National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination low-cost integrated

  1. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low ...

  2. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficient, scalable, and low cost vehicular thermoelectric generators development will ... More Documents & Publications An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low ...

  3. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles | Department of Energy Efficient, scalable, and low cost vehicular thermoelectric generators development will include rapid synthesis of thermoelectric materials, different device geometries, heat sink designs, and durability and long-term performance tests PDF icon huxtable.pdf More Documents & Publications An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles

  4. R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with ...

  5. Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Subhendu Guha; Dr. Jeff Yang

    2012-05-25

    The goal of the program is to develop 'LOW COST THIN FILM BUILDING-INTEGRATED PV SYSTEMS'. Major focus was on developing low cost solution for the commercial BIPV and rooftop PV market and meet DOE LCOE goal for the commercial market segment of 9-12 cents/kWh for 2010 and 6-8 cents/kWh for 2015. We achieved the 2010 goal and were on track to achieve the 2015 goal. The program consists of five major tasks: (1) modules; (2) inverters and BOS; (3) systems engineering and integration; (4) deployment; and (5) project management and TPP collaborative activities. We successfully crossed all stage gates and surpassed all milestones. We proudly achieved world record stable efficiencies in small area cells (12.56% for 1cm2) and large area encapsulated modules (11.3% for 800 cm2) using a triple-junction amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon/nanocrystalline silicon structure, confirmed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. We collaborated with two inverter companies, Solectria and PV Powered, and significantly reduced inverter cost. We collaborated with three universities (Syracuse University, University of Oregon, and Colorado School of Mines) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and improved understanding on nanocrystalline material properties and light trapping techniques. We jointly published 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals and International Conference Proceedings. We installed two 75kW roof-top systems, one in Florida and another in New Jersey demonstrating innovative designs. The systems performed satisfactorily meeting/exceeding estimated kWh/kW performance. The 50/50 cost shared program was a great success and received excellent comments from DOE Manager and Technical Monitor in the Final Review.

  6. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle ... NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: High-Performance ... approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost ...

  7. Recovery Act: Low Cost Integrated Substrate for OLED Lighting Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Benton; Abhinav Bhandari

    2012-09-30

    PPG pursued the development of an integrated substrate, including the anode, external, and internal extraction layers. The objective of PPG??s program was to achieve cost reductions by displacing the existing expensive borosilicate or double-side polished float glass substrates and developing alternative electrodes and scalable light extraction layer technologies through focused and short-term applied research. One of the key highlights of the project was proving the feasibility of using PPG??s high transmission Solarphire® float glass as a substrate to consistently achieve organic lightemitting diode (OLED) devices with good performance and high yields. Under this program, four low-cost alternatives to the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) anode were investigated using pilot-scale magnetron sputtered vacuum deposition (MSVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technologies. The anodes were evaluated by fabricating small and large phosphorescent organic lightemitting diode (PHOLED) devices at Universal Display Corporation (UDC). The device performance and life-times comparable to commercially available ITO anodes were demonstrated. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to down-select two anodes for further low-cost process development. Additionally, PPG developed and evaluated a number of scalable and compatible internal and external extraction layer concepts such as scattering layers on the outside of the glass substrate or between the transparent anode and the glass interface. In one external extraction layer (EEL) approach, sol-gel sprayed pyrolytic coatings were deposited using lab scale equipment by hand or automated spraying of sol-gel solutions on hot glass, followed by optimizing of scattering with minimal absorption. In another EEL approach, PPG tested large-area glass texturing by scratching a glass surface with an abrasive roller and acid etching. Efficacy enhancements of 1.27x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for 2.0mm substrates which are at par with the standard diffuser sheets used by OLED manufacturers. For an internal extraction layer (IEL), PPG tested two concepts combining nanoparticles either in a solgel coating inserted between the anode and OLED or anode and glass interface, or incorporated into the internal surface of the glass. Efficacy enhancements of 1.31x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for the IEL by itself and factors of 1.73x were attained for an IEL in combination of thick acrylic block as an EEL. Recent offline measurements indicate that, with further optimization, factors over 2.0x could be achieved through an IEL alone.

  8. Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a new low-cost, high-efficiency LED architecture made possible by novel large-area ... Related Publications PDF icon 2015 BTO Peer Review Presentation - Print-based ...

  9. Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (L3) Integrated Optimized * Electronics (PCB, Driver, LED's) * Heatsink * Housing * Optics On Track to meet Project End Goal Next Steps Equipment readiness , Process validation, ...

  10. PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Research & Development » R&D Highlights » PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate With the help of DOE funding, PPG Industries, Inc., has developed a low-cost OLED substrate, using inexpensive soda-lime "float" glass that the company manufactures at high volume for the architectural industry. Float glass is thin sheet glass and is much less expensive than the borosilicate or

  11. Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance SSL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luminaires | Department of Energy Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance SSL Luminaires Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance SSL Luminaires Lead Performer: Eaton Corporation - Menomonee Falls, WI Partners: - Heraeus Materials Technology, LLC - Conshohocken, PA - Haiku Tech, Inc - Miami, FL - Eaton Cooper Lighting Innovation Center - Peachtree City, GA DOE Total Funding: $2,468,672 Cost Share: $2,468,676 Project Term: 9/15/2013 -

  12. R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling | Department of Energy R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling Lead Performer: MicroContinuum, Inc. - Cambridge, MA DOE Total Funding: $1,149,037 Project Term: April 6, 2015 - April 5, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 1 SBIR

  13. Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PET Power Distribution System | Department of Energy High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a PET Power Distribution System Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a PET Power Distribution System Lead Performer: VoltServer Inc. - East Greenwich, RI DOE Total Funding: $999,122 Project Term: July 28, 2015 - July 27, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 2 SBIR Awards PROJECT OBJECTIVE This project will demonstrate a novel

  14. Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packet Energy Transfer (PET) power-supply design that improved conversion efficiency to ... Lighting Pedestrian Areas Daylighting Digital Dimmer R2R Production of Low-Cost ...

  15. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficient, scalable, and low cost vehicular thermoelectric generators development will include rapid synthesis of thermoelectric materials, different device geometries, heat sink designs, and durability and long-term performance tests

  16. EATON PURSUES PRINT-BASED MANUFACTURING OF INTEGRATED, LOW-COST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    number of configurations that are competitive with the most robust LED luminaire products. ... could reduce the integrated light engine price from 50klm at the project's inception to ...

  17. Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Progress report 14, August 1979-December 1979 and proceedings of the 14th Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period August through November 1979, is described. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area sheet silicon, and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations, and the steps taken to integrate these efforts are detailed. A report on the Project Integration Meeting held December 5-6, 1979, including copies of the visual materials used, is presented.

  18. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on low cost, durable seals, was given by George Roberts of UTC Power at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

  19. Low-cost integrated teamwork and seismic monitoring improved reservoir management of Norwegian gas reservoir with active water drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinde, P.; Blanche, J.P.; Schnapper, D.B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows how new techniques, using integrated seismic and reservoir modelling, have shown there is no need to drill two previously proposed additional need to drill two previously proposed additional producers on the Heimdal gas field. Older simulations had shown this to be necessary in order to recover locally trapped gas. The study emphasizes the necessity of close team work to obtain the detailed reservoir description needed for such a study. A multidisciplinary team of geologists, geophysicists and reservoir specialists performed this study to reappraise the Heimdal Field. Using seismic attributes from 3D (mainly 2D amplitude versus offset AVO) a detailed structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation provided the geometrical basis for the field model. A heterogenetic approach (identifying potential flow barriers) to detailed geology was then applied using regional experience and detailed field data including the production characteristics. The resulting reservoir model also incorporated offset fields on common regional aquifers, to properly monitor and predict the dynamic pressure behavior and aquifer energy in this series of connecting, Paleocene, turbiditic sands. Two repetitive seismic campaigns have been acquired since the pre-production 3D seismic survey. Mapping of the water encroachment was accomplished using advanced interpretation techniques of 2D AVO and inversion. The results have been integrated into the dynamic matching process in the reservoir simulation.

  20. Development of a low-cost integrated 20-kW-AC solar tracking subarray for grid-connected PV power system applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, M.; Duran, G.; Fourer, G.; Mackamul, K.; Whalen, W.; Loo, M. van; West, R.

    1998-06-01

    This report chronicles Utility Power Group's (UPG) successful two-year Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Phase 4A1 work effort which began in July, 1995. During this period, UPG completed design, fabrication, testing and demonstration of a modular and fully integrated 15-kW-ac, solar tracking PV power system sub-array. The two key and innovative components which were developed are a Modular Panel which optimizes factory assembly of PV modules into a large area, field-deployable, structurally-integrated PV panel, and an Integrated Power Processing Unit which combines all dc and ac power collection, conversion and control functions within a single, field-deployable structurally-integrated electrical enclosure. These two key sub-array elements, when combined with a number of other electrical, mechanical, and structural components, create a low-cost and high-performance PV power system. This system, or sub-array, can be deployed in individual units, or paralleled with any number of other sub-arrays, to construct multi-megawatt P fields. 21 figs.

  1. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  2. Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    components and associated control system Design, integrate, and test a low-cost concentrator Analyze the system's cost to demonstrate achieving the 75m2 collector system target. ...

  3. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

    2009-10-16

    A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost models assume a natural gas cost of $5/MMBtu (HHV). Praxair has, in Phases I and II of this program, shown that significant improvements in cost, plant layout, system integration and overall system optimization are achievable. Phase III of the program, submitted in January 2007, was to focus on demonstrating both the technical feasibility and economic viability of the design developed in Phases I and II through a full-scale prototype design, construction, installation, analysis and operation at a hydrogen fueling station. Due to funding limitations, Phase III of the program was not approved by the DOE.

  4. Low cost back contact heterojunction solar cells on thin c-Si wafers. integrating laser and thin film processing for improved manufacturability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegedus, Steven S.

    2015-09-08

    An interdigitated back contact (IBC) Si wafer solar cell with deposited a-Si heterojunction (HJ) emitter and contacts is considered the ultimate single junction Si solar cell design. This was confirmed in 2014 by both Panasonic and Sharp Solar producing IBC-HJ cells breaking the previous record Si solar cell efficiency of 25%. But manufacturability at low cost is a concern for the complex IBC-HJ device structure. In this research program, our goals were to addressed the broad industry need for a high-efficiency c-Si cell that overcomes the dominant module cost barriers by 1) developing thin Si wafers synthesized by innovative, kerfless techniques; 2) integrating laser-based processing into most aspects of solar cell fabrication, ensuring high speed and low thermal budgets ; 3) developing an all back contact cell structure compatible with thin wafers using a simplified, low-temperature fabrication process; and 4) designing the contact patterning to enable simplified module assembly. There were a number of significant achievements from this 3 year program. Regarding the front surface, we developed and applied new method to characterize critical interface recombination parameters including interface defect density Dit and hole and electron capture cross-section for use as input for 2D simulation of the IBC cell to guide design and loss analysis. We optimized the antireflection and passivation properties of the front surface texture and a-Si/a-SiN/a-SiC stack depositions to obtain a very low (< 6 mA/cm2) front surface optical losses (reflection and absorption) while maintaining excellent surface passivation (SRV<5 cm/s). We worked with kerfless wafer manufacturers to apply defect-engineering techniques to improve bulk minority-carrier lifetime of thin kerfless wafers by both reducing initial impurities during growth and developing post-growth gettering techniques. This led insights about the kinetics of nickel, chromium, and dislocations in PV-grade silicon and to achieving millisecond lifetimes in kerfless silicon materials. Laser fired contacts to n-Si were developed for the first time using a Al/Sb/Ti metal stack giving contact resistances < 5 mOhm-cm2 when fired through several different dielectric layers. A new 2 step laser+chemical etch isolation technique was developed using a sacrificial top coating which avoids laser damage to Si passivation. Regarding the heterojunction emitter, analysis of front FHJ (1D) and IBC (2D) cells with range of p-layer conditions found that a 2-stage high/low doped p-layer was optimum: the low doped region has lower defects giving higher Voc and the high doped region gave a better contact to the metal. A significant effort was spent studying the patterning process and its contribution to degradation of passivation and reproducibility. Several promising new cleaning, contact and deposition patterning and processing approaches were implemented leading to fabrication of several runs with cells having 19-20% efficiency which were stable over several months. This program resulted in the training and support of 12 graduate students, publication of 21 journal papers and 14 conference papers.

  5. Low cost back contact heterojunction solar cells on thin c-Si wafers. Integrating laser and thin film processing for improved manufacturability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegedus, Steven S.

    2015-09-08

    An interdigitated back contact (IBC) Si wafer solar cell with deposited a-Si heterojunction (HJ) emitter and contacts is considered the ultimate single junction Si solar cell design. This was confirmed in 2014 by both Panasonic and Sharp Solar producing IBC-HJ cells breaking the previous record Si solar cell efficiency of 25%. But manufacturability at low cost is a concern for the complex IBC-HJ device structure. In this research program, our goals were to addressed the broad industry need for a high-efficiency c-Si cell that overcomes the dominant module cost barriers by 1) developing thin Si wafers synthesized by innovative, kerfless techniques; 2) integrating laser-based processing into most aspects of solar cell fabrication, ensuring high speed and low thermal budgets ; 3) developing an all back contact cell structure compatible with thin wafers using a simplified, low-temperature fabrication process; and 4) designing the contact patterning to enable simplified module assembly. There were a number of significant achievements from this 3 year program. Regarding the front surface, we developed and applied new method to characterize critical interface recombination parameters including interface defect density Dit and hole and electron capture cross-section for use as input for 2D simulation of the IBC cell to guide design and loss analysis. We optimized the antireflection and passivation properties of the front surface texture and a-Si/a-SiN/a-SiC stack depositions to obtain a very low (< 6 mA/cm2) front surface optical losses (reflection and absorption) while maintaining excellent surface passivation (SRV<5 cm/s). We worked with kerfless wafer manufacturers to apply defect-engineering techniques to improve bulk minority-carrier lifetime of thin kerfless wafers by both reducing initial impurities during growth and developing post-growth gettering techniques. This led insights about the kinetics of nickel, chromium, and dislocations in PV-grade silicon and to achieving millisecond lifetimes in kerfless silicon materials. Laser fired contacts to n-Si were developed for the first time using a Al/Sb/Ti metal stack giving contact resistances < 5 mOhm-cm2 when fired through several different dielectric layers. A new 2 step laser+chemical etch isolation technique was developed using a sacrificial top coating which avoids laser damage to Si passivation. Regarding the heterojunction emitter, analysis of front FHJ (1D) and IBC (2D) cells with range of p-layer conditions found that a 2-stage high/low doped p-layer was optimum: the low doped region has lower defects giving higher Voc and the high doped region gave a better contact to the metal. A significant effort was spent studying the patterning process and its contribution to degradation of passivation and reproducibility. Several promising new cleaning, contact and deposition patterning and processing approaches were implemented leading to fabrication of several runs with cells having 19-20% efficiency which were stable over several months. This program resulted in the training and support of 12 graduate students, publication of 21 journal papers and 14 conference papers.

  6. Low-cost inertial measurement unit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deyle, Travis Jay

    2005-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

  7. Novel, Low-Cost Nanoparticle Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    Fact sheet describing a modular hybrid plasma reactor and process to manufacture low-cost nanoparticles

  8. Development of a low cost integrated 15 kW A.C. solar tracking sub-array for grid connected PV power system applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G.

    1997-02-01

    Utility Power Group has achieved a significant reduction in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems. The two part technical approach focused on (1) The utilization of a large area factory assembled PV panel, and (2) The integration and packaging of all sub-array power conversion and control functions within a single factory produced enclosure. Eight engineering prototype 15kW ac single axis solar tracking sub-arrays were designed, fabricated, and installed at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District{close_quote}s Hedge Substation site in 1996 and are being evaluated for performance and reliability. A number of design enhancements will be implemented in 1997 and demonstrated by the field deployment and operation of over twenty advanced sub-array PV power systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

    2008-09-30

    In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW Conesville, Ohio plant and contrasted with the cryogenic air separation option (ASU). Design of a large scale CAR unit was completed to support this techno-economic assessment. Based on the finding that the overall cost potential of the CAR technology compared to cryogenic ASU is nominal at current performance levels and that the risks related to both material and process scale up are still significant, the team recommended not to proceed to Phase 2. CAR process economics continue to look attractive if the original and still 'realistic' target oxygen capacities could be realized in practice. In order to achieve this end, a new fundamental materials development program would be needed. With the effective oxygen capacities of the current CAR materials there is, however, insufficient economic incentive to use this commercially unproven technology in oxy-fuel power plant applications in place of conventional ASUs. In addition, it is now clear that before a larger scale pilot demonstration of the CAR technology is made, a better understanding of the impact of flue-gas impurities on the CAR materials and of thermal transients in the beds is required.

