carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon M. Schartau1 , A Correspondence to: M. Schartau (markus.schartau@gkss.de) 13 #12;BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

3

Use of molecular modeling to determine the interaction and competition of gases within coal for carbon dioxide sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular modeling was employed to both visualize and probe our understanding of carbon dioxide sequestration within a bituminous coal. A large-scale (>20,000 atoms) 3D molecular representation of Pocahontas No. 3 coal was generated. This model was constructed based on a the review data of Stock and Muntean, oxidation and decarboxylation data for aromatic clustersize frequency of Stock and Obeng, and the combination of Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry data with HRTEM, enabled the inclusion of a molecular weight distribution. The model contains 21,931 atoms, with a molecular mass of 174,873 amu, and an average molecular weight of 714 amu, with 201 structural components. The structure was evaluated based on several characteristics to ensure a reasonable constitution (chemical and physical representation). The helium density of Pocahontas No. 3 coal is 1.34 g/cm{sup 3} (dmmf) and the model was 1.27 g/cm{sup 3}. The structure is microporous, with a pore volume comprising 34% of the volume as expected for a coal of this rank. The representation was used to visualize CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity, and the role of moisture in swelling and CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity reduction. Inclusion of 0.68% moisture by mass (ash-free) enabled the model to swell by 1.2% (volume). Inclusion of CO{sub 2} enabled volumetric swelling of 4%.

Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Determination of the atherogenic potential of inhaled carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

he effects of chronic exposure to moderate levels of carbon monoxide upon the augmentation of arteriosclerotic plaque development were investigated in a series of in vivo studies in the cockerel (young rooster). This animal model has been well characterized, especially regarding the role of environmental agents in exacerbating early stages of plaque development. Cockerels injected with subtumorigenic doses of carcinogens exhibit markedly accelerated development of aortic arteriosclerotic plaques. Inhalation of mainstream smoke from two packs of cigarettes (100 minutes/day for 16 weeks) causes small but statistically significant increases in plaque size. As is the case with many animal models of plaque development, raised fat-proliferative plaques also appear in these animals following cholesterol feeding. Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous pollutant in urban environments, where it is derived largely from mobile sources and cigarette smoke. Exposure to chronically elevated carbon monoxide levels has been implicated in a number of health-related problems. Whether such exposure plays a role in the development of arteriosclerosis has not been determined conclusively. In the present study, three questions were posed: 1. Will inhaled carbon monoxide at levels of 50 to 200 parts per million (ppm)* (two hours/day for 16 weeks) be sufficient to augment arteriosclerotic plaque development in cockerels, in the absence of other plaque-promoting agents 2. Will the inhalation of 100 ppm carbon monoxide (two hours/day for 16 weeks), concomitant with the feeding of low levels (0.1%) of cholesterol, yield larger plaques than those obtained with either of these agents administered alone 3. Will inhalation of 100 ppm carbon monoxide (two hours/day for 11 or 22 weeks), by cockerels in whom plaques have already appeared, further augment plaque development Cockerels were exposed to carefully regulated levels of carbon monoxide in stainless-steel and Plexiglas dynamic exposure chambers.

Penn, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National fiber reinforced composites have enjoyed limited acceptance in the automotive industry due to high costs to bond with composite matrix material. It is important that a carbon fiber manufacturing cost model

7

Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

Maiti, A

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Modeling the Costs of Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the fundamental concepts required to model intertemporal carbon capture costs. A technical overview of post-combustion, pre-combustion, and alternative combustion carbon capture technologies i...

Erin Baker; Gregory Nemet; Peter Rasmussen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Determination of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in high purity magnesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF CARBON, NITROGEN, AND OXYGEN IN HIGH PURITY MAGNESIUM A Thesis by NEIL GERARD ROCHE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial i'ulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1981 Major Subject: Chemistry DETERMINATION OF CARBON, NITROGEN, AND OXYGEN IN HIGH PURITY MAGNESIUM A Thesis by NEIL GERARD ROCHE Approved as to style and content by: E. A. Schweikert (Chairman of Committee) G. J. Bastiaans (Member) L...

Roche, Neil Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

EB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITE UNDER TRIBOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS 1, homogenization, carbon ABSTRACT Thermo mechanical properties of Carbon-Carbon composite (C/C) allow them, the Carbon-Carbon composites (C/C) are materials frequently used in industrial applications such as plane

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture July 17, 2012 | Tags: Dirac, Energy Technologies, Materials...

13

A new carbon-13 method for determining aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of the relative percentages of aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon in samples of natural origin is important for many petroleum related studies including processing, geological studies, and certain product specifications. The normal method is the n-d-M method which requires the measurement of refractive index, density and molecular weight and a ternary correlation diagram to obtain the relative carbon percentages. It is difficult or inconvenient to make n-d-M measurements of very heavy products and the presence of significant amounts of polar materials makes n-d-M results inaccurate. The average molecular parameters determinable by a number of NMR techniques are directly or indirectly related to the percentage of various carbon types present in the mixture. Unfortunately, all the standard techniques we have examined have some built-in assumption which does not allow the accurate calculation of relative carbon percentages. For example, any proton technique applicable to aromatic fractions will give potentially low values for naphthenic carbon because naphthenic carbon is normally determined from the ..beta..-CH/sub 2/ region of tetralin-type structures (1.65-1.9 ppm). This is a very specific kind of naphthenic structure and to the extent that more than one saturate ring is asymmetrically condensed to the aromatic ring or that the saturate rings are not directly condensed to the aromatic rings, the method will fail.

Galya, L.G.; Young, D.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Growth model for carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence is presented, through high-resolution electron microscopy images, for the open-end growth of carbon nanotubes. Terminations of incomplete layers of carbon, seen on the tube surfaces and cone tips, suggest that the extension and thickening of the tubes occur by the island growth of graphite basal planes on existing tube surfaces. The nucleation of positive (pentagons) and negative (heptagons) disclinations on open tube ends results in changes of growth directions, producing different morphologies. A novel structure that shows complete turn around growth, involving pentagon-heptagon pairs, of the tubular assemblies is presented.

Sumio Iijima; P. M. Ajayan; T. Ichihashi

1992-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Modeling and Integrated Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling and Integrated Modeling and Integrated Assessment Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Economic Assessments * Engineering analysis of CO 2 separation and capture * Economic modeling/ integrated assessment of carbon capture and sequestration * Comparison on equal basis of the major sequestration options Economic Modeling Motivation * When might carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) become competitive? * What is its potential scale? * Which technologies look most promising? . . . . And when? * How to see the potential in a general market context? Detailed Reference *Sean Biggs Thesis: S Biggs, S. D., "Sequestering Carbon from Power Plants: The Jury is Still Out," M.I.T. Masters Thesis, (2000). S http://sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/SeanBiggs.pdf What Determines Competitiveness?

16

Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' soil horizon show that model improvements need to be made to capture observed soil carbon cyclingSoil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate and transport processes. Testing and improvement of soil carbon cycling models is a key anticipated output

17

Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with an attractive Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian which is exactly solvable.

Horia D. Cornean; Pierre Duclos; Benjamin Ricaud

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modelling Correlation in Carbon and Energy Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

content. The crude oil price is included in the estimation in order to control for contemporaneous correlation with all other energy sources. This is this study does not take into account the lagged relationship between crude oil and natural gas, as a... Modelling Correlation in Carbon and Energy Markets Philipp Koenig February 2011 CWPE 1123 & EPRG 1107 www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Modelling Correlation...

Koenig, Philipp

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

researchers improve soil carbon cycling models researchers improve soil carbon cycling models January 01, 2013 ORNL's new carbon cycling model could help scientists understand the role of soil microbes (MBC) in climate change by tracking extracellular enzymes (ENZ) that break down carbon-rich soil materials (SOC) into forms that microbes can respire (DOC). A more robust model of the soil carbon cycle developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves understanding of carbon residence time in soils and enables scientists to make more accurate climate predictions. The model does a better job than previous models of accounting for how microbes in the soil break down carbon-rich materials and release carbon dioxide. "Soil is a big reservoir of carbon," said co-author Melanie Mayes of the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science

20

Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Economic Development, People and Policy Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Training materials, Workshop Website: einstitute.worldbank.org/ei/course/low-carbon-development Cost: Paid References: Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling[1] Program Overview This course has the following modules - (i) Introduction to Low Carbon Development Planning; (ii) Overview for Policymakers; (iii) Power; (iv) Household; (v) Transport - which introduce you to climate change

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Determining timescales of natural carbonation of peridotite in the Samail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining timescales of the formation and preservation of carbonate alteration products in mantle peridotite is important in order to better understand the role of this potentially important sink in the global carbon ...

Mervine, Evelyn Martinique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Incorporating Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporating Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models J. R. Mc climate policy analysis. This paper examines the representation of carbon capture and storage (CCS carbon capture and storage, 2) a natural gas combined cycle technology with carbon capture and storage 1

23

COLLOQUIUM: Ensemble Modeling of Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

change. NOAA-GFDL developed two coupled climate-carbon cycle models - or Earth System Models (ESMs) - that are able to simulate these interactions. While the major...

24

A mathematical model for countercurrent moving-bed activated carbon adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the carbon column was divided into ten sections and the activated carbon flow rate was such that its detention time was fifty hours. Also, during this fifty hours one thousand gallons of water were treated. Thus the water volume of each section would... be one thou- sand gallons divided by ten sections or 100 gallons. One practical difficulty with the model is that an acti- vated carbon volume must be assumed, tests made, and calculations performed to determine if the effluent quality...

Anderson, Douglas Harold

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

White, Luther

26

Economic Modeling of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Modeling of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Jim McFarland (jrm1@mit.edu; +1 explores the economics of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating of the world economy, is used to model two of the most promising carbon capture and sequestration (CCS

27

Graph Model for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Metallurgical Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mathematical models are presented for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from metallurgical processes. The article also presents ... in graph form to calculate transit and net emissions of carbon dioxide based o...

Yu. N. Chesnokov; V. G. Lisienko; A. V. Lapteva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes Kaihui of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-sensitivity absorption spectros- copy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization

Wang, Feng

29

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration...

30

Numerical simulation and modeling of carbon nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The discovery of carbon nanotubes has triggered a significant amount of interest. Since then, much research has been done on these new forms of carbon (more)

Wong, Chee How.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ab Initio Thermodynamic Model for Magnesium Carbonates and Hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ab initio thermodynamic framework for predicting properties of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals has been developed using density-functional theory linked to macroscopic thermodynamics through the experimental chemical potentials for MgO, water, and CO2. Including semiempirical dispersion via the Grimme method and small corrections to the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof for the heat of formation yields a model with quantitative agreement for the benchmark minerals brucite, magnesite, nesquehonite, and hydromagnesite. The model shows how small differences in experimental conditions determine whether nesquehonite, hydromagnesite, or magnesite is the result of laboratory synthesis from carbonation of brucite, and what transformations are expected to occur on geological time scales. Because of the reliance on parameter-free first principles methods, the model is reliably extensible to experimental conditions not readily accessible to experiment and to any mineral composition for which the structure is known or can be hypothesized, including structures containing defects, substitutions, or transitional structures during solid state transformations induced by temperature changes or processes such as water, CO2, or O2 diffusion. Demonstrated applications of the ab initio thermodynamic framework include an independent means to evaluate differences in thermodynamic data for lansfordite, predicting the properties of Mg analogs of Ca-based hydrated carbonates monohydrocalcite and ikaite which have not been observed in nature, and an estimation of the thermodynamics of barringtonite from the stoichiometry and a single experimental observation.

Chaka, Anne M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures (VMM) Libby Berger (General Motors), Omar Faruque (Ford) Co-Principal Investigators US Automotive...

33

Method for determination of heterogeneous rate constants at carbon-fibre microelectrodes using multi-ac-voltammetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art FFT-instrument recently described in this journal (which measures the impedance at each dc potential applied to a working electrode) was shown to perform with excellent precision in a kinetic study at a carbon fibre microelectrode. A constant phase element (CPE) was used in a model in order to correct for double layer effects arising at the carbon fibre microelectrode (?11 ?m). This simple model in combination with the data collected by the FFT-instrument were then used in order to determine the heterogeneous rate constant for a well-defined red/ox couple. Good agreement with previously published values was obtained.

Magnus Rosvall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Tumor models for efficacy determination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GFP or RFP have been developed (Hoffman website). The molecular characterization of many...with tumor response. In addition to the search for better models, there remains an effort...Cancer 1996;65:695-9. 25 Rockwell SC. Tumor-cell survival. In: Teicher...

Beverly A. Teicher

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carbon-cycle models for better long-term predictions | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon-cycle models for better long-term predictions Carbon-cycle models for better long-term predictions Reduced variation among models should improve precision Improved...

36

Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling applied to degradation during carboncarbon composite processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling has been successfully utilized to describe phenomena during cure of thermoset based carbon fiber reinforced matrices. The basic difference from classic viscoelasticity is that the fundamental ...

Drakonakis, Vassilis M.

37

REACTIVE FLOW IN VUGGY CARBONATES: METHODS AND MODELS APPLIED TO MATRIX ACIDIZING OF CARBONATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonates invariably have small (micron) to large (centimeter) scale heterogeneities in flow properties that may cause the effects of injected acids to differ greatly from what is predicted by a model based on a homogenous formation. To the best...

Izgec, Omer

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

CarbonConcentration and CarbonClimate Feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnitude and evolution of parameters that characterize feedbacks in the coupled carbonclimate system are compared across nine Earth system models (ESMs). The analysis is based on results from biogeochemically, radiatively, and fully coupled ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer; Pierre Friedlingstein; Michael Eby; Chris D. Jones; James R. Christian; Gordon Bonan; Laurent Bopp; Victor Brovkin; Patricia Cadule; Tomohiro Hajima; Tatiana Ilyina; Keith Lindsay; Jerry F. Tjiputra; Tongwen Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Deployment Models for Commercialized Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deployment Models for Commercialized Carbon Capture and Storage ... Several proposed integrated gasification-combined cycle and postcombustion coal CO2 capture projects are teaming with oil companies for use of the captured CO2 in EOR. ...

Richard A. Esposito; Larry S. Monroe; Julio S. Friedman

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling Carbon Nanotubes in Injection Molding | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Carbon Nanotubes in Injection Molding Feb 03 2015 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM Lukas Bystricky, Florida State University Computer Science and Mathematics Division Computational and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Continuum Model for Carbon Nanotube-Infused Polyimides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Continuum Model for Carbon Nanotube-Infused Polyimides Heather Wilson1 , Sumanth Banda2 , Ralph C, the materials need to withstand this process. The nanotube-infused polyimides are flexible enough to withstand

42

A method for the determination of dissolved organic carbon in sea water by gas chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organic matter was carried out at elevated temperature and pressure after collection of a large number of samples. The resulting carbon dioxide was flushed through a gas chromatograph with helium as the carrier gas and the signal was recorded on a strip... chart recorder. Chromatographic analysis time was approximately eleven minutes per sample with a precision of + Q. 1 mg C/l. The organic carbon content of the sample was determined by measurement of the peak area using an appropriate carbon dioxide...

Fredericks, Alan D

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeosciences, 6, 20992120, 2009 www.biogeosciences.net/6/2099/2009/ Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Biogeosciences Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.... Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated with CO2 fertil- ization, and increased carbon...

Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: a framework for Earth System Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is one of the fundamental processes of global carbon cycling and it determines the magnitude of microbial biomass in soils. Mechanistic understanding of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls is important for to improve Earth system models ability to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks. Although microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is broadly considered to be an important parameter, it really comprises two separate physiological processes: one-time assimilation efficiency and time-dependent microbial maintenance energy. Representing of these two mechanisms is crucial to more accurately simulate carbon cycling in soils. In this study, a simple modeling framework was developed to evaluate the substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon using a new term: microbial annual active period (the length of microbes remaining active in one year). Substrate quality has a positive effect on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: higher substrate quality (lower C:N ratio) leads to higher ratio of microbial carbon to soil organic carbon and vice versa. Increases in microbial annual active period from zero stimulate microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon; however, when microbial annual active period is longer than an optimal threshold, increasing this period decreases microbial biomass. The simulated ratios of soil microbial biomass to soil organic carbon are reasonably consistent with a recently compiled global dataset at the biome-level. The modeling framework of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls developed in this study offers an applicable ways to incorporate microbial contributions to the carbon cycling into Earth system models for simulating carbon-climate feedbacks and to explain global patterns of microbial biomass.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL] [ORNL; Schimel, Joshua [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Song, Xia [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Santonu [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

Hoffman, Forrest M.

46

Determination and mapping of diameter and helicity for single-walled carbon nanotubes using nanobeam electron diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the formation energy of carbon nanotubes, while the growth prefers slightly the structure with helicity 15Determination and mapping of diameter and helicity for single-walled carbon nanotubes using June 2005 The atomic structures of 124 single-walled carbon nanotubes, described by their diameter

Qin, Lu-Chang

47

Evaluation of stress in bmi-carbon fiber laminate to determine the onset of microcracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work the conditions for which a (0,90,90,0,0,90)s BMI-carbon fiber laminate will initiate transverse microcracking are determined for the fabrication of a cryogenic fuel tank for use in a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). This is accomplished...

Pickle, Brent Durrell

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 655674 Determining true particulate organic carbon: bottles, pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 655­674 Determining true particulate organic carbon: bottles, pumps or by in situ filtration with pumps and analyzing the filters. The concentrations measured by these two methods-latitude waters. Here we report that the ratio of bottle POC to pump POC ranged between 20 and 200 in the Ross Sea

Hansell, Dennis

49

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

50

Temperature determination from the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of temperature from experimental data has become important in searches for critical phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Widely used methods are ratios of isotopes (which rely on chemical and thermal equilibrium), population ratios of excited states etc. Using the lattice gas model we propose a new observable: $n_{ch}/Z$ where $n_{ch}$ is the charge multiplicity and $Z$ is the charge of the fragmenting system. We show that the reduced multiplicity is a good measure of the average temperature of the fragmenting system.

S. Das Gupta; J. Pan; M. B. Tsang

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

New Method for Assimilable Organic Carbon Determination Using Flow-Cytometric Enumeration and a Natural Microbial Consortium as Inoculum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concentration of easily assimilable organic carbon (AOC) largely determines the microbiological stability of drinking water. However, AOC determination is often neglected in practice due to the complex and tedious nature of the conventional bioassay. ...

Frederik A. Hammes; Thomas Egli

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

Paul Bolstad

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Modeling of Acid Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The acid fracturing process is a thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and geochemical (THMG)-coupled phenomena in which the behavior of these variables are interrelated. To model the flow behavior of an acid into a fracture, mass and momentum balance...

Al Jawad, Murtada s

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Kinetic model of catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanism is proposed for describing the previous disclosed multiplicity of equilibrium states in the oxidation of carbon monoxide on metallic nickel. In contrast to the known mechanism for oxidation of CO on platinum metals it includes a nonlinear stage of carbon monoxide adsorption and a linear stage of oxygen adsorption. A kinetic model has been obtained and stage velocity constants have been found, providing a basis for obtaining a quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimental relations between the reaction velocity and the reagent concentrations. Opinions are stated in relation to the causes for evolution of the CO oxidation reaction from platinum metals to nickel.

Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Ostapyuk, V.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Integrated Modeling Framework for Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Karen L. cohen Karen L. cohen Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-6667 karen.cohen@netl.doe.gov Edward s. Rubin Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue 128A Baker Hall Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-268-5897 rubin@cmu.edu An IntegrAted ModelIng FrAMework For CArbon CApture And StorAge teChnologIeS Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is developing safe, lower-cost methods of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) as a potential option for climate change mitigation. In addition to technology development, there is a need for modeling and assessment tools to evaluate and compare the cost and effectiveness of CCS methods. Analytical

56

Macro scale physical model of nanoindentation on vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently the process of nanoindentation is being explored as a reliable means of determining the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the constituent tubes of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) ...

Ebeling, Geoffrey F. (Geoffrey Foster), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

18 Use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Modeling Carbon Emissions from Fires: A Perspective in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Modeling Carbon Emissions from Fires: A Perspective of the accurate estimation of carbon emissions from fires. So far, the continental-scale estimates of carbon conventional and satellite data to maximize their utility for fire emission estimation. 18.2 Carbon Emission

Li, Zhanqing

58

Causes and implications of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intercomparison Project indicated that climate models oftenpled ClimateCarbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project (C 4BIOFEEDBACK project of the Center for Climate Dynamics (SKD)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An electrochemical model for prediction of corrosion of mild steel in aqueous carbon dioxide solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A predictive model was developed for uniform carbon dioxide corrosion, based on modeling of individual electrochemical reactions in a water-CO{sub 2} system. The model takes into account the electrochemical reactions of hydrogen ion reduction, carbonic acid reduction, direct water reduction, oxygen reduction, and anodic dissolution of iron. The required electrochemical parameters (e.g., exchange current densities and Tafel slopes) for different reactions were determined from experiments conducted in glass cells. The corrosion process was monitored using polarization resistance, potentiodynamic sweep, electrochemical impedance, and weight-loss measurements. The model was calibrated for two mild steels over a range of parameters: temperature (t) = 20 C to 80 C, pH = 3 to 6, partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) = 0 bar to 1 bar (0 kPa to 100 kPa), and {omega} = 0 rpm to 5,000 rpm (v{sub p} = 0 m/s to 2.5 m/s). The model was applicable for uniform corrosion with no protective films present. Performance of the model was validated by comparing predictions to results from independent loop experiments. Predictions also were compared to those of other CO{sub 2} corrosion prediction models. Compared to the previous largely empirical models, the model gave a clearer picture of the corrosion mechanisms by considering the effects of pH, temperature, and solution flow rate on the participating anodic and cathodic reactions.

Nesic, S. [Inst. for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway); Postlethwaite, J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Olsen, S. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An XFEM Model for Carbon Sequestration Journal: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PeerReview Only An XFEM Model for Carbon Sequestration Journal: International Journal for Numerical method, Carbon Sequestration, Multiphase flow, XFEM, Multifield systems, Petrov-Galerkin httpScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/nme An XFEM Model for Carbon Sequestration Chris Ladubec

Gracie, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

62

Rippling and a phase-transforming mesoscopic model for multiwalled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rippling and a phase-transforming mesoscopic model for multiwalled carbon nanotubes M. Arroyo I 08034, Spain Abstract We propose to model thick multiwalled carbon nanotubes as beams with non- convex transformation, B. beams and columns, B. finite strain, B. multiwalled carbon nanotubes 1 Introduction Since

Huerta, Antonio

63

Synthesis, characterization, and modeling of hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (600-800 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. These materials are usually synthesized from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde or phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical extraction of the solvent and pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. The resultant aerogel has a nanocrystalline structure with micropores (<2 nm diameter) located within the solid matrix. Carbon aerogel monoliths can be prepared at densities ranging from 0.05-1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, leading to volumetric surface areas (> 500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}) that are much larger than commercially available materials. This research program is directed at optimization of the aerogel structure for maximum hydrogen adsorption over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Computer modeling of hydrogen adsorption at carbon surfaces was also examined.

Pekala, R.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Calef, D.F.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Atomistic Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Carbons.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nanoporous carbons are among the widely studied and promising materials on hydrogen storage for on-board vehicles. However, the nature of nanoporous carbon structures, as well (more)

Peng, Lujian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ecological Modelling xxx (2005) xxxxxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on simulated NEE. Finally 17 parameters, linked to photosynthesis, vegetative respiration and soil water are used to create a set of 17,000 simulations, where the values of the 17 key parameters are randomlyEcological Modelling xxx (2005) xxx­xxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest Part I

Boyer, Edmond

66

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

States of Carbon-12 in the Skyrme Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Skyrme model has two Skyrmion solutions of baryon number $12$, with $D_{3h}$ and $D_{4h}$ symmetries. The first has an equilateral triangular shape and the second an extended linear shape, analogous to the triangle and linear chain structures of three alpha particles. We recalculate the moments of inertia of these Skyrmions, and deduce the energies and spins of their quantized rotational excitations. There is a good match with the ground-state band of Carbon-12, and with the recently established rotational band of the Hoyle state. The ratio of the root mean square matter radii also matches the experimental value.