  10. Project Profile: Low-Cost Heliostat Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Heliostat Development Project Profile: Low-Cost Heliostat Development HiTek logo HiTek Services, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is conducting fundamental parametric analyses of the optimum heliostat size and developing a novel low-cost heliostat design. Approach There are four tasks under this award: Photo of a machine with two round discs connected by intertwined chains. Develop a means to determine the optimum size range of the heliostat, in terms of the applied forces and moments,

  11. Low Cost Durable Seal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Durable Seal Low Cost Durable Seal Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 4utc.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  12. Low Cost Heliostat Development | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    blackmon.pdf More Documents & Publications Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY13 Q1 Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY12 Q4 Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - FY13 Q1

  13. Renewable Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Workshop Agenda | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Workshop Agenda Renewable Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Workshop Agenda Renewable Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Workshop Agenda PDF icon carbonfiberworkshopagenda.pdf More ...

  14. Solid State Processing of New Low Cost Titanium Powders Enabling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Processing of New Low Cost Titanium Powders Enabling Affordable Automotive Components Solid State Processing of New Low Cost Titanium Powders Enabling Affordable Automotive ...

  15. Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  16. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report This report outlines the final...

  17. Manufacturing of Monolithic Electrodes from Low-Cost Renewable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Monolithic Electrodes from Low-Cost Renewable Resources Lignin, a low-cost, biomass derived precursor, was selected as an alternative for carbon based free standing...

  18. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrator Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator This fact sheet describes a low-cost, lightweight solar conductor project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating ...

  19. Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector This presentation was delivered at the ...

  20. Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management This presentation, which ...

  1. Low Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management Low Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management Part of a 100 million ...

  2. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report This report outlines the final ...

  3. Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP ...

  4. Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by ...

  5. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-...

  6. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple ...

  7. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

  8. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  9. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  10. Low-Cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ALTEX TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION Low-Cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger DOE Grant DE-EE0004541 2013-2014 Dr. John T. Kelly Altex Technologies Corporation 244 Sobrante Way Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Phone: 408-328-8302 E-mail: john@altextech.com U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office PEER Review Meeting Washington, D.C. May 6-7, 2014 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. ALTEX TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION Project Objectives  Define and test low

  11. Project Profile: High-Concentration, Low-Cost Parabolic Trough...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentration, Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload CSP Project Profile: High-Concentration, Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload CSP SkyFuel logo SkyFuel, under ...

  12. Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  13. The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting Lead Performer: University of California - Los Angeles - Los Angeles, CA Partners: Polyradiant Corp. - Calabasas, CA DOE Total Funding: $612,733 Cost Share: $153,183 Project Term: September 4, 2014 - August 31, 2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project will develop an integrated plastic

  14. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc. | Department of Energy Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain

  15. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An overview of the Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation project to transition Amonix's concentrating photovoltaic (PV) systems from low-volume to high-volume production. PDF icon Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation More Documents & Publications Solar America Initiative Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation

  16. Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epler, John

    2013-08-31

    Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

  17. Final Report- Low Cost, Epitaxial Growth of II-VI Materials for Multijunction Photovoltaic Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multijunction solar cells have theoretical power conversion efficiencies in excess of 29% under one sun illumination and could become a highly disruptive technology if fabricated using low cost processing techniques to epitaxially grow defect tolerant, thin films on silicon. The PLANT PV/Molecular Foundry team studied the feasibility of using cadmium selenide (CdSe) as the wide band-gap, top cell and Si as the bottom cell in monolithically integrated tandem architecture. The greatest challenge in developing tandem solar cells is depositing wide band gap semiconductors that are both highly doped and have minority carrier lifetimes greater than 1 ns. The proposed research was to determine whether it is possible to rapidly grow CdSe films with sufficient minority carrier lifetimes and doping levels required to produce an open-circuit voltage (Voc) greater than 1.1V using close-space sublimation (CSS).

  18. Durable Low Cost Improved Fuel Cell Membranes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Durable Low Cost Improved Fuel Cell Membranes Durable Low Cost Improved Fuel Cell Membranes Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 1_arkema.pdf More Documents & Publications Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

  19. Hot Electron Photovoltaics Using Low Cost Materials and Simple...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hot Electron Photovoltaics Using Low Cost Materials and Simple Cell Design Lawrence ... Similarly, complex cell designs or designs that feature nano-architectures such as quantum ...

  20. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for optimized anode water management Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management A fuel cell ...

  1. Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy ... Return to Search Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs ... gaps will lead to efficient power conversion. ...

  2. Retro-Commissioning Increases Data Center Efficiency at Low Cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site to increase data center energy efficiency at low costs. PDF icon datacentersavannah.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  3. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing Citation Details ... reduce the cost of the tooling (machining and materials) required to create ...

  4. Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Abstract The...

  5. Low Cost Exploration, Testing, and Development of the Chena Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Low Cost Exploration, Testing, and Development of the Chena Geothermal Resource Abstract The...

  6. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    02_warren_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors

  7. A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary Engine SCRDPF ApplicationsData-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition This project describes a novel ...

  8. Utilizing Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost Nanoparticles Chad Duty, Ph.D. ... bacteria Valuable mass produced nanoparticles Cheap sugar 4 Managed by UT-Battelle ...

  9. Low-Cost Electrochemical Compressor Utilizing Green Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrochemical Compressor Utilizing Green Refrigerants for HVAC Applications Low-Cost ... 31, 2017 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation ...

  10. Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion-based Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer ...

  11. Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions for Dynamic Window Material Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material ... More Documents & Publications Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows ...

  12. Low cost bare-plate solar air collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maag, W.L.; Wenzler, C.J.; Rom, F.E.; VanArsdale, D.R.

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a low cost, bare-plate collector, determine its performance for a variety of climatic conditions, analyze the economics of this type of solar collector and evaluate specific applications. Two prototype collectors were designed, fabricated and installed into an instrumented test system. Tests were conducted for a period of five months. Results of the tests showed consistent operating efficiencies of 60% or greater with air preheat temperature uses up to 20/sup 0/F for one of the prototypes. The economic analyses indicated that an installed cost of between $5 and $10 per square foot would make this type of solar system economically viable. For the materials of construction and the type of fabrication and installation perceived, these costs for the bare-plate solar collector are believed to be attainable. Specific applications for preheating ventilation air for schools were evaluated and judged to be economically viable.

  13. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators

  14. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  15. Efficient, Low-cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Efficient, Low-cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger ... will not only be much more efficient, but will also be manufactured at a much lower cost. ...

  16. low-cost-sorbent | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005497 TDA sorbent test equipment TDA sorbent test equipment. TDA ...

  17. Low-Cost Electrochemical Compressor Utilizing Green Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Milestones: 1. Test Novel (low cost) Membrane systems 2. Develop Advanced MEA based on Membranes 3. Design and build prototype ECC system for testing 4. Design and build ...

  18. Bio-oil Upgrading with Novel Low Cost Catalysts Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Bio-oil Upgrading with Novel Low Cost Catalysts March 24, 2015 Bio-oil Technology Area Review Jae-Soon Choi Oak Ridge National ...

  19. Low-Cost LED Luminaire for General Illumination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    paulfini@cree.com CREE SBTC Low-Cost LED Luminaire for General Illumination 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Paul Fini CREE Santa Barbara Technology Center 2 Project ...

  20. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for mass production and that produces high adhesive strength of the ceramic-metal interfaces. Consider the fabrication and use of low-cost AlN as a potential (and...

  1. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, A.

    1999-03-02

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value. 2 figs.

  2. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, Arun

    1999-01-01

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

  3. Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist prepares slot die coater for solution based deposition of electrochromic layer. Image: Heliotrope Technologies 2 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist investigates the coating quality of a slot die deposition of electrochromic layer. Image: Heliotrope Technologies 3 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist investigates the spray coater for a solution based deposition of electrochromic

  4. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation | Department of Energy Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple and cost-effective ventilation strategies for homes. As high-performance homes get more air tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research by Building Science Corporation to develop

  5. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Manufacturing (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing The purpose of the proposed project between Cummins and ORNL is to significantly reduce the cost of the tooling (machining and materials) required to create injection molds to make plastic components. Presently, the high cost of this

  6. Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks | Department of Energy Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks Lead Performer: Case Western Reserve University - Cleveland, OH Partner: Intwine Inc. - Cleveland, OH DOE Funding: $750,000 Cost Share: N/A Project Term: October 2014 - September 2016 Funding

  7. Testing of a low-cost item monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, D.J.; Cunningham, K.R.; Hoover, C.E.; Trujillo, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Material control is an important element of any security system which seeks to address the insider threat. Sandia has developed Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling (WATCH) which is a remote sensor system that provides a low-cost, convenient way of monitoring item movement. Rockwell International/Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and Sandia have conducted a long-term evaluation of the WATCH system in an operating production facility. Testing was conducted in a large scale, remote access storage vault for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). A total of fourteen WATCH units were placed on storage containers in the vault. A schedule was established which provided prearranged movement of monitored containers on a regular basis. The test objectives were to determine (1) the feasibility of using the WATCH system technology to implement material control concepts, (2) the system performance in an active production area, and high radiation environment, (3) the sensitivity settings required for optimum system performance, and (4) the spatial resolution of the transmitter/receiver utilized.

  8. Testing of a low-cost item monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, D.J.; Cunningham, K.R.; Hoover, C.E.; Trujillo, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Material control is an important element of any security system which seeks to address the insider threat. Sandia has developed Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling (WATCH) which is a remote sensory system that provides a low-cost, convenient way of monitoring item movement. Rockwell International/Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and Sandia have conducted a long-term evaluation of the WATCH system in an operating production facility. Testing was conducted in a large scale, remote access storage vault for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). A total of fourteen WATCH units were placed on storage containers in the vault. A schedule was established which provided prearranged movement of monitored containers on a regular basis. The test objectives were to determine 1) the feasibility of using the WATCH system technology to implement material control concepts, 2) the system performance in an active production area, and high radiation environment, 3) the sensitivity settings required for optimum system performance, and 4) the spatial resolution of the transmitter/receiver utilized.

  9. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurston, Anthony

    2012-10-31

    The objective of the research was to determine the best low cost method for the large scale production of the Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) layered cathode materials. The research and development focused on scaling up the licensed technology from Argonne National Laboratory in BASFs battery material pilot plant in Beachwood Ohio. Since BASF did not have experience with the large scale production of the NCM cathode materials there was a significant amount of development that was needed to support BASFs already existing research program. During the three year period BASF was able to develop and validate production processes for the NCM 111, 523 and 424 materials as well as begin development of the High Energy NCM. BASF also used this time period to provide free cathode material samples to numerous manufactures, OEMs and research companies in order to validate the ma-terials. The success of the project can be demonstrated by the construction of the production plant in Elyria Ohio and the successful operation of that facility. The benefit of the project to the public will begin to be apparent as soon as material from the production plant is being used in electric vehicles.

  10. Key issues for low-cost FGD installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePriest, W.; Mazurek, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    This paper will discuss various methods for installing low-cost FGD systems. The paper will include a discussion of various types of FGD systems available, both wet and dry, and will compare the relative cost of each type. Important design issues, such as use of spare equipment, materials of construction, etc. will be presented. An overview of various low-cost construction techniques (i.e., modularization) will be included. This paper will draw heavily from Sargent & Lundy`s database of past and current FGD projects together with information we gathered for several Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies on the subject.

  11. Gelatin/graphene systems for low cost energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, Giovanni; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore; Neitzert, Heinz C.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we introduce the possibility to use a low cost, biodegradable material for temporary energy storage devices. Here, we report the use of biologically derived organic electrodes composed of gelatin ad graphene. The graphene was obtained by mild sonication in a mixture of volatile solvents of natural graphite flakes and subsequent centrifugation. The presence of exfoliated graphene sheets was detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The homogeneous dispersion in gelatin demonstrates a good compatibility between the gelatin molecules and the graphene particles. The electrical characterization of the resulting nanocomposites suggests the possible applications as materials for transient, low cost energy storage device.

  12. Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Inc. | Department of Energy A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic

  13. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    simple, cost-effective techniques for providing fresh air throughout the home, including exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Building America has refined simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing As high-performance homes get more air-tight

  14. Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture of a

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothemal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis | Department of Energy Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture of a Geothemal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon tibuleac_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Integration of Noise and Coda

  15. Project Profile: Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    -- This project is inactive -- The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is developing and demonstrating a novel collector design and low-cost heliostat that will reduce equipment and installation costs while improving or maintaining performance, thereby reaching SunShot Initiative cost and performance targets for concentrating solar power (CSP) collector systems.

  16. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research in the LM Materials Program Overview Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM ... More Documents & Publications Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview FY 2009 Progress Report for ...

  17. Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles Vehicle ...

  18. Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles ...

  19. Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    313_ganapathi.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

  20. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Presented at the 2007 ...

  1. Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies ...

  2. Low-Cost Phase Change Material for Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2015-08-06

    A low-cost PCM process consisting of conversion of fats and oils to PCM-range paraffins, and subsequent “encapsulation” of the paraffin using conventional plastic compounding/pelletizing equipment was demonstrated. The PCM pellets produced were field-tested in a building envelope application. This involved combining the PCM pellets with cellulose insulation, whereby 33% reduction in peak heat flux and 12% reduction in heat gain was observed (average summertime performance). The selling price of the PCM pellets produced according to this low-cost process is expected to be in the $1.50-$3.00/lb range, compared to current encapsulated PCM price of about $7.00/lb. Whole-building simulations using corresponding PCM thermal analysis data suggest a payback time of 8 to 16 years (at current energy prices) for an attic insulation retrofit project in the Phoenix climate area.

  3. Improved Solar Power Plant Efficiency: Low Cost Solar Irradiance Sensor -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Solar Power Plant Efficiency: Low Cost Solar Irradiance Sensor University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication CU3117D (Irradiance Sensor) Marketing Summary.pdf (149 KB) Technology Marketing Summary A University of Colorado research group led

  4. Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Michael Garrabrant mgarrabrant@stonemtntechnologies.com Stone Mountain Technologies, Inc. Project Summary Timeline: Start date: March 01, 2013 Planned end date: August 31, 2015 Key Milestones: 1. Cycle & System Design: 12/31/2014 2. Breadboard Test Results: 12/31/2014 3. Packaged Prototype Results: 04/01/2015 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $629,730 Total future DOE $: $273,140 Target

  5. Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings 1 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist prepares slot die coater for solution based deposition of electrochromic layer. Image: Heliotrope Technologies 2 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist investigates the coating quality of a slot die deposition of electrochromic layer. Image: Heliotrope Technologies 3 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist investigates the spray coater for a solution based deposition of electrochromic layer. Image:

  6. NREL Funds Research into Low-Cost Solar Electricity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Funds Research into Low-Cost Solar Electricity Media contact: George Douglas (303) 275-4096 e:mail: george_douglas@nrel.gov Golden, Colo., Dec. 8, 1997 -- C Contracts worth about $60 million over three years will be awarded under the Thin Film PV (photovoltaic) Partnership program at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Recipients of the money will research ways to lower the cost of producing electricity from sunlight using photovoltaic semiconductors that

  7. A Flexible, Low Cost, Beam Loss Monitor Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyes, George Garnet; Pimol, Piti; Juthong, Nawin; Attaphibal, Malee

    2007-01-19

    A flexible, low cost, Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) Evaluation System based on Bergoz BLMs has been developed. Monitors can easily be moved to any location for beam loss investigations and/or monitor usefulness evaluations. Different PC pulse counting cards are compared and tested for this application using the display software developed based on LabVIEW. Beam problems uncovered with this system are presented.

  8. Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump fro Building Space Heating

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Michael Garrabrant mgarrabrant@stonemtntechnologies.com Stone Mountain Technologies, Inc. Project Summary Timeline: Start date: March 01, 2013 Planned end date: February 28, 2015 Key Milestones: 1. Cycle & System Design: 12/31/2014 2. Breadboard Test Results: 06/30/2014 3. Packaged Prototype Results: 02/28/2015 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $305,396 Total future DOE $: $597,474 Target

  9. Alloy Design and Method for Processing Low-Cost Refractory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dispersoid-Reinforced Alloys for Harsh Environments - Energy Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Alloy Design and Method for Processing Low-Cost Refractory Dispersoid-Reinforced Alloys for Harsh Environments Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Alloys used in applications such as exhaust valves are increasingly subject to demanding operating environments, such as high temperatures and exposure

  10. Low-cost solar flat-plate-collector development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Cost goals were developed for the collector which led to the rejection of conventional approaches and to the exploration of thin-film technology. A thin-film sola absorber suited for high-speed continous-roll manufacture at low cost was designed. The absorber comprises two sheets of aluminum-foil/polymeric-material laminate bonded together at intervals to form channels with water as the heat transfer fluid. Several flat-plate panels were fabricated and tested. (MHR)

  11. Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansari, Asif; Philip, Lee; Thouppuarachchi, Chirath

    2012-08-01

    This is a Final Technical Report on the Research and Development completed towards the development of a Low Cost Solar Collector conducted under the DOE cost-sharing award EE-0003591. The objective of this project was to develop a new class of solar concentrators with geometries and manufacturability that could significantly reduce the fully installed cost of the solar collector field for concentrated solar thermal power plants. The goal of the project was to achieve an aggressive cost target of $170/m2, a reduction of up to 50% in the total installed cost of a solar collector field as measured against the current industry benchmark of a conventional parabolic trough. The project plan, and the detailed activities conducted under the scope of the DOE Award project addressed all major drivers that affect solar collector costs. In addition to costs, the study also focused on evaluating technical performance of new collector architectures and compared them to the performance of the industry benchmark parabolic trough. The most notable accomplishment of this DOE award was the delivery of a full-scale integrated design, manufacturing and field installation solution for a new class of solar collector architecture which has been classified as the Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector (BPFC) and may be considered as a viable alternative to the conventional parabolic trough, as well as the conventional Fresnel collectors. This was in part accomplished through the design and development, all the way through fabrication and test validation of a new class of Linear Planar Fresnel Collector architecture. This architecture offers a number of key differentiating features which include a planar light-weight frame geometry with small mass-manufacturable elements utilizing flat mirror sections. The designs shows significant promise in reducing the material costs, fabrication costs, shipping costs, and on-site field installation costs compared to the benchmark parabolic trough, as well as the conventional Fresnel collector. The noteworthy design features of the BPFC architecture include the use of relatively cheaper flat mirrors and a design which allows the mirror support beam sections to act as load-bearing structural elements resulting in more than a 36% reduction in the overall structural weight compared to an optimized parabolic trough. Also, it was shown that the utilization of small mass-produced elements significantly lowers mass-production and logistics costs that can more quickly deliver economies of scale, even for smaller installations while also reducing shipping and installation costs. Moreover, unlike the traditional Fresnel trough the BPFC architecture does not require complex articulating drive mechanisms but instead utilizes a standard parabolic trough hydraulic drive mechanism. In addition to the development of the Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector, an optimized conventional space-frame type parabolic trough was also designed, built, analyzed and field-tested during the first phase of this award. The design of the conventional space-frame parabolic collector was refined with extensive FEA and CFD analysis to reduce material costs and re-designed for simpler fabrication and more accurate lower-cost field assembly. This optimized parabolic trough represented an improvement over the state-of-the art of the traditional parabolic trough architecture and also served as a more rigorous and less subjective benchmark that was used for comparison of new candidate design architectures. The results of the expanded 1st phase of the DOE award project showed that both the Optimized Parabolic Trough and the new Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector design concepts failed to meet the primary objectives for the project of achieving a 50% cost reduction from the industry reference total installed cost of $350/m2. Results showed that the BPFC came in at projected total installed cost of $237/m2 representing a 32% savings compared to the industry benchmark conventional parabolic trough. And the cost reduction obtained by the Optimized Parabolic Trough compared to the

  12. Flexible low-cost packaging for lithium ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, A. N.; Amine, K.; Chaiko, D. J.; Henriksen, G. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2004-01-01

    Batteries with various types of chemistries are typically sold in rigid hermetically sealed containers that, at the simplest level, must contain the electrolyte while keeping out the exterior atmosphere. However, such rigid containers can have limitations in packaging situations where the form of the battery is important, such as in hand-held electronics like personal digital assistants (PDAs), laptops, and cell phones. Other limitations exist as well. At least one of the electrode leads must be insulated from the metal can, which necessitates the inclusion of an insulated metal feed-through in the containment hardware. Another limitation may be in hardware and assembly cost, such as exists for the lithium-ion batteries that are being developed for use in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The large size (typically 10-100 Ah) of these batteries usually results in electric beam or laser welding of the metal cap to the metal can. The non-aqueous electrolyte used in these batteries are usually based on flammable solvents and therefore require the incorporation of a safety rupture vent to relieve pressure in the event of overcharging or overheating. Both of these features add cost to the battery. Flexible packaging provides an alternative to the rigid container. A common example of this is the multi-layered laminates used in the food packaging industry, such as for vacuum-sealed coffee bags. However, flexible packaging for batteries does not come without concerns. One of the main concerns is the slow egress of the electrolyte solvent through the face of the inner laminate layer and at the sealant edge. Also, moisture and air could enter from the outside via the same method. These exchanges may be acceptable for brief periods of time, but for the long lifetimes required for batteries in electric/hybrid electric vehicles, batteries in remote locations, and those in satellites, these exchanges are unacceptable. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with several industrial partners, is working on low-cost flexible packaging as an alternative to the packaging currently being used for lithium-ion batteries. This program is funded by the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. (It was originally funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, or PNGV, Program, which had as one of its mandates to develop a power-assist hybrid electric vehicle with triple the fuel economy of a typical sedan.) The goal in this packaging effort is to reduce the cost associated with the packaging of each cell several-fold to less than $1 per cell ({approx}50 cells are required per battery, 1 battery per vehicle), while maintaining the integrity of the cell contents for a 15-year lifetime. Even though the battery chemistry of main interest is the lithium-ion system, the methodology used to develop the most appropriate laminate structure will be very similar for other battery chemistries.

  13. Developments in Die Pressing Strategies for Low-Cost Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Weil, K. Scott; Lavender, Curt A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent developments in the production of low-cost titanium powders have rejuvenated interest in manufacturing titanium powder metallurgy components by direct press and sinter techniques. However excessive friction typically observed during titanium powder pressing operations leads to numerous problems ranging from non-homogeneous green densities of the compacted powder to excessive part ejection forces and reduced die life due to wear and galling. An instrumented double-acting die press was developed to both investigate the mechanics of titanium powder pressing (particularly for the new low-cost powder morphologies) and to screen potential lubricants that could reduce frictional effects. As will be discussed, the instrument was used to determine friction coefficients and to evaluate a number of candidate lubricants. These results were then used to optimize the lubricant system to reduce die-wall stresses and improve part density uniformity.

  14. Development of Low Cost Sensors for Hydrogen Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Holmes, W., Jr.; Lauf, R.J.; Maxey, L.C.; Salter, C.; Walker, D.

    1999-04-07

    We are developing rugged and reliable hydrogen safety sensors that can be easily manufactured. Potential applications also require an inexpensive sensor that can be easily deployed. Automotive applications demand low cost, while personnel safety applications emphasize light-weight, battery-operated, and wearable sensors. Our current efforts involve developing and optimizing sensor materials for stability and compatibility with typical thick-film manufacturing processes. We are also tailoring the sensor design and size along with various packaging and communication schemes for optimal acceptance by end users.

  15. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes an advanced, low-cost receiver project for parabolic troughs, awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. Norwich Technologies is designing a novel receiver that addresses these issues for parabolic trough concentrating solar power systems. This technology represents significant operational and cost advances in the most trusted and broadly implemented form of CSP and provides a viable pathway to achieving SunShot’s $0.06/kWh goal for utility-scale CSP systems.

  16. Novel Low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Chobot; Debarshi Das; Tyler Mayer; Zach Markey; Tim Martinson; Hayden Reeve; Paul Attridge; Tahany El-Wardany

    2012-09-13

    Clipper Windpower, in collaboration with United Technologies Research Center, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation, developed a low-cost, deflection-compliant, reliable, and serviceable chain drive speed increaser. This chain and sprocket drivetrain design offers significant breakthroughs in the areas of cost and serviceability and addresses the key challenges of current geared and direct-drive systems. The use of gearboxes has proven to be challenging; the large torques and bending loads associated with use in large multi-MW wind applications have generally limited demonstrated lifetime to 8-10 years [1]. The large cost of gearbox replacement and the required use of large, expensive cranes can result in gearbox replacement costs on the order of $1M, representing a significant impact to overall cost of energy (COE). Direct-drive machines eliminate the gearbox, thereby targeting increased reliability and reduced life-cycle cost. However, the slow rotational speeds require very large and costly generators, which also typically have an undesirable dependence on expensive rare-earth magnet materials and large structural penalties for precise air gap control. The cost of rare-earth materials has increased 20X in the last 8 years representing a key risk to ever realizing the promised cost of energy reductions from direct-drive generators. A common challenge to both geared and direct drive architectures is a limited ability to manage input shaft deflections. The proposed Clipper drivetrain is deflection-compliant, insulating later drivetrain stages and generators from off-axis loads. The system is modular, allowing for all key parts to be removed and replaced without the use of a high capacity crane. Finally, the technology modularity allows for scalability and many possible drivetrain topologies. These benefits enable reductions in drivetrain capital cost by 10.0%, levelized replacement and O&M costs by 26.7%, and overall cost of energy by 10.2%. This design was achieved by: (1) performing an extensive optimization study that deter-mined the preliminary cost for all practical chain drive topologies to ensure the most competitive configuration; (2) conducting detailed analysis of chain dynamics, contact stresses, and wear and efficiency characteristics over the chain???????¢????????????????s life to ensure accurate physics-based predictions of chain performance; and (3) developing a final product design, including reliability analysis, chain replacement procedures, and bearing and sprocket analysis. Definition of this final product configuration was used to develop refined cost of energy estimates. Finally, key system risks for the chain drive were defined and a comprehensive risk reduction plan was created for execution in Phase 2.

  17. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Conghua

    2013-05-30

    Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

  18. Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

  19. Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudon, K.; Merrigan, T.; Burch, J.; Maguire, J.

    2012-08-01

    The market environment for solar water heating technology has changed substantially with the successful introduction of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs). The addition of this energy-efficient technology to the market increases direct competition with solar water heaters (SWHs) for available energy savings. It is therefore essential to understand which segment of the market is best suited for HPWHs and focus the development of innovative, low-cost SWHs in the market segment where the largest opportunities exist. To evaluate cost and performance tradeoffs between high performance hot water heating systems, annual energy simulations were run using the program, TRNSYS, and analysis was performed to compare the energy savings associated with HPWH and SWH technologies to conventional methods of water heating.

  20. LOW-COST LED LUMINAIRE FOR GENERAL ILLUMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowes, Ted

    2014-07-31

    During this two-year Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Manufacturing R&D project Cree developed novel light emitting diode (LED) technologies contributing to a cost-optimized, efficient LED troffer luminaire platform emitting at ~3500K correlated color temperature (CCT) at a color rendering index (CRI) of >90. To successfully achieve program goals, Cree used a comprehensive approach to address cost reduction of the various optical, thermal and electrical subsystems in the luminaire without impacting performance. These developments built on Cree’s high- brightness, low-cost LED platforms to design a novel LED component architecture that will enable low-cost troffer luminaire designs with high total system efficacy. The project scope included cost reductions to nearly all major troffer subsystems as well as assembly costs. For example, no thermal management components were included in the troffer, owing to the optimized distribution of compact low- to mid-power LEDs. It is estimated that a significant manufacturing cost savings will result relative to Cree’s conventional troffers at the start of the project. A chief project accomplishment was the successful development of a new compact, high-efficacy LED component geometry with a broad far-field intensity distribution and even color point vs. emission angle. After further optimization and testing for production, the Cree XQ series of LEDs resulted. XQ LEDs are currently utilized in Cree’s AR series troffers, and they are being considered for use in other platforms. The XQ lens geometry influenced the independent development of Cree’s XB-E and XB-G high-voltage LEDs, which also have a broad intensity distribution at high efficacy, and are finding wide implementation in Cree’s omnidirectional A-lamps.

  1. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  2. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

  3. PROJECT PROFILE: 2D Materials for Low Cost Epitaxial Growth of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-cost III-V cells will result in a breakthrough in photovoltaic (PV) market by enabling a lower levelized cost of energy. The project will develop low-cost substrates to ...

  4. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1...

  5. Energy Department Announces up to $4 Million to Advance Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Hydrogen Production from Renewable and Low Carbon Sources Energy Department Announces up to 4 Million to Advance Low-Cost Hydrogen Production from Renewable and Low ...

  6. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2_warren.pdf More Documents & Publications Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber

  7. Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with ... The mine's byproduct of geothermal brine allows for an additional revenue stream from ...

  8. Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch The Dow ...

  9. High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle - FY13 Q1 High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle - ...

  10. Municipal Bond- Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to Provide Low-Cost Solar Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview for power purchase agreement model to provide low-cost solar energy. Author: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  11. Development of High Rate Coating Technology for Low Cost Electrochromic Dynamic Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, B.; Joshi, Ajey

    2013-03-31

    Objectives of the Project: The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of depositing critical electrochromic layers at high rate using new novel vacuum coating sources, to develop a full electrochromic process flow by combining conventional processes with new deposition sources, to characterize, test, evaluate, and optimize the resulting coatings and devices, and, to demonstrate an electrochromic device using the new process flow and sources. As addendum objectives, this project was to develop and demonstrate direct patterning methods with novel integration schemes. The long term objective, beyond this program, is to integrate these innovations to enable production of low-cost, high-performance electrochromic windows produced on highly reliable and high yielding manufacturing equipment and systems.

  12. Development of a Low-Cost Rotary Steerable Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roney Nazarian

    2012-01-31

    The project had the goal to develop and commercialize a low-cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures to reduce operating costs by a minimum of 50% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50% over the currently offered systems. The LCRSS system developed under this project does reduce operating costs by 55% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50%. The developed product is not commercializable in its current form. The overall objective was to develop and commercialize a low cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures (20,000 psi/150 C) while reducing the operating costs by 50% and the lost-in-hole charges by 50% over the currently available systems. The proposed reduction in costs were to be realized through the significant reduction in tool complexity, a corresponding increase in tool reliability as expressed in the mean-time between failure (MTBF), and a reduction in the time and costs required to service tools after each field operation. Ultimately, the LCRSS system was to be capable of drilling 7 7/8 in. to 9 5/8 in. borehole diameters. The project was divided into three Phases, of which Phases I & II were previously completed and reported on, and are part of the case file. Therefore, the previously reported information is not repeated herein. Phase III included the fabrication of two field ready prototypes that were to be subjected to a series of drilling tests at GTI Catoosa, DOE RMOTC, and at customer partnering wells, if possible, as appropriate in the timing of the field test objectives to fully exercise all elements of the LCRSS. These tests were conducted in an iterative process based on a performance/reliability improvement cycle with the goal of demonstrating the system met all aspects required for commercial viability. These tests were conducted to achieve continuous runs of 100+ hours with well trajectories that fully exercised the tool's build/turn/drop/hold target capabilities and its higher end ratings for bit weight, torque and rotary speed. The tool teardowns were rigorously analyzed at the conclusion of each field run to assess component wear rates and to fully document any detrimental behavior(s) observed.