P. H. C. Lau; N. S. Manton

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed.

OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity the application of the adjoint method to develop three-dimensional maps of carbon sequestration efficiency. Sequestration efficiency (the percentage of carbon injected at a continuous point source that remains

Follows, Mick

70

Back to Exploration 2008 CSPG CSEG CWLS Convention 1 A Computational Model of Catalyzed Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explores the feasibility of catalysis-based carbon sequestration by efficiently and accurately modeling that this method can be scaled to accurately predict the efficacy of such systems for carbon sequestration to help find the most cost effective methods possible. Most carbon sequestration methods are capture

Spiteri, Raymond J.

71

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

72

Carbon Nanotube Mats and Fibers with Irradiation-Improved Mechanical Characteristics: ATheoretical Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotube Mats and Fibers with Irradiation-Improved Mechanical Characteristics: ATheoretical model to calculate mechanical characteristics of macroscopic mats and fibers of single-walled carbon-flow technique [4]. The SWNT fibers, which in contrast to most ordinary carbon fibers could be strongly bent with

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

73

Shielding-Effectiveness Modeling of Carbon-Fiber/Nylon-6,6 Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shielding-Effectiveness Modeling of Carbon-Fiber/Nylon- 6,6 Composites Nicholas B. Janda,1 Jason M for various amounts of Thermal- Graph DKD X carbon fiber within nylon 6,6. The theory predicts that the most important parameters for the shield- ing effectiveness of a sample are the carbon-fiber volume percentage

Perger, Warren F.

74

January 2, 2008 Numerical modeling of the effect of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2, 2008 Numerical modeling of the effect of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate souterrain de dioxyde de carbone sur la déformation des calcaires par dissolution sous contrainte: résultats;Abstract When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its

Boyer, Edmond

75

Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

Boyer, Edmond

76

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

77

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models Saif Benjaafar1, we illustrate how carbon emission concerns could be integrated into operational decision-making with regard to procurement, production, and inventory management. We show how, by associating carbon emission

Benjaafar, Saifallah

78

Changes in soil organic carbon storage predicted by Earth system models during the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown et

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

80

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profile, cloud temperature and amount, the seasonal cycle, and the tropopause level and accelerating polar ice melting. We use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model to investigate is generally assumed. Citation: Koch, D., and J. Hansen (2005), Distant origins of Arctic black carbon

82

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Carbon Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CARBON EMISSIONS CARBON EMISSIONS A part of the integrating module, the carbon emissions submodule (CEM) computes the carbon emissions due to the combustion of energy. The coefficients for carbon emissions are derived from Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1996, published in October 1997. The calculations account for the fact that some fossil fuels are used for nonfuel purposes, such as feedstocks, and thus the carbon in the fuel is sequestered in the end product. CEM also allows for several carbon policy evaluation options to be imposed within NEMS. Although none of the policy options are assumed in the Annual Energy Outlook 1998, the options can be used in special analyses to simulate potential market-based approaches to meet national carbon emission

83

One-dimensional Hubbard-Luttinger model for carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Hubbard-Luttinger model is developed for qualitative description of one-dimensional motion of interacting Pi-conductivity-electrons in carbon single-wall nanotubes at low temperatures. The low-lying excitations in one-dimensional electron gas are described in terms of interacting bosons. The Bogolyubov transformation allows one to describe the system as an ensemble of non-interacting quasi-bosons. Operators of Fermi-excitations and Green functions of fermions are introduced. The electric current is derived as a function of potential difference on the contact between a nanotube and a normal metal. Deviations from Ohm law produced by electron-electron short-range repulsion as well as by the transverse quantization in single-wall nanotubes are discussed. The results are compared with experimental data.

Ishkhanyan, H A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Finite Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a hydro-mechanical model, followed by stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account of the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process. Analytical solutions for pressure and deformation fields were derived for a typical geological sequestration scenario in our previous work. A finite element approach is introduced here for numerically solving the hydro-mechanical model with arbitrary boundary conditions. The numerical approach was built on an open-source finite element code Elmer, and results were compared to the analytical solutions. The shear-slip failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where the potential failure zone is identified. Information is relevant to the prediction of the maximum sustainable injection rate or pressure. The effects of caprock permeability on the fluid pressure, deformation, stress, and the shear-slip failure zone were also quantitatively studied. It was shown that a larger permeability in caprock and base rock leads to a larger uplift but a smaller shear-slip failure zone.

Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

2013-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dominance of the Southern Ocean in anthropogenic carbon and heat uptake in CMIP5 models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assess the uptake, transport and storage of oceanic anthropogenic carbon and heat over the period 1861 to 2005 in a new set of coupled carbon-climate Earth System models conducted for the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), ...

Thomas L. Frlicher; Jorge L. Sarmiento; David J. Paynter; John P. Dunne; John P. Krasting; Michael Winton

86

Temperature Zonal Combustion Reactor for the 15-Nitrogen and 13-Carbon Isotopic Determination of Enriched Biosynthetic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature Zonal Combustion Reactor for the 15-Nitrogen and 13-Carbon Isotopic Determination of Enriched Biosynthetic Materials ... After the furnace controller had been reset from 250 C (VHT) to 700 C (combustion), the sample zone temperature increased at ?50 C/min, which coincided with a pressure rise from 255 to 363 Torr (over some 8 min). ...

Michael May; John Kuo; Michael Gray; I. Knyazhansky; C. T. Tan

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

NMR Determination of Carbon Aromatization during Hydrous Pyrolysis of Coals from the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NMR Determination of Carbon Aromatization during Hydrous Pyrolysis of Coals from the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin ... This process is thought to activate capillary seals and could lead to abnormally pressured compartments, which represent a new class of hydrocarbon gas resources. ...

Francis P. Miknis; Daniel A. Netzel; Ronald C. Surdam

1996-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: Climate Relations in Eight CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight Earth System Models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated, focusing on both the net carbon dioxide flux and its components and their relation with climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and ...

Pu Shao; Xubin Zeng; Koichi Sakaguchi; Russell K. Monson; Xiaodong Zeng

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Nicaragua Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

91

Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for

92

Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Honduras Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

93

Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Belize Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

94

Costa Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Costa Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa-Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Costa Rica Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

95

Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Guatemala Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

96

A general model for chemical erosion of carbon materials due to low-energy H + impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the chemical erosion of carbon materials due to low-energy H + impact is of paramount importance for the prediction of the behavior of carbon-based plasma-facing components in nuclear fusion devices. In this paper a simple general model describing both energy and temperature dependence of carbon-based chemical erosion is presented. Enlightened by Hopfs model {Hopf et al. [J. Appl. Phys.94 2373 (Year: 2003)} the chemical erosion is separated into the contributions from three mechanisms: thermal chemical erosion energetic chemical sputtering and ion-enhanced chemical erosion. Using input from the Monte Carlo code TRIDYN this model is able to reproduce experimental data well.

Shengguang Liu; Jizhong Sun; Shuyu Dai; Thomas Stirner; Dezhen Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Integrated Analysis and Application of Reservoir Models to Early Permian Detrital Carbonate Deposits, Midland Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 3-D seismic volume, wireline logs and core data were integrated to determine the spatial distribution of porous reservoirs within the Wolfcampian-Leonardian detrital carbonate slope and basin strata in Glasscock County, Texas. A 3-D seismic...

Johnston, Travis Wayne 1987-

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Preindustrial-Control and Twentieth-Century Carbon Cycle Experiments with the Earth System Model CESM1(BGC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Version 1 of the Community Earth System Model, in the configuration where its full carbon cycle is enabled, is introduced and documented. In this configuration, the terrestrial biogeochemical model, which includes carbonnitrogen dynamics and is ...

Keith Lindsay; Gordon B. Bonan; Scott C. Doney; Forrest M. Hoffman; David M. Lawrence; Matthew C. Long; Natalie M. Mahowald; J. Keith Moore; James T. Randerson; Peter E. Thornton

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fuel processing for fuel cells: a model for fuel conversion and carbon formation in the adiabatic steam reformer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In present fuel cell power plants the fuel processor is a catalytic steam reformer which is limited to the use of fuels such as naphtha and natural gas. The sulfur content of these feeds must be reduced to low levels by hydrotreatment before contacting the nickel catalyst in the reformer. However, future fuel cell power plants may be required to ue coal-derived liquid fuel or heavy petroleum distillates which are more difficult to hydrotreat and reform. To meet this requirement, an adiabatic steam reformer is being developed by United Technologies Corporation with the support of the Electric Power Research Institute. In the adiabatic reformer, air is added to the process stream to provide, by combustion, the heat for endothermic reforming in a catalyst bed. In the inlet section of the reformer, air and fuel combust, and reforming is initiated on special catalysts whose primary functon is to prevent formation and accumulation of carbon. Following the inlet section, catalysts with high activity for steam reforming complete the conversion of the remaining fuel, principally methane. The objective of the present program is to establish a reactor model for the adiabatic reformer which would predict process stream compositions and temperatures and include carbon formation processes. Progress is reported on the four tasks: (1) determine rate expressions for catalytic reactions occurring in the adiabatic reformer; (2) establish a reactor model to predict process stream compositions in the adiabatic reformer using data from Task 1 for cataytic reactions and data from the literature for homogeneous gas-phase reactions; (3) determine critical conditions for carbon formation on selected catalysts using microbalance experiments; and (4) establish a model to predict carbon formation by combination of the model for process stream composition from Task 2 and data for carbon formation from Task 3. (WHK)

Bett, J.A.S.; Cutlip, M.C.; Foley, P.F.; Lesieur, R.R.; Meyer, A.P.; Sederquist, R.A.; Setzer, H.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cost-Effective Choices of Marine Fuels in a Carbon-Constrained World: Results from a Global Energy Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Choices of Marine Fuels in a Carbon-Constrained World: Results from a Global Energy Model ... Department

Maria Taljegard; Selma Brynolf; Maria Grahn; Karin Andersson; Hannes Johnson

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injection in Heterogeneous Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the physical processes that occur during the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in liquid-saturated, brine-bearing geologic formations using the numerical simulator TOUGH2. CO2 is injected in a supercritical state that has a much lower density and viscosity than the liquid brine it displaces. In situ, the supercritical CO2 forms a gas-like phase, and also partially dissolves in the aqueous phase, creating a multi-phase, multi-component environment that shares many important features with the vadose zone. The flow and transport simulations employ an equation of state package that treats a two-phase (liquid, gas), three-component (water, salt, CO2) system. Chemical reactions between CO2 and rock minerals that could potentially contribute to mineral trapping of CO2 are not included. The geological setting considered is a fluvial/deltaic formation that is strongly heterogeneous, making preferential flow a significant effect, especially when coupled with the strong buoyancy forces acting on the gas-like CO2 plume. Key model development issues include vertical and lateral grid resolution, grid orientation effects, and the choice of characteristic curves.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic performance computing to assess the risks involved in carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations-thermal- chemical processes in variably saturated, non-isothermal porous media is applied to sequestration

Mills, Richard

104

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units ... This paper investigates the alternative of precombustion capture of carbon dioxide from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants using membrane reactors equipped with H2-selective zeolite membranes for the water gas shift reaction. ...

Fernando V. Lima; Prodromos Daoutidis; Michael Tsapatsis; John J. Marano

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

105

Requirements Model for a High-Privacy Decentralized Carbon Emissions Trading Platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper elicits and models the requirements of a decentralized carbon emissions trading platform (CarboCoin). CarboCoin platform is based on the Bit coin, a peer-to-peer digital currency with no central authority. CarboCoin is focused on providing ... Keywords: privacy, carbon trading platform, crypto currency

Enas Alkawasmi; Edin Arnautovic; Davor Svetinovic

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

ORNL/CDIAC-150 DETERMINATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA Date Published: March 2006 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

107

Design and modeling of carbon nanotube-based compliant mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to generate the knowledge required to adapt macro- and microscale compliant mechanism theory to design carbon nanotube-based nano-scale compliant mechanisms. Molecular simulations of a ...

DiBiasio, Christopher M. (Christopher Michael)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

Jan, Badr H.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions The emissions policy submodule, part of the integrating module, estimates the energy–related emissions of carbon dioxide and methane. Carbon dioxide emissions are dependent on the fossil fuel consumed, the carbon content of the fuel, and the fraction of the fuel consumed in combustion. The product of the carbon dioxide coefficient and the combustion fraction yields a carbon dioxide emission factor. For fuel uses of fossil energy, the combustion fractions are assumed to be 0.99 for liquid fuels and 0.995 for gaseous fuels. The carbon dioxide potential of nonfuel uses of energy, such as asphalt and petrochemical feedstocks, is assumed to be sequestered in the product and not released to the atmosphere. The coefficients for carbon dioxide emissions are updated each year from the Energy Information Administration’s annual, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States.17

111

GFDLs ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part II: Carbon System Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors describe carbon system formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbonclimate Earth System Models (ESM), ESM2M and ESM2G. These models demonstrate good climate fidelity as described in part I of this study ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Lori T. Sentman; Alistair J. Adcroft; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Matthew J. Harrison; Hiram Levy; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Peter J. Phillips; Niki Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Uncertainty in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) deployment projections: a cross-model comparison exercise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) can be a...2...mitigation option, but what role CCS will play in the future is uncertain. In this paper we analyze the results of different integrated assessment models (IAMs) tak...

Barbara Sophia Koelbl; Machteld A. van den Broek; Andr P. C. Faaij

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Finite Element Modelling and Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Carbon nanotubes/ Polymer Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled nanotubes and nanotube reinforced polymer composites using both the Finite Element method and the Molecular Dynamic simulation technique is presented. Nanotubes subjected to mechanical loading...

Gaddamanugu, Dhatri

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Terrestrial Carbon Sinks for the United States Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Alfredo Huete; Vanessa Genovese

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mass Transfer after Amendment of Contaminated Sediment with Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). We extend our evaluation of ...

David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Atmospheric black carbon may not cause as much warming of the climate as we thought. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe

118

Modelling interwall interactions in carbon nanotubes: fundamentals and device applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the static friction force, F f. The balance of these forces in all-carbon nanorelays...understanding of the fundamental science giving rise...Nakayama2003Interlayer sliding force of individual multiwall...the nanoscale. In Handbook of nanoscience, engineering...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

\tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

120

Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, accounting for the response of microbial communities to environmental parameters in Earth system models may

German, Donovan P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both EulerianEulerian and EulerianLagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT EulerianLagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA EulerianLagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT EulerianEulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W. [U.S. DOE; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Project Summary Full Title: Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity Project ID: 195 Principal Investigator: David McCollum Brief Description: This project addresses several components of carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs, provides technical models for determining the engineering and infrastructure requirements of CCS, and describes some correlations for estimating CO2 density and viscosity. Keywords: Pipeline, transportation, greenhouse gases (GHG), costs, technoeconomic analysis Purpose Estimate costs of carbon dioxide capture, compression, transport, storage, etc., and provide some technical models for determining the engineering and

124

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment. A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models. This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in the following Section II on Large scale fertilization, has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on patch fertilization discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on model development summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Jorge L. Sarmiento - Princeton PI, Anand Gnanadesikan - Princeton Co-I, Nicolas Gruber - UCLA PI, Xin Jin - UCLA PostDoc, Robert Armstrong - SUNY /Stony Brook Consultant

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

125

Recent Site-Wide Transport Modeling Related to the Carbon Tetrachloride Plume at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon tetrachloride transport in the unconfined aquifer system at the Hanford Site has been the subject of follow-on studies since the Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program was completed in FY 2002. These scoping analyses were undertaken to provide support for strategic planning and guidance for the more robust modeling needed to obtain a final record of decision (ROD) for the carbon tetrachloride plume in the 200 West Area. This report documents the technical approach and the results of these follow-on, site-wide scale-modeling efforts. The existing site-wide groundwater model was used in this effort. The work extended that performed as part of the ITRD modeling study in which a 200 West Area scale submodel was developed to examine arrival concentrations at an arbitrary boundary between the 200 E and 200 W areas. These scoping analyses extended the analysis to predict the arrival of the carbon tetrachloride plume at the Columbia River. The results of these analyses illustrate the importance of developing field-scale estimates of natural attenuation parameters, abiotic degradation rate and soil/water equilibrium sorption coefficient, for carbon tetrachloride. With these parameters set to zero, carbon tetrachloride concentrations will exceed the compliance limit of 5 ?g/L outside the 200 Area Plateau Waste Management Area, and the aquifer source loading and area of the aquifer affected will continue to grow until arrival rates of carbon tetrachloride equal source release rates, estimated at 33 kg/yr. Results of this scoping analysis show that the natural attenuation parameters are critical in predicting the future movement of carbon tetrachloride from the 200 West Area. Results also show the significant change in predictions between continual source release from the vadose zone and complete source removal.

Bergeron, Marcel P.; Cole, C R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Non-parametric regression and neural-network inll drilling recovery models for carbonate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in®ll drilling recovery model is capable of forecasting the oil recovery with less error variance®ll drilling recovery eciency. The approach we take here is stat- istical. It is based on an oil recoveryNon-parametric regression and neural-network in®ll drilling recovery models for carbonate

Valkó, Peter

127

A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land propagates through models and the processes and feedbacks they simulate. One of our jobs as environmental partitioning of energy, the evapotranspiration of water and if the land-surface is a sink or a source of CO2

128

Fullerene-like models for microporous carbon Peter J. F. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Fullerene-like models for microporous carbon Peter J. F. Harris Received: 8 June 2012 with Franklin's original models, which were based on cross-linked graphitic P. J. F. Harris (&) Centre, UK e-mail: p.j.f.harris@reading.ac.uk 123 J Mater Sci DOI 10.1007/s10853-012-6788-1 Author's personal

Harris, Peter J F

129

Peatland carbon cycle responses to hydrological change at time scales from years to centuries: Impacts on model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peatland carbon cycle responses to hydrological change at time scales from years to centuries: Impacts on model simulations and regional carbon budgets By Benjamin N. Sulman A dissertation submitted to the long-term storage of carbon in peat, these ecosystems contain a significant fraction of the global

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

130

Integrated 3D Acid Fracturing Model for Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in integrating fracture propagation, acid transport and dissolution, and well performance models in a seamless fashion for acid fracturing design. In this new approach, the fracture geometry data of a hydraulic fracture is first obtained from commercial models...

Wu, Xi

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Exploring growth kinetics of carbon nanotube arrays by in situ optical diagnostics and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple kinetic models of carbon nanotube growth have been able to successfully link together many experimental parameters involved in the growth of carbon nanotubes for practical applications including the prediction of growth rates, terminal lengths, number of walls, activation energies, and their dependences on the growth environment. The implications of recent experiments utilizing in situ monitoring of carbon nanotube growth on our past kinetic model are first reviewed. Then, sub-second pulsed feedstock gas introduction is discussed to explore the nucleation and initial growth of carbon nanotubes in the context of the kinetic model. Moreover, kinetic effects in "pulsed CVD" - using repeated pulsed gas introduction to stop and restart nanotube growth - are explored to understand renucleation, the origin of alignment in nanotube arrays, and incremental growth. Time-resolved reflectivity of the surface is used to remotely understand the kinetics of nucleation and the coordinated growth of arrays. This approach demonstrates that continuous vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes can be grown incrementally by pulsed CVD, and that the first exposure of fresh catalyst to feedstock gas is critical to nanotubes site density required for coordinated growth. Aligned nanotube arrays (as short as 60 nm) are shown to nucleate and grow within single, sub-second gas pulses. The multiple-pulse growth experiments (> 100 pulses) show that a high fraction of nanotubes renucleate on subsequent gas pulses.

Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL] [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL] [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Using tracer experiments to determine deep saline aquifers caprocks transport characteristics for carbon dioxide storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure in high permeability rocks such as hydrocarbon reservoirs or aquifers. However, the permeability to the determination of transport characteristics of tight rock formations. Main obtained parameters are intrinsic permeability and the Klinkenberg coefficient; permeability as low as 10-21 m2 is easily attainable. Some

Boyer, Edmond

134

Electrochemical biotin determination based on a screen printed carbon electrode array and magnetic beads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A biotin assay using magnetic beads (1?m) and a re-usable 8-chanel screen printed electrochemical array is here reported. The reaction scheme is based on a one step competitive assay between biotin and biotin labeled with horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP). The mixture of magnetic beads modified with streptavidin (Strep-MB), biotin and B-HRP is left 15min under stirring and then a washing step is performed. After that, 20?L of the mixture is dropped twice on the electrodes and left 2min. Then, the drop is removed and 20?L of 3,3?,5,5?-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) is deposited on the electrode surface. After 20min a potential of ?0.2V is applied during 60s, and 8 analytical signals are obtained. After washing with 0.1M phosphate buffer the screen printed carbon electrode array can be use again. The linear range obtained is between 0.1 and 250nM of biotin and have a sensitivity of 10?2?AnM?1.

Julien Biscay; Mara Begoa Gonzlez Garca; Agustn Costa Garca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of two alternative carbon capture and storage technologies: A stochastic model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we evaluate two alternative CCS technologies at a coal-fired power plant from an investor's point of view. The first technology uses CO"2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) paired with storage in deep saline formations (DSF) and the second ... Keywords: Carbon capture and storage, Enhanced oil recovery, Futures markets, Power plants, Real options, Stochastic model

Luis M. Abadie; Ibon Galarraga; Dirk Rbbelke

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling the Exchanges of Energy, Water, and Carbon Between Continents and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the Exchanges of Energy, Water, and Carbon Between Continents and the Atmosphere P. J, water vapor, and momentum across the land-atmosphere interface to be specified. These fluxes and the climate system to global change, for example, in- creasing atmospheric CO2 (1�3). Three generations

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

137

Analysis of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Performance Using a Three-Phase Homogeneous Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, nickel oxide dissolves in the melt. This slow loss of active material contributes to an increase as compared to nickel oxide. The search for alternate cathode materials could be simplified through the use-phase homogeneous model was developed to simulate the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell MCFC cathode

Popov, Branko N.

138

Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Mohammed Y is required to optimize hydrocarbon production. A rock containing parallel fractures can be seismically to the seismic wavelength. Seismic anisotropy may be detectable from attributes of pre-stack 3-D seismic data

Ali, Mohammed

139

Carbon pools in Mediterranean forests: comparing eddy covariance and GOTILWA+ model results.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water stress on ecosystem function leads to big discrepancies when modelling under these conditions. Recent advances allow us to successfully reproduce water and carbon balances during periods of stress ilex, Pinus ponderosa, and Fagus sylvatica, and varying degrees of water stress and ecosystem responses

Gracia, Carlos

140

Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy Multivariate calibration Pre-processing transformations In order to reduce costs and time in the analysis of soil properties, visible/near-infrared

Grunwald, Sabine

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141

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas-phase chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas: Coal gasification Carbon gasification Detailed chemistry Heterogeneous surface reactions Radiation Multi-physics numerical modeling a b s t r a c t Fuel synthesis through coal and biomass gasification

Qiao, Li

142

New Modified-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Paste Electrode for Electrocatalytic Oxidation and Determination of Hydrazine Using Square Wave Voltammetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The applications of p-aminophenol as a suitable mediator, as a sensitive and selective voltammetric sensor for the determination of hydrazine using a square wave voltammetric method were described. The modified multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode exhibited a good electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine at pH = 7.0. The catalytic oxidation peak currents showed a linear dependence of the peaks current to the hydrazine concentrations in the range of 0.5175 ?mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9975. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was estimated to be 0.3 ?mol/L of hydrazine. The relative standard deviations for 0.7 and 5.0 ?mol/L hydrazine were 1.7 and 1.1%, respectively. The modified electrode showed good sensitivity and selectivity. The diffusion coefficient (D = 9.5 10?4 cm2/s) and the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient (? = 0.7) of hydrazine at the surface of the modified electrode were determined using electrochemical approaches. The electrode was successfully applied for the determination of hydrazine in real samples with satisfactory results.

Ali A. ENSAFI; Mahsa LOTFI; Hassan KARIMI-MALEH

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

144

Chombo-Crunch: Modeling Pore-Scale Reactive Transport in Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transient pH on calcite grains in capillary tube experiment. 1 billion grid points computed on 48K cores. 1 micron resolution. Transient pH on calcite grains in capillary tube experiment. 1 billion grid points computed on 48K cores. 1 micron resolution. Transient pH on calcite grains in capillary tube experiment. 1 billion grid points computed on 48K cores. 1 micron resolution. David Trebotich, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Chombo-Crunch: Modeling Pore-Scale Reactive Transport in Carbon Sequestration PI Name: David Trebotich PI Email: treb@lbl.gov Institution: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 80 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Earth Science Carbon sequestration, the process of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) before it enters the atmosphere and transferring it into the earth, is a promising technique to help control greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers from the

145

Kinetic models for uncatalyzed and potassium-catalyzed gasification of char by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of uncatalyzed and 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa). The gasification temperature was varied between 1131 and 1229 K for the uncatalyzed case, and between 922 and 1046 K for the catalyzed case. Gasification rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains both the uncatalyzed and catalyzed gasification data. However, higher concentrations of carbon-oxygen complex, (C(O)), exist on the surface during catalyzed gasification. The increase in (C(O)) weakens carbon-carbon bonds and thus lowers the activation energy for desorption of the C(O) complex. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 559 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalysts' role is to augment the efficiency and/or number of sites for CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface. The higher rate during catalyzed gasification can be attributed to a combination of increased (C(O)) and a smaller activation energy for desorption of C(O).

Koenig, P.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Low Cost Carbon Fibre: Applications, Performance and Cost Models - Chapter 17  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weight saving in automotive applications has a major bearing on fuel economy. It is generally accepted that, typically, a 10% weight reduction in an automobile will lead to a 6-8% improvement in fuel economy. In this respect, carbon fibre composites are extremely attractive in their ability to provide superlative mechanical performance per unit weight. That is why they are specified for high-end uses such as Formula 1 racing cars and the latest aircraft (e.g. Boeing 787, Airbus A350 and A380), where they comprise over 50% by weight of the structure However, carbon fibres are expensive and this renders their composites similarly expensive. Research has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Tennessee, USA for over a decade with the aim of reducing the cost of carbon fibre such that it becomes a cost-effective option for the automotive industry. Aspects of this research relating to the development of low cost carbon fibre have been reported in Chapter 3 of this publication. In this chapter, the practical industrial applications of low-cost carbon fibre are presented, together with considerations of the performance and cost models which underpin the work.

Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Wheatley, Dr. Alan [University of Sunderland; Das, Sujit [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Early Standard Model Measurement and Determination of Standard Model Background for Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva (Switzerland) will go in operation in the coming months and will soon enable us to analyze the highest energy collisions ever produced at an accelerator. Beyond Standard Model searches at LHC require a detailed understanding of the detector performance, reconstruction algorithms and triggering. Precision measurements of Standard Model processes are also mandatory to acquire the necessary knowledge of Standard Model background. Both ATLAS and CMS efforts are hence addressed to determine the best calibration candles and to design a realistic plan for the initial period of data taking.

S. Beauceron

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Linear and non-linear mechanistic modeling and simulation of the formation of carbon adsorbents.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon adsorbents, namely, activated carbons and carbon molecular sieves, can be variously applied in the purification and separation of gaseous and liquid mixtures, e.g., in (more)

Argoti Caicedo, Alvaro Andres

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Model comparisons for estimating carbon emissions from North American wildland fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hirsch (2001), Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forestin estimating carbon emissions from boreal forest fires, J.Law (2007), Pyrogenic carbon emission from a large wildfire

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Exploration model for shallow Silurian (Kankakee) carbonate reservoirs in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoirs in shallow (600-650 ft deep) basal Silurian Kankakee carbonates at Buckhorn consolidated, Siloam, and Kellerville oil fields in western Illinois have produced nearly 2 million bbl of oil, but were developed essentially by random drilling. A new exploration model that combines lithologic studies and isopach mapping has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. Isopach mapping of Silurian and Devonian rocks between an organic facies in the Mississippian-Devonian New Albany Shale and the top of the Ordovician Maquoketa Shale reveals thickened sequences that coincide with most of the oil fields. These thickened intervals apparently reflect subtle paleovalleys eroded into the Maquoketa shale during the Ordovician-Silurian hiatus. During the initial Silurian marine transgression, these paleovalleys at the base of the Kankakee were filled with carbonates to form the thickened sequences. Differential erosion at the top of the Kankakee does not satisfactorily explain the locally thickened sequences in the Kankakee. Lithologic studies suggest that subsurface fluid flows concentrated along these paleovalleys contributed to subsequent diagenesis of valleyfill carbonates. Diagenetic alteration of these carbonates resulted in development of basal Kankakee reservoirs within the paleovalleys. This concept of Kankakee reservoirs occurring within paleovalleys at the Ordovician-Silurian unconformity is a new exploration model that can aid in the search for similar traps in western Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Seyler, B.J.; Whitaker, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields M. Ferer, (mferer@wvu.edu) Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315, Grant S. Bromhal, (bromhal@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; and Duane H. Smith, (dsmith@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 & Department of Physics, West Virginia University. Underground injection of gas is a common practice in the oil and gas industry. Injection into deep, brine-saturated formations is a commercially proven method of sequestering CO 2 . However, it has long been known that displacement of a connate fluid by a less viscous fluid produces unstable displacement fronts with significant fingering. This fingering allows only a

157

Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) and Availability of the Data on the Earth System Grid (ESG)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) being carried out through a collaboration between the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Biogeochemistry Working Group, a DOE SciDAC-2 project, and the DOE Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI). The goal of the project is to intercompare terrestrial biogeochemistry models running within the CCSM framework to determine the best set of processes to include in future versions of CCSM. As a part of the project, observational datasets are being collected and used to score the scientific performance of these models following a well-defined set of metrics. In addition, metadata standards for terrestrial biosphere models are being developed to support archival and distribution of the C-LAMP model output via the Earth System Grid (ESG). Progress toward completion of this project and preliminary results from the first set of experiments are reported.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Covey, Curtis [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Lee, Jeff [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Rosenbloom, Nan [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Williams, Dean [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Carbon dioxide, argon, nitrogen and methane clathrate hydrates:1 thermodynamic modelling, investigation of their stability in Martian2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon dioxide, argon, nitrogen and methane clathrate hydrates:1 thermodynamic modelling-4Dec2012 #12;3 Keywords: Mars, clathrate hydrate, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, methane, equilibrium and allows to simulating a Martian gas, CO2 dominated (95.3%) plus nitrogen6 (2.7%) and argon (2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Extinction properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Two-fluid model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extinction spectra of a single-walled carbon nanotube are investigated, within the framework of the vector wave function method in conjunction with the hydrodynamic model. Both polarizations of the incident plane wave (TE and TM with respect to the x-z plane) are treated. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a two-dimensional electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the ? and ? electrons. Numerical results show that strong interaction between the fluids gives rise to the splitting of the extinction spectra into two peaks in quantitative agreement with the ? and ? + ? plasmon energies.

Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Determination of the Concentration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Dispersions Using UV?Visible Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36 A drop of the solution was deposited on a TEM grid coated by a holey carbon film (lacey carbon, 300 mesh, Ted Pella, Inc.), automatically blotted with a filter paper, and plunged into liquid ethane at its freezing point. ... (11)?Vigolo, B.; Penicaud, A.; Coulon, C.; Sauder, C.; Pailler, R.; Journet, C.; Bernier, P.; Poulin, P. Science 2000, 290, 1331?1334. ...

S. Attal; R. Thiruvengadathan; O. Regev

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Model Development Development of a system emulating the global carbon cycle in Earth system models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed a loosely coupled model (LCM) which can represent the outputs of a GCMbased Earth system model

K. Tachiiri; J. C. Hargreaves; J. D. Annan; A. Oka; A. Abe-ouchi; M. Kawamiya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application of computer modeling techniques to the kinetics of the reaction of carbon with oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer modeling techniques are applied to the kinetics of the reaction of carbon with oxygen. The rates of disappearance of oxygen, of formation of CO, CO/sub 2/ and the surface complex, measured over the temperature range 748-1173 K and the pressure range 0.5-400 Pa may be described by a mechanism involving adsorption of oxygen, formation of the strongly-bound complex, desorption of the complex and reaction of the complex with a gas-phase molecule of oxygen. The latter is shown to be an important source of CO/sub 2/ at low temperatures and higher pressures of oxygen. An important feature of the mechanism is the existence of at least two distinct types of active sites for the binding of the complex on the carbon surface, each with a characteristic reactivity. Most of the results on which the model is based were obtained using thin films of pyrolytic carbon, but some results from the oxidation of graphon are also consistent with the mechanism.

Ahmed, S.; Back, M.H.; Roscoe, J.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Summary Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simu-lated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simu- lated with canopy models or retrieved from applications and model development. Keywords: canopy photosynthesis model, carbon dioxide flux- es, eddy in de- termining the balance between photosynthesis and respiration can lead to unexpected behavior

165

Patterns, determinants and models of woody plant diversity in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determine the distributions of species and...mean monthly temperature. RAIN is the...tolerate the low temperature of C to C...and vegetation distributions has long been...Fang 2009 Temperature dependence...plants in China: distribution and climate...Zhou, H. Sun, D. Z. Li...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A validated dynamic model of the first marine molten carbonate fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we present a modular, dynamic and multi-dimensional model of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) onboard the offshore supply vessel Viking Lady serving as an auxiliary power unit. The model is able to capture detailed thermodynamic, heat transfer and electrochemical reaction phenomena within the fuel cell layers. The model has been calibrated and validated with measured performance data from a prototype installation onboard the vessel. The model is able to capture detailed thermodynamic, heat transfer and electrochemical reaction phenomena within the fuel cell layers. The model has been calibrated and validated with measured performance data from a prototype installation onboard the offshore supply vessel. The calibration process included parameter identification, sensitivity analysis to identify the critical model parameters, and iterative calibration of these to minimize the overall prediction error. The calibrated model has a low prediction error of 4% for the operating range of the cell, exhibiting at the same time a physically sound qualitative behavior in terms of thermodynamic heat transfer and electrochemical phenomena, both on steady-state and transient operation. The developed model is suitable for a wide range of studies covering the aspects of thermal efficiency, performance, operability, safety and endurance/degradation, which are necessary to introduce fuel cells in ships. The aim of this MCFC model is to aid to the introduction, design, concept approval and verification of environmentally friendly marine applications such as fuel cells, in a cost-effective, fast and safe manner.

E. Ovrum; G. Dimopoulos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nonlinearity of Ocean Carbon Cycle Feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon cycle feedbacks are usually categorized into carbonconcentration and carbonclimate feedbacks, which arise owing to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and changing physical climate. Both feedbacks are often assumed to operate ...

Jrg Schwinger; Jerry F. Tjiputra; Christoph Heinze; Laurent Bopp; James R. Christian; Marion Gehlen; Tatiana Ilyina; Chris D. Jones; David Salas-Mlia; Joachim Segschneider; Roland Sfrian; Ian Totterdell

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part III: Analysis of Global-Mean Response Using Simple Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

Fitzgerald, J.E.; Robinson, R.L.; Gasem, K.A.M. [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Black Carbon-Inclusive Modeling Approaches for Estimating the Aquatic Fate of Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three versions of the model were developed in which sediment-water partitioning was described using (i) an amorphous organic carbon (AOC) partitioning sorption model without BC sorption, (ii) a combined AOC and BC sorption model based on the Freundlich isotherm, and (iii) a combined BC-AOC model based on the Langmuir isotherm. ... However, for estimation of KTOC or dissolved water concentrations, both versions of the combined AOC and BC sorption models provided greatly improved estimates compared to the AOC-only model. ... Multimedia fate models typically assume that amorphous organic carbon (AOC) is entirely responsible for the sorbing capacity of solids for hydrophobic compounds and that the solid-water distribution coefficient Kd (LW/kgdw) can be readily estimated from the mass fraction of organic carbon in the solid and the organic carbon normalized solid-water partition coefficient (KAOC) (1), where fAOC is the mass fraction of AOC in dried soil or sediment and KAOC (LW/kgAOC) is the organic carbon normalized solidwater partition coefficient. ...

James M. Armitage; Ian T. Cousins; N. Johan Persson; rjan Gustafsson; Gerard Cornelissen; Tuomo Saloranta; Dag Broman; Kristoffer Ns

2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Finite-Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Herein, we present a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide followed by the stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis. This fully coupled model considers the geomechanical response, fluid flow, and thermal transport relevant to geological sequestration. Both analytical solutions and numerical approach via finite element model are introduced for solving the thermal-hydro-mechanical model. Analytical solutions for pressure, temperature, deformation, and stress field were obtained for a simplified typical geological sequestration scenario. The finite element model is more general and can be used for arbitrary geometry. It was built on an open-source finite element code, Elmer, and was designed to simulate the entire period of CO2 injection (up to decades) both stably and accuratelyeven for large time steps. The shear-slip failure analysis was implemented based on the numerical results from the finite element model. The analysis reveals the potential failure zone caused by the fluid injection and thermal effect. From the simulation results, the thermal effect is shown to enhance well injectivity, especially at the early time of the injection. However, it also causes some side effects, such as the appearance of a small failure zone in the caprock. The coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model improves prediction of displacement, stress distribution, and potential failure zone compared to the model that neglects non-isothermal effects, especially in an area with high geothermal gradient.

Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Carbon nanotubes in almost homogeneous transverse magnetic field: exactly solvable model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-wall carbon nanotubes are considered in the presence of an external magnetic field with inhomogeneous transverse component. The continuum model is employed where the dynamics of the charge carriers is governed by the Dirac-Weyl equation. It is shown that a small fluctuation of the transverse field around a constant value represented by a finite-gap vector potential provides exact solutions of the stationary equation. An example is elaborated in detail. The spectrum of the system manifests remarkable stability with respect to small perturbations of the longitudinal momentum. Nonlinear, N=2 supersymmetry associated with the metallic and the maximally semi-conducting nanotubes is discussed.

Jakubsky, Vit; Negro, Javier

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative: A Case Study in Multi-Scale Modeling and New Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools including basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, high-resolution filtered computational-fluid-dynamic (CFD) submodels, validated high-fidelity device-scale CFD models with quantified uncertainty, and a risk analysis framework. These tools and models enable basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to synthesize and optimize a process. The resulting process informs the development of process control systems and more detailed simulations of potential equipment to improve the design and reduce scale-up risk. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty across scales is an essential part of these tools and models.

Miller, David C [U.S. DOE; Syamlal, Madhava [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluating the Land and Ocean Components of the Global Carbon Cycle in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors assess the ability of 18 Earth system models to simulate the land and ocean carbon cycle for the present climate. These models will be used in the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) for ...

A. Anav; P. Friedlingstein; M. Kidston; L. Bopp; P. Ciais; P. Cox; C. Jones; M. Jung; R. Myneni; Z. Zhu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Universal field-emission model for carbon nanotubes on a metal tip D. Y. Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, and S. Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universal field-emission model for carbon nanotubes on a metal tip D. Y. Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, and S Electron-field-emission properties have been investigated systematically for carbon nanotubes CNTs.1063/1.1430507 Carbon nanotubes CNTs have excellent electron-field- emission properties because of their electronic

Zhang, Guangyu

176

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Climate, Land Focus Area: Forestry Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/ccrc/topics/urban-forests/ctcc/ Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator[1] Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator is the only tool approved by the Climate Action Reserve's Urban Forest Project Protocol for quantifying carbon dioxide sequestration from GHG tree planting projects. The CTCC is programmed in an Excel spreadsheet and provides carbon-related information

177

A model to determine financial indicators for organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solar cells are an emerging photovoltaic technology that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, despite low efficiency and stability. A model, named TEEOS (Technical and Economic Evaluator for Organic Solar), is presented that evaluates organic solar cells for various solar energy applications in different geographic locations, in terms of two financial indicators, payback period and net present value (NPV). TEEOS uses SMARTS2 software to estimate broadband (2804000nm) spectral irradiance data and with the use of a cloud modification factor, predicts hourly irradiation in the absence of actual broadband irradiance data, which is scarce for most urban locations. By using the avoided cost of electricity, annual savings are calculated which produce the financial indicators. It is hoped that these financial indicators can help guide certain technical decisions regarding the direction of research for organic solar cells, for example, increasing efficiency or increasing the absorptive wavelength range. A sample calculation using solar hats is shown to be uneconomical, but a good example of large-scale organic PV production.

Colin Powell; Timothy Bender; Yuri Lawryshyn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A model to determine financial indicators for organic solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic solar cells are an emerging photovoltaic technology that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, despite low efficiency and stability. A model, named TEEOS (Technical and Economic Evaluator for Organic Solar), is presented that evaluates organic solar cells for various solar energy applications in different geographic locations, in terms of two financial indicators, payback period and net present value (NPV). TEEOS uses SMARTS2 software to estimate broadband (280-4000 nm) spectral irradiance data and with the use of a cloud modification factor, predicts hourly irradiation in the absence of actual broadband irradiance data, which is scarce for most urban locations. By using the avoided cost of electricity, annual savings are calculated which produce the financial indicators. It is hoped that these financial indicators can help guide certain technical decisions regarding the direction of research for organic solar cells, for example, increasing efficiency or increasing the absorptive wavelength range. A sample calculation using solar hats is shown to be uneconomical, but a good example of large-scale organic PV production. (author)

Powell, Colin; Bender, Timothy; Lawryshyn, Yuri [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

180

Recovery Boiler Modeling: An Improved Char Burning Model Including Sulfate Reduction and Carbon Removal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification, reactions between oxygen and combustibles in the boundary layer, and integration of sulfate reduction and sulfide reoxidation into the char burning process. Simulations using the model show that for typical recovery boiler conditions, char burning...

Grace, T. M.; Wag, K. J.; Horton, R. R.; Frederick, W. J.

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181

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midale (Mississippian) production was first established in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. That nomenclature is used in this report. During 1953, Midale production was found in the United States portion of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl, of which 640 million bbl are from Canadian fields. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal channel, subtidal bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, R.S.R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal-flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midale (Mississippian) production was first indicated in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. This same nomenclature is used in this paper. In 1953, Midale production was found on the US side of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota, in 1955. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl with 640 million from the Canadian side of the Williston basin. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal-channel, subtidal-bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal-flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, F.S.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl mass transfer after amendment of contaminated sediment with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). The authors extend their evaluation of a model based on intraparticle diffusion by including a biomimetic semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and a first-order degradation rate for the aqueous phase. The model predictions are compared with the previously reported experimental PCB concentrations in the bulk water phase and in SPMDs. The simulated scenarios comprise a marine and a freshwater sediment, four PCB congeners, two AC grain sizes, four doses of AC, and comparison with laboratory experiments. The modeling approach distinguishes between two different sediment particles types: a light-density fraction representing carbonaceous particles such as charcoal, coal, coke, cenospheres, or wood, and a heavy-density fraction representing the mineral phase with coatings of organic matter. A third particle type in the numerical model is AC. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed shifts in the PCB distribution during repartitioning after AC amendment but overestimates the overall effect of the treatment in reducing aqueous and SPMD concentrations of PCBs by a factor of 2-6. For the AC application in sediment, competitive sorption of the various solutes apparently requires a reduction by a factor of 16 of the literature values for the AC-water partitioning coefficient measured in pure aqueous systems. With this correction, model results and measurements agree within a factor of 3. After AC amendment is homogeneously mixed into the sediment and then left undisturbed, aqueous PCB concentrations tend toward the same reduction after 5 years. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Carbon nanotube mats and fibers with irradiationimproved mechanical characteristics: a theoretical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon nanotube mats and fibers with irradiation­improved mechanical characteristics characteristics of macroscopic mats and fibers of single­walled carbon nanotubes. We further investigate, which in contrast to most ordinary carbon fibers could be strongly bent without breaking, had much

Nordlund, Kai

185

Carbon nanotube mats and fibers with irradiation-improved mechanical characteristics: a theoretical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon nanotube mats and fibers with irradiation-improved mechanical characteristics characteristics of macroscopic mats and fibers of single-walled carbon nanotubes. We further investigate]. The SWNT fibers, which in contrast to most ordinary carbon fibers could be strongly bent without breaking

Nordlund, Kai

186

Uncertainty of ConcentrationTerrestrial Carbon Feedback in Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon uptake by land and ocean as a biogeochemical response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is called concentrationcarbon feedback and is one of the carbon cycle feedbacks of the global climate. This feedback can have a major impact ...

Tomohiro Hajima; Kaoru Tachiiri; Akihiko Ito; Michio Kawamiya

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A conceptual model for determining yield loss due to drought stress in sorghum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A Thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair of Committee...

Koch, Paul Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT Determining the temperature of an internal surface within cavernous of these internal surfaces. The cavernous target has often been assumed to be a blackbody, but in field experiments

Salvaggio, Carl

189

Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Determining appropriate forestry extension model: Application of AHP in the Zagros area, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining an appropriate forestry extension model remains as a major challenge if sustainable forest management is a goal. This article was an attempt to show how the analytical hierarchy process can effectively be helpful in selecting appropriate model for forestry extension. The results revealed that the present situation fails to regard the privatized extension as an appropriate model for the Zagros area in Iran. The results also showed while the beneficiaries select cooperative extension system as the most appropriate model, it has no tangible difference with public extension system as the second preferred option. Accordingly, a hybrid forestry extension model was recommended as an appropriate model.

Davood Samari; Hossein Azadi; Kiumars Zarafshani; Gholamhossein Hosseininia; Frank Witlox

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Determination of optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

Yuh, C.Y.; Pigeaud, A.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

1994 conceptual model of the carbon tetrachloride contamination in the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1955 and 1973, a total of 363,000 to 580,000 L (577,000 to kg) of liquid carbon tetrachloride, in mixtures with other organic and aqueous, actinide-bearing fluids, were discharged to the soil column at three disposal facilities -- the 216-Z-9 Trench, the 216-Z-lA TiTe Field, and the 216-Z-18 Crib -- in the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site. In the mid-1980`s, dissolved carbon tetrachloride was found in the uppermost aquifer beneath the disposal facilities, and in late 1990, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology requested that the US Department of Energy proceed with planning and implementation of an expedited response action (ERA) to minimize additional carbon tetrachloride contamination of the groundwater. In February 1992, soil vapor extraction was initiated to remove carbon tetrachloride from the unsaturated zone beneath these disposal facilities. By May 1994, a total of 10,560 L (16,790 kg) of carbon tetrachloride had been removed, amounting to an estimated 2% of the discharged inventory. In the spring of 1991, the Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) program selected the carbon tetrachloride-contaminated site for demonstration and deployment of new technologies for evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soils and groundwater at arid sites. Site investigations conducted in support of both the ERA and the VOC-Arid ID have been integrated because of their shared objective to refine the conceptual model of the site and to promote efficiency. Site characterization data collected in fiscal year 1993 have supported and led to refinement of the conceptual model of the carbon tetrachloride site.

Rohay, V.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Solubilities of 21 Commonly Used Industrial Solid Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Solubilities of 21 Commonly Used Industrial Solid Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide ... Artificial neural networks are composed of simple elements working in a parallel computational strategy. ... These elements are inspired by biological nervous systems(36-40) and are called neurons. ...