  13. Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, S. James

    2015-07-31

    This report summarizes the technical progress made of the research project entitled “Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels,” under DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0011958. The period of performance was October 1, 2013 through July 30, 2015. The overall objectives of this project was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of a systems approach for producing high hydrogen syngas from coal with the potential to reduce significantly the cost of producing power, chemical-grade hydrogen or liquid fuels, with carbon capture to reduce the environmental impact of gasification. The project encompasses several areas of study and the results are summarized here. (1) Experimental work to determine the technical feasibility of a novel hybrid polymer/metal H2-membrane to recover pure H2 from a coal-derived syngas was done. This task was not successful. Membranes were synthesized and show impermeability of any gases at required conditions. The cause of this impermeability was most likely due to the densification of the porous polymer membrane support made from polybenzimidazole (PBI) at test temperatures above 250 °C. (2) Bench-scale experimental work was performed to extend GTI's current database on the University of California Sulfur Recovery Process-High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and recently renamed Sulfur Removal and Recovery (SR2) process for syngas cleanup including removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, such as, chlorides and ammonia. The SR2 process tests show >90% H2S conversion with outlet H2S concentrations less than 4 ppmv, and 80-90% ammonia and chloride removal with high mass transfer rates. (3) Techno-economic analyses (TEA) were done for the production of electric power, chemical-grade hydrogen and diesel fuels, from a mixture of coal- plus natural gas-derived syngas using the Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) Advanced Compact coal gasifier and a natural gas partial oxidation reactor (POX) with SR2 technology. Due to the unsuccessful experimental results with the hybrid polymer/metal H2 membrane, a conventional CO2 capture (single-stage Selexol) and hydrogen purification (PSA) technologies were used in the appropriate cases. In all cases, the integrated system of Advanced Compact coal gasifier, non-catalytic natural gas partial oxidation, and SR2 multicontaminant removal with state-of-the-art auxiliary system provided a 5-25% cost advantage over the base line plants using GEE coal gasifier with conventional Selexol/Claus sulfur removal and recovery. These plants also produce 18-30% less CO2 than with the conventional coal gasification plants.

  14. Norwich Technologies' Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stettenheim, Joel; McBride, Troy O.; Brambles, Oliver J.; Cashin, Emil A.

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes the successful results of our SunShot project, Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs. With a limited budget of $252K and in only 12 months, we have (1) developed validated optical and thermal models and completed rigorous optimization analysis to identify key performance characteristics as part of developing first-generation laboratory prototype designs, (2) built optical and thermal laboratory prototypes and test systems with associated innovative testing protocols, and (3) performed extensive statistically relevant testing. We have produced fully functioning optical and thermal prototypes and accurate, validated models shown to capture important underlying physical mechanisms. The test results from the first-generation prototype establish performance exceeding the FOA requirement of thermal efficiency >90% for a CSP receiver while delivering an exit fluid temperature of > 650 °C and a cost < $150/kWth. Our vacuum-free SunTrap receiver design provides improvements over conventional vacuum-tube collectors, allowing dramatic reductions in thermal losses at high operating temperature.

  15. Low Cost Polymer heat Exchangers for Condensing Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, Thomas; Trojanowski, Rebecca; Wei, George; Worek, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Work in this project sought to develop a suitable design for a low cost, corrosion resistant heat exchanger as part of a high efficiency condensing boiler. Based upon the design parameters and cost analysis several geometries and material options were explored. The project also quantified and demonstrated the durability of the selected polymer/filler composite under expected operating conditions. The core material idea included a polymer matrix with fillers for thermal conductivity improvement. While the work focused on conventional heating oil, this concept could also be applicable to natural gas, low sulfur heating oil, and biodiesel- although these are considered to be less challenging environments. An extruded polymer composite heat exchanger was designed, built, and tested during this project, demonstrating technical feasibility of this corrosion-resistant material approach. In such flue gas-to-air heat exchangers, the controlling resistance to heat transfer is in the gas-side convective layer and not in the tube material. For this reason, the lower thermal conductivity polymer composite heat exchanger can achieve overall heat transfer performance comparable to a metal heat exchanger. However, with the polymer composite, the surface temperature on the gas side will be higher, leading to a lower water vapor condensation rate.

  16. PEM Electrolyzer Incorporating an Advanced Low-Cost Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamdan, Monjid

    2013-08-29

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified hydrogen production by electrolysis of water at forecourt stations as a critical technology for transition to the hydrogen economy; however, the cost of hydrogen produced by present commercially available electrolysis systems is considerably higher than the DOE 2015 and 2020 cost targets. Analyses of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer systems indicate that reductions in electricity consumption and electrolyzer stack and system capital cost are required to meet the DOE cost targets. The primary objective is to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective energy-based system for electrolytic generation of hydrogen. The goal is to increase PEM electrolyzer efficiency and to reduce electrolyzer stack and system capital cost to meet the DOE cost targets for distributed electrolysis. To accomplish this objective, work was conducted by a team consisting of Giner, Inc. (Giner), Virginia Polytechnic Institute & University (VT), and domnick hunter group, a subsidiary of Parker Hannifin (Parker). The project focused on four (4) key areas: (1) development of a high-efficiency, high-strength membrane; (2) development of a long-life cell-separator; (3) scale-up of cell active area to 290 cm2 (from 160 cm); and (4) development of a prototype commercial electrolyzer system. In each of the key stack development areas Giner and our team members conducted focused development in laboratory-scale hardware, with analytical support as necessary, followed by life-testing of the most promising candidate materials. Selected components were then scaled up and incorporated into low-cost scaled-up stack hardware. The project culminated in the fabrication and testing of a highly efficient electrolyzer system for production of 0.5 kg/hr hydrogen and validation of the stack and system in testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  17. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Arun

    1997-12-01

    The invention relates to a low-cost process for insulating walls comprising: (a) stacking bags filled with insulating material next to the exterior surface of a wall until the wall is covered, the stack of bags thus formed having fasteners to attach to a wire mesh (e.g., straps looped between the bags and fastened to the wall); (b) stretching a wire mesh (e.g., chicken wire or stucco netting) over the stack of bags, covering the side of the bags which is not adjacent to the wall; (c) fastening the wire mesh to stationary objects; (d) attaching the wire mesh to said fasteners on said stack of bags; and (e) applying a cemetitious material (e.g., stucco) to the wire mesh and allowing it to harden. Stacking the bags against the wall is preferably preceded by laying a base on the ground at the foot of the wall using a material such as cement or crushed stone wrapped in a non-woven fabric (e.g., geosynthetic felt). It is also preferred to erect stationary corner posts at the ends of the wall to be insulated, the top ends of the posts being tied to each other and/or tied or otherwise anchored to the wall. The invention also includes the structure made by this process. The structure comprises a stack of bags of insulating material next to the exterior wall of a building, said stack of bags of insulating material being attached to said wall and having a covering of cementitious material on the side not adjacent to said wall.

  18. A low-cost float method of harnessing wave energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, M.P.

    1983-12-01

    The author proposes in this paper a low-cost and simple method of harnessing wave energy that should enable coastal regions to be self-sufficient in electric power. The method is eminently applicable to India and such developing countries, being simple and involving a small capital investment. The method was evolved after study of the Indian West Coast fronting the Arabian Sea, and can harness about 50% of the wave energy. A log of wood about 5 metres long and 50 cm. in diameter, having a specific gravity of 0.8 to 0.9, is made to float parallel to the beach and about 50 metres away from it. Its movement is restricted to the vertical plane by means of poles. Two roller chains are attached to the ends of the log which pass over two sprocket free-wheels. When the log is lifted with the crest of the wave, the roller chain moves over the free-wheel. When the trough of the wave reaches the log, its weight is applied to the sprocket wheels through the roller chains. Each sprocket wheel rotates and the rotation is multiplied with a gear wheel. The torque from the high speed spindle of the gear is applied to a small alternating current generator. The AC output from the generator is rectified and used either for charging a battery bank, or connected to the lighting system, or supplied to electrolytic tank for producing hydrogen and other chemicals at the site. A chain of such systems along the coast can supply enough power to light the fishermen's hamlets stretching along the coast.

  19. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

    2010-12-31

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering-guided R&D approach, which involved the rapid down-selection of a large number of options (chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4}) to a smaller, more manageable number. The research began by conducting an extensive review of the technical and patent literature to identify all possible options. The down-selection was based on evaluation of the options against a set of metrics, and to a large extent occurred before experimentation was initiated. Given the vast amount of literature and patents that has evolved over the years, this approach helped to focus efforts and resources on the options with the highest technical and commercial probability of success. Additionally, a detailed engineering analysis methodology was developed for conducting the cost and energy-efficiency calculations. The methodology utilized a number of inputs and tools (Aspen PEA{trademark}, FCHTool, and H2A). The down-selection of chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4} identified three options that were subsequently pursued experimentally. Metal reduction of borate was investigated in Dow's laboratories, research on electrochemical routes to NaBH{sub 4} was conducted at Pennsylvania State University, and Idaho National Laboratory researchers examined various carbothermal routes for producing NaBH{sub 4} from borate. The electrochemical and carbothermal studies did not yield sufficiently positive results. However, NaBH{sub 4} was produced in high yields and purities by an aluminum-based metal reduction pathway. Solid-solid reactive milling, slurry milling, and solution-phase approaches to metal reduction were investigated, and while both reactive milling and solution-phase routes point to fully recyclable processes, the scale-up of reactive milling processes to produce NaBH{sub 4} is expected to be difficult. Alternatively, a low-cost solution-phase approach to NaBH{sub 4} has been identified that is based on conventional process unit operations and should be amenable to scale-up. Numerous advances in AB synthesis have been made in recent years to improve AB yields and purities. Process analysis of several leading routes to AB (Purdue's formate-based metathesis route and PNNL's NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}-based route) indicated the cost to produce first-fill AB to be on the order of $9-10/kg AB, assuming a NaBH{sub 4} cost of $5/kg for a 10,000 metric tons/year sized AB plant. The analysis showed that the dominant cost component for producing first-fill AB is the cost of the NaBH4 raw material. At this AB cost and assuming 2.5 moles hydrogen released per mole of AB, it may be possible to meet DOE's 2010 storage system cost target, but the 2015 target will likely require lower cost AB and demonstrates the importance of having a low-cost route to NaBH{sub 4}. Substantial progress has also been made to define feasible pathways for the regeneration of spent ammonia borane fuel.

  20. Low temperature pyrotechnic smokes: A potential low cost alternative to nonpyrotechnic smoke for access delay applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenholt, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    Smokes are frequently used as visual obscurants in access delay applications. A new generation of low temperature pyrotechnic smokes is being developed. Terephthalic Acid (TPA) smoke was developed by the U.S. Army and Sebacic Acid (SA) smoke is being developed by Thiokol Corp. The advantages these smokes offer over traditional pyrotechnic smokes include; low generation temperature (approximately 450{degree}C), lower toxicity, and lower corrosivity. The low generation temperature reduces smoke layering effects and allows the addition of sensory irritants, such as o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile (CS), to the formulation. Some advantages low temperature pyrotechnic smokes offer over nonpyrotechnic smokes include; low cost, simplicity, compactness, light weight, long storage life, and orientation insensitive operation. Low cost permits distribution of multiple units for reduced vulnerability and refill flexibility. Some disadvantages may include the combustibility of the smoke particulate; however, the published lower explosive limit of the mentioned materials is approximately ten times greater than the concentration required for effective obscuration. The TPA smoke cloud contains small quantities of benzene, formaldehyde, and carbon monoxide; no benzene or formaldehyde was identified during preliminary SA smoke analyses performed by Thiokol Corp. Sandia performed tests and analyses on TPA smoke to determine the smoke cloud composition, the quantity of particulate produced per canister, and the relationship between airborne particulate concentration and measured optical density values. Current activities include characterization of SA smoke.

  1. Low-Cost Packaged Combined Heat and Power System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CPG also managed the controls design and thermo-mechanical integration of the system. Once the heat recovery system, 330 kW Genset, and control system were completed, CPG produced ...

  2. Development of a Low-Cost Particulate Matter Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Richard M.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Black, Justin

    2008-08-01

    We describe a small, inexpensive portable monitor for airborne particulates, composed of the following elements: a. A simple size-selective inlet (vertical elutriator) that permits only particles below a pre-set diameter to pass and enter the measurement section; b. A measurement section in which passing particles are deposited thermophoretically on a micro-fabricated resonant piezoelectric mass sensor; c. An optical characterization module co-located with the mass sensor module that directs infrared and ultraviolet beams through the deposit. The emergent optical beams are detected by a photodiode. The optical absorption of the deposit can be measured in order to characterize the deposit, and determine how much is due to diesel exhaust and/or environmental tobacco smoke; and d. A small pump that moves air through the device, which may also be operated in a passive mode. The component modules were designed by the project team, and fabricated at UCB andLBNL. Testing and validation were performed in a room-sized environmental chamber at LBNL in to which was added either environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, produced by a cigarette smoking machine) or diesel exhaust (from a conventional diesel engine). Two pilot field tests in a dwelling compared the monitor with existing aerosol instruments during exposure to infiltrated ambient air to which cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust, wood smoke and cooking fumes were added. The limit of detection (LOD) derived from statistical analysis of field data is 18 mu g m-3, at the 99percent confidence level. The monitor weighs less than 120 g and has a volume of roughly 250 cm3. Power consumption is approximately 100 milliwatts. During this study, the optical component of the device was not fully implemented and has been left for future efforts. Suggested improvements in the current prototype include use of integrated thermal correction, reconfiguration of the resonator for increased particle collection area, increased thermophoretic collection efficiency using an increased temperature gradient, and shielding the resonator electronics from deposition of ultrafine particles.

  3. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California | Department of Energy Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California In this project, U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS partnered with builder Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes to develop a simple and low-cost methodology by which

  4. Low-Cost Wireless Sensors for Building Applications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wireless Sensors for Building Applications Low-Cost Wireless Sensors for Building Applications ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors. ORNL's Pooran Joshi shows how the process enables electronics components to be printed on flexible plastic substrates. Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors.

  5. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate a 98% or greater reflective, highly diffuse, low-cost

  6. Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Launch | Department of Energy Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch The Dow Chemical Company - Midland, MI An extrusion process for making carbon fiber uses a novel polyolefin material in place of conventional polyacrylonitrile. Low-cost carbon fiber has widespread application in automobiles, wind turbines, and other industrial applications. This novel process could

  7. Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm048_husman_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview

  8. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Thomas, Ph.D., President Franklin D. Lomax, Ph.D, CTO & Principal Investigator, and Maxim Lyubovski, Ph.D.

    2011-03-10

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

  9. Manufacturing Facility Opened Using EERE-Supported Low-Cost Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To accomplish this cost reduction, BASF developed a higher throughput coating process, ... Catalyst Licensed for Use in Fuel Cell Hybrid Advanced Vehicles Low-Cost Production of ...

  10. A NEW METHOD FOR LOW-COST PRODUCTION OF TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR REDUCING...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A novel metallurgical process for producing titanium (Ti) components could produce a ... PDF icon A New Method for Low-Cost Production of Titanium Alloys More Documents & ...

  11. Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and After-treatment Systems Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER ...

  12. Webinar: Low Cost Carbon Fiber Process Soliciation, April 7th, 2016 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Low Cost Carbon Fiber Process Soliciation, April 7th, 2016 Webinar: Low Cost Carbon Fiber Process Soliciation, April 7th, 2016 April 7, 2016 11:00AM to 12:00PM EDT Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be hosting a webinar for the AMO supported Low Cost Carbon Fiber Process Solicitation. ORNL is seeking commercialization partners to license a new method to produce industrial-grade structural carbon fiber and flame-retardant fibers from commercially-available low-cost

  13. Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High ...

  14. Low-Cost, Third Generation Solar Cells on Solid Ground | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Summary Current solar cell technologies are largely constrained by high production costs, low operating efficiency, and limited durability. A low-cost alternative to current ...

  15. Low-Cost Light-Emitting Diode Luminaire for General Illumination...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Light-Emitting Diode Luminaire for General Illumination Presenter: Paul Fini, CREE Santa Barbara Technology Center This project is demonstrating an efficient and stable ...

  16. Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from SunShot...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013 Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from ...

  17. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale Fresno, California PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Evaluation of New Construction Pilot Community Location: Fresno, ...

  18. A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Adam London

    2008-06-20

    The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

  19. Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Water Heating R&D Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D Emerging Technologies Project for ... More Documents & Publications Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows ...