Farhad Gharagheizi; Ali Eslamimanesh; Amir H. Mohammadi; Dominique Richon

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nanostructured electrodes for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: Model study using carbon nanotube dispersed polythiophene-fullerene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanostructured electrodes for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: Model study using carbon for organic pseudo-bilayer solar cells J. Appl. Phys. 112, 084511 (2012) Addition of regiorandom poly(3 (2012) Tunable open-circuit voltage in ternary organic solar cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 163302 (2012

Hone, James

195

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low energy Carbon emissions a b s t r a c t Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing of resource cost scenarios, most coal power plants would be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear

Kammen, Daniel M.

196

A Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

looping is selected as the model cycle because of its suitability for solar-driven carbon dioxide captureA Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture Lindsey Yue and Wojciech Lipi´nski, The Australian

197

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

198

Section 6. Deep Time: Modelling of Atmospheric CO2 and the Marine CO2-Carbonic Acid-Carbonate System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original MAGic model (Arvidson et al., 2006) as revised in Arvidson et al. (2011). There are a number of Earth system models in the literature (e.g., Berner and Canfield 1989; Hansen and Wallmann, 2003; Berner 2004; Bergman et al...

Fred T. Mackenzie; Andreas J. Andersson

199

A model combining spectrum standardization and dominant factor based partial least square method for carbon analysis in coal by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Successful quantitative measurement of carbon content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is suffered from relatively low precision and accuracy. In the present work, the spectrum standardization method was combined with the dominant factor based partial least square (PLS) method to improve the measurement accuracy of carbon content in coal by LIBS. The combination model employed the spectrum standardization method to convert the carbon line intensity into standard state for more accurately calculating the dominant carbon concentration, and then applied PLS with full spectrum information to correct the residual errors. The combination model was applied to the measurement of carbon content for 24 bituminous coal samples. The results demonstrated that the combination model could further improve the measurement accuracy compared with both our previously established spectrum standardization model and dominant factor based PLS model using spectral area normalized intensity for the dominant fa...

Li, Xiongwei; Fu, Yangting; Li, Zheng; Ni, Weidou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

GFDLs ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical climate formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbonclimate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate similar climate fidelity as the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Alistair J. Adcroft; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Matthew J. Harrison; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Peter J. Phillipps; Lori T. Sentman; Bonita L. Samuels; Michael J. Spelman; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Niki Zadeh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon nanotubes: Atomistic modeling and mesoscopic description  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exchange of energy between low-frequency mechanical oscillations and high-frequency vibrational modes in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a process that plays an important role in a range of dynamic phenomena involving the dissipation of mechanical energy in both individual CNTs and CNT-based materials. The rates and channels through which acoustic energy deposited instantaneously in individual CNTs is dissipated are investigated in a series of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Several distinct regimes of energy dissipation, dependent on the initial stretching or bending deformations, are established. The onset of axial or bending buckling marks the transition from a regime of slow thermalization to a regime in which the energy associated with longitudinal and bending oscillations is rapidly damped. In the case of stretching vibrations, an intermediate regime is revealed in which dynamic coupling between longitudinal vibrational modes and the radial squash mode causes delayed axial buckling followed by a rapid transfer of energy to high-frequency vibrations. The results of the atomistic simulations are used in the design and parameterization of a heat bath description of thermal energy in a mesoscopic model, which is capable of simulating systems consisting of thousands of interacting CNTs. Two complementary methods for the description of mechanical energy dissipation in the mesoscopic model are developed. The relatively slow dissipation of acoustic vibrations in the absence of buckling is described by adding a damping force to the equations of motion of the dynamic elements of the mesoscopic model. The sharp increase in the energy dissipation rate at the onset of buckling is reproduced by incorporating a hysteresis loop into the strain energy that accounts for localized thermalization in the vicinity of buckling kinks. The ability of the mesoscopic model to reproduce the complex multistep processes of acoustic energy dissipation predicted by the atomistic simulations is demonstrated in mesoscopic simulations of free stretching and bending vibrations of individual CNTs.

William M. Jacobs; David A. Nicholson; Hagit Zemer; Alexey N. Volkov; Leonid V. Zhigilei

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Analysis of the Newphew/Spore model for determining costs of coal mining in Appalachia. Computer model study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was primarily to determine whether a computer program developed to determine the costs of coal surface mining and reclamation in Appalachia was capable of being responsive to the needs of the Office of Surface Mining for projecting the extraction costs of coal in support of the Small Operator Assistance Program. The study analysis validated the model and adapted it to specific small operator needs in terms of user flexibility. It found that the model as originally programmed was subject to a number of limitations and functional constraints. Although a substantial loosening of these constraints was not feasible within the current scope of work, it did establish an approach to reprogram the model to take into account dynamically certain previously static aspects of the model. The approach was implemented in order to made the model more useful and to establish a baseline for future development.

Nephew, E.A.; Spore, R.L.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Using modeling to design and evaluate transient open ocean iron enrichment for carbon sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using modeling to design and evaluate Using modeling to design and evaluate transient open ocean iron enrichment for carbon sequestration Richard T. Barber (rbarber@duke.edu; 252-504-7578) Duke University Marine Laboratory 135 Duke Marine Lab Road Beaufort, NC 28516-9721 Fei Chai (fchai@maine.edu; 207-581-4317) University of Maine School of Marine Sciences 5741 Libby Hall Orono, ME 04469-5741 Introduction During the 1990s the rate of increase of CO 2 in the atmosphere was about 3.5 Pg C y -1 . Total emissions were 7.4 Pg C y -1 , so about 3.9 Pg C y -1 (52% of total emissions) were sequestered naturally. Of this, about 2.2 Pg C y -1 was absorbed by the oceans and 1.7 Pg C y -1 by the land (US DOE, 1999). The Kyoto Protocol of 1997 calls for a 34% reduction of emissions by 2050 and a reduction of 70% from the projected emissions at 2100. The major approach to

204

Development of advanced off-design models for supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the search for increased efficiency of utility-scale electricity generation, Brayton cycles operating with supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) have found considerable interest. There are two main advantages of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle compared to a Rankine cycle: 1) equal or greater thermal efficiencies can be realized using significantly smaller turbomachinery, and 2) heat rejection is not limited by the saturation temperature of the working fluid, which has the potential to reduce or completely eliminate the need for cooling water and instead allow dry cooling. While dry cooling is especially advantageous for power generation in arid climates, a reduction of water consumption in any location will be increasingly beneficial as tighter environmental regulations are enacted in the future. Because daily and seasonal weather variations may result in a plant operating away from its design point, models that are capable of predicting the off-design performance of S-CO{sub 2} power cycles are necessary for characterizing and evaluating cycle configurations and turbomachinery designs on an annual basis. To this end, an off-design model of a recuperated Brayton cycle was developed based on the radial turbomachinery currently being investigated by Sandia National Laboratory. (authors)

Dyreby, J. J.; Klein, S. A.; Nellis, G. F.; Reindl, D. T. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Solar Energy Laboratory, 1343 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic chracteristic curves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOUGH2 models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent the interactions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When a problem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and its subsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage and wetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctly capture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation, capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on the current grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturation in the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or only wetting, a nonhysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure and relative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-block saturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robust computationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability of the characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-point saturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Two example problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated using non-hysteretic and hysteretic models, to illustrate the applicability and limitations of non-hysteretic methods: the first considers leakage of CO2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the second examines the role of heterogeneity within the storage formation.

Doughty, Christine

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

A parametric study of factors affecting oil recovery efficiency from carbon dioxide injection using a compositional reservoir model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% OOIP. The reservoir and fluid information for the pilot area is located in Table 2. 1. 5. Injection of a 338 of pore volume slug of carbon 15 dioxide, methane, and n-butane began in January of 1981. The project consisted of one updip injector...A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING OIL RECOVERY EFFICIENCY FROM CARBON DIOXIDE INJECTION USING A COMPOSITIONAL RESERVOIR MODEL A THESIS by GREGORY ALLEN BARNES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Barnes, Gregory Allen.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Determination of Uric Acid in Urine by Fast-Scan Voltammetry (FSV) Using a Highly Activated Carbon Fiber Electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sensitivity of FSV determinations depends on the stability of the background current (23...). Previously we have established experimentally that after the electrochemical pretreatment of the CFE, by continuou...

Roberto Bravo; Dawn M. Stickle

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marine carbon uptake, Biogeosciences, 6, 16031613, doi:10.5194/bg- 6-1603-2009, 2009. www.biogeosciences.net/

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modelling and development of carbon molecular sieve membrane for gas separation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the research project was to investigate the feasibility of preparing carbon molecular sieve membranes from Kapton polyimide film. The effects of carbonisation (more)

Su, Jincai.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pacific Northwest rangeland carbon sequestration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper models the supply curve of carbon sequestration on Pacific Northwest rangelands. Rangeland managers have the ability to sequester carbon in agricultural soils by (more)

Wiggins, Seth T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Photosynthesis-dependent isoprene emission from leaf to planet in a global carbon-chemistry-climate model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar/Ball- Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance that is embedded within a global chemistry-climate simulation framework. The isoprene production is calculated as a function of electron transport-limited photosynthesis, intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, and canopy temperature. The vegetation biophysics module computes the photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide coupled with the transpiration of water vapor and the isoprene emission rate at the 30 min physical integration time step of the global chemistry-climate model. In the model, the rate of carbon assimilation provides the dominant control on isoprene emission variability over canopy temperature. A control simulation representative of the present day climatic state that uses plant functional types (PFTs), prescribed phenology and generic PFT-specific isoprene emission potentials (fraction of electrons available for isoprene synthesis) reproduces 50% of the variability across different ecosystems and seasons in a global database of measured campaign-average fluxes. Compared to time-varying isoprene flux measurements at select sites, the model authentically captures the observed variability in the 30 min average diurnal cycle (R2 = 64-96 %) and simulates the flux magnitude to within a factor of 2. The control run yields a global isoprene source strength of 451 TgCyr?1 that increases by 30% in the artificial absence of plant water stress and by 55% for potential natural vegetation.

Unger, N.; Harper, K.; Zheng, Y.; Kiang, N. Y.; Aleinov, I.; Arneth, Almut; Schurgers, G.; Amelynck, C.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Heinesch, B.; Hewitt, C. N.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Langford, B.; McKinney, Karena A.; Misztal, P.; Potosnak, M.; Rinne, J.; Pressley, S.; Schoon, N.; Serca, D.

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

Determination of simple constitutive models for borosilicate glass using penetration-velocity data from ballistic experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constitutive models for brittle materials such as glass can be very complex as they are dependent on strains, strain rates, pressures, temperatures, damage and other parameters. There may also be significant (pressure-dependent) strength after failure such that the constitutive response is much different for intact material and failed material. A large number of laboratory tests is required to develop a comprehensive constitutive model. Another approach is to develop simple models by using penetration-velocity data obtained from ballistic experiments. Here various functional forms of simple models (with a limited number of constants) can be used to (computationally) match the penetration velocity over a range of impact velocities. This allows for the determination of the most important parameters and it provides an approximation of the stresses that occur during penetration. This article presents several simple computational models for borosilicate glass, including single-state models and dual-state models (that include an intact strength and a failed strength)

Johnson, G. R.; Holmquist, T. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 5353 Wayzata Blvd., Minneapolis, MN 55416 (United States)

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

Bacon, Diana H.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Carbon-nitrogen bond-forming reactions in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide media : green synthetic chemistry with multiscale reaction and phase behavior modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this work was to develop a detailed understanding of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bond-forming reactions of amines carried out in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) media. Key motivations behind ...

Ciccolini, Rocco P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Satellite-Based Modeling of the Carbon Fluxes in Mature Black Spruce Forests in Alaska: A Synthesis of the Eddy Covariance Data and Satellite Remote Sensing Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scaling up of observed point data to estimate regional carbon fluxes is an important issue in the context of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. In this study, the authors proposed a new model to scale up the eddy covariance data to estimate ...

Masahito Ueyama; Yoshinobu Harazono; Kazuhito Ichii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An agent based modeling approach for determining optimal price-rebate schemes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delayed incentives in the form of cash mail-in rebates have become very popular. While some research has been conducted on consumer perception and behavior toward rebates, little research has been undertaken with respect to a sellers optimal rebate strategy. We use an agent-based modeling approach for jointly determining optimal price and rebate value. This approach has been previously applied to pricing and can capture some aspects of the problem which are difficult to analyze using traditional mathematical modeling. The model indicates that rebates are much more profitable when their values are jointly determined with price. In addition, the profitability of rebates at a given time depends on past consumers experience with rebates and that consumers memory of their past rebate redemption behavior plays an important role in determining the profitability of rebates. Also, the analysis shows that agent-based modeling may provide an alternative method for analyzing problems in which interactions between participants in the systems, i.e. consumers, sellers, and regulating agencies, are important in determining the overall behavior of the system.

Moutaz Khouja; Mirsad Hadzikadic; Muhammad Adeel Zaffar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Determination of Non{Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born{Oppenheimer Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Non{Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born{Oppenheimer Model George A for the time dependent molecular Schrodinger equation in the Born{Oppenheimer limit. We assume the elec- tron. This component is shown to be exponentially small in the square of the Born{Oppenheimer parameter, due

Hagedorn, George A.

218

Determination of Non--Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born--Oppenheimer Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Non--Adiabatic Scattering Wave Functions in a Born--Oppenheimer Model George A molecular Schr?odinger equation in the Born--Oppenheimer limit. We assume the elec­ tron Hamiltonian has to be exponentially small in the square of the Born--Oppenheimer parameter, due to the Landau­Zener mechanism

219

Mathematical modelling approach for determining optimal machining parameters in turning with computer numerical control (CNC) machines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to advancement in the manufacturing technology the application of computer numerical control (CNC) machines have increased manifolds. The determination of machining parameters for optimal results in machining is a part of computer aided process planning. In computer numerical control (CNC) machining, determining optimum or appropriate cutting parameters can minimise machining errors such as tool breakage, tool deflection and tool wear, thus yielding a high productivity or minimum cost. Different mathematical models have been proposed by various researchers in the past for the determination of optimal machining parameters. The present paper attempt's to review the literature regarding 'machining parameter optimisation' for turning operation in CNC machines. Diverse contributing and important factors in mathematical modelling like, the economic criteria's, single and multi-pass turning, optimisation techniques and practical constraints deployed have been considered. A detailed discussion is presented regarding the topic and in the end conclusions are drawn.

Bhaskar Naithani; Santram Chauhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Can 3-D models explain the observed fractions of fossil and non-fossil carbon in and near Mexico City?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC NF ) ranged from 0.37 to 0.67 at the downtown location, and from 0.50 to 0.86 at the suburban site. Substantially lower values (i.e. 0.240.49) were found for PM10 filters downtown by an independent set of measurements (Swiss team), which are inconsistent with the modeled and known differences between the size ranges, suggesting higher than expected uncertainties in the measurement techniques of 14C. An increase in the non-fossil organic carbon (OC) fraction (f OC NF ) by 0.100.15 was observed for both sets of filters during periods with enhanced wildfire activity in comparison to periods when fires were suppressed by rain, which is consistent with the wildfire impacts estimated with other methods. Model results show that the relatively high fraction of nonfossil carbon found in Mexico City seems to arise from the combination in about equal proportions of regional biogenic SOA, biomass burning POA and SOA, as well as non-fossil urban POA and SOA. Predicted spatial and temporal variations for f OC NF are similar to those in the measurements between the urban vs. suburban sites, and high-fire vs. low-fire periods. The absolute modeled values of f OC NF are consistent with the Swiss dataset but lower than the US dataset. Resolving the 14C measurement discrepancies is necessary for further progress in model evaluation. The model simulations that included secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (S/IVOC) vapors showed improved closure for the total OA mass compared to simulations which only included SOA from VOCs, providing a more realistic basis to evaluate the fNF predictions. f OC NF urban sources of modern carbon are important in reducing or removing the difference in fNF between model and measurements, even though they are often neglected on the interpretation of 14C datasets. An underprediction of biomass burning POA by the model during some mornings also explains a part of the model-measurement differences. The fNF of urban POA and SOA precursors is an important parameter that needs to be better constrained by measurements. Performing faster ( 3 h) 14C measurements in future campaigns is critical to further progress in this area. To our knowledge this is the first time that radiocarbon measurements are used together with aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) organic components to assess the performance of a regional model for organic aerosols.

Hodzic, Alma; Jimenez, Jose L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Szidat, S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Madronich, Sasha

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon nanotubes: Atomistic modeling and mesoscopic description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exchange of energy between low-frequency mechanical oscillations and high-frequency vibrational modes in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a process that plays an important role in a range of dynamic phenomena involving the ...

Nicholson, David A.

222

Modeling and control of a silicon substrate heater for carbon nanotube growth experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precision engineering research group at MIT is working on carbon nanotube growth experiments on silicon substrates and in microfabricated silicon devices, to try to produce improved bulk nanotube growth. For this thesis, ...

Held, David (David A.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electrical and Thermal Experimental Characterization and Modeling of Carbon Nanotube/Epoxy Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work investigates the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) inclusions on the electrical and thermal conductivity of a thermoset epoxy resin. The characterization of electrical and thermal conductivity of CNT/epoxy composites is presented...

Gardea, Frank

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Micromechanics modeling of the multifunctional nature of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work provides a micromechanics approach based on the generalized self-consistent composite cylinders method as a non-Eshelby approach towards for assessing the impact of carbon nanotubes on the multi-functional nature of nanocom...

Seidel, Gary Don

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modelling the convenience yield in carbon prices using daily and realized measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for carbon spot and futures prices, which are exchanged since 2005 on the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). The EU emissions trading system has been created by the Directive 2003/87/CE. Across 27

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Cathode response model and literature review of metal solubility in carbonates. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report is intended to explain some of the aspects of molten carbonate fuel cell system. The research currently being investigated is an important part of MCFC performance development.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Modeling Seasonal Variations in Carbon Dioxide and Nitrous Oxide in the Vadose Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperature, and soil atmosphere composition were being monitored was specifically...and CEL pools were predominant in the composition of the maize residue and were mainly...also taken into account. agriculture agrochemicals Avignon France Cambisols CANTIS carbon...

P. Cannavo; F. Lafolie; B. Nicolardot; P. Renault

228

Performance Comparison of Two Fuzzy Based Models in Predicting Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many studies have been carried out worldwide to predict carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions using various methods. Most of the methods...2 emissions are not immediately known. This paper offers...2 emissions in Malays...

Herrini Mohd Pauzi; Lazim Abdullah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Supersymmetric twisting of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct exactly solvable models of twisted carbon nanotubes via supersymmetry, by applying the matrix Darboux transformation. We derive the Green's function for these systems and compute the local density of states. Explicit examples of twisted carbon nanotubes are produced, where the back-scattering is suppressed and bound states are present. We find that the local density of states decreases in the regions where the bound states are localized. Dependence of bound-state energies on the asymptotic twist of the nanotubes is determined. We also show that each of the constructed unextended first order matrix systems possesses a proper nonlinear hidden supersymmetric structure with a nontrivial grading operator.

Vit Jakubsky; Mikhail S. Plyushchay

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Enterprise Audit Modeling of Large-Scale Agencies' Energy and Carbon Dioxide Accounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and corporations as it has a broad impact on industries, societies, and global communities. The concept is extremely catchy and thus has been promoted and outside the research community. (Weidema et al, 2008) Even though carbon accounting frameworks has been... information. The economic method is more reasonable, but the cost is still limited by its planned cost savings. (Mishan & Quah, 2007) 1.3 ECA AND EEA IN DESIGN Tracking and understanding how each element in Figure 1 impacts the overall carbon total...

Wade, Brigitta Alexandra Anne

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Carbon monoxide in the solar atmosphere I. Numerical method and two-dimensional models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiation hydrodynamic code CO5BOLD has been supplemented with the time-dependent treatment of chemical reaction networks. Advection of particle densities due to the hydrodynamic flow field is also included. The radiative transfer is treated frequency-independently, i.e. grey, so far. The upgraded code has been applied to two-dimensional simulations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the non-magnetic solar photosphere and low chromosphere. For this purpose a reaction network has been constructed, taking into account the reactions which are most important for the formation and dissociation of CO under the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere. The network has been strongly reduced to 27 reactions, involving the chemical species H, H2, C, O, CO, CH, OH, and a representative metal. The resulting CO number density is highest in the cool regions of the reversed granulation pattern at mid-photospheric heights and decreases strongly above. There, the CO abundance stays close to a value of 8.3 on the usual logarithmic abundance scale with [H]=12 but is reduced in hot shock waves which are a ubiquitous phenomenon of the model atmosphere. For comparison, the corresponding equilibrium densities have been calculated, based on the reaction network but also under assumption of instantaneous chemical equilibrium by applying the Rybicki & Hummer (RH) code by Uitenbroek (2001). Owing to the short chemical timescales, the assumption holds for a large fraction of the atmosphere, in particular the photosphere. In contrast, the CO number density deviates strongly from the corresponding equilibrium value in the vicinity of chromospheric shock waves. Simulations with altered reaction network clearly show that the formation channel via hydroxide (OH) is the most important one under the conditions of the solar atmosphere.

S. Wedemeyer-Boehm; I. Kamp; J. Bruls; B. Freytag

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modeling Coal Matrix Shrinkage and Differential Swelling with CO2 Injection for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery and Carbon Sequestration Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix shrinkage and swelling can cause profound changes in porosity and permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs during depletion or when under CO{sub 2} injection processes, with significant implication for primary or enhanced methane recovery. Two models that are used to describe these effects are discussed. The first was developed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) and published in 1990 by Sawyer, et al. The second model was published by Palmer and Mansoori in 1996. This paper shows that the two provide equivalent results for most applications. However, their differences in formulation cause each to have relative advantages and disadvantages under certain circumstances. Specifically, the former appears superior for undersaturated coalbed methane reservoirs while the latter would be better if a case is found where matrix swelling is strongly disproportional to gas concentration. Since its presentation in 1996, the Palmer and Mansoori model has justifiably received much critical praise. However, the model developed by ARI for the COMET reservoir simulation program has been in use since 1990, and has significant advantages in certain settings. A review of data published by Levine in 1996 reveals that carbon dioxide causes a greater degree of coal matrix swelling compared to methane, even when measured on a unit of concentration basis. This effect is described in this report as differential swelling. Differential swelling may have important consequences for enhanced coalbed methane and carbon sequestration projects. To handle the effects of differential swelling, an extension to the matrix shrinkage and swelling model used by the COMET simulator is presented and shown to replicate the data of Levine. Preliminary field results from a carbon dioxide injection project are also presented in support of the extended model. The field evidence supports that considerable changes to coal permeability occur with CO{sub 2} injection, with significant implication for the design, implementation and performance of enhanced coalbed methane recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

L. J. Pekot; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part 1: Control Climate and Flux Adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance.

Cohen, Warren [USDA Forest Service] [USDA Forest Service

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of 30% proved unsuccessful.

Rogers, John

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Consistent geological-simulation modeling in carbonate reservoirs, a case study from the Khuff Formation, Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Khuff Formation constitutes reservoir body in many gas producer fields of the Persian Gulf and Arabian plate. This carbonate reservoir represents a complex character which strongly affects reservoir modeling and prediction of its reservoir performance. This paper examines construction of a reservoir model for this formation by the use of an integrated approach and shows how geological and simulation grids can perform consistently. This approach shows that in case of proper data integration, loss of value in z-dimension after grid scale-up would be ignorable and will not affect actual reservoir performance. The presented approach uses sequence stratigraphic framework (SSF) as the basis of reservoir zonation and permeability prediction. This is resulted to consistent poro/perm models that help accurate prediction of reservoir performance in simulation model. SSF also helped propagation of reservoir bodies in geological model. A seismic derived effective porosity (SPHIE) cube is used in conjunction with core and log data to distribute porosity. Hydraulic flow units (HFUs) which are assessed by the use of core and log data are used as the basis of grid scale-up. Our findings showed that if data integration is properly done, strong correlation of \\{HFUs\\} and SSF will be obtained which results to consistent geological and simulation models. Permeability should be populated into the 3D grid by the use of functions derived from SSF zonation and water saturation modeling should be upon capillary pressure curves assigned to each reservoir rock type (RRT) so that the final geological model and coarse simulation grid would be consistent. The presented approach in this study explains how various visions and different scale data could be properly used in a reservoir model. It also provides ideas about ideal consistent reservoir modeling for the Khuff Formation and similar heterogeneous carbonate reservoirs.

Ashkan Asadi-Eskandar; Hossein Rahimpour-Bonab; Shahab Hejri; Khalil Afsari; Alireza Mardani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Gas chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and smoked rice samples after solid-phase microextraction using multiwalled carbon nanotube loaded hollow fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded on hollow fiber membrane pores. Stainless steel wire was used as unbreakable support. The major advantages of the proposed fiber are its (a) high reproducibility due to the uniform structure of the hollow fiber membranes, (b) high extraction capacity related to the porous structure of the hollow fiber and outstanding adsorptive characteristics of MWCNTs. The proposed fiber was applied for the microextraction of five representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous media (river and hubblebubble water) and smoked rice samples followed by gas chromatographic determination. Analytical merits of the method, including high correlation coefficients [(0.99630.9992) and (0.99820.9999)] and low detection limits [(9.013.0ngL?1) and (40.0150.0ngkg?1)] for water and rice samples, respectively, made the proposed method suitable for the ultra-trace determination of PAHs.

Amir Abbas Matin; Pourya Biparva; Mohammad Gheshlaghi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The identification of HCN and HNC in Carbon Stars: Model Atmospheres, Synthetic Spectra and Fits to Observations in the 2.7-4.0 micron Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model carbon star atmospheres and synthetic spectra have been calculated using the recent HCN/HNC vibration rotation linelist of Harris et al. (2002) ApJ, 578, 657. The calculations are repeated using only HCN lines and show that HNC has a significant effect upon the temperature, density and optical depth of a stellar atmosphere. We fit synthetic spectra in the 2.7-4.0 micron region to observed ISO spectra of the carbon stars WZ Cas and TX Psc obtained by Aoki et al. (1998), A&A, 340, 222. These fits allow us to identify absorption by HNC in the spectrum of WZ Cas at 2.8-2.9 microns, and to determine new independent estimates of effective temperature and log(Nc)/log(No). The findings reported here indicate that absorption by both HCN and HNC is needed to fully explain the observed stellar spectra and represent the first identification of HNC in a star. Q branch absorption by the HCN $\\Delta v_2=1$, $\\Delta v_3=1$ and $\\Delta v_1=1$, $\\Delta v_2=-1$ bands at 3.55 and 3.86 microns respectively, are identified in the spectrum of WZ Cas.

G. J. Harris; Ya. V. Pavlenko; H. R. A. Jones; J. Tennyson

2003-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Assimilation of satellite reflecance dataa into a dynamical leaf model to infer seasonally varying leaf area for climate and carbon models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leaf area index is an important input for many climate and carbon models. The widely used leaf area products derived from satellite-observed surface reflectances contain substantial erratic fluctuations in time due to inadequate atmospheric corrections and observational and retrieval uncertainties. These fluctuations are inconsistent with the seasonal dynamics of leaf area, known to be gradual. Their use in process-based terrestrial carbon models corrupts model behavior, making diagnosis of model performance difficult. We propose a data assimilation approach that combines the satellite observations of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo with a dynamical leaf model. Its novelty is that the seasonal cycle of the directly retrieved leaf areas is smooth and consistent with both observations and current understandings of processes controlling leaf area dynamics. The approach optimizes the dynamical model parameters such that the difference between the estimated surface reflectances based on the modeled leaf area and those of satellite observations is minimized. We demonstrate the usefulness and advantage of our new approach at multiple deciduous forest sites in the United States.

Liu, Qing [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Dickinson, Robert E. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tian, Y [Georgia Institute of Technology; Zhou, L [Georgia Institute of Technology; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The charge-asymmetric nonlocally-determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally-determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With only three parameters per solvent, this `CANDLE' model simultaneously reproduce...

Sundararaman, Ravishankar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo computation and Bayesian model determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for Bayesian computation have until recently been restricted to problems where the joint distribution of all variables has a density with respect to some xed standard underlying measure. They have therefore not been available for application to Bayesian model determination, where the dimensionality of the parameter vector is typically not xed. This article proposes a new framework for the construction of reversible Markov chain samplers that jump between parameter subspaces of di ering dimensionality, which is exible and entirely constructive. It should therefore have wide applicability in model determination problems. The methodology is illustrated with applications to multiple change-point analysis in one and two dimensions, and toaBayesian comparison of binomial experiments.

Peter J. Green

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Model independent determination of the spin of the {sup 180}Ta naturally occurring isomer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hyperfine structures of the 33715.27 cm{sup -1} and 33706.47 cm{sup -1} transitions from the ground state of singly ionized Ta have been measured by collinear laser spectroscopy. The structures were found to contain a large second order contribution. From fitting the observed hyperfine components for both {sup 181}Ta and the {sup 180}Ta naturally occurring isomer it was possible to determine the first and second order hyperfine structure coefficients. As no model independent determination of the nuclear spin of the {sup 180}Ta isomer has been performed, fitting was attempted for a range of spins. A clear chi-squared minimum is obtained for a nuclear spin of 9, in agreement with model dependent measurements.

Bissell, M. L.; Baczynska, K.; Forest, D. H.; Gardner, M. D.; Tungate, G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Tordoff, B. [Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Moore, I. D.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Kansas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 11, 2009 December 11, 2009 CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Manhattan, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Lawrence, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

244

Causes and implications of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013), The Community Earth System Model: A framework forin the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM), Geosci. Modelsimulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Carbon metabolism in model microbial systems from a temperate salt marsh.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from a temperate salt marsh. R D Fallon F K Pfaender...Burkholder, P. R., and G. H. Bornside...Decompo- sition of marsh grass by aerobic marine...W. G. Smith, P. R. Wagner, and W...carbon budget of a salt marsh and shallow bay estuarine...

R D Fallon; F K Pfaender

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

MODEL FOR DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PARTICLE BEDS WITH HIGH SOLID-TO-GAS THERMAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL FOR DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PARTICLE BEDS WITH HIGH SOLID-TO-GAS- to-gas conductivity ratio (such as Be and He). The model has the capability of accounting with high solid-to-gas thermal conductivity ratios. This paper summarizes this modeling effort. Model

Abdou, Mohamed

247

A multi-period modelling and optimization approach to the planning of China's power sector with consideration of carbon dioxide mitigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A great challenge China's power sector faces is to mitigate its carbon dioxide emissions while satisfying the ever-increasing power demand. Optimal planning of the power sector with consideration of carbon mitigation for a long-term future remains a complex task, involving many technical alternatives and an infinite number of possible plants installations, retrofitting, and decommissioning over the planning horizon. This paper presents a multi-period modelling and optimization framework for the optimal planning of China's power sector between 2010 and 2050. The planning horizon is divided into several time intervals, over which power plants of all types can be installed, retrofitted, or closed. Impacts of carbon mitigation related measures, including carbon cap and price, application of carbon capture and sequestration, are explicitly represented. A case study follows, based on real-life data of existing capacity of China's power sector in 2009, and a year-by-year development plan for China's power sector is proposed.

Dongjie Zhang; Pei Liu; Linwei Ma; Zheng Li; Weidou Ni

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

Achieving negative emissions with BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage) in the power sector: New insights from the TIAM-FR (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model France) model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It seems increasingly likely that atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration will overshoot the recommended 450ppm CO2 equivalent target. Therefore, it may become necessary to use BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage) technologiesto remove CO2 from the atmosphere. This technique is gaining increasing attention as it offers the dual benefit of providing low-carbon energy products and leading to negative CO2 emissions. This study evaluates the possible deployment of BECCS in the power sector using the bottom-up multiregional optimization model TIAM-FR (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model France). Under two climate scenarios, a regional analysis is conducted to discuss where the technology will be developed. The impact of the unavailability of this technology on the structure of the electricity mix and the cost of the energy system completes the analysis. In line with literature, the results suggest that BECCS technology offers an environmentally and economically viable option to achieve stringent targets. The regional analysis shows that industrialized countries will develop CCS (carbon capture and storage) mainly on biomass power plants while CCS on fossil fuel power plants will be widely deployed in China. With a specific constraint on CCS diffusion, the share of renewables and nuclear energy becomes significant to meet the climate targets.

Sandrine Selosse; Olivia Ricci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and capture more of the spa- tial variation in soil carbon.carbon stocks (Table 3). ESMs varied in their ability to capture

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

252

Simultaneous determination of amantadine, rimantadine and memantine in chicken muscle using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a reversed-dispersive solid phase extraction sorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a reversed-dispersive solid phase extraction (r-dSPE) material combined with ultra-high liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLCMS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of amantadine, rimantadine and memantine in chicken muscle. The satisfactory separation of isomers (rimantadine and memantine) was obtained on an Acquity BEH C18 column (2.1mmנ100mm, 1.7?m) after optimization of mobile phase composition, column temperature and flow rate. The method involved an acetonitrile-based sample preparation and a dSPE clean-up procedure with \\{MWCNTs\\} material. Variations in the type and amount of MWCNTs, the pH value of the extract, the extraction time for MWCNTs, and the type of eluent were used to determine the optimal parameters for increasing the sample throughput and the sensitivity. The samples were quantified using amantadine-D15, rimantadine-D4 and memantine-D6 as the internal standards. Under the optimized conditions, recoveries of 96.8104.6% and the values of coefficient of variation (CV) of 3.86.4% were obtained for the three drugs in chicken muscle at three spiked levels (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5?g/kg), and the decision limits (CC?) and detection capabilities (CC?) were 0.150.20?g/kg and 0.200.25?g/kg, respectively. Positive results were obtained from local supermarket using this method, and the concentrations obtained from the newly developed method compared well to the previously reported method.

Yin-Liang Wu; Ruo-Xia Chen; Yi Xue; Ting Yang; Jian Zhao; Yong Zhu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissolution of NiO cathodes during cell operation is a limiting factor to the successful commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Microencapsulation of the NiO cathode has been adopted as a surface modification technique to increase the stability of NiO cathodes in the carbonate melt. The material used for surface modification should possess thermodynamic stability in the molten carbonate and also should be electro catalytically active for MCFC reactions. A simple first principles model was developed to understand the influence of exchange current density and conductivity of the electrode material on the polarization of MCFC cathodes. The model predictions suggest that cobalt can be used to improve the corrosion resistance of NiO cathode without affecting its performance. Cobalt was deposited on NiO cathode by electroless deposition. The morphology and thermal oxidation behavior of Co coated NiO was studied using scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis respectively. The electrochemical performance of cobalt encapsulated NiO cathodes were investigated with open circuit potential measurement and current-potential polarization studies. These results were compared to that of bare NiO. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of cobalt-coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. Dissolution of nickel into the molten carbonate melt was less in case of cobalt encapsulated nickel cathodes. Co coated on the surface prevents the dissolution of Ni in the melt and thereby stabilizes the cathode. Finally, cobalt coated nickel shows similar polarization characteristics as nickel oxide. A similar surface modification technique has been used to improve the performance of the SS 304 current collectors used in MCFC cells. SS 304 was encapsulated with nanostructured layers of NiCo and NiMo by electroless deposition. The corrosion behavior of bare and surface modified SS 304 in molten carbonate under cathode gas atmosphere was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential studies, Tafel polarization, impedance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. This study confirms that the presence of surface modification leads to the formation of complex scales with better barrier properties and electronic conductivity.

Dr. Ralph E. White

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Resuspension of carbon dust collected in Tore Supra and exposed to turbulent airflow: Controlled experiments and comparison with model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents the results of experiments conducted with carbon microparticles collected in the tokamak Tore Supra in order to characterize their resuspension behaviour from a stainless-steel substrate when exposed to turbulent airflow. Experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel with controlled velocity profiles and monitored environmental conditions. A consequent amount of dust has been collected in the vessel of the tokamak and a bimodal particle size distribution of samples is first demonstrated. Comparison with resuspension of alumina powders with equivalent particle size distributions under turbulent airflow is also discussed. Results for both carbon and alumina microparticles are then compared to a theoretical resuspension model. Data reveal that exposing multilayer deposits with bimodal particle size distributions to low-speed flows (i.e. 310m/s) induces a significant reduction of the mobilized fractions compared to what was predicted by the model. In addition, results helped to highlight some limitations in the model to physically describe changes in the adhesive strength that can occur with a polydisperse deposit.

S. Peillon; A. Roynette; C. Grisolia; F. Gensdarmes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

CX-012303: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post Combustion Carbon Capture Using Polyethylenimine (PEI) Functionalized Titanate Nanotubes CX(s)...

256

CX-000292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000292: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell - Based Combined...

257

CX-000293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000293: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell - Based Combined...

258

CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell- Based Combined...

259

CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Air Quality VIII: An International Conference on Carbon Management, Mercury, Trace Elements,...

260

CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

262

CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

263

The Role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a Lower Carbon World  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a Lower Carbon World Past Compliance model Regulations determine 'acceptability' of risks, Our performance judged by regulators view of compliance, Industry focused upon cost and pace of new regulations, Managed as a License to Operate issue, Current Reputation model 'Acceptability' of risk set by our own expectations, Responsible care determined by opinion formers, Our focus is upon investing in our Corporate Reputation, Success recognised by governments, NGOs and suppliers. Future Customer model BP fuels our customers economic and social growth, while allowing them to invest in their own environment through us, Our offer is to help Customers manage their environmental impact, The environment becomes an integral part of individual customer

264

Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

L. S. Pilyugin

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

266

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Applications of Lagrangian Dispersion Modeling to the Analysis of Changes in the Specific Absorption of Elemental Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use a Lagrangian dispersion model driven by a mesoscale model with four-dimensional data assimilation to simulate the dispersion of elemental carbon (EC) over a region encompassing Mexico City and its surroundings, the study domain for the 2006 MAX-MEX experiment, which was a component of the MILAGRO campaign. The results are used to identify periods when biomass burning was likely to have had a significant impact on the concentrations of elemental carbon at two sites, T1 and T2, downwind of the city, and when emissions from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) were likely to have been more important. They are also used to estimate the median ages of EC affecting the specific absorption of light, aABS, at 870 nm as well as to identify periods when the urban plume from the MCMA was likely to have been advected over T1 and T2. Values of aABS at T1, the nearer of the two sites to Mexico City, were smaller at night and increased rapidly after mid-morning, peaking in the mid-afternoon. The behavior is attributed to the coating of aerosols with substances such as sulfate or organic carbon during daylight hours, but such coating appears to be limited or absent at night. Evidence for this is provided by scanning electron microscope images of aerosols collected at three sampling sites. During daylight hours the values of aABS did not increase with aerosol age for median ages in the range of 1-4 hours. There is some evidence for absorption increasing as aerosols were advected from T1 to T2 but the statistical significance of that result is not strong.

Doran, J. C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Laskin, Alexander; Desyaterik, Yury; Gilles, Marry K.; Hopkins, Rebecca J.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GOAL: To develop and apply an approach to quantify and understand the regional carbon balance of the west coast states for the North American Carbon Program. OBJECTIVE: As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance. APPROACH: In performing the regional analysis, the research plan for the bottom-up approach uses a nested hierarchy of observations that include AmeriFlux data (i.e., net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from eddy covariance and associated biometric data), intermediate intensity inventories from an extended plot array partially developed from the PI's previous research, Forest Service FIA and CVS inventory data, time since disturbance, disturbance type, and cover type from Landsat developed in this study, and productivity estimates from MODIS algorithms. The BIOME-BGC model is used to integrate information from these sources and quantify C balance across the region. The inverse modeling approach assimilates flux data from AmeriFlux sites, high precision CO2 concentration data from AmeriFlux towers and four new calibrated CO2 sites, reanalysis meteorology and various remote sensing products to generate statewide estimates of biosphere carbon exchange from the atmospheric point of view.

B.E. Law; D. Turner; M. Goeckede

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The p-Process in the Carbon Deflagration Model for Type Ia Supernovae and Chronology of the Solar System Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study nucleosynthesis of p-nuclei in the carbon deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by assuming that seed nuclei are produced by the s-process in accreting layers on a carbon-oxygen white dwarf during mass accretion from a binary companion. We find that about 50 % of the p-nuclides are synthesized in proportion to the solar abundance and that p-isotopes of Mo and Ru which are significantly underproduced in Type II supernovae (SNe II) are produced up to a level close to other p-nuclei. Comparing the yields of iron and p-nuclei in SNe Ia we find that SNe Ia can contribute to the galactic evolution of the p-nuclei. Next, we consider nucleochronology of the solar system formation by using four radioactive nuclides and apply the result of the p-process nucleosynthesis to simple galactic chemical evolution models. We find that when assumed three phases of interstellar medium are mixed by the interdiffusion with the timescale of about 40 Myr 53Mn/55Mn value in the early solar system is consistent with a meteoritic value. In addition, we put constraints to a scenario that SNe Ia induce the core collapse of the molecular cloud, which leads to the formation of the solar system.

Kusakabe, Motohiko [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Iwamoto, Nobuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

DEVELOPMENT OF A VALIDATED MODEL FOR USE IN MINIMIZING NOx EMISSIONS AND MAXIMIZING CARBON UTILIZATION WHEN COFIRING BIOMASS WITH COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT40895. A statement of the project objectives is included in the Introduction of this report. The project goals and detailed plans were presented in two project kickoff meetings; one at NETL in Pittsburgh and one in Birmingham, AL at Southern Research Institute. Progress has been made in developing a modeling approach to synthesize the reaction time and temperature distributions that will be produced by computational fluid dynamic models of the pilot-scale combustion furnace and the char burnout and chemical reaction kinetics that will predict NOx emissions and unburned carbon levels in the furnace exhaust. Preparations are under way for the initial pilot-scale combustion experiments.

Larry G. Felix; P. Vann Bush; Stephen Niksa

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

Carbon taxes and India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Carbon in detonations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review three principal results from a five year study of carbon and its properties in detonations and discuss the implications of these results to the behavior of explosives. We first present a new determination of the carbon melt line from release wave velocity measurements in the shocked state. We then outline a colloidal theory of carbon clustering which from diffusion limited coagulation predicts a slow energy release rate for the carbon chemistry. Finally, we show the results from the examination of recovered soot. Here we see support for the colloid theory and find the diamond phase of carbon. The main theme of this paper is that the carbon in detonation products is in the form of a colloidal suspension of carbon clusters which grow through diffusion limited collisions. Even the final state is not bulk graphite or diamond, but is a collection of small, less than 100 /angstrom/A, diamond and graphitic clusters. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnson, J.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Modeling of Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production. Organisms like green algae, grasses, and trees use photosynthesis to transform light energy and carbon dioxide into chemicals-chemicals that can be turned back into energy when used as biofuels or feedstocks for biofuel production. Researchers at NREL have set out to make photo- synthesis more efficient, so that more energy can be captured as biofuels. To improve the efficiency

274

The use of stored carbon reserves in growth of temperate tree roots and leaf buds: Analyses using radiocarbon measurements and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the use of carbon (C) reserves in trees is important for understanding regional and global C cycles, stress responses, asynchrony between photosynthetic activity and growth demand, and isotopic exchanges in studies of tree physiology and ecosystem C cycling. Using an inadvertent, whole-ecosystem radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) release in a temperate deciduous oak forest and numerical modeling, we estimated that the mean age of stored C used to grow both leaf buds and new roots is 0.7 years and about 55% of new-root growth annually comes from stored C. Therefore, the calculated mean age of C used to grow new-root tissue is {approx}0.4 years. In short, new roots contain a lot of stored C but it is young in age. Additionally, the type of structure used to model stored C input is important. Model structures that did not include storage, or that assumed stored and new C mixed well (within root or shoot tissues) before being used for root growth, did not fit the data nearly as well as when a distinct storage pool was used. Consistent with these whole-ecosystem labeling results, the mean age of C in new-root tissues determined using 'bomb-{sup 14}C' in three additional forest sites in North America and Europe (one deciduous, two coniferous) was less than 1-2 years. The effect of stored reserves on estimated ages of fine roots is unlikely to be large in most natural abundance isotope studies. However, models of root C dynamics should take stored reserves into account, particularly for pulse-labeling studies and fast-cycling roots (<1 years).

Gaudinski, J.B.; Torn, M.S.; Riley, W.J.; Swanston, C.; Trumbore, S.E.; Joslin, J.D.; Majdi, H.; Dawson, T.E.; Hanson, P.J.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Simultaneous determination of uric acid and dopamine using a carbon fiber electrode modified by layer-by-layer assembly of graphene and gold nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel layer-by-layer assembly of graphene sheets and gold nanoparticles modified carbon fiber electrode (GE/Au/GE/CFE) was successfully fabricated and applied to simultaneous ... UA). The structure of GE/Au/GE/

Jiao Du; Ruirui Yue; Fangfang Ren; Zhangquan Yao; Fengxing Jiang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

CX-009848: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-009848: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01302013 Location(s): Alabama...

277

CX-000591: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination 25A2936 - Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12152009 Location(s): California...

278

An Analytical Model for Determination of the Solvent Convective Dispersion Coefficient in the Vapor Extraction Heavy Oil Recovery Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, a new model is developed to determine the solvent convective dispersion coefficient in a solvent vapor extraction (VAPEX) heavy oil recovery process. It is assumed that solvent mass transfer b...

Mohammad Derakhshanfar; Yongan Gu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mitigation of atmospheric carbon emissions through increased energy efficiency versus increased non-carbon energy sources: A trade study using a simplified {open_quotes}market-free{close_quotes} exogenously driven model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simplified model of global, long-term energy use is described and used to make a `top-level` comparison of two generic approaches for mitigating atmospheric carbon emissions: (a) those based on increased energy efficiency; and (b) those based on increased use of reduced- or non-carbon fuels. As approximate as is the model, first-order estimates of and trade offs between increasing non-carbon generation capacities (e.g., supply-side solutions) versus energy-use efficiency (e.g., demand-side solutions) to stem atmospheric carbon accumulations can be useful in guiding more elaborate models. At the level of this analysis, both the costs of abatement and the costs of damage can be large, with the formation of benefit-to-cost ratios as a means of assessment being limited by uncertainties associated with relating given climatic responses to greenhouse warming to aggregate damage cost, as well as uncertainties associated with procedures used for multi-generation discounting of both abatement and damage costs. In view of uncertainties associated with both supply-side and demand-side approaches, as well as the estimation of greenhouse-warming responses per se, a combination of solutions seems prudent. Key findings are: (a) the relative insensitivity of the benefit-to-cost ratio adopted in this study to supply-side versus demand-side approaches to abating atmospheric carbon-dioxide emissions; (b) the extreme sensitivity of damage costs, abatement costs, and the related benefit-to-cost ratios to the combination of discounting procedure and the (time) concavity of the function used to relate global temperature rise to damage costs; and (c) no matter the discounting procedure and/or functional relationship between average temperature rise and a damage cost, a goal of increased per-capita gross world product at minimum damage suggests action now rather than delay.

Krakowski, R.A.

1997-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Explanatory Model of Public Acceptance for Nuclear Power Technology: From Low-Carbon Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are not so many literature about nuclear power technology of public acceptance in China, but different scholars have different opinions about the determinants of public acceptance. Xi and Xue studied that w...

Yuan-hua Yang; Li Li; Guo-hua Niu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Systems Models Publications Questions WECSsim Model The Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration Model (WECSsim): A Collaborative Systems Model The Water, Energy and...