  20. Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Geothemal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture of a Geothemal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis ...

  1. Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nnovative M anufacturing and M aterials for Low -Cost Lithium -I on Batteries This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information...

  2. Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2010-02-04

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  3. Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2011-06-08

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  4. The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George A. Marchetti

    1999-12-15

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

  5. Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

  6. PROJECT PROFILE: 2D Materials for Low Cost Epitaxial Growth of Single Sun

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Photovoltaics | Department of Energy 2D Materials for Low Cost Epitaxial Growth of Single Sun Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Photovoltaics PROJECT PROFILE: 2D Materials for Low Cost Epitaxial Growth of Single Sun Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Photovoltaics Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO SunShot Award Amount: $125,000 Low-cost III-V cells will result in a breakthrough in photovoltaic (PV)

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $4,000,000 Low-cost III-V photovoltaics have the potential to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) because III-V cells outperform silicon in terms of efficiency and annual energy

  8. Fundamental understanding and development of low-cost, high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHATGI,A.; NARASIMHA,S.; MOSCHER,J.; EBONG,A.; KAMRA,S.; KRYGOWSKI,T.; DOSHI,P.; RISTOW,A.; YELUNDUR,V.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

    2000-05-01

    The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  9. Novel Material for Efficient and Low-Cost Separation of Gases for Fuels and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plastics | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Novel Material for Efficient and Low-Cost Separation of Gases for Fuels and Plastics

  10. Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this project, U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS partnered with builder Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes to develop a simple and low-cost methodology by ...

  12. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for laboratory equipment By Raphael Rosen February 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on...

  13. Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 5cwru.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting Agenda Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting

  14. Project Profile: High-Concentration, Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SkyFuel, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing an advanced, low-cost CSP collector using higher-concentration, higher-temperature, parabolic trough technology to substantially reduce the cost of baseload utility-scale solar power generation.

  15. Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems Lower-Cost, Variable-Speed ... DynaMotors Inc., with the aid of a grant from DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, ...

  16. Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High Efficiency LED Luminaires

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Award DE-EE0006264 Paul Fini, paulfini@cree.com CREE, Inc. Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High Efficiency LED Luminaires 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 ...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low Cost, High Capacity Non-Intercalation Chemistry Automotive Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sila Nanotechnologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low cost, high capacity...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low Cost, Structurally Advanced Novel Electrode and Cell Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 24M Technologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low cost, structurally...

  19. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report outlines the final results and findings from the Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles Workshop, held in June 2013 and hosted by the Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  20. Low-Cost, Haziness-Free, Transparent Insulation Based On a Porous Silica

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Material | Department of Energy Low-Cost, Haziness-Free, Transparent Insulation Based On a Porous Silica Material Low-Cost, Haziness-Free, Transparent Insulation Based On a Porous Silica Material Image of porous silica material in alcohol.<br /> Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Image of porous silica material in alcohol. Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partner: VELUX Design and Development Company USA Inc.,

  1. Low-Cost, Robust Ceramic Membranes for Gas Separation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Low-Cost, Robust Ceramic Membranes for Gas Separation Low-Cost, Robust Ceramic Membranes for Gas Separation Innovative Ceramic Membrane Reduces Energy and Cost of Industrial Gas Separation Ceramic membranes offer great potential for industrial gas separation. Without a ceramic membrane, gases must be cooled before separation. Unfortunately, even though ceramic membranes can improve the productivity for many reactions and separations in the chemicals and refining industries, they are

  2. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    management (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel

  3. Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive Manufacturing (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion-based Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion-based Additive Manufacturing To improve the flow of materials used in in polymer additive manufacturing, ORNL and Ajax Tocco created an induction system for heating fused deposition modeling (FDM) nozzles used in

  4. Low-Cost and Lightweight: Strongest titanium alloy aims at improving

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Innovation | Department of Energy Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple and cost-effective ventilation strategies for homes. As high-performance homes get more air tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research by Building Science Corporation to develop

  5. Low-Cost, Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating Film to Enable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings | Department of Energy Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings Low-Cost, Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings ITN Energy Systems is using low-cost, high volume roll-to-roll coating techniques to develop a new low-e film with high visible transmission and high infrared reflectivity.

  6. DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery | Department of Energy 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and Delivery DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and Delivery October 29, 2014 - 12:29pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued two requests for information (RFIs) seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders about hydrogen production and hydrogen delivery research, development, and demonstration

  7. A NEW METHOD FOR LOW-COST PRODUCTION OF TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR REDUCING ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONSUMPTION OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS | Department of Energy A NEW METHOD FOR LOW-COST PRODUCTION OF TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR REDUCING ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS A NEW METHOD FOR LOW-COST PRODUCTION OF TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR REDUCING ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS The University of Utah - Salt Lake City, UT A novel metallurgical process for producing titanium (Ti) components could produce a ten-fold material usage improvement in aircraft and vehicle manufacturing. This technology

  8. High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recompression Cycle | Department of Energy 313_sullivan.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle - FY13 Q1 High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles - FY13 Q3 Final Report - High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle

  9. HIGH-QUALITY, LOW-COST BULK GALLIUM NITRIDE SUBSTRATES GROWN BY THE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ELECTROCHEMICAL SOLUTION GROWTH METHOD | Department of Energy HIGH-QUALITY, LOW-COST BULK GALLIUM NITRIDE SUBSTRATES GROWN BY THE ELECTROCHEMICAL SOLUTION GROWTH METHOD HIGH-QUALITY, LOW-COST BULK GALLIUM NITRIDE SUBSTRATES GROWN BY THE ELECTROCHEMICAL SOLUTION GROWTH METHOD MEMC Electronic Materials, Inc. - St. Peters, MO Efficient manufacturing of gallium nitride (GaN) could reduce the cost of and improve the output for light-emitting diodes, solid-state lighting, laser displays, and other

  10. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pechersky, Martin

    1996-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis techniques to determine the damping loss factor of a material. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity as a function of time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method. If an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the amount of coil current used in vibrating the magnet. If a reciprocating transducer is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the reciprocating transducer. Using known vibrational analysis methods, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity measurements. The damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  11. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a nondestructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis to determine the damping loss factor. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity vs time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method: if an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the coil current. If a reciprocating transducer is used, the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the transducer. Using vibrational analysis, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity data. Damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  12. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  13. EATON PURSUES PRINT-BASED MANUFACTURING OF INTEGRATED, LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE SSL LUMINAIRES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Eaton is using manufacturing process innovation to develop a way to place the LED package, chip, or chip array directly on a fixture or heat sink in order to improve...

  14. EATON PURSUES PRINT-BASED MANUFACTURING OF INTEGRATED, LOW-COST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pilot-scale results include an optimized process that to date has reduced the number of process steps by 33% and has cut total process time by almost 50%. Thermal shock reliability ...

  15. The Development of Low-Cost Integrated Composite Seal for SOFC: Materials and Design Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xinyu Huang; Kristoffer Ridgeway; Srivatsan Narasimhan; Serg Timin; Wei Huang; Didem Ozevin; Ken Reifsnider

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted by UConn SOFC seal development team during the Phase I program and no cost extension. The work included composite seal sample fabrication, materials characterizations, leak testing, mechanical strength testing, chemical stability study and acoustic-based diagnostic methods. Materials characterization work revealed a set of attractive material properties including low bulk permeability, high electrical resistivity, good mechanical robustness. Composite seal samples made of a number of glasses and metallic fillers were tested for sealing performance under steady state and thermal cycling conditions. Mechanical testing included static strength (pull out) and interfacial fracture toughness measurements. Chemically stability study evaluated composite seal material stability after aging at 800 C for 168 hrs. Acoustic based diagnostic test was conducted to help detect and understand the micro-cracking processes during thermal cycling test. The composite seal concept was successfully demonstrated and a set of material (coating composition & fillers) were identified to have excellent thermal cycling performance.

  16. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses isostatic pressing for scalable TE elements, properties characterization of nanostructured ZnO materials, and heat exchanger designs to improve device efficiency

  17. Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal Collector...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    However, in order to achieve net-zero energy use, solar thermal collectors are often required to produce hot water for domestic and space heating needs or pre-heated ventilation ...

  18. Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 | Department of Energy Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Presentation on a 330 kWe Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions, given by John Pendray of Cummins Power Generation, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2,

  19. EERE Success Story-Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity EERE Success Story-Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis At an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, EERE provided funds to Bloom Energy in completing a one-year demonstration of two 25-kilowatt fuel cells-providing valuable, real-world data in one of the harshest environments on earth. Each fuel cell showed an impressive peak electrical efficiency of more than 50%. The high operating

  20. EERE Success Story-Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Big Potential | Department of Energy Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential EERE Success Story-Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a $1 million EERE investment, heat from geothermal fluids-a byproduct of gold mining-will be generating electricity this year for less than $0.06 per kilowatt hour with ElectraTherm's new plug-and-play technology. Building on this first-of-its-kind success, this

  1. Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhaus, Scott N; Yu, Z; Jaworski, A J

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

  2. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or shaped features. As a result, we believe that this work will lead to the development of a cost-effective manufacturing solution to produce very-high efficiency OLEDs. By comparison to more common ink-jet printing (IJP), OVJP can also produce well-defined patterns without the need to pattern the substrate with ink wells or to dry/anneal the ink. In addition, the material set is not limited by viscosity and solvent solubility. During the program we successfully demonstrated a 6-inch x 6-inch PHOLED lighting panel consisting of fine-featured red, green and blue (R-G-B) stripes (1mm width) using an OVJP deposition system that was designed, procured and installed into UDC's cleanroom as part of this program. This project will significantly accelerate the DOE's ability to meet its 2015 DOE SSL targets of 70-150 lumens/Watt and less than $10 per 1,000 lumens for high CRI lighting index (76-90). Coupled with a low cost manufacturing path through OVJP, we expect that this achievement will enable the DOE to achieve its 2015 performance goals by the year 2013, two years ahead of schedule. As shown by the technical work performed under this program, we believe that OVJP is a very promising technology to produce low cost, high efficacy, color tunable light sources. While we have made significant progress to develop OVJP technology and build a pilot line tool to study basic aspects of the technology and demonstrate a lighting panel prototype, further work needs to be performed before its full potential and commercial viability can be fully assessed.

  3. Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - Presentation from SunShot

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013 | Department of Energy kutscher.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems - FY13 Q1 High-Temperature Solar Thermoelectric Generators (STEG) SunShot Vision Study: February 2012 (Book), SunShot, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

  4. Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid Removal Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient NGL recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale, and pilot-scale testing - so that it can be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization.

  5. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale - Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    In this project, IBACOS partnered with builder Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes to develop a simple and low-cost methodology by which community-scale energy savings can be evaluated based on results at the occupied test house level.Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a whole-house systems integrated measures package and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  6. A LOW COST AND HIGH QUALITY SOLID FUEL FROM BIOMASS AND COAL FINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John T. Kelly; George Miller; Mehdi Namazian

    2001-07-01

    Use of biomass wastes as fuels in existing boilers would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, SO2 and NOx emissions, while beneficially utilizing wastes. However, the use of biomass has been limited by its low energy content and density, high moisture content, inconsistent configuration and decay characteristics. If biomass is upgraded by conventional methods, the cost of the fuel becomes prohibitive. Altex has identified a process, called the Altex Fuel Pellet (AFP) process, that utilizes a mixture of biomass wastes, including municipal biosolids, and some coal fines, to produce a strong, high energy content, good burning and weather resistant fuel pellet, that is lower in cost than coal. This cost benefit is primarily derived from fees that are collected for accepting municipal biosolids. Besides low cost, the process is also flexible and can incorporate several biomass materials of interest The work reported on herein showed the technical and economic feasibility of the AFP process. Low-cost sawdust wood waste and light fractions of municipal wastes were selected as key biomass wastes to be combined with biosolids and coal fines to produce AFP pellets. The process combines steps of dewatering, pellet extrusion, drying and weatherizing. Prior to pilot-scale tests, bench-scale test equipment was used to produce limited quantities of pellets for characterization. These tests showed which pellet formulations had a high potential. Pilot-scale tests then showed that extremely robust pellets could be produced that have high energy content, good density and adequate weatherability. It was concluded that these pellets could be handled, stored and transported using equipment similar to that used for coal. Tests showed that AFP pellets have a high combustion rate when burned in a stoker type systems. While NOx emissions under stoker type firing conditions was high, a simple air staging approach reduced emissions to below that for coal. In pulverized-fuel-fired tests it was found that the ground pellets could be used as an effective NOx control agent for pulverized-coal-fired systems. NOx emissions reductions up to 63% were recorded, when using AFP as a NOx control agent. In addition to performance benefits, economic analyses showed the good economic benefits of AFP fuel. Using equipment manufacturer inputs, and reasonable values for biomass, biosolids and coal fines costs, it was determined that an AFP plant would have good profitability. For cases where biosolids contents were in the range of 50%, the after tax Internal Rates of Return were in the range of 40% to 50%. These are very attractive returns. Besides the baseline analysis for the various AFP formulations tested at pilot scale, sensitivity analysis showed the impact of important parameters on return. From results, it was clear that returns are excellent for a range of parameters that could be expected in practice. Importantly, these good returns are achieved even without incentives related to the emissions control benefits of biomass.

  7. Low cost, compact high efficiency, traction motor for electric vehicles/hybrid electric vehicles. Final report for the period September 1998 - December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Jerry; Kessinger, Roy

    2000-04-28

    This final report details technical accomplishments for Phase I of the ''Low Cost, Compact High Efficiency, Traction Motor for Electric Vehicles/Hybrid Electric Vehicles'' program. The research showed that the segmented-electromagnetic array (SEMA) technology combined with an Integrated Motion Module (IMM) concept is highly suited for electric vehicles. IMMs are essentially mechatronic systems that combine the motor, sensing, power electronics, and control functions for a single axis of motion into a light-weight modular unit. The functional integration of these components makes possible significant reductions in motor/alternator size, weight, and cost, while increasing power density and electromechanical conversion efficiency.

  8. High Volume Method of Making Low Cost, Lightweight Solar Materials - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search High Volume Method of Making Low Cost, Lightweight Solar Materials Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA critical challenge for solar energy is the high cost (>$1/W) of quality solar materials. Researchers at ORNL have invented an approach for producing large volumes of solar cell material at a fraction of the cost of today's solar cells.

  9. Pathways to Low-Cost Electrochemical Energy Storage: A Comparison of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aqueous and Nonaqueous Flow Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research September 16, 2014, Research Highlights Pathways to Low-Cost Electrochemical Energy Storage: A Comparison of Aqueous and Nonaqueous Flow Batteries Comparison of available design space for aqueous and nonaqueous flow batteries to meet long term stationary storage cost goals. The nonaqueous redox flow battery technology has a potentially wider range of chemistry options but takes on new constraints of active

  10. Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump For Building Space Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas Heat Pump For Building Space Heating Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump For Building Space Heating Credit: Stone Mountain Technologies Credit: Stone Mountain Technologies Lead Performer: Stone Mountain Technologies - Erwin, TN Partners: -- A.O. Smith - Milwaukee, WI -- Gas Technology Institute - Des Plaines, IL DOE Funding: $903,000 Cost Share: $232,294 Project Term: March 1, 2013 - August 31, 2015 Funding Opportunity: Energy Savings Through Improved Mechanical Systems and Building Envelope Technologies

  11. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for laboratory equipment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for laboratory equipment By Raphael Rosen February 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's Planeterrella, a device that simulates Northern Lights. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's

  12. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for laboratory equipment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for laboratory equipment By Raphael Rosen February 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's Planeterrella, a device that simulates Northern Lights. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's

  13. Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting Process and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Asymmetric Rolling | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm058_warren_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus Lightweighting Materials Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High

  14. State and Local Energy Investment Partnerships: Partnerships for Low Cost Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Local Energy Investment Partnerships Partnerships for Low Cost Clean Energy The Vision 1. Double the deployment of wind, solar, geothermal, and other renewable electricity generation by 2020. 2. Cut in half the energy wasted by our homes and businesses over the next 20 years. - President Barack Obama, 2013 State of the Union Address The Challenge 1. Taxpayer and ratepayer funds alone cannot finance a 20% increase in energy efficiency across all of America's buildings. 2. Nor can diminishing

  15. Membrane-Electrode Structures for Low Cost Molecular Catalysts in Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells and Other Electrochemical Devices - Energy Innovation Portal Membrane-Electrode Structures for Low Cost Molecular Catalysts in Fuel Cells and Other Electrochemical Devices Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary A team of Berkeley Lab researchers has developed a technology to coat electrode surfaces with a homogeneous catalyst that has been immobilized within a polymer layer. The team demonstrated that a 3-D distributed array

  16. Low Cost Fabrication of Thin-Film Ceramic Membranes for Nonshrinking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrates - Energy Innovation Portal Low Cost Fabrication of Thin-Film Ceramic Membranes for Nonshrinking Substrates Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryCertain fuel cell manufacturing specifications require deposition of a thin ceramic membrane onto a substrate that doesn't shrink over it's lifetime. Pre-firing the substrate improves substrate reliability and may lower its cost. This requires a film that has minimal volume

  17. The Stirling engine as a low cost tool to educate mechanical engineers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gros, J.; Munoz, M.; Moreno, F.; Valero, A.