282

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of n y of n y Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0471-1607) University of Florida - Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production via a Novel Low Pressure, Magnetically Stabilized, Non-Volatile Iron Oxide Looping Process Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Gainesville, FL Proposed Action Description: University of Florida proposes to develop a novel solar thermochemical reactor with inputs of water, recycled carbon dioxide (C02), and concentrated solar energy to cost-effectively produce Syngas, a renewable, carbon-neutral fuel. Project activities will include: (1) modeling, design, and fabrication of a high efficiency 1 OkW reactor prototype; (2) test analysis of bench-scale

283

A model for determining shelf life, estimating terminal body composition, yield grade and quality grade of feedlot cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as to style and content by: F. M. Byers (Chairman of Co m ttee) James McGrann (Member) ~&~& G. T. Schelling (Member) December 1986 ABSRACT A Model for Determining Shelf Life, Estimating Terminal Body Composition, Yield Grade and Quality Grade... of Feedlot Cattle. (December 1985) Richard Jay Perry, B, S. , Texas AlkM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F, M. Byers A model for determining shelf life and estimating carcass fat (kg), yield grade and quality grade was developed. Shelf...

Perry, Richard Jay

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Using stochastic models to determine financial indicators and technical objectives for organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic photovoltaics (PVs) are a rapidly emerging technology that has the potential to provide low-cost power for many different applications. The TEEOS model had previously been developed to determine various financial indicators for this technology. This paper modifies TEEOS in order to better analyze the effects of variability in the inputs. This modified TEEOS incorporates a mean-reverting jump diffusion model to simulate synthetic electricity price and a modified rainfall occurrence model to simulate a weather series. As well, the external quantum efficiency (EQE) is used as an input in order to gain insight on using low band gap polymers or enhancing the existing EQE. The power production NPV of three example cells, a Si-based solar cell, dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and an organic solar cell (OSC), are first examined using a 25-year time period where the DSSC and OSC have to be replaced five times due to low lifetimes. The DSSC and OSC are also compared using five years of actual data using a five-year horizon. The sensitivity analysis looks specifically at inherent increases in the electricity price, the correlation of electricity prices and weather, modeling electricity without jumps, as well as enhancing and expanding the EQE. The best option for increasing the economic feasbility for the \\{OSCs\\} is expanding the EQE, that is, reducing the band gap of the polymers used. A break-even target of $45/m2 for the OSC is stated, which is on the low range of current cost estimates; this break-even-target would increase for locales closer to the equator.

Colin Powell; Yuri Lawryshyn; Timothy Bender

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Applications of Living Fire PRA models to Fire Protection Significance Determination Process in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The living fire probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models for all three operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Taiwan had been established in December 2000. In that study, a scenario-based PRA approach was adopted to systematically evaluate the fire and smoke hazards and associated risks. Using these fire PRA models developed, a risk-informed application project had also been completed in December 2002 for the evaluation of cable-tray fire-barrier wrapping exemption. This paper presents a new application of the fire PRA models to fire protection issues using the fire protection significance determination process (FP SDP). The fire protection issues studied may involve the selection of appropriate compensatory measures during the period when an automatic fire detection or suppression system in a safety-related fire zone becomes inoperable. The compensatory measure can either be a 24-hour fire watch or an hourly fire patrol. The living fire PRA models were used to estimate the increase in risk associated with the fire protection issue in terms of changes in core damage frequency (CDF) and large early release frequency (LERF). In compliance with SDP at-power and the acceptance guidelines specified in RG 1.174, the fire protection issues in question can be grouped into four categories; red, yellow, white and green, in accordance with the guidelines developed for FD SDP. A 24-hour fire watch is suggested only required for the yellow condition, while an hourly fire patrol may be adopted for the white condition. More limiting requirement is suggested for the red condition, but no special consideration is needed for the green condition. For the calculation of risk measures, risk impacts from any additional fire scenarios that may have been introduced, as well as more severe initiating events and fire damages that may accompany the fire protection issue should be considered carefully. Examples are presented in this paper to illustrate the evaluation process. (authors)

De-Cheng, Chen; Chung-Kung, Lo; Tsu-Jen, Lin; Ching-Hui, Wu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, P. O. Box 3-3, Lung-Tan, Tao-Yuan Taiwan (China); Lin, James C. [ABSG Consulting Inc., 300 Commerce Drive, Suite 200, Irvine, CA 92602 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

VISION Model: Description of Model Used to Estimate the Impact of Highway Vehicle Technologies and Fuels on Energy Use and Carbon Emissions to 2050  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ESD/04-1 ESD/04-1 VISION Model: Description of Model Used to Estimate the Impact of Highway Vehicle Technologies and Fuels on Energy Use and Carbon Emissions to 2050 Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

287

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

288

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

289

Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Simple model of bulk and surface excitation effects to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of bulk and surface excitations to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is studied using the dielectric formalism. Calculations are based on a semiempirical dielectric response function for MWCNTs determined by means of a many-pole plasmon model with parameters adjusted to available experimental spectroscopic data under theoretical sum-rule constrains. Finite-size effects are considered in the context of electron gas theory via a boundary correction term in the plasmon dispersion relations, thus, allowing a more realistic extrapolation of the electronic excitation spectrum over the whole energy-momentum plane. Energy-loss differential and total inelastic scattering cross sections as a function of electron energy and distance from the surface, valid over the energy range {approx}50-30,000 eV, are calculated with the individual contribution of bulk and surface excitations separated and analyzed for the case of normally incident and escaping electrons. The sensitivity of the results to the various approximations for the spatial dispersion of the electronic excitations is quantified. Surface excitations are shown to have a strong influence upon the shape and intensity of the energy-loss differential cross section in the near surface region whereas the general notion of a spatially invariant inelastic mean free path inside the material is found to be of good approximation.

Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris [Medical Physics Lab, University of Ioannina Medical School, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica - CIOyN, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abril, Isabel [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d'Alacant, Apartat 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kostarelos, Kostas [Nanomedicine Lab, Centre for Drug Delivery Research, The School of Pharmacy, University of London, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on addressing the two main problems associated with state of art Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, namely loss of cathode active material and stainless steel current collector deterioration due to corrosion. We followed a dual approach where in the first case we developed novel materials to replace the cathode and current collector currently used in molten carbonate fuel cells. In the second case we improved the performance of conventional cathode and current collectors through surface modification. States of art NiO cathode in MCFC undergo dissolution in the cathode melt thereby limiting the lifetime of the cell. To prevent this we deposited cobalt using an electroless deposition process. We also coated perovskite (La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3}) in NiO thorough a sol-gel process. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of Co and perovskites coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. Co and perovskite coatings on the surface decrease the dissolution of Ni into the melt and thereby stabilize the cathode. Both, cobalt and provskites coated nickel oxide, show a higher polarization compared to that of nickel oxide, which could be due to the reduced surface area. Cobalt substituted lithium nickel oxide (LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}) and lithium cobalt oxide were also studied. LiNi{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} was synthesized by solid-state reaction procedure using lithium nitrate, nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxalate precursor. LiNi{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} showed smaller dissolution of nickel than state of art nickel oxide cathode. The performance was comparable to that of nickel oxide. The corrosion of the current collector in the cathode side was also studied. The corrosion characteristics of both SS304 and SS304 coated with Co-Ni alloy were studied. This study confirms that surface modification of SS304 leads to the formation of complex scales with better barrier properties and better electronic conductivity at 650 C. A three phase homogeneous model was developed to simulate the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell cathode and the complete fuel cell. The homogeneous model is based on volume averaging of different variables in the three phases over a small volume element. This approach can be used to model porous electrodes as it represents the real system much better than the conventional agglomerate model. Using the homogeneous model the polarization characteristics of the MCFC cathode and fuel cell were studied under different operating conditions. Both the cathode and the full cell model give good fits to the experimental data.

Hector Colonmer; Prabhu Ganesan; Nalini Subramanian; Dr. Bala Haran; Dr. Ralph E. White; Dr. Branko N. Popov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

Computer model study: An analysis of the Nephew/Spore model for determining costs of cost of coal mining in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study determined whether the model developed to study Costs of Coal Surface Mining and Reclamation in Appalachia was capable of being responsive to the needs of the Office of Surface Mining for projecting the extraction costs of coal in support of the Small Operator Assistance Program. The study analysis validated the model and adapted the model to specific small operator needs in terms of user flexibility. Based on the analysis and model enhancements approach used by the study, three primary recommendations are made: Validate the model with live cost and performance data to determine potential viability for small operator assistance; Enhance the model to provide greater flexibility and ease of user support; and field test the model through regional offices of the Small Operator Assistance Program.

Nephew, E.A.; Spore, R.L.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

295

Generalized Volume-Averaged Filtration Combustion Model and Its Application for Calculating Carbon Gasifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a generalized volume-averaged model of filtration combustion of gases taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of a porous medium and the change in porosity due to the heterogeneous chem...

K. V. Dobrego; I. A. Koznacheev

296

ModelingandMeasuringGreenhouseGasReductionfromLowCarbonAirportAccessModes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic greenhousegas(GHG)emissionsin2003. WithinproportionofaviationsystemGHGemissions;duetotheirforaviation systemGHGreduction. Discretechoicemodels

Smirti, Megan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

TEXIN2: a model for predicting carbon monoxide concentrations near intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association emitted along straight roadways, where traffic is wel 1-def ined and flows uniformly at constant speeds. This scenario is extremely inap- propriate for intersections. A simple conversion from straight... are presented in Chapter V. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW The task of modeling pollutant concentrations near intersections has traditionally been approached by first enlisting an emissions model to estimate a composite emission rate for vehicular traffic...

Korpics, J. J

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thermodynamic Models for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria of Nitrogen+Oxygen+Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the design and optimization of CO2 recovery from alcoholic fermentation processes by distillation, models for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) are needed. Two such thermodynamic models, the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS) and a model based on Henry's law constants, are proposed for the ternary mixture N2+O2+CO2. Pure substance parameters of the Peng-Robinson EOS are taken from the literature, whereas the binary parameters of the Van der Waals one-fluid mixing rule are adjusted to experimental binary VLE data. The Peng-Robinson EOS describes both binary and ternary experimental data well, except at high pressures approaching the critical region. A molecular model is validated by simulation using binary and ternary experimental VLE data. On the basis of this model, the Henry's law constants of N2 and O2 in CO2 are predicted by molecular simulation. An easy-to-use thermodynamic model, based on those Henry's law constants, is developed to reliably describe the VLE in the CO2-rich region.

Vrabec, J; Buchhauser, U; Meyer-Pittroff, R; Hasse, H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

302

The Effect of Terrestrial Photosynthesis Down Regulation on the Twentieth-Century Carbon Budget Simulated with the CCCma Earth System Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The simulation of atmosphericlandocean CO2 exchange for the 18502000 period offers the possibility of testing and calibrating the carbon budget in earth system models by comparing the simulated changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and in ...

V. K. Arora; G. J. Boer; J. R. Christian; C. L. Curry; K. L. Denman; K. Zahariev; G. M. Flato; J. F. Scinocca; W. J. Merryfield; W. G. Lee

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Spatial and Temporal Structure of Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75 lat 3.75 long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases ...

J. M. Murphy; J. F. B. Mitchell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Soft-linking energy systems and GIS models to investigate spatial hydrogen infrastructure development in a low-carbon UK energy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes an innovative modelling approach focusing on linking spatial (GIS) modelling of hydrogen (H2) supply, demands and infrastructures, anchored within a economy-wide energy systems model (MARKAL). The UK government is legislating a groundbreaking climate change mitigation target for a 60% CO2 reduction by 2050, and has identified H2 infrastructures and technologies as potentially playing a major role, notably in the transport sector. An exploratory set of linked GISMARKAL model scenarios generate a range of nuanced insights including spatial matching of supply and demand for optimal zero-carbon H2 deployment, a crucial finding on successive clustering of demand centres to enable economies of scale in H2 supply and distribution, the competitiveness of imported liquid H2 and of liquid H2 distribution, and sectoral competition for coal with carbon sequestration between electricity and H2 production under economy-wide CO2 constraints.

Neil Strachan; Nazmiye Balta-Ozkan; David Joffe; Kate McGeevor; Nick Hughes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

CX-008674: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

74: Categorical Exclusion Determination 74: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008674: Categorical Exclusion Determination ATK - A High Efficiency Inertial Carbon Dioxide Extraction System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 07/01/2011 Location(s): New York, Pennsylvania Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Funding will support small-scale laboratory research, design, fabrication and pilot-scale testing of the Inertial Carbon Dioxide Extraction System (ICES), an aero-thermodynamic inertial separation device for use in carbon capture processes. Funding will also support computational and performance modeling, economic modeling, and commercialization/transition planning for the ICES system under development. CX-008674.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

306

Modelling of CO2 content in the atmosphere until 2300: influence of energy intensity of gross domestic product and carbon intensity of energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study provides a model of CO2 content in the atmosphere based on the global carbon cycle and the Kaya identity. The influences of: 1) energy intensity of GDP; 2) carbon intensity of energy on CO2 trajectories are given under four scenarios. The results from the most optimistic and technologically challenging scenario show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration can stabilise at 610 ppmv. It is also shown that the annual growth rates of atmospheric CO2 peak for all the scenarios before 2100 due to the expected world population peak in 2075 and the large share of fossil fuel energy.

Wojciech M. Budzianowski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Automatic determination about precision parameter value based on inclusion degree with variable precision rough set model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The rough set theory provides a powerful approach for attributes reduction and data analysis. The variable precision rough set (VPRS) model, an extension of the original rough set approach, tolerates misclassifications of the training data to some degree, which promotes the applications of rough set theory in inconsistent information systems. However, in most existing algorithms of feature reduction based on VPRS, the precision parameter (?) is introduced as prior knowledge, which restricts their applications because it is not clear how to set the ? value. By studying ?-consistency in the measurement of a decision table and the threshold value of the ?-consistent decision table, this paper presents an algorithm for automatic determination of the precision parameter value from a decision table based on VPRS. At the same time, the precision parameter value from our proposed method is compared with the thresholds from the decision-theoretic rough set (DTRS). The influences of the precision parameter are also discussed on attribute reduction, which shows the necessity of the estimated precision parameter from a decision table. The simulation results including VPRS and other classification methods in real data further indicate that different precision parameter values make a great difference on rules and setting a precise parameter near the threshold value of the ?-consistent decision table can precisely reflect the decision distribution of the decision table.

Yusheng Cheng; Wenfa Zhan; Xindong Wu; Yuzhou Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Lawrence, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Characterize the Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in an area covering approximately 17 counties in south-central Kansas in order to estimate its potential for carbon dioxide sequestration. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000462.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002613: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination

309

CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Manhattan, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Characterize the Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in an area covering approximately 17 counties in south-central Kansas in order to estimate its potential for carbon dioxide sequestration. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002611.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002613: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination

310

CX-002610: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002610: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Sumner County, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Characterize the Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in an area covering approximately 17 counties in south-central Kansas in order to estimate its potential for carbon dioxide sequestration. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002610.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002613: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002612: Categorical Exclusion Determination

311

Size Effects in Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intershell spacing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes was determined by analyzing the high resolution transmission electron microscopy images of these nanotubes. For the nanotubes that were studied, the intershell spacing d^002 is found to range from 0.34 to 0.39 nm, increasing with decreasing tube diameter. A model based on the results from real space image analysis is used to explain the variation in intershell spacings obtained from reciprocal space periodicity analysis. The increase in intershell spacing with decreased nanotube diameter is attributed to the high curvature, resulting in an increased repulsive force, associated with the decreased diameter of the nanotube shells.

C.-H. Kiang; M. Endo; P. M. Ajayan; G. Dresselhaus; M. S. Dresselhaus

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

A model for the contribution of macrophyte-derived organic carbon in harvested tidal freshwater marshes to surrounding estuarine and oceanic ecosystems and its response to global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The tidal freshwater marshes dominated by Phragmites australis (common reed) in the Chongxi Wetland are important components of the Yangtze River estuary in China. The litter from P. australis is exported to the surrounding estuarine area and the sea with the tidal flushing in the form of plant residue, particulate organic matter, and dissolved organic matter and is an important organic carbon resource of the East China Sea. A model was constructed using STELLA software (version 9.1.3) to simulate the contribution of macrophyte-derived organic carbon to surrounding estuary and ocean ecosystems. The model is based on the monitoring and observational data from field surveys and published information on the Chongxi Wetland from 2008 to 2011, and the response of the total organic carbon flowing out of the wetland to global changes was also predicted in conditions of plant shoots that were annually harvested in winter. The results demonstrate the following: (1) the annual contributed organic carbon is 891gCm?2, of which 612gCm?2 flows out of the wetland directly as plant residue; (2) total organic carbon continually increases after a short decrease at the start of April of 2010, retains a high value from mid-July to mid-November and rapidly decreases to approximately zero during the harvest of the aboveground plant organs; and (3) accumulated annual organic carbon contributions to the surrounding estuarine and oceanic ecosystems are predicted to increase as the global average temperature rises, and the sea level increases.

Jiarui Zhang; Sven E. Jrgensen; Jianjian Lu; Sren N. Nielsen; Qiang Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Soil warming, carbonnitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphereoceanland earth system models to accurately simulate land...atmosphereoceanland earth system models by comparing terrestrial carbon...atmosphereoceanland earth system models (44...

Jerry M. Melillo; Sarah Butler; Jennifer Johnson; Jacqueline Mohan; Paul Steudler; Heidi Lux; Elizabeth Burrows; Francis Bowles; Rose Smith; Lindsay Scott; Chelsea Vario; Troy Hill; Andrew Burton; Yu-Mei Zhou; Jim Tang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION L.C. Castro, D.L. John, and D.L. Pulfrey Department A simple, non-equilibrium model is used to evaluate the likely DC performance of carbon nanotube field and transcon- ductance close to the low-quantum-capacitance limit. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, field

Pulfrey, David L.

316

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?1 distribution of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Economic Screening of Geologic Sequestration Options in the United States with a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a carbon management strategy is a formidable task for nations as well as individual companies. It is often difficult to understand what options are available, let alone determine which may be optimal. In response to the need for a better understanding of complex carbon management options, Battelle has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) model with economic screening capability focused on carbon capture and geologic sequestration opportunities in the United States. This paper describes the development of this GIS-based economic screening model and demonstrates its use for carbon management analysis.

Dahowski, Robert T. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dooley, James J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brown, Daryl R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Badie I. Morsi

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Complete Transport Validated Model on a Zeolite Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Permeance and Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CO2 emissions from major industries cause serious global environment problems and their mitigation is urgently needed. The use of zeolite membranes is a very efficient way in order to capture CO2 from some flue gases. The dominant transport mechanism at low temperature andor high pressure is the diffusion through the membrane. This procedure can be divided in three steps: Adsorption of the molecules of the species in the surface of the membrane, then a driving force gives a path where the species follow inside the membrane and finally the species desorbed from the surface of the membrane. The current work is aimed at developing a simulation model for the CO2 transport through a zeolite membrane and estimate the diffusion phenomenon through a very thin membrane of 150 nm in a Wicke-Kallenbach cell. The cell is cylindrical in shape with diameter of 19 mm and consists of a retentate gas chamber, a permeate gas chamber which are separated by a cylindrical zeolite membrane. This apparatus have been modeled wit...

Gkanas, Evangelos I; Stubos, Athanasios K; Makridis, Sofoklis S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

CX-000265: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

65: Categorical Exclusion Determination 65: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000265: Categorical Exclusion Determination Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/23/2009 Location(s): Santa Clara, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Symyx Technologies would design and develop a geochemical model that simulates an Enhanced Geothermal System reservoir. The model would develop a foundation in theory and measurement of physical and chemical interactions between minerals, rocks, carbon dioxide and water. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000265.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003343: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000264: Categorical Exclusion Determination

320

Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Development of model evaluation criteria. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the usefulness and effectiveness of currently existing models that simulate the release of uranium hexafluoride from UF{sub 6}-handling facilities, subsequent reactions of UF{sub 6} with atmospheric moisture, and the dispersion of UF{sub 6} and reaction products in the atmosphere. The study evaluates screening-level and detailed public-domain models that were specifically developed for UF{sub 6} and models that were originally developed for the treatment of dense gases but are applicable to UF{sub 6} release, reaction, and dispersion. The model evaluation process is divided into three specific tasks: model-component evaluation; applicability evaluation; and user interface and quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) evaluation. Within the model-component evaluation process, a model`s treatment of source term, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion are considered and model predictions are compared with actual observations. Within the applicability evaluation process, a model`s applicability to Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis, and to site-specific considerations are assessed. Finally, within the user interface and QA/QC evaluation process, a model`s user-friendliness, presence and clarity of documentation, ease of use, etc. are assessed, along with its handling of QA/QC. This document presents the complete methodology used in the evaluation process.

Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of carbon-carbon composites from solvent extracted pitch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several methods used to fabricate carbon-carbon composites. One used extensively in the fabrication of aerospace components such as rocket nozzles and reentry vehicle nosetips, as well as commercial components for furnace fixturing and glass manufacturing, is the densification of a woven preform with molten pitch, and the subsequent conversion of the pitch to graphite through heat treatment. Two types of pitch are used in this process; coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch. The objective of this program was to determine if a pitch produced by the direct extraction of coal could be used as a substitute for these pitches in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. The program involved comparing solvent extracted pitch with currently accepted pitches and rigidizing a carbon-carbon preform with solvent extracted pitch for comparison with carbon-carbon fabricated with currently available pitch.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Carbon Cycle 2.0  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Cycle 2.0 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Pioneering science for sustainable energy solutions Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Storage Combustion Carbon Capture & Storage Developing World Efficiency Photovoltaics Biofuels Energy Analysis Climate Modeling Carbon Cycle 2.0 is... 1. A vision for * a global energy system integrated with the Earth's natural carbon cycles * an interactive Berkeley Lab environment with a shared sense of purpose 2. A program development plan that will allow us to deepen our capabilities and provide more opportunities to have impact 3. An attempt to integrate our basic research with applications using models of technology deployment constraints 4. Set of internal activities aimed at priming the effort

323

Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon & Northern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal is to quantify and explain the carbon (C) budget for Oregon and N. California. The research compares "bottom -up" and "top-down" methods, and develops prototype analytical systems for regional analysis of the carbon balance that are potentially applicable to other continental regions, and that can be used to explore climate, disturbance and land-use effects on the carbon cycle. Objectives are: 1) Improve, test and apply a bottom up approach that synthesizes a spatially nested hierarchy of observations (multispectral remote sensing, inventories, flux and extensive sites), and the Biome-BGC model to quantify the C balance across the region; 2) Improve, test and apply a top down approach for regional and global C flux modeling that uses a model-data fusion scheme (MODIS products, AmeriFlux, atmospheric CO2 concentration network), and a boundary layer model to estimate net ecosystem production (NEP) across the region and partition it among GPP, R(a) and R(h). 3) Provide critical understanding of the controls on regional C balance (how NEP and carbon stocks are influenced by disturbance from fire and management, land use, and interannual climate variation). The key science questions are, "What are the magnitudes and distributions of C sources and sinks on seasonal to decadal time scales, and what processes are controlling their dynamics? What are regional spatial and temporal variations of C sources and sinks? What are the errors and uncertainties in the data products and results (i.e., in situ observations, remote sensing, models)?

Beverly Law; David Turner; Warren Cohen; Mathias Goeckede

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

324

Different Models for Determination of Thermal Stratification in A Solar Storage Tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work two different models are shown for describing the thermal stratification in the solar storage tank of the solar water heating system. The first model was ... hour from the average hourly data of the

P. Gczy-Vg; I. Farkas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

Permana, Dony, E-mail: donypermana@students.itb.ac.id [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia and Statistics Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padang State University (Indonesia); Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S. [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Model evaluation report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three uranium hexafluoride-(UF{sub 6}-) specific models--HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6}, Science Application International Corporation, and RTM-96; three dense-gas models--DEGADIS, SLAB, and the Chlorine Institute methodology; and one toxic chemical model--AFTOX--are evaluated on their capabilities to simulate the chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion of UF{sub 6} released from accidents at nuclear fuel-cycle facilities, to support Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis. These models are also evaluated for user-friendliness and for quality assurance and quality control features, to ensure the validity and credibility of the results. Model performance evaluations are conducted for the three UF{sub 6}-specific models, using field data on releases of UF{sub 6} and other heavy gases. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} and SAIC models are within an order of magnitude of the field data, but the SAIC model overpredicts beyond an order of magnitude for a few UF{sub 6}-specific data points. The RTM-96 model provides overpredictions within a factor of 3 for all data points beyond 400 m from the source. For one data set, however, the RTM-96 model severely underpredicts the observations within 200 m of the source. Outputs of the models are most sensitive to the meteorological parameters at large distances from the source and to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters at distances close to the source. Specific recommendations are being made to improve the applicability and usefulness of the three models and to choose a specific model to support the intended analyses. Guidance is also provided on the choice of input parameters for initial dilution, building wake effects, and distance to completion of UF{sub 6} reaction with water.

Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Radonjic, Z.R.; Coutts, P.T.; Lewis, C.J.; Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Modeling and economic evaluation of the integration of carbon capture and storage technologies into coal to liquids plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyzes the technical and economic feasibility of the integration of FischerTropsch process based Coal to Liquid (CTL) plants with Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies (CCS). CTL plants could be multipurpose, and for this reason, starting from coal can produce different energy products like liquid fuels, such as diesel and gasoline, chemicals, electricity and hydrogen. Different plant configurations are possible especially in the case of integration with CCS technologies. Obviously, the choice of the optimal process configuration is one that better meets technical and economical requirements. In order to make a first assessment, a screening of suitable technologies has been made. The CTL facility study here proposed is based on commercial coal gasification and FischerTropsch technologies. The system configuration selected and the plant performance has been evaluated using Aspen Plus software. The plant size considered is about 10,000bbl/d of liquid fuel products, equivalent to a consumption of about 4500ton/d of coal fed to the gasification island. The declared objective is to evaluate the potential of the identified plant and to perform a first economic evaluation. The ultimate goal is to determine the specific cost of produced liquid fuels and to evaluate the economic performance of the system. The economic analysis was done to estimate the Internal Rate of Return (IRR), the payback period and the net present value for configurations with CCS or without CO2 capture. Results shows that the CCS introduction in CTL plants has a lighter impact on plant costs and performance since CO2 capture it is already included in the base plant.

Claudia Bassano; Paolo Deiana; Giuseppe Girardi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ab-initio coupled-cluster effective interactions for the shell model: Application to neutron-rich oxygen and carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive and compute effective valence-space shell-model interactions from ab-initio coupled-cluster theory and apply them to open-shell and neutron-rich oxygen and carbon isotopes. Our shell-model interactions are based on nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective-field theory. We compute the energies of ground and low-lying states, and find good agreement with experiment. In particular our calculations are consistent with the N=14, 16 shell closures in oxygen-22 and oxygen-24, while for carbon-20 the corresponding N=14 closure is weaker. We find good agreement between our coupled-cluster effective-interaction results with those obtained from standard single-reference coupled-cluster calculations for up to eight valence neutrons.

G. R. Jansen; J. Engel; G. Hagen; P. Navratil; A. Signoracci

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

329

An Analytical Model for Determining the Thermal Conductivity of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present analytical methods and some preliminary test results for determining the thermal conductivity and net heat flow in closed-cell foam materials used as cryogenic insulation. ...

M. B. Hammond Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ecology Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators David...determinants of ecosystem C sequestration. carbon|island ecology|rats...of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in European forests and forest...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

332

Assessment of carbon sequestration and timber production of Scots pine across Scotland using the process-based model 3-PGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detailed eco-physiological interpretation of the environmental factors affecting Scots pine growth and it provided an assessment of carbon sequestration under the scenario of sustainable, normal production and its effects from the environment. Finally...

Xenakis, Georgios

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Regional environmental change: special issue on Modelling future changes in Cropland Soil Carbon in European Russia and the Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many studies have examined the potential for climate mitigation in agriculture in Europe and globally, as well as in other regions of the world such as North America, but soil carbon sequestration potential for t...

Pete Smith

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CCl4 ...

Xiao, X.

335

Computational Knee Ligament Modeling Using Experimentally Determined Zero-Load Lengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to model kinematics [7, 9]. In this method, cadaver knees are loaded with known forces (for example with a robotic testing system [13]) and ligament parameters are modified until the kinematic error between model and experiment is minimized. This method... Corporation, Santa Ana, CA) (Fig. 1). The anatomical points identified during the cadaver testing were used to align the knee geometries (tibia, femur, and patella) with the machine in the computational model. Compliant contacts were then defined between...

Bloemker, Katherine H.; Guess, Trent M.; Maletsky, Lorin; Dodd, Kevin A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The socioeconomic determinants of correlations between stock market returns as revealed by a gravity model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Economic variants of Newton's law of universal gravitation have been used to model the flow of trade between two countries as proportional to the attraction (more)

Yang, Danni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Carbon Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Conference ... The Fourth Hienninl Conference on Carbon will be held at the University of Buffalo, June 15 to 19. ... The Pittsburgh Section's coal technology group will meet in the conference room at Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, June ... ...

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

Ernest A. Mancini

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

340

PlaneCarbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlaneCarbon PlaneCarbon Jump to: navigation, search Name PlaneCarbon Address 9149 N. 109th Place Place Scottsdale, Arizona Zip 85259 Sector Carbon Product PlaneCarbon Year founded 2002 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 480-205-0881 Website http://iteknowledgies.com/tran References Iteknowledgies[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! TODO: Determine if all of this content is appropriate and has a neutral point of view. PlaneCarbon, a division of Iteknowledgies International, is a company based in Scottsdale, Arizona. PlaneCarbon purchases carbon credits to achieve carbon neutral operation of your aircraft based on the average utilization of a specific aircraft in hours per year and then calculating the amount of fuel burned and purchasing offsetting carbon credits to achieve carbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CX-012137: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Carbon Dioxide Capture Facility Decommission - Building 84, Room 124 CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

342

CX-003442: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003442: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture for Existing Post-Combustion Boilers by Self-Concentrating Amine...

343

CX-011274: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011274: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09262013 Location(s):...

344

CX-000586: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000586: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A1455 - Carbon Dioxide Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue Date: 12152009 Location(s):...

345

CX-011273: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011273: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09262013 Location(s):...

346

CX-003443: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003443: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture for Existing Post-Combustion Boilers by Self-Concentrating Amine...

347

CX-011786: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011786: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02192014 Location(s):...

348

CX-011805: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

05: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011805: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture By Cold Membrane Operation with Actual Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas...

349

CX-011276: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011276: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09262013 Location(s):...

350

CX-011785: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02192014 Location(s):...

351

CX-012261: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-012261: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois CX(s)...

352

CX-012164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vapor Space Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04292014 Location(s): South...

353

CX-002588: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-002588: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulfurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat...

354

CX-100173 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100173 Categorical Exclusion Determination Biomass Conversion to Acrylonitrile Monomer-Precursor for Production of Carbon Fibers Award...

355

CX-008294: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008294: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

356

CX-008293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

93: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008293: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

357

CX-008295: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008295: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

358

CX-008292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from...

359

CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

77: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied:...

360

CX-003876: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003876: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Basic solutions to carbon/carbon oxidation: Science and technology. Final report, 15 April 1993--14 April 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the role of boron in carbon oxidation. Boron-doped carbons were synthesized via CVD, ion implantation and high temperature doping are subsequently characterized. It was found that high temperature doped HOPG carbons were ideal for oxidation studies because their surface could be reproduced, their surface structures were determined and they were able to be characterized by XPS, AFM and SEM. The direct analysis of the chemical structures and atomic arrangements in boron- doped carbon or carbon surfaces by these techniques was critical in determining the effect of boron on carbon oxidation. XPS was utilized in this work to determine the local bonding environment of boron in carbon before an after oxidation. It was necessary to obtain an accurate calibration of the B1s binding energy scale which was accomplished by obtaining photoemission spectra of boron-doped carbons with known structures (local boron bonding environments), such as boron oxide, boron carbide, triphenylboroxine, tourmaline, boric acid, danburite and high temperature boron-doped graphite. All of the aforementioned standards contain boron in a unique bonding environment and thus their spectra formulated a complete conversion of B1s binding energies to boron chemical environments which has not been reported in the past. It was clearly established that a chemical shift for substitutional boron in graphite exists at 186.5 eV with a FWHM of 1.2. The chemical structures of the boron in the standards were related to the binding energy using a Pauling charge distribution model and a modification of the Sanderson electronegativity method. This approach was used to determine whether the B1s binding energy would change depending upon the specific location of boron in the graphite or graphite surface.

Harrison, I.R.; Chung, T.; Pantano, C.; Radovic, L.; Thrower, P.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Determination of the proper operating range for the CAFCA IIB fuel cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fuel cycle simulation tool, CAFCA II was previously modified to produce the most recent version, CAFCA IIB. The code tracks the mass distribution of transuranics in the fuel cycle in one model and also projects costs ...

Warburton, Jamie (Jamie L.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Numerical model to determine the composition of H2ONaClCaCl2 fluid inclusions based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical model to determine the composition of H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 fluid inclusions based 2010 Abstract Natural fluids approximated by the H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 system are common in a wide range the compositions of fluid inclusions in the H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 sys- tem based on microthermometric and microanalytical

Bodnar, Robert J.

364

A simulation model for determining the productivity and costs associated with a mobile small-log sawmill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee) 7 ad of partment (Memb r) (Member) Member) December 1975 ABSTRACT A Simulation Model for Determining The Productivity and Costs Associated With a Mobile Small-Log Sawmill. (December 1975) Ken E. Rogers, B. S. F. , Stephen F. Austin... for their fine suggestions and critical comments. They are: Dr. Don F. Durso, Dr. Clifford Hickman, and Dr. August Smith. Lastly, I would like to express sincere appreciation to my wife, Kathy, for her continued patience, help, and encouragement through...

Rogers, Kenneth E

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide for Direct Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850C in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Cell area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Herring, J. S.; Hartvigsen, J. J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Steam for the Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850C in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

368

Carbon Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

369

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization is progressing. Data on reservoir production rate and pressure history at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been tabulated, and porosity data from core analysis has been correlated with porosity as observed from well log response. Data integration is on schedule, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database for reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation for the reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs for each of these fields.

Ernest A. Mancini

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Determination of the effects caused by different polymers on coal fluidity during carbonization using high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of blending polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET), a flexible polyurethane (FPU), and a car shredded fluff waste (CSF) on fluidity development of a bituminous coal during carbonization have been studied by means of high-torque, small-amplitude controlled-strain rheometry and in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The most detrimental effects were caused by PET and PS, which completely destroyed the fluidity of the coal. The CSF had a deleterious effect on coal fluidity similar to that of PET, although the deleterious effect on the viscoelastic properties of the coal were less pronounced than those of PET and PS. On the contrary, the addition of 10 wt % PE caused a slight reduction in the concentration of fluid hydrogen and an increase in the minimum complex viscosity, and the addition of 10 wt % FPU reduced the concentration of fluid hydrogen without changing the viscoelastic properties of the coal. Although these results suggest that these two plastics could potentially be used as additives in coking blends without compromising coke porosity, it was found that the semicoke strengths were reduced by adding 2 wt % FPU and 5 wt % PE. Therefore, it is unlikely that more than 2 wt % of a plastic waste could be added to a coal blend without deterioration in coke quality. 35 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Miguel Castro Diaz; Lucky Edecki; Karen M. Steel; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I. [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Garcia-Molina, R. [Departamento de Fisica-CIOyN, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abril, I. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d'Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kostarelos, K. [Nanomedicine Laboratory, Centre for Drug Delivery Research, School of Pharmacy, University of London, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Bimolecular recombination on carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By using a suspension of single-walled carbon nanotubes in an applied electric field and measuring transient photoinduced currents the problem of contacting nanotubes in charge transport studies is circumvented; basic electronic transport properties are thus studied. It is observed that the peak photocurrent excited by a mode-locked laser pulse has a sublinear dependence on light intensity. Careful measurement of these phototransients has allowed a fit of the intensity dependence of the peak photocurrent to a bimolecular recombination model developed for the one-dimensional semiconductor that the nanotubes represent. Application of the model allows the determination of some microscopic transport properties. This has been done as concentration, electric field and excitation wavelength are varied.

J. C. Bunning; K. J. Donovan; K. Scott; M. Somerton

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...devices. Some advantages and limitations...devices. Some advantages and limitations...devices. Some advantages and limitations...from one to five solar masses are believed...whose emergent energy flux is presumed...There are several disadvantages in the model nebular...

L. H. Aller; C. D. Keyes; S. J. Czyzak

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Model independent determination of the light-cone wave functions for exclusive processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method to compute, by numerical simulations of lattice QCD, the light-cone wave functions which enter exclusive processes at large momentum transfer, such as electromagnetic elastic scatterings, or exclusive semi-leptonic decays as B -> pi (B -> rho) and radiative decays as B -> K* gamma. The method is based on first principles and does not require any model assumption.

Aglietti, U; Corb, G; Franco, E; Martinelli, G; Silvestrini, L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Adaptation costs for sustainable development and ecological transitions: a presentation of the structural model M3ED with reference to French energy?economy?carbon dioxide emission prospects*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to assess the adaptation costs associated with the transition to a sustainable development path, taking the example of carbon dioxide emissions in the French economy. The model used is based on systems dynamics modelling and energy input-output analysis. This type of approach has the interesting property of precisely defining the nature of interactions between the different economic sectors, and between the economic sectors and the environment. This provides a framework within which to test different types of economic, technology and environment policy. In effect, according to our interests, it is necessary to measure problems of resources allocation or sequential choices between different alternatives why and how a particular solution comes to be selected from a multiplicity of alternatives. First, we characterise the methodological and conceptual specification of the model. Secondly, we locate specific properties of the model linked with both ecological sustainability and economic feasability constraints. Thirdly, a sensitivity test is applied concerning different control policy scenarios for the case of carbon dioxide emissions in the French economy.

Patrick Schembri

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

Enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake in the Northern High Latitudes in the 21st century from the Coupled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project model projections H A I F E N G Q I A N *, R E Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project. Our analysis suggests that the NHL will be a carbon the intense warming there enhances SOM decomposition, soil organic carbon (SOC) storage continues to increase

Zeng, Ning

379

CX-004437: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004437: Categorical Exclusion Determination Single-Well Low Temperature Carbon Dioxide-Based Engineered Geothermal System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/16/2010 Location(s): Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office GreenFire Energy would use United States Department of Energy grant funds to identify and characterize the key uncertainties in the modeling and design of carbon dioxide-based Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), then install a simplified prototype system to obtain the field data necessary for realistic cost and performance estimation of commercial scale carbon dioxide-EGS systems. Field portions of the project would occur on Arizona State Lands at the Saint Johns Dome formation near Springerville, Arizona.

380

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 11, 2009 December 11, 2009 CX-000418: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Poughkeepsie, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-002609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Wichita, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-002610: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to diagnose and estimate secondary porosity and absolute permeability of fractured and vuggy carbonate in the Barinas-Apure Basin in southwest Venezuela. The latter reservoir behaves as a triple-porosity-connected) and fractured porosity, all embedded in a tight matrix. Rock-core data and wellbore resistivity images indicate

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

382

Transport parameter determination and modeling of sodium and strontium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , 1974] . . 7. Generalized plume with centerline 8. Strontium-90 distribution, 1970 [after Robertson et aL, 1974]. . . . 20 . 22 9. The sodium plume transverse dispersivity-Rnite source size in y iteration diagram. 10. The calculat. ed sodium plume.... There is flow there which picks up the contaminant ions dispersing them through the complex network of fractures and interconnected pore space of the saturated porous medium, the aquifer. Being able to model this spread of contaminant in the subsurface...

Londergan, John Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Determination of Retrofit Savings Using a Calibrated Building Energy Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in commercial buildings (Katipamula and Claridge 1991. Wu et al. 1992). Of all the modeling approaches, use of building energy simulation programs is considered most comprehensive. However, owing to the considerable uncertainty involved with various input... presents the results of a study lucted to develop a robust methodology to mine retrofit energy and cost savings in commercial buildings when few measured data are available for the preretrofit condition. Although the study focuses on commercial...

Reddy, S. N.; Hunn, B. D.; Hood, D. B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Modeling the determinants of Medicaid home care payments for children with special health care needs: A structural equation model approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground The management of children with special needs can be very challenging and expensive. Objective To examine direct and indirect cost drivers of home care expenditures for this vulnerable and expensive population. Methods We retrospectively assessed secondary data on children, ages 420, receiving Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) (n=2760). A structural equation model assessed direct and indirect effects of several child characteristics, clinical conditions and functional measures on Medicaid home care payments. Results The mean age of children was 12.1 years and approximately 60% were female. Almost half of all subjects reported mild, moderate or severe ID diagnosis. The mean ADL score was 5.27 and about 60% of subjects received some type of rehabilitation services. Caseworkers authorized an average of 25.5h of PCS support per week. The SEM revealed three groups of costs drivers: indirect, direct and direct+indirect. Cognitive problems, health impairments, and age affect expenditures, but they operate completely through other variables. Other elements accumulate effects (externalizing behaviors, PCS hours, and rehabilitation) and send them on a single path to the dependent variable. A few elements exhibit a relatively complex position in the model by having both significant direct and indirect effects on home care expenditures medical conditions, intellectual disability, region, and ADL function. Conclusions The most important drivers of home care expenditures are variables that have both meaningful direct and indirect effects. The only one of these factors that may be within the sphere of policy change is the difference among costs in different regions.

Omolola E. Adepoju; Yichen Zhang; Charles D. Phillips

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Carbon Sequestered, Carbon Displaced and the Kyoto Context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated system that embraces forest management, forest products, and land-use change impacts the global carbon cycle - and hence the net emission of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide - in four fundamental ways. Carbon is stored in living and dead biomass, carbon is stored in wood products and landfills, forest products substitute in the market place for products made from other materials, and forest harvests can be used wholly or partially to displace fossil fuels in the energy sector. Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would result in the creation of international markets for carbon dioxide emissions credits, but the current Kyoto text does not treat all carbon identically. We have developed a carbon accounting model, GORCAM, to examine a variety of scenarios for land management and the production of forest products. In this paper we explore, for two simple scenarios of forest management, the carbon flows that occur and how these might be accounted for under the Kyoto text. The Kyoto protocol raises questions about what activities can result in emissions credits, which carbon reservoirs will be counted, who will receive the credits, and how much credit will be available? The Kyoto Protocol would sometimes give credits for carbon sequestered, but it would always give credits when fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are displaced.

Marland, G.; Schlamadinger, B.

1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capturing carbon Capturing carbon New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

389

Determination of Electrochemical Performance and Thermo-Mechanical-Chemical Stability of SOFCs from Defect Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was focused on two distinct but related issues. The first issue concerned using defect modeling to understand the relationship between point defect concentration and the electrochemical, thermo-chemical and mechano-chemical properties of typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) materials. The second concerned developing relationships between the microstructural features of SOFC materials and their electrochemical performance. To understand the role point defects play in ceramics, a coherent analytical framework was used to develop expressions for the dependence of thermal expansion and elastic modulus on point defect concentration in ceramics. These models, collectively termed the continuum-level electrochemical model (CLEM), were validated through fits to experimental data from electrical conductivity, I-V characteristics, elastic modulus and thermo-chemical expansion experiments for (nominally pure) ceria, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with consistently good fits. The same values for the material constants were used in all of the fits, further validating our approach. As predicted by the continuum-level electrochemical model, the results reveal that the concentration of defects has a significant effect on the physical properties of ceramic materials and related devices. Specifically, for pure ceria and GDC, the elastic modulus decreased while the chemical expansion increased considerably in low partial pressures of oxygen. Conversely, the physical properties of YSZ remained insensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure within the studied range. Again, the findings concurred exactly with the predictions of our analytical model. Indeed, further analysis of the results suggests that an increase in the point defect content weakens the attractive forces between atoms in fluorite-structured oxides. The reduction treatment effects on the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of pure ceria were also evaluated at room temperature. The results reveal that the flexural strength decreases significantly after heat treatment in very low oxygen partial pressure environments; however, in contrast, fracture toughness is increased by 30-40% when the oxygen partial pressure was decreased to 10{sup -20} to 10{sup -22} atm range. Fractographic studies show that microcracks developed at 800 oC upon hydrogen reduction are responsible for the decreased strength. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, electrical impedance spectra from symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells was de-convoluted to obtain the key electrochemical components of electrode performance, namely charge transfer resistance, surface diffusion of reactive species and bulk gas diffusion through the electrode pores. These properties were then related to microstructural features, such as triple-phase boundary length and tortuosity. From these experiments we found that the impedance due to oxygen adsorption obeys a power law with pore surface area, while the impedance due to charge transfer is found to obey a power-law with respect to triple phase boundary length. A model based on kinetic theory explaining the power-law relationships observed was then developed. Finally, during our EIS work on the symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells a technique was developed to improve the quality of high-frequency impedance data and their subsequent de-convolution.

Eric Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Model-Independent Determinations of B -> D l nu , D* l nu Form Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present nonperturbative, model-independent parametrizations of the individual QCD form factors relevant to B -> D* l nu and B -> D l nu decays. These results follow from dispersion relations and analyticity, without recourse to heavy quark symmetry. To describe a form factor with two percent accuracy, three parameters are necessary, one of which is its normalization at zero recoil, F(1). We combine the individual form factors using heavy quark symmetry to extract values for the product |V_{cb}| F(1) from B -> D* l nu data with negligible extrapolation uncertainty.

C. Glenn Boyd; Benjamin Grinstein; Richard F. Lebed

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

CX-003343: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

43: Categorical Exclusion Determination 43: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003343: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/05/2010 Location(s): Palo Alto, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Palo Alto Research Center, Incorporated (PARC) would design and develop a geochemical model that stimulates an Enhanced Geothermal System reservoir. The model would develop a foundation in theory and measurement of physical and chemical interactions between minerals, rocks, supercritical carbon dioxide, and water. The work would take place at the existing PARC facility located at 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304.

392

Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Double Counting in Supply Chain Carbon Footprinting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon footprinting is a tool for firms to determine the total greenhouse gas GHG emissions associated with their supply chain or with a unit of final product or service. Carbon footprinting typically aims to identify where best to invest in emission ... Keywords: carbon footprint, emissions allocation, supply chain, sustainable operations

Felipe Caro; Charles J. Corbett; Tarkan Tan; Rob Zuidwijk

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic edges and other observables.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 08 14 3v 2 3 0 A ug 2 00 5 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION CAV-HEP-2005-15 ATL-PHYS-PUB-2005-013 ATL-COM-PHYS-2005-033 Determining SUSY model parameters and masses at the LHC using cross-sections, kinematic... with the endpoint mea- surements. Note that p(m|eobs) is the equivalent of the P ?(x) defined later on in equation (A.2), as it is defined only up to an unknown normalisation constant. So, in order to plot the probability distribution, one follows the following...

Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; White, Martin J

395

Numerical determination of OPE coefficients in the 3D Ising model from off-critical correlators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a general method for the numerical evaluation of OPE coefficients in three dimensional Conformal Field Theories based on the study of the conformal perturbation of two point functions in the vicinity of the critical point. We test our proposal in the three dimensional Ising Model, looking at the magnetic perturbation of the $$, $$ and $$ correlators from which we extract the values of $C^{\\sigma}_{\\sigma\\epsilon}=1.07(3)$ and $C^{\\epsilon}_{\\epsilon\\epsilon}=1.45(30)$. Our estimate for $C^{\\sigma}_{\\sigma\\epsilon}$ agrees with those recently obtained using conformal bootstrap methods, while $C^{\\epsilon}_{\\epsilon\\epsilon}$, as far as we know, is new and could be used to further constrain conformal bootstrap analyses of the 3d Ising universality class.