    1995-12-31

    The University of Zaragoza through CIRCE, the New Enterprise foundation, an Opel foundation and the local Government of Aragon have been developed a program to introduce the Stirling Engine as a low cost tool to educate students in mechanical engineering. The promotion of a prize like GNAT Power organized by the magazine Model Engineer in London, has improved the practical education of students in the field of mechanical devices and thermal engines. Two editions of the contest, 1993 and 1994, awarded the greatest power Stirling engine made by only using a little candle of paraffin as a heat source. Four engines were presented in the first edition, with an average power of about 100 mW, and seven engines in the second one, achieving a power of about 230 mW. Presentations in Technical Schools and the University have been carried out. Also low cost tools have been made for measuring an electronic device to draw the real internal pressure volume diagram using a PC. A very didactic software to design classic kinematic alpha, beta and gamma engines plus Ringbom beta and gamma engines has been created. A book is going to be published (in Spanish) explaining the design of small Stirling engines as a way to start with low cost research in thermal engines, a very difficult target with IC engines.

  18. Low-cost flexible packaging for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, A. N.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G. L.

    2004-06-18

    Batteries with various types of chemistries are typically sold in rigid hermetically sealed containers that, at the simplest level, must contain the electrolyte while keeping out the exterior atmosphere. However, such rigid containers can have limitations in packaging situations where the form of the battery is important, such as in hand-held electronics like personal digital assistants (PDAs), laptops, and cell phones. Other limitations exist as well. At least one of the electrode leads must be insulated from the metal can, which necessitates the inclusion of an insulated metal feed-through in the containment hardware. Another limitation may be in hardware and assembly cost, such as exists for the lithium-ion batteries that are being developed for use in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The large size (typically 10-100 Ah) of these batteries usually results in electric beam or laser welding of the metal cap to the metal can. The non-aqueous electrolyte used in these batteries are usually based on flammable solvents and therefore require the incorporation of a safety rupture vent to relieve pressure in the event of overcharging or overheating. Both of these features add cost to the battery. Flexible packaging provides an alternative to the rigid container. A common example of this is the multi-layered laminates used in the food packaging industry, such as for vacuum-sealed coffee bags. However, flexible packaging for batteries does not come without concerns. One of the main concerns is the slow egress of the electrolyte solvent through the face of the inner laminate layer and at the sealant edge. Also, moisture and air could enter from the outside via the same method. These exchanges may be acceptable for brief periods of time, but for the long lifetimes required for batteries in electric/hybrid electric vehicles, batteries in remote locations, and those in satellites, these exchanges are unacceptable. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with several industrial partners, is working on low-cost flexible packaging as an alternative to the packaging currently being used for lithium-ion batteries [1,2]. This program is funded by the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. (It was originally funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, or PNGV, Program, which had as one of its mandates to develop a power-assist hybrid electric vehicle with triple the fuel economy of a typical sedan.) The goal in this packaging effort is to reduce the cost associated with the packaging of each cell several-fold to less than $1 per cell ({approx} 50 cells are required per battery, 1 battery per vehicle), while maintaining the integrity of the cell contents for a 15-year lifetime. Even though the battery chemistry of main interest is the lithium-ion system, the methodology used to develop the most appropriate laminate structure will be very similar for other battery chemistries.

  19. Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Light- Emitting Diode Luminaires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarsa, Eric

    2015-08-31

    During this two-year program Cree developed a scalable, modular optical architecture for low-cost, high-efficacy light emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Stated simply, the goal of this architecture was to efficiently and cost-effectively convey light from LEDs (point sources) to broad luminaire surfaces (area sources). By simultaneously developing warm-white LED components and low-cost, scalable optical elements, a high system optical efficiency resulted. To meet program goals, Cree evaluated novel approaches to improve LED component efficacy at high color quality while not sacrificing LED optical efficiency relative to conventional packages. Meanwhile, efficiently coupling light from LEDs into modular optical elements, followed by optimally distributing and extracting this light, were challenges that were addressed via novel optical design coupled with frequent experimental evaluations. Minimizing luminaire bill of materials and assembly costs were two guiding principles for all design work, in the effort to achieve luminaires with significantly lower normalized cost ($/klm) than existing LED fixtures. Chief project accomplishments included the achievement of >150 lm/W warm-white LEDs having primary optics compatible with low-cost modular optical elements. In addition, a prototype Light Module optical efficiency of over 90% was measured, demonstrating the potential of this scalable architecture for ultra-high-efficacy LED luminaires. Since the project ended, Cree has continued to evaluate optical element fabrication and assembly methods in an effort to rapidly transfer this scalable, cost-effective technology to Cree production development groups. The Light Module concept is likely to make a strong contribution to the development of new cost-effective, high-efficacy luminaries, thereby accelerating widespread adoption of energy-saving SSL in the U.S.

  20. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Hartman, J.K.; McCampbell, C.B.; Churchill, J.K.

    1993-12-31

    A conventional NSI (NASA standard initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium subhydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  1. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: FE0007502 GE Global Research and their project partners are conducting research on the use of a novel silicone solvent to capture CO2 with a continuous bench-scale system. The project will utilize both computational and experimental methods. Previously measured experimental data from a continuous laboratory-scale CO2 capture system will be used to design this bench-scale system. Data from the bench-scale system, such as kinetics

  2. Low Cost Production of InGaN for Next-Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick M. Sbrockey, Shangzhu Sun, Gary S. Tompa,

    2012-07-09

    The goal of this project is to develop a low-cost and low-energy technology for production of photovoltaic devices based on InGaN materials. This project builds on the ongoing development by Structured Materials Industries (SMI), of novel thin film deposition technology for Group III-Nitride materials, which is capable of depositing Group-III nitride materials at significantly lower costs and significantly lower energy usage compared to conventional deposition techniques. During this project, SMI demonstrated deposition of GaN and InGaN films using metalorganic sources, and demonstrated compatibility of the process with standard substrate materials and hardware components.

  3. Low-cost Manufacturing of Wireless Sensors for Building Monitoring Applications

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ALTEX TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION Low-Cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger DOE Grant DE-EE0004541 2013-2014 Dr. John T. Kelly Altex Technologies Corporation 244 Sobrante Way Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Phone: 408-328-8302 E-mail: john@altextech.com U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office PEER Review Meeting Washington, D.C. May 6-7, 2014 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. ALTEX TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION Project Objectives  Define and test low

  4. Noise testing of gearboxes and transmissions using low cost digital analysis and control techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The combination of low cost personal computer, powerful array processor and intelligent data interface make it possible to carry out multichannel noise and vibration analysis at high speed during acceleration of gearbox on a test rig. Order analysis is used to compare noise signatures with preset targets for up to 20 orders of input shaft rotation. Targets are derived by the computer from practical test results. The computer also controls the test sequence and provides for varying the sequence according to the gearbox to be tested. Design considerations for a Quality Audit system are discussed and practical test results presented.

  5. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm010_zaluzec_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Magnesium Front End Research and Development AMD 604 Magnesium Front End Development (AMD 603/604/904) Department of Energy

    lm_19_quinn.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of

  6. Low Cost Carbon Fibre: Applications, Performance and Cost Models - Chapter 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Charles David; Wheatley, Dr. Alan; Das, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Weight saving in automotive applications has a major bearing on fuel economy. It is generally accepted that, typically, a 10% weight reduction in an automobile will lead to a 6-8% improvement in fuel economy. In this respect, carbon fibre composites are extremely attractive in their ability to provide superlative mechanical performance per unit weight. That is why they are specified for high-end uses such as Formula 1 racing cars and the latest aircraft (e.g. Boeing 787, Airbus A350 and A380), where they comprise over 50% by weight of the structure However, carbon fibres are expensive and this renders their composites similarly expensive. Research has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Tennessee, USA for over a decade with the aim of reducing the cost of carbon fibre such that it becomes a cost-effective option for the automotive industry. Aspects of this research relating to the development of low cost carbon fibre have been reported in Chapter 3 of this publication. In this chapter, the practical industrial applications of low-cost carbon fibre are presented, together with considerations of the performance and cost models which underpin the work.

  7. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  8. Low-cost household paint abatement to reduce children's blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, T.; Kanarek, M.S.; Schultz, B.D.; Murphy, A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of low-cost abatement on children's blood lead levels. Blood lead was analyzed before and after abatement in 37 homes of children under 7 years old with initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL. Ninety-five percent of homes were built before 1950. Abatement methods used were wet-scraping and repainting deteriorated surfaces and wrapping window wells with aluminum or vinyl. A control group was retrospectively selected. Control children were under 7 years old, had initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL and a follow-up level at least 28 days afterward, and did not have abatements performed in their homes between blood lead levels. After abatement, statistically significant declines occurred in the intervention children's blood lead levels. The mean decline was 22%, 1 to 6 months after treatment. After adjustment for seasonality and child's age, the mean decline was 6.0 {micro}g/dL, or 18%. The control children's blood levels did not decline significantly. There was a mean decline of 0.25 {micro}g/dL, or 0.39%. After adjustment for seasonality and age, the mean decline for control children was 1.6 {micro}g/dL, or 1.8%. Low-cost abatement and education are effective short-term interim controls.

  9. Low-cost, compact, robust laser-based ultrasound sensors using photo-EMF detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, D.M.; Dunning, G.J.; Chiao, M.P.; O`Meara, T.R.; Mitchell, P.V.

    1996-12-31

    There is a great need in the manufacturing, aerospace, commercial, energy, automotive, microelectronics and DoD communities for diagnostic systems that can improve the efficiency, yield and performance of various materials processes--while reducing cost, labor, scrap, and machine downtime. Laser-based ultrasound (LBU) represents a noncontact, reconfigurable, high-bandwidth ultrasonic inspection and process control technology. LBU enables remote ultrasonic sensing by replacing conventional PZT transducers, squirters, and immersion systems with laser beams. One laser beam generates the ultrasound in an opaque workpiece, while a second laser beam probes the sample to sense minute surface displacements, induced by the ultrasound or via other acoustic emission mechanisms. LBU systems have yet to be fielded commercially, owing primarily to the cost, size, and complexity of the system components. The authors have developed a low-cost, compact sensor which can potentially enable LBU systems to become a reality. The sensor employs a semiconductor crystal (GaAs) using a mechanism called nonsteady-state photo-induced emf. When combined with a laser diode as an optical source, the result is a very compact, low-cost robust sensor, which can function under in-factory conditions, including inspection of rough-cut workpieces which undergo rapid platform motion, such as high-speed, scanning laser welders. Experimental results will be discussed, including the potential for optical fiber delivery.

  10. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  11. Final Technical Report: Low-Cost Solar Variability Sensors for Ubiquitous Deployment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, Matthew Samuel

    2016-01-01

    In this project, an integrated solution to measuring and collecting solar variability data called the solar variability datalogger (SVD) was developed, tested, and the value of its data to distribution grid integration studies was demonstrated. This work addressed the problem that high-frequency solar variability is rarely measured – due to the high cost and complex installation of existing solar irradiance measuring pyranometers – but is critical to the accurate determination of the impact of photovoltaics to electric grid operation. For example, up to a 300% difference in distribution grid voltage regulator tap change operations (a measure of the impact of PV) [1] has been observed due solely to different solar variability profiles.

  12. Development and Industrialization of InGaN/GaN LEDs on Patterned Sapphire Substrates for Low Cost Emitter Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flemish, Joseph; Soer, Wouter

    2015-11-30

    Patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) technology has proven to be an effective approach to improve efficacy and reduce cost of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The volume emission from the transparent substrate leads to high package efficiency, while the simple and robust architecture of PSS-based LEDs enables low cost. PSS substrates have gained wide use in mid-power LEDs over the past years. In this project, Lumileds has developed and industrialized PSS and epitaxy technology for high- power flip-chip LEDs to bring these benefits to a broader range of applications and accelerate the adoption of energy-efficient solid-state lighting (SSL). PSS geometries were designed for highly efficient light extraction in a flip-chip architecture and high-volume manufacturability, and corresponding sapphire patterning and epitaxy manufacturing processes were integrally developed. Concurrently, device and package architectures were developed to take advantage of the PSS flip-chip die in different types of products that meet application needs. The developed PSS and epitaxy technology has been fully implemented in manufacturing at Lumileds’ San Jose, CA location, and incorporated in illumination-grade LED products that have been successfully introduced to the market, including LUXEON Q and LUXEON FlipChip White.

  13. Energy Department Announces up to $4 Million to Advance Low-Cost Hydrogen Production from Renewable and Low Carbon Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today announced up to$4 million in new funding to address critical challenges and barriers for low-cost, low-carbon hydrogen production.

  14. Ion Torren Semiconductor Sequencing Allows Rapid, Low Cost Sequencing of the Human Exome ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jenkins, David [EdgeBio

    2013-03-22

    David Jenkins on "Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing allows rapid, low-cost sequencing of the human exome" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low-cost, High Energy Si/Graphene Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XG Sciences at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low-cost, high energy Si/graphene...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thick Low-Cost, High-Power Lithium-Ion Electrodes via Aqueous Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thick low-cost,...

  17. Low-cost evacuated-tube solar collector appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beecher, D.T.

    1980-05-31

    A low cost solar heat energy collector module and array has been designed using the evacuated tube, selective absorber, air cooled concept. Glass tubing as used in fluorescent lamps with automatic sealing methods is a key feature of the evacuated tube design. A molded fiber glass concentrating reflector panel and sheet metal header assembly are proposed. Major design problems involved included the cost of materials and labor, thermal expansion and distortion problems, high stagnation and operating temperatures, isolation, thermal efficiency, sealing, joining, air pressure drop, and weight of the preassembled module. A cost of less than $5 per active square foot of collecting surface has been estimated for materials and labor of the module and its mounting frame.

  18. A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hubler, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

  19. Low-Cost Substrates for High-Performance Nanorod Array LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, Timothy; Stach, Eric; Garcia, Edwin

    2009-04-30

    The completed project, entitled Low-Cost Substrates for High-Performance Nanorod LEDs, targeted the goal of a phosphor-free nanorod-based white LED with IQE > 50% across the spectrum from 450 nm to 600 nm on metallized silicon substrates. The principal achievements of this project included: Demonstration of (In,Ga)N nanopyramid heterostructures by a conventional OMVPE process. Verification of complete filtering of threading dislocations to yield dislocation-free pyramidal heterostructures. Demonstration of electroluminescence with a peak wavelength of ~600 nm from an (In,Ga)N nanopyramid array LED. Development of a reflective ZrN/AlN buffer layer for epitaxial growth of GaN films and GaN nanopyramid arrays on (111)Si.

  20. Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeh, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

  1. Performance predictions of alternative, low cost absorbents for open-cycle absorption solar cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameel, T.A.; Gee, K.G.; Wood, B.D.

    1995-02-01

    To achieve solar fractions greater than 0.90 using the open-cycle absorption refrigeration system, considerable sorbent solution storage is necessary. Having identified the absorber as the system component whose performance is affected the most by a change in absorbent, an absorber model was selected from available literature pertaining to simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Low-cost absorbent candidates were selected and their physical properties were either located in the literature, measured, or estimated. The most promising of the absorbents considered was a mixture of two parts lithium chloride and one part zinc chloride. Both the lithium-zinc chloride mixture and lithium bromide solutions had estimated pumping powers of less than 0.1 kW. The solubility of the lithium-zinc chloride mixture at absorber conditions was improved over that of lithium bromide, reducing the risk of solidification of the solution. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Qazi, Shefah; Agogino, Alice M.

    2009-09-14

    Researchers have invented a material called ARUBA -- Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash -- that effectively and affordably removes arsenic from Bangladesh groundwater. Through analysis of studies across a range of disciplines, observations, and informal interviews conducted over three trips to Bangladesh, we have applied mechanical engineering design methodology to develop eight key design strategies, which were used in the development of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to removearsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analysed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than US$2/day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  3. Polycrystalline GaAs solar cells on low-cost Silicon-Film{trademark} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauk, M.G.; Feyock, B.W.; Hall, R.B.; Cavanaugh, K.D.; Cotter, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The authors assess the potential of a low-cost, large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet as a substrate for thin-film polycrystalline GaAs solar cells. Silicon-Film is a relatively inexpensive material on which large-grain (>2 mm) polycrystalline GaAs films can be formed. The GaAs epitaxial layers are grown by a simple close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) technique using water vapor as a transport agent. A recrystallized Ge{sub 1{minus}x}Si{sub x} buffer layer between the GaAs epilayer and Silicon-Film substrate can facilitate growth of the GaAs. Selective epitaxy on patterned, oxide-masked substrates is effective in reducing thermal stress effects.

  4. Flat-plate solar collectors utilizing polymeric film for high performance and very low cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Polymeric films are used in the construction of the absorber and window portions of a flat plate solar collector. The absorber heat exchanger consists of a channeled liquid envelope constructed using a polymeric film and metal foil laminate. In addition, the composite films and light frame monocoque construction contribute to very light weight and low cost. The use of high-performance polymers permits low-loss designs with high thermal performance. The construction concepts are consistent with high speed mass production and installation with manufacturing cost projections of $15/m/sup 2/. Tests performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and elsewhere indicate performance potential consistent with applications incorporating solar absorption air conditioning.

  5. Low cost, bare plate solar air collector. Semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A low cost, bare plate solar collector that is specifically designed to preheat ambient air with solar energy is discussed. Two prototype solar collector test systems have been designed, fabricated and assembled. Each system has been instrumented to provide instantaneous and average thermal performance data by means of a computerized data logger system. This data logger system is currently being made operational. Data collection is scheduled to begin March 1, 1980 and continue until the project completion date of June 17, 1980. Some preliminary test data have been obtained for both prototype systems. The results showed that ambient air was preheated between 5/sup 0/F and 10/sup 0/F with the systems achieving a thermal performance of between 15% and 30% efficiency.

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Georgia | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficient-Type Cells with Low Cost Manufacturing Award ... (G-TEG) with integrated Temperature Driven Membrane ... Water Treatment System for Effective Acid Mine Drainage ...

  7. Is predictive emission monitoring an acceptable low cost alternative to continuous emission monitoring for complying with enhanced monitoring requirements?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jernigan, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    Title VII of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (the {open_quotes}Act{close_quotes}) expanded and clarified the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) enforcement capabilities under the Act. Section 702 of the 1990 Amendments clarified EPA`s ability to require sources to provide information. Additionally, Section 702(b) required EPA to promulgate rules on enhanced monitoring and compliance certifications by adding a new section 114(a)(3) of the Act which states in part: {open_quotes}The Administrator shall in the case of any person which is the owner or operator of a major stationary source, and any in the case of any other person, require enhanced monitoring and submission of compliance certifications. Compliance certifications shall include (A) identification of the applicable requirement that is the basis of the certification, (B) the method used for determining the compliance status of the source, (C) the compliance status, (D) whether compliance is continuous or intermittent, (E) such other facts as the Administrator may require...{close_quotes} The 1990 Amendments contained several other changes that either relate directly to section 114(a)(3) or provide additional indications of the intent behind the new section. First, section 504(b) of the Amendments permits the Administrator to promulgate appropriate tests methods and monitoring requirements for determining compliance. That section states that {open_quotes}continuous emissions monitoring need not be required if alternative methods are available that provide sufficiently reliable and timely information for determining compliance.{close_quotes} This paper will describe Predictive Emission Systems (PEMS) and how the applications of PEMS may be a low cost, accurate, and acceptable alternative to Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) for complying with Enhanced Monitoring requirements.

  8. Development of alternate methods of determining integrated SMR source terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Kenneth

    2014-06-10

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Task Force (TF) has been evaluating licensing issues unique and important to iPWRs, ranking these issues, and developing NEI position papers for submittal to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during the past three years. Papers have been developed and submitted to the NRC in a range of areas including: Price-Anderson Act, NRC annual fees, security, modularity, and staffing. In December, 2012, NEI completed a draft position paper on SMR source terms and participated in an NRC public meeting presenting a summary of this paper, which was subsequently submitted to the NRC. One important conclusion of the source term paper was the evaluation and selection of high importance areas where additional research would have a significant impact on source terms. The highest ranked research area was iPWR containment aerosol natural deposition. The NRC accepts the use of existing aerosol deposition correlations in Regulatory Guide 1.183, but these were developed for large light water reactor (LWR) containments. Application of these correlations to an iPWR design has resulted in greater than a ten-fold reduction of containment airborne aerosol inventory as compared to large LWRs. Development and experimental justification of containment aerosol natural deposition correlations specifically for the unique iPWR containments is expected to result in a large reduction of design basis and beyond-design-basis accident source terms with concomitantly smaller dose to workers and the public. Therefore, NRC acceptance of iPWR containment aerosol natural deposition correlations will directly support the industry’s goal of reducing the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for SMRs. Based on the results in this work, it is clear that thermophoresis is relatively unimportant for iPWRs. Gravitational settling is well understood, and may be the dominant process for a dry environment. Diffusiophoresis and enhanced settling by particle growth are the dominant processes for determining DFs for expected conditions in an iPWR containment. These processes are dependent on the areato-volume (A/V) ratio, which should benefit iPWR designs because these reactors have higher A/Vs compared to existing LWRs.

  9. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a project to develop a process for press and sinter of net shape Titanium components. All of these project objectives have been successfully completed.

  10. Near-Net Shape Fabrication Using Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David M. Bowden; Dr. William H. Peter

    2012-03-31

    The use of titanium in commercial aircraft production has risen steadily over the last half century. The aerospace industry currently accounts for 58% of the domestic titanium market. The Kroll process, which has been used for over 50 years to produce titanium metal from its mineral form, consumes large quantities of energy. And, methods used to convert the titanium sponge output of the Kroll process into useful mill products also require significant energy resources. These traditional approaches result in product forms that are very expensive, have long lead times of up to a year or more, and require costly operations to fabricate finished parts. Given the increasing role of titanium in commercial aircraft, new titanium technologies are needed to create a more sustainable manufacturing strategy that consumes less energy, requires less material, and significantly reduces material and fabrication costs. A number of emerging processes are under development which could lead to a breakthrough in extraction technology. Several of these processes produce titanium alloy powder as a product. The availability of low-cost titanium powders may in turn enable a more efficient approach to the manufacture of titanium components using powder metallurgical processing. The objective of this project was to define energy-efficient strategies for manufacturing large-scale titanium structures using these low-cost powders as the starting material. Strategies include approaches to powder consolidation to achieve fully dense mill products, and joining technologies such as friction and laser welding to combine those mill products into near net shape (NNS) preforms for machining. The near net shape approach reduces material and machining requirements providing for improved affordability of titanium structures. Energy and cost modeling was used to define those approaches that offer the largest energy savings together with the economic benefits needed to drive implementation. Technical feasibility studies were performed to identify the most viable approaches to NNS preform fabrication using basic powder metallurgy mill product forms as the building blocks and advanced joining techniques including fusion and solid state joining to assemble these building blocks into efficient machining performs.

  11. Binder-free highly conductive graphene laminate for low cost printed radio frequency applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianjun; Leng, Ting; Zhang, Xiao; Hu, Zhirun; Chen, Jia Cing; Chang, Kuo Hsin; Geim, Andre K.; Novoselov, Kostya S.

    2015-05-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate realization of printable radio frequency identification (RFID) antenna by low temperature processing of graphene ink. The required ultra-low resistance is achieved by rolling compression of binder-free graphene laminate. With compression, the conductivity of graphene laminate is increased by more than 50 times compared to that of as-deposited one. Graphene laminate with conductivity of 4.3??10{sup 4?}S/m and sheet resistance of 3.8 ?/sq (with thickness of 6??m) is presented. Moreover, the formation of graphene laminate from graphene ink reported here is simple and can be carried out in low temperature (100?C), significantly reducing the fabrication costs. A dipole antenna based on the highly conductive graphene laminate is further patterned and printed on a normal paper to investigate its RF properties. The performance of the graphene laminate antenna is experimentally measured. The measurement results reveal that graphene laminate antenna can provide practically acceptable return loss, gain, bandwidth, and radiation patterns, making it ideal for low cost printed RF applications, such as RFID tags and wearable wireless sensor networks.

  12. Nonequilibrium Thermoelectrics: Low-Cost, High-Performance Materials for Cooling and Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.

    2011-05-18

    Thermoelectric materials can be made into coolers (TECs) that use electricity to develop a temperature difference, cooling something, or generators (TEGs) that convert heat directly to electricity. One application of TEGs is to place them in a waste heat stream to recuperate some of the power being lost and putting it to use more profitably. To be effective thermoelectrics, however, materials must have both high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity, a combination rarely found in nature. Materials selection and processing has led to the development of several systems with a figure of merit, ZT, of nearly unity. By using non-equilibrium techniques, we have fabricated higher efficiency thermoelectric materials. The process involves creating an amorphous material through melt spinning and then sintering it with either spark plasma or a hot press for as little as two minutes. This results in a 100% dense material with an extremely fine grain structure. The grain boundaries appear to retard phonons resulting in a reduced thermal conductivity while the electrons move through the material relatively unchecked. The techniques used are low-cost and scaleable to support industrial manufacturing.

  13. Defect Engineering, Cell Processing, and Modeling for High-Performance, Low-Cost Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-02-26

    The objective of this project is to close the efficiency gap between industrial multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and monocrystalline silicon solar cells, while preserving the economic advantage of low-cost, high-volume substrates inherent to mc-Si. Over the course of this project, we made significant progress toward this goal, as evidenced by the evolution in solar-cell efficiencies. While most of the benefits of university projects are diffuse in nature, several unique contributions can be traced to this project, including the development of novel characterization methods, defect-simulation tools, and novel solar-cell processing approaches mitigate the effects of iron impurities ("Impurities to Efficiency" simulator) and dislocations. In collaboration with our industrial partners, this project contributed to the development of cell processing recipes, specialty materials, and equipment that increased cell efficiencies overall (not just multicrystalline silicon). Additionally, several students and postdocs who were either partially or fully engaged in this project (as evidenced by the publication record) are currently in the PV industry, with others to follow.

  14. Low-cost, low-weight CNG cylinder development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Mark E.; Melford, K.; Wong, J.; Gambone, L.

    1999-09-01

    This program was established to develop and commercialize new high-strength steel-lined, composite hoop-wrapped compressed natural gas (CNG) cylinders for vehicular applications. As much as 70% of the cost of natural gas vehicles can be related to on-board natural gas storage costs. The cost and weight targets for this program represent significant savings in each characteristic when compared to comparable containers available at the initiation of the program. The program objectives were to optimize specific weight and cost goals, yielding CNG cylinders with dimensions that should, allowing for minor modifications, satisfy several vehicle market segments. The optimization process encompassed material, design, and process improvement. In optimizing the CNG cylinder design, due consideration was given to safety aspects relative to national, international, and vehicle manufacturer cylinder standards and requirements. The report details the design and development effort, encompassing plant modifications, material selection, design issues, tooling development, prototype development, and prototype testing. Extenuating circumstances prevented the immediate commercialization of the cylinder designs, though significant progress was made towards improving the cost and performance of CNG cylinders. A new low-cost fiber was successfully employed while the weight target was met and the cost target was missed by less than seven percent.

  15. A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-02-21

    The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass feedstocks were utilized to identify optimized process conditions and selective HDO catalyst for high yield production of hydrocarbons from biomass. In addition to these experimental efforts, in Tasks D and E, we have developed a mathematical optimization framework to identify carbon and energy efficient biomass-to-liquid fuel process designs that integrate the use of different primary energy sources along with biomass (e.g. solar, coal or natural gas) for liquid fuel production. Using this tool, we have identified augmented biomass-to-liquid fuel configurations based on the fast-hydropyrolysis/HDO pathway, which was experimentally studied in this project. The computational approach used for screening alternative process configurations represents a unique contribution to the field of biomass processing for liquid fuel production.

  16. Investigation of low-cost LNG vehicle fuel tank concepts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, J.E.; Siahpush, A.

    1998-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate development of a low-cost liquid natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel storage tank with low fuel boil-off, low tank pressure, and high safety margin. One of the largest contributors to the cost of converting a vehicle to LNG is the cost of the LNG fuel tank. To minimize heat leak from the surroundings into the low-temperature fuel, these tanks are designed as cryogenic dewars with double walls separated by an evacuated insulation space containing multi-layer insulation. The cost of these fuel tanks is driven by this double-walled construction, both in terms of materials and labor. The primary focus of the analysis was to try to devise a fuel tank concept that would allow for the elimination of the double-wall requirement. Results of this study have validated the benefit of vacuum/MLI insulation for LNG fuel tanks and the difficulty in identifying viable alternatives. The thickness of a non-vacuum insulation layer would have to be unreasonably large to achieve an acceptable non-venting hold time. Reasonable hold times could be achieved by using an auxiliary tank to accept boil-off vapor from a non-vacuum insulated primary tank, if the vapor in the auxiliary tank can be stored at high pressure. The primary focus of the analysis was to try to devise a fuel tank concept that allowed for the elimination of the double-wall requirement. Thermodynamic relations were developed for analyzing the fuel tank transient response to heat transfer, venting of vapor, and out-flow of either vapor or liquid. One of the major costs associated with conversion of a vehicle to LNG fuel is the cost of the LNG fuel tank. The cost of these tanks is driven by the cryogenic nature of the fuel and by the fundamental design requirements of long non-venting hold times and low storage pressure.

  17. A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2012-09-30

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

  18. Ranking low cost sorbents for mercury capture from simulated flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Revata Seneviratne; Cedric Charpenteau; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti

    2007-12-15

    Coal fired utility boilers are the largest anthropogenic source of mercury release to the atmosphere, and mercury abatement legislation is already in place in the USA. The present study aimed to rank low cost mercury sorbents (char and activated carbon from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber and two coal fly ashes from UK power plants) against Norit Darco HgTM for mercury retention by using a novel bench-scale reactor. In this scheme, a fixed sorbent bed was tested for mercury capture efficiency from a simulated flue gas stream. Experiments with a gas stream of only mercury and nitrogen showed that while the coal ashes were the most effective in mercury capture, char from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber was as effective as the commercial sorbent Norit Darco HgTM. Tests conducted at 150{sup o}C, with a simulated flue gas mix that included N{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and HCl, showed that all the sorbents captured approximately 100% of the mercury in the gas stream. The introduction of NO and NO{sub 2} was found to significantly improve the mercury capture, possibly by reactions between NOx and the mercury. Since the sorbents' efficiency decreased with increasing test temperature, physical sorption could be the initial step in the mercury capture process. As the sorbents were only exposed to 64 ng of mercury in the gas stream, the mercury loadings on the samples were significantly less than their equilibrium capacities. The larger capacities of the activated carbons due to their more microporous structure were therefore not utilized. Although the sorbents have been characterized by BET surface area analysis and XRD analysis, further analysis is needed in order to obtain a more conclusive correlation of how the characteristics of the different sorbents correlate with the observed variations in mercury capture ability. 34 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a coating system meeting the requirements for photovoltaic module encapsulation.

  20. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... materials and compare the formability of continuous cast (CC) and direct chill (DC) materials. * Demonstrate high volume cycle times with CC material on an integrated forming cell. ...