Caselle, M; Magnoli, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

CarbonSolve | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarbonSolve CarbonSolve Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CarbonSolve Agency/Company /Organization: CarbonSolve Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.carbonsolve.com Web Application Link: www.carbonsolve.com Cost: Paid CarbonSolve Screenshot References: CarbonSolve[1] Logo: CarbonSolve The CarbonSolve platform is designed to address a broad spectrum of needs, and makes possible for organizations to transform their sustainability objectives - including carbon, water, waste, employee engagement, or supply chain related initiatives into measureable metrics and trackable processes. Overview The CarbonSolve platform is designed to address a broad spectrum of needs, and makes possible for organizations to transform their sustainability

398

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration in Oil Fields: A Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces Grant S. Bromhal, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880, gbromhal@netl.doe.gov, M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, and Duane H. Smith, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Underground injection of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is a common practice in the oil and gas industry and has often been cited as a proven method of sequestering CO 2 (US DOE, 1999). Of all sequestration methods, this is probably the best understood, as carbon dioxide has been used in the oil industry for many years. Additionally, most oil fields have been relatively well characterized geologically, and

399

CX-011452: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11122013 Location(s):...

400

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250C, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment. A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models. This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on Large scale fertilization, has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on patch fertilization discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on model development summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Determining the Effect of Concerted Elimination Reactions in the Pyrolysis of Lignin Using Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin pyrolysis is a significant impediment in forming liquid fuel from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at a higher temperature than other biomass components (ie cellulose, hemicellulose) and tends to form radicals which lead to cross linking and ultimately char formation. A primary step in advances biomass-to-fuel technology will be to discover mechanisms that can disassemble lignin at lower temperatures and depolymerize lignin into more stable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin ({beta}-O4, {alpha}-O4, {beta}-{beta}, {beta}-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to the usually-assumed bond homolysis reactions, we have investigated a variety of concerted elimination pathways that will tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

Robichaud, D.; Clark, J.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

Collaboration/ University of California, Berkeley; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Exchange rate determination: market models and empirical evidence for the 1990-2000 period from emerging financial markets the case of Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to test, empirically, the well known financial and economic exchange rate models to examine the exchange rate behaviour and its determinants in Indonesia, a number of econometric methods are used. Univariate time series models like exponential smoothing and autoregressive integrated moving average models, as well as the Augmented Dickey-Fueller method are used. In general, the Monetary model has been the preferred model since the end of the Breton Woods period. On the contrary, with the PPP model, there are many reasons why deviations from PPP happen. However, empirical tests of the well known financial and economic exchange rate models in this paper show that neither the monetary model nor the PPP model can explain the exchange rate behaviour and its determinants in Indonesia.

M. Rusydi; Sardar M.N. Islam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Model-independent determination of the magnetic radius of the proton from spectroscopy of ordinary and muonic hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To date the magnetic radius of the proton has been determined only by means of electron-proton scattering, which is not free of controversies. Any existing atomic determinations are irrelevant because they are strongly model-dependent. We consider a so-called Zemach contribution to the hyperfine interval in ordinary and muonic hydrogen and derive a self-consistent model-independent value of the magnetic radius of the proton. More accurately, we constrain not a value of the magnetic radius by itself, but its certain combination with the electric-charge radius of the proton, namely, R_E^2+R_M^2. The result from the ordinary hydrogen is found to be R_E^2+R_M^2=1.35(12) fm^2, while the derived muonic value is 1.49(18) fm^2. That allows us to constrain the value of the magnetic radius of proton R_M=0.78(8) fm at the 10% level.

Karshenboim, Savely G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Theory of Toeplitz Determinants and the Spin Correlations of the Two-Dimensional Ising Model. IV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the rectangular Ising model on a half-plane of infinite extent and study some of the consequences connected with the presence of the boundary. Only the spins on the boundary row are allowed to interact with a magnetic field H. The method of Pfaffians is employed to obtain exact expressions for the partition function. It is found that the free energy is the sum of two terms, one of which is independent of H and proportional to the total number of lattice sites, while the other depends on H and is proportional to the number of lattice sites on the boundary. This separation makes it possible to define various thermodynamic quantities associated with the boundary. In particular, the boundary magnetization is shown to be discontinuous, in the ferromagnetic case, at zero magnetic field for temperatures below the bulk critical temperature Tc. This discontinuity, which is the spontaneous boundary magnetization, goes to zero as (1-TTc)12 as T?Tc-. For T=Tc, the discontinuity is of course absent, and the boundary magnetization behaves as -HlnH for small H. The boundary susceptibility at zero magnetic field in the ferromagnetic case exhibits a logarithmic singularity at T=Tc, both above and below transition. An interesting feature is that the ferromagnetic boundary magnetization, although discontinuous for T

Barry M. McCoy and Tai Tsun Wu

1967-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Texas Texas Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Texas. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010911: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane-Absorption Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 16, 2013 CX-010976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical-Mechanical (THCM) Coupled Model for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments: Data Analysis and Design of New Field Experiments CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 16, 2013 CX-010972: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Clean Start" - Development of a National Liquid Propane (Autogas)

408

Evaluation of Preindustrial to Present-day Black Carbon and its Albedo Forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against the observations including 12 ice core records, a long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using the NCAR Community Land and Sea-Ice model 4 with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000, which includes the SNICAR BC-snow model. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations to using recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to the differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology among models; 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However,models agree well on 2.5~3 times increase in the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day, which matches with the 2.5 times increase in BC emissions. We find a large model diversity at both NH and SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfrauch and Ispra. However, the models fail to capture the Arctic BC seasonality due tosevere underestimations during winter and spring. Compared to recent snowpack measurements, the simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of observations except for Greenland and Arctic Ocean. However, model and observation differ widely due to missing interannual variations in emissions and possibly due to the choice of the prescribed meteorology period (i.e., 1996-2000).

Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, Drew; Berntsen, T.; Bisiauxs, M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; McConnell, J.R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and NCAR in the development of a comprehensive, earth systems model. This model incorporates the most-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well. Our collaborators in climate research include the National Center

411

Determinating the influence of different PM10 sources on air quality in Ljubljana basin with CALPUFF dispersion model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ljubljana has an unfavourable geographical location in the basin, almost entirely surrounded by high hills. Winds in the basin are often weak and situations with temperature inversion are very frequent, therefore, many PM10 daily limit value exceedances were observed in 2011. The Directive 2008/50/EC (EU, 2008) requires member states to adjust or provide new air quality plans in order to comply with air quality standards for over-polluted area in near future. This is why it is necessary to provide the action plan for PM10 pollution reduction in Ljubljana. Firstly, it is important to determine the sources of PM10 particles and its spatial distribution. In the present study traffic emissions as the major local emission source were estimated with the NEMO pollution model. The map of important point sources in Ljubljana was prepared as well as emissions from these sources were estimated. This detailed emissions database was then introduced into the CALPUFF/CALMET modelling system coupled with the meso-scale meteorological model ALADIN.

Matic Ivančič; Rudi Vončina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Calculating carbon nanotubecatalyst adhesion strengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density-functional theory is used to assess the validity of modeling metal clusters as single atoms or rings of atoms when determining adhesion strengths between clusters and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Representing a cluster by a single atom or ring gives the correct trends in SWNT-cluster adhesion strengths (Fe?Co>Ni), but the single-atom model yields incorrect minimum-energy structures for all three metals. We have found that this is because of directional bonding between the SWNT end and the metal cluster, which is captured in the ring model but not by the single atom. Hence, pairwise potential models that do not describe directional bonding correctly, and which are commonly used to study these systems, are expected to give incorrect minimum-energy structures.

Peter Larsson; J. Andreas Larsson; Rajeev Ahuja; Feng Ding; Boris I. Yakobson; Haiming Duan; Arne Rosn; Kim Bolton

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Selection of coals of different maturities for CO2 Storage by modelling of CH4 and CO2 adsorption isotherms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study is to compare and model pure gas sorption isotherms (CO2 and CH4) for well-characterised coals of different maturities to determine the most suitable coal for CO2 storage. Carbon dioxide and methane; Coals; Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption; Modelling isotherms 1. Introduction CO2 is a greenhouse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

414

A conceptual model of the roles of price, quality, and intermediary constructs in determining behavioral intention to visit a festival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model 1???????.... 96 The Second Revised Structural Model 1??????? 99 The Final Revised Structural Model 1???????... 102 Initial Structural Model 2????????????... 106 The Revised Structural Model 2??????????. 109... The Initial Structural Model 2?...???????????... 105 FIGURE 12 The Revised Structural Model 2????????????... 108 FIGURE 13 Final Structural Model and Standardized Parameter Estimates of Model 1??????????????.?????.?.. 115 FIGURE 14 Final...

Lee, So Yon

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

416

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A broad review of the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes is presented. Particular emphasis is given to ... dimensional density of states predicted for single-wall nanotubes of small diameter. The eviden...

M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Dresselhaus

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

418

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

419

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 26, 2012 June 26, 2012 CX-008441: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir (Task 17 - Office Work) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/26/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 26, 2012 CX-008439: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir (Task 17 - Borehole) CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.13, B3.1, B3.7 Date: 06/26/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 25, 2012 CX-008570: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program Formula Grant for the State of Utah CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office

420

CX-001190: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001190: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a Reaction Transport Model that Couples Chemical Reactions of Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation with Spatial and Temporal Flow Variations in Carbon Dioxide/Brine/Rock Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/21/2010 Location(s): Minneapolis, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The University of Minnesota would develop a model for chemical interactions between super-critical carbon dioxide and enhanced geothermal system (EGS) reservoir rocks and their effects on modifications of pore space geometries and related reservoir rock porosity and permeability owing to mineral

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421

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SS 304 was encapsulated with thin layers of Co-Ni by an electroless deposition process. The corrosion behavior of SS304 and Co-Ni-SS304 was investigated in molten carbonate under cathode gas atmosphere with electrochemical and surface characterization tools. Surface modification of SS304 reduced the dissolution of chromium and nickel into the molten carbonate melt. Composition of the corrosion scale formed in case of Co-Ni-SS304 is different from SS304 and shows the presence of Co and Ni oxides while the latter shows the presence of lithium ferrite. Polarization resistance for oxygen reduction reaction and conductivity of corrosion values for the corrosion scales were obtained using impedance analysis and current-potential plots. The results indicated lower polarization resistance for oxygen reduction reaction in the case of Co-Ni-SS304 when compared to SS304. Also, the conductivity of the corrosion scales was considerably higher in case of Co-Ni-SS304 than the SS304. This study shows that modifying the current collector surface with Co-Ni coatings leads to the formation of oxide scales with improved barrier properties and electronic conductivity.

Dr. Ralph E. White

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications CX-009154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview Carbon Fiber Technology...

423

WTP Calculation Sheet: Determining the LAW Glass Former Constituents and Amounts for G2 and Acm Models. 24590-LAW-M4C-LFP-00002, Rev. B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to determine the LAW glass former recipe and additives with their respective amounts. The methodology and equations contained herein are to be used in the G2 and ACM models until better information is supplied by R&T efforts. This revision includes calculations that determines the mass and volume of the bulk chemicals/minerals needed per batch. Plus, it contains calculations (for the G2 model) to help prevent overflow in LAW Feed Preparation Vessel.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

Houze, Jr., Robert A. [University of Washington Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Monte Carlo Approach To Generator Portfolio Planning And Carbon Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monte Carlo Approach To Generator Portfolio Planning And Carbon Emissions Monte Carlo Approach To Generator Portfolio Planning And Carbon Emissions Assessments Of Systems With Large Penetrations Of Variable Renewables Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Monte Carlo Approach To Generator Portfolio Planning And Carbon Emissions Assessments Of Systems With Large Penetrations Of Variable Renewables Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A new generator portfolio planning model is described that is capable of quantifying the carbon emissions associated with systems that include very high penetrations of variable renewables. The model combines a deterministic renewable portfolio planning module with a Monte Carlo simulation of system operation that determines the expected least-cost

426

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part I: Control climate and flux adjustment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control integration with respect to climate drift is assessed, and aspects of the model climatology relevant to the simulation of climate change are discussed. The observed variation of oceanic temperature with latitude and depth is basically well simulated, although, in common with other ocean models, the main thermocline is too diffuse. Nevertheless, it is found that large heat and water flux adjustments must be added to the surface layer of the ocean in order to prevent the occurrence of unacceptable climate drift. The ocean model appears to achieve insufficient meridional heat transport, and this is supported by the pattern of the heat flux adjustment term, although errors in the simulated atmosphere-ocean heat flux also contribute to the latter. The application of the flux adjustments restricts climate drift during the 75-year control experiment. However, a gradual warming still occurs in the surface layers of the Southern Ocean because the flux adjustments are inserted as additive terms in this integration and cannot therefore be guaranteed to prevent climate drift completely. 68 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, J.M. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Convergence behavior of carbon dioxide emissions in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In view of global warming, the concept of a low carbon world economy has been brought to center stage. In this paper, a systematical empirical investigation of the convergence behavior of carbon dioxide emissions in China is conducted based on provincial data for the period of 19952011. Using the log t test developed by Phillips and Sul (2007), evident divergence at the country level and convergence to three steady state equilibriums at provincial level was identified. Furthermore, estimates from the ordered logit model uncover important determinants underlying the formation of clubs, including the per capita GDP, energy consumption structure, energy intensity, and initial levels of economic development. The results from this study contribute to a more in-depth understanding of the carbon dioxide emissions status quo in China and serves as reference when launching region-based emissions mitigation policies.

Yiming Wang; Pei Zhang; Dake Huang; Changda Cai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Success Stories: Carbon Explorer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LBNL Device Monitors Ocean Carbon LBNL Device Monitors Ocean Carbon Imagine waking up each morning and discovering that twenty percent of all plants in your garden had disappeared over night. They had been eaten. Equally astonishing would be the discovery in the afternoon that new plants had taken their place. This is the norm of life in the ocean. Without the ability to accurately observe these daily changes in ocean life cycles, over vast spatial scales, we lack the ability to predict how the ocean will respond to rising CO2 levels, crippling our ability to develop accurate models of global warming or devise strategies to prevent it. The Carbon Explorer, conceived by Berkeley Lab's James K. Bishop in collaboration with Scripps Institution of Oceanography (La Jolla, California) and WET labs, Inc. (Philomath, Oregon), bridges this

431

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Historical warming reduced due to enhanced land carbon uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...JP ( 2012 ) ESM2 global coupled climate-carbon Earth System Models Part II: Carbon system formulation and baseline simulation...emissions and airborne fraction simulated by CMIP5 Earth System models under 4 representative concentration pathways. J...

Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev; John P. Krasting; George C. Hurtt; Stephen W. Pacala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

434

CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

435

CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

436

CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

437

CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

438

CX-012279: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-012279: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vertically Aligned Carbon-Nanotubes Embedded in Ceramic Matrices for Hot Electrode Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

439

CX-011443: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Sorbent Based Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Slipstream Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11132013 Location(s): Alabama...

440

CX-011441: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Sorbent Based Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Slipstream Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11132013 Location(s): Colorado...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CX-011442: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Sorbent Based Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Slipstream Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11132013 Location(s): Colorado...

442

CX-002497: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Capitalizing on Carbon Dioxide Storage in Lignite Coal: Biological In Situ Methane Production CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06022010...

443

CX-010641: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 06272013 Location(s): California Offices(s):...

444

CX-011293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 10242013 Location(s): California Offices(s):...

445

CX-010896: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 06272013...

446

CX-011292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 10242013 Location(s): California Offices(s):...

447

CX-002644: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-002644: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photoactive, Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Porous Structures for Photocatalytic Carbon Dioxide Reduction CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

448

Consequences of Considering CarbonNitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of carbonnitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems on the interaction between the carbon cycle and climate is studied using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM). Numerical ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo; Benjamin S. Felzer; C. Adam Schlosser; Timothy W. Cronin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project modelprojects are supported by the European Commission Directorate General XII Environment, Climate

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Changes in carbon sink value based on RS and GIS in the Heidaigou opencast coal mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The determination of carbon sink value is primarily confined to forest and farmland carbon sinks. Wang and Feng (2000) analyzed Chinas ecosystem carbon storage, Zhou et al. (2000) estimated Chinas forest ecosys...

Jinman Wang; Zezhen Jiao; Zhongke Bai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

455

Building A Simulation Model For The Prediction Of Temperature Distribution In Pulsed Laser Spot Welding Of Dissimilar Low Carbon Steel 1020 To Aluminum Alloy 6061  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a computer model used to analyze the heat flow during pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot welding of dissimilar metal; low carbon steel (1020) to aluminum alloy (6061). The model is built using ANSYS FLUENT 3.6 software where almost all the environments simulated to be similar to the experimental environments. A simulation analysis was implemented based on conduction heat transfer out of the key hole where no melting occurs. The effect of laser power and pulse duration was studied.Three peak powers 1, 1.66 and 2.5 kW were varied during pulsed laser spot welding (keeping the energy constant), also the effect of two pulse durations 4 and 8 ms (with constant peak power), on the transient temperature distribution and weld pool dimension were predicated using the present simulation. It was found that the present simulation model can give an indication for choosing the suitable laser parameters (i.e. pulse durations, peak power and interaction time required) during pulsed laser spot welding of dissimilar metals.

Yousef, Adel K. M. [Faculty of Engineering , University of Diyala, Diyala-Baqouba (Iraq); Taha, Ziad A.; Shehab, Abeer A. [Institute of laser for postgraduate studies, Baghdad University, Baghdad (Iraq)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

456

Analysis of mid-tropospheric carbon monoxide data using a three- dimensional Global atmospheric Chemistry numerical Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GChM atmospheric chemistry and transport model has been used to analyze the mid-tropospheric CO dataset obtained from NASA`s Measurement of Air Pollution by Satellites (MAPS) program. Fourteen simulations with a 3.75 horizontal resolution have been performed, including a base case and 13 sensitivity runs. The model reproduces many, but not all, of the major features of the MAPS dataset. Locations of peak CO mixing ratios associated with biomass burning as observed in the MAPS experiment are slightly farther south than the model result, indicating either greater horizontal transport than present in the model representation or a spatial difference between the location of modeled biomass fires and actual fires. The current version of GChM was shown to be relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the prescribed NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} global distributions and very insensitive to the depth of the mixed layer as parameterized in the model. Cloud convective transport was shown to play an important role in venting boundary layer CO to the free troposphere. This result agrees with prior meteorological analyses of the MAPS dataset that have-indirectly inferred the presence of convective activity through satellite-based information. Work is continuing to analyze the results of these simulations further and to perform more detailed comparisons between model results and MAPS data.

Easter, R.C.; Saylor, R.D.; Chapman, E.G.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Three Dimensional CFD Model of a Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell for Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon-Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE). A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. An experimental study is also being performed at the INL to assess the SOE. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and syn-gas production over a range of stack operating conditions. Typical results of current density versus cell potential, cell current versus H2 and CO production, temperature, and voltage potential are all presented within this paper. Plots of mole fraction of CO2, CO, H2, H2O, O2, are presented. Currently there is strong interest in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. This process takes the carbon-neutral approach where the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere does not increase. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $70 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis or thermochemical processes, using high-temperature nuclear process heat. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (~850C). High-temperature electrolytic CO2 and water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce syn-gas with an overall system efficiency near those of the thermochemical processes. Specifically, a high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to

G. Hawkes; J. O'Brien; C. Stoots; S. Herring; R. Jones

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Response of a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled oceanatmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Natural materials for carbon capture.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

Myshakin, Evgeniy M. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

NPP and the Global Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Global Carbon Cycle the Global Carbon Cycle Introduction Photosynthetic carbon fixation comprises a major component of the global carbon cycle. Data on net primary productivity (NPP) may be sparse, but a consistent NPP data set may be used to calibrate, parameterize and evaluate models of terrestrial carbon cycling, as well as for validation of remote sensing data and other applications (identifying trends, investigating biogeochemical processes, etc.). It is also useful to place such data within the context of carbon cycling and carbon storage worldwide. For example: How much carbon exists in the biosphere, and where exactly is it stored? How much is in fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), and how large are current fossil-fuel emissions? How much is in living biomass (plants/ animals/ humans)?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination modeling carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Relationship between industrial firms, high-carbon and low-carbon energy: An agent-based simulation approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the present research is to describe an agent-based computational model that simulates the relationship between industrial firms and high-carbon and low-carbon energy. A set of behavioral rules for each agent involved was formalized in the ... Keywords: Agent-based simulation, High-carbon energy, Industrial firms, Low-carbon energy

Yong Liu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

All carbon nanotubes are not created equal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter presents the various factors that enter into consideration when choosing the source of carbon nanotubes for a specific application. Carbon nanotubes are giant molecules made of pure carbon. They have captured the imagination of the scientific community by the unique structure that provides superior physical, chemical, and electrical properties. However, a surprisingly wide disparity exists between the intrinsic properties determined under ideal conditions and the properties that carbon nanotubes exhibit in real world situations. The lack of uniformity in carbon nanotube properties is likely to be the main obstacle holding back the development of carbon nanotube applications. This tutorial addresses the nonuniformity of carbon nanotube properties from the synthesis standpoint. This synthesis-related nonuniformity is on top of the intrinsic chirality distribution that gives the ~1:2 ratio of metallic to semiconducting nanotubes. From the standpoint of carbon bonding chemistry the variation in the quality and reproducibility of carbon nanotube materials is not unexpected. It is an intrinsic feature that is related to the metastability of carbon structures. The extent to which this effect is manifested in carbon nanotube formation is governed by the type and the kinetics of the carbon nanotube synthesis reaction. Addressing this variation is critical if nanotubes are to live up to the potential already demonstrated by their phenomenal physical properties.

Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22, 2010 22, 2010 CX-000737: Categorical Exclusion Determination Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Ithaca, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 22, 2010 CX-000739: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization of the Highest-Priority Geologic Formations for Carbon Dioxide storage in Wyoming CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 21, 2010 CX-002154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: DeepCwind Consortium National Research Program: Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures

464

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

465

Impurity screening in carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanotube geometry determines electronic structure and thus impurity screening. A metallic carbon nanotube could effectively screen a charged impurity, while a semiconducting carbon nanotube could not. The ability to screen a long-range Coulomb field is mainly determined by whether there are free carriers in the subbands nearest the Fermi level. The detailed screening properties are sensitive to the impurity position, and the tubular structure (such as radius and chiral angle). Strong, short-wavelength Friedel oscillations at long distances are found to exist only in metallic armchair nanotubes. They are relatively obvious for a smaller armchair nanotube, and could survive at room temperature.

M. F. Lin and D. S. Chuu

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low t Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Exploiting intermittent be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear generation, with intermittent renewable sources providing

Kammen, Daniel M.

467

Thermoelectric power in carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical results for the temperature dependence of the thermoelectric power of graphite and semimetal carbon nanotubes are reported. In the calculations, the cylindrical superatomic range structure of nanotubes is taken into account. The Boltzmann equation and the {pi}-electron model of semimetal carbon nanotubes are used. The basic parameters of the calculation are the concentration of electrons, the Fermi energy, and the energy of the local level associated with the cylindrical structure of carbon nanotubes. The theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data.

Mavrinskiy, A. V., E-mail: mavrinsky@gmail.com; Baitinger, E. M. [Chelyabinsk State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Agency/Company /Organization: Sandbag Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Industry, Solar, Wind Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: sandbag.org.uk/carbondata/cers Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Screenshot References: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map[1] Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a massive issue and personal actions like switching off lights and unplugging televisions can feel like small contributions. Background "Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a

469

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from f