  1. Screening of low cost sorbents for arsenic and mercury capture in gasification systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cedric Charpenteau; Revata Seneviratne; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti

    2007-09-15

    A novel laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor has been developed to investigate trace metal capture on selected sorbents for cleaning the hot raw gas in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants. The new reactor design is presented, together with initial results for mercury and arsenic capture on five sorbents. It was expected that the capture efficiency of sorbents would decrease with increasing temperature. However, a commercial activated carbon, Norit Darco 'Hg', and a pyrolysis char prepared from scrap tire rubber exhibit similar efficiencies for arsenic at 200 and at 400{sup o}C (70% and 50%, respectively). Meta-kaolinite and fly ash both exhibit an efficiency of around 50% at 200{sup o}C, which then dropped as the test temperature was increased to 400{sup o}C. Activated scrap tire char performed better at 200{sup o}C than the pyrolysis char showing an arsenic capture capacity similar to that of commercial Norit Darco 'Hg'; however, efficiency dropped to below 40% at 400{sup o}C. These results suggest that the capture mechanism of arsenic (As4) is more complex than purely physical adsorption onto the sorbents. Certain elements within the sorbents may have significant importance for chemical adsorption, in addition to the effect of surface area, as determined by the BET method. This was indeed the case for the mercury capture efficiency for all four sorbents tested. Three of the sorbents tested retained 90% of the mercury when operated at 100{sup o}C. As the temperature increased, the efficiency of activated carbon and pyrolysis char reduced significantly. Curiously, despite having the smallest Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area, a pf-combustion ash was the most effective in capturing mercury over the temperature range studied. These observations suggest that the observed mercury capture was not purely physical adsorption but a combination of physical and chemical processes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Development of advanced manufacturing technologies for low cost hydrogen storage vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick

    2014-12-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defined a need for low-cost gaseous hydrogen storage vessels at 700 bar to support cost goals aimed at 500,000 units per year. Existing filament winding processes produce a pressure vessel that is structurally inefficient, requiring more carbon fiber for manufacturing reasons, than would otherwise be necessary. Carbon fiber is the greatest cost driver in building a hydrogen pressure vessel. The objective of this project is to develop new methods for manufacturing Type IV pressure vessels for hydrogen storage with the purpose of lowering the overall product cost through an innovative hybrid process of optimizing composite usage by combining traditional filament winding (FW) and advanced fiber placement (AFP) techniques. A numbers of vessels were manufactured in this project. The latest vessel design passed all the critical tests on the hybrid design per European Commission (EC) 79-2009 standard except the extreme temperature cycle test. The tests passed include burst test, cycle test, accelerated stress rupture test and drop test. It was discovered the location where AFP and FW overlap for load transfer could be weakened during hydraulic cycling at 85°C. To design a vessel that passed these tests, the in-house modeling software was updated to add capability to start and stop fiber layers to simulate the AFP process. The original in-house software was developed for filament winding only. Alternative fiber was also investigated in this project, but the added mass impacted the vessel cost negatively due to the lower performance from the alternative fiber. Overall the project was a success to show the hybrid design is a viable solution to reduce fiber usage, thus driving down the cost of fuel storage vessels. Based on DOE’s baseline vessel size of 147.3L and 91kg, the 129L vessel (scaled to DOE baseline) in this project shows a 32% composite savings and 20% cost savings when comparing Vessel 15 hybrid design and the Quantum baseline all filament wound vessel. Due to project timing, there was no additional time available to fine tune the design to improve the load transfer between AFP and FW. Further design modifications will likely help pass the extreme temperature cycle test, the remaining test that is critical to the hybrid design.

  3. Tandem Microwire Solar Cells for Flexible High Efficiency Low Cost Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Harry A.

    2015-03-10

    This project has developed components of a waferless, flexible, low-cost tandem multijunction III-V/Si microwire array solar cell technology which combines the efficiency of wafered III-V photovoltaic technologies with the process designed to meet the Sunshot object. The project focused on design of lattice-matched GaAsP/SiGe two junction cell design and lattice-mismatched GaInP/Si tandem cell design. Combined electromagnetic simulation/device physics models using realistic microwire tandem structures were developed that predict >22% conversion efficiency for known material parameters, such as tunnel junction structure, window layer structure, absorber lifetimes and optical absorption and these model indicate a clear path to 30% efficiency for high quality III-V heterostructures. SiGe microwire arrays were synthesized via Cu-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth with inexpensive chlorosilane and chlorogermance precursors in an atmospheric pressure reactor. SiGe alloy composition in microwires was found to be limited to a maximum of 12% Ge incorporation during chlorogermane growth, due to the melting of the alloy near the solidus composition. Lattice mismatched InGaP double heterostructures were grown by selective epitaxy with a thermal oxide mask on Si microwire substrates using metallorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirms the growth of individual step graded layers and a high density of defects near the wire/III-V interface. Selective epitaxy was initiated with a low temperature nucleation scheme under “atomic layer epitaxy” or “flow mediated epitaxy” conditions whereby the Ga and P containing precursors are alternately introduced into the reactor to promote layer-bylayer growth. In parallel to our efforts on conformal GaInP heteroepitaxy on selectively masked Si microwires, we explored direct, axial growth of GaAs on Si wire arrays as another route to a tandem junction architecture. We proposed axial, lattice-mismatched growth of a GaAs segment that extrude out of a Si wire via a self-aligned SiO2 hollow cylindrical mask. With this growth strategy, misfit dislocations that would normally form at the GaAs/Si interface during thin film epitaxy may bend over to and thus terminate at the sidewall of the SiO2 tube. A reactive-ion etching technique was employed 1) to remove Si to form a hollow, self-aligned SiO2 cylindrical tube as a growth template for GaAs epitaxy using a vertical, showerhead, low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition reactor that was operated at 0.1 atm. Successful epitaxy of axial GaAs wires on non-polar, <111>-oriented Si wire substrates was found at temperatures of ~850C. This and the other III-V/Si heterojunction wire synthesis strategies described here are promising approaches to realize future III-V/Si tandem solar cell designs.

  4. Cost-Effective Cable Insulation: Nanoclay Reinforced Ethylene-Propylene-Rubber for Low-Cost HVDC Cabling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-24

    GENI Project: GE is developing new, low-cost insulation for high-voltage direct current (HVDC) electricity transmission cables. The current material used to insulate HVDC transmission cables is very expensive and can account for as much as 1/3 of the total cost of a high-voltage transmission system. GE is embedding nanomaterials into specialty rubber to create its insulation. Not only are these materials less expensive than those used in conventional HVDC insulation, but also they will help suppress excess charge accumulation. The excess charge left behind on a cable poses a major challenge for high-voltage insulation—if it’s not kept to a low level, it could ultimately lead the insulation to fail. GE’s low-cost insulation is compatible with existing U.S. cable manufacturing processes, further enhancing its cost effectiveness.

  5. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ramamoorthy Ramesh: Low-cost Solar

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh:

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  6. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  7. CX-100138 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-100138 Categorical Exclusion Determination Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials ... a chemically resistant and anti-fouling coating for low-cost Weak Black Liquor (WBL) ...

  8. Low Cost Arc Fault Detection and Protection for PV Systems: January 30, 2012 - September 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCalmont, S.

    2013-10-01

    Final report for Tigo Energy Incubator project. The specific objective of this 18-month research effort was to develop an off-the-shelf arc-fault detector. The starting point of the project was a prototype detector that was constructed using discrete components and laboratory equipment. An intermediate objective was to build a technically viable detector using programmable components in the detector circuitry. The final objective was to build a commercially viable detector by reducing the cost of the circuitry through the use of more sophisticated programmable components and higher levels of integration.

  9. Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

    2012-08-10

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

  10. Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

    2008-05-31

    This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

  11. Development of a High Efficiency Hot Gas Turbo-expander and Low Cost Heat

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exchangers for Optimized CSP Supercritical CO2 Operation | Department of Energy 313_moore.pdf More Documents & Publications Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander - FY12 Q4 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers CX-009021: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  12. Low-cost CuInSe[sub 2] submodule development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C. )

    1992-10-01

    Aim of this project is development and demonstration of processing steps necessary for fabrication of high efficiency CuInSe[sub 2] solar cells and sub-modules by the two-stage technique (also called the selenization method.) During this period, we have optimized the processing parameters of this method and demonstrated CuInSe[sub 2]/CdS/ZnO devices with a 1[endash]4 cm[sup 2] area and up to 12.4% active area efficiency. We have also developed a novel approach for the preparation of Cu/In precursors that improved the stoichiometric and morphological uniformity in these films. We have developed processing steps and tooling for handling up to 1 ft[sup 2] size substrates and as a result of these efforts demonstrated our first monolithically integrated sub-module of 1 ft[sup 2] area. 16 figs, 1 tab, 15 refs.

  13. Further development of a Low Cost Solar Panel. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, T.; Erskine, D.; Short, R.; Torok, R.

    1980-04-01

    The primary objective of this phase of the Low Cost Solar Panel (LCSP) development is to fabricate, test, and gain practical operational experience on a full-scale prototype panel section, with emphasis on the unglazed configuration. The program includes design refinement, fabrication of full-scale prototypes by hand and semiautomated equipment, subscale and full-scale structural testing, outdoor performance tests, and an assessment of manufacturing requirements and production costs. The report describes the LCSP concept in more detail, the project approach and the more significant accomplishments to date.

  14. Further development of a low-cost solar panel. Final report, September 28, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, T.; Torok, R.; Erskine, D.; Short, R.

    1980-07-01

    The primary objective of this project was to fabricate, test, and gain practical operational experience on a full-scale prototype panel section, with emphasis on the unglazed configuration. The project included design refinement, fabrication of full-scale prototypes by hand and semiautomated equipment, subscale and full-scale structural testing, outdoor performance tests, and an assessment of manufacturing requirements and production costs. The Low Cost Solar Panel, the project approach, and the more significant accomplishments of this contract are described in detail.

  15. A New Method of Low Cost Production of Ti Alloys to Reduce Energy Cpnsumption of Mechanical Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zak Fang, PI, University of Utah, U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office Peer Review Meeting Washington, D.C. May 6-7, 2014 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Project Objective  Develop a novel low cost method for manufacturing Ti  Demonstrate the mechanical properties of Ti using the new method to be equivalent to that of wrought Ti at a fraction of its cost.  Demonstrate advantages of using Ti (by this technology) in

  16. Scale-up of Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, Mark A

    2014-08-27

    The project started in September, 2012 with the goal of scaling up from the existing laboratory scale process for producing carbon fiber (CF) from polyolefin (PO) based precursor fiber using a Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation stabilization process. The award was used to develop a process that was capable of producing market development quantities of CF from PO precursor fiber at a rate of 4 kg/h of CF. The CF would target properties that met or exceeded the Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicles Technology [1] standard; i.e., 172 GPa modulus and 1.72 GPa strength at greater than or equal to 1% strain. The Dow proprietary process was capable of meeting and exceeding these targets properties. Project DE-EE0005760 resulted from a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Dow and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with support from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and DOE. In the first budget period, the main goal was to design a sulfonation-desulfonation market development plant capable of stabilizing PO precursor fiber at a rate of 5 kg/h using a sulfonation solution. The detailed design, location, and cost estimate were determined as scheduled in the Project Management Plan (PMP). In parallel with this DOE award project was a fundamentals and economic evaluation funded by The Dow Chemical Company (Dow). The goal of the Dow sponsored project was to finalize the mass balances, energy balances, and levelized cost to produce CF using the Dow process. A Go-No-Go decision was scheduled in June, 2013 based on the findings of the DOE sponsored scale up project and the Dow sponsored project. In June, 2013, Dow made the No-Go decision to halt and abandon the Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation process for stabilizing PO precursor fibers for the manufacturing of CF. This No-Go decision was identified in the original proposal and at the start of this project, and the decision was made as scheduled. The decision was based on the high levelized economic cost of the process relative to the manufacture of CF from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor fibers. The capital required to sulfonate the fibers adds a significant cost to the process due to the need for investment in a sulfuric acid recovery plant. This high additional capital over the capital for a PAN based CF plant, reduces the levelized economic cost to slightly advantaged over PAN based CF. The sulfonation-desulfonation stabilization route failed to meet the Dow’s return on investment criterion and the cost advantage target set forth for the DOE project. The DOE and Dow decided to halt spending on the project until a new PO fiber stabilization process could be identified that met the DOE physical properties standard and the levelized economic cost constraints of Dow. When the new technology was developed, then award DE-EE0005760 would be re-started with the same goals of the development of a market development plant capable of producing CF at 4 kg/h with the properties that met or exceed those set forth by the Department of Energy Vehicles Technology standard. Progress on the development of the new process has been slow and thus has delayed the scale up project. Dow’s efforts to date have not progressed to the point of demonstrating a commercially-viable process for production of low cost CF from PO precursors for Dow’s rigorous economic constraints. After extensive discussions within Dow and consultation with DOE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) Headquarters and Golden Field Office teams, Dow has decided to proceed with the formal recommendation to terminate subject project. DOE’s AMO Headquarters and Golden Field Office teams agreed with the termination of the project.

  17. A procedure to determine the planar integral spot dose values of proton pencil beam spots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Aman; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Poenisch, Falk; Amos, Richard A.; Ciangaru, George; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Planar integral spot dose (PISD) of proton pencil beam spots (PPBSs) is a required input parameter for beam modeling in some treatment planning systems used in proton therapy clinics. The measurement of PISD by using commercially available large area ionization chambers, like the PTW Bragg peak chamber (BPC), can have large uncertainties due to the size limitation of these chambers. This paper reports the results of our study of a novel method to determine PISD values from the measured lateral dose profiles and peak dose of the PPBS. Methods: The PISDs of 72.5, 89.6, 146.9, 181.1, and 221.8 MeV energy PPBSs were determined by area integration of their planar dose distributions at different depths in water. The lateral relative dose profiles of the PPBSs at selected depths were measured by using small volume ion chambers and were investigated for their angular anisotropies using Kodak XV films. The peak spot dose along the beam's central axis (D{sub 0}) was determined by placing a small volume ion chamber at the center of a broad field created by the superposition of spots at different locations. This method allows eliminating positioning uncertainties and the detector size effect that could occur when measuring it in single PPBS. The PISD was then calculated by integrating the measured lateral relative dose profiles for two different upper limits of integration and then multiplying it with corresponding D{sub 0}. The first limit of integration was set to radius of the BPC, namely 4.08 cm, giving PISD{sub RBPC}. The second limit was set to a value of the radial distance where the profile dose falls below 0.1% of the peak giving the PISD{sub full}. The calculated values of PISD{sub RBPC} obtained from area integration method were compared with the BPC measured values. Long tail dose correction factors (LTDCFs) were determined from the ratio of PISD{sub full}/PISD{sub RBPC} at different depths for PPBSs of different energies. Results: The spot profiles were found to have angular anisotropy. This anisotropy in PPBS dose distribution could be accounted in a reasonable approximate manner by taking the average of PISD values obtained using the in-line and cross-line profiles. The PISD{sub RBPC} values fall within 3.5% of those measured by BPC. Due to inherent dosimetry challenges associated with PPBS dosimetry, which can lead to large experimental uncertainties, such an agreement is considered to be satisfactory for validation purposes. The PISD{sub full} values show differences ranging from 1 to 11% from BPC measured values, which are mainly due to the size limitation of the BPC to account for the dose in the long tail regions of the spots extending beyond its 4.08 cm radius. The dose in long tail regions occur both for high energy beams such as 221.8 MeV PPBS due to the contributions of nuclear interactions products in the medium, and for low energy PPBS because of their larger spot sizes. The calculated LTDCF values agree within 1% with those determined by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Conclusions: The area integration method to compute the PISD from PPBS lateral dose profiles is found to be useful both to determine the correction factors for the values measured by the BPC and to validate the results from MC simulations.

  18. Thin-film flat-plate solar collectors for low-cost manufacture and installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J.W.; Wilhelm, W.G.

    1980-03-01

    A flat-plate solar energy collector design using thin-film plastics in both the absorber and glazing is described. The design approach proceeded in two steps. First, cost constraints on solar collectors were determined using reasonable economic projections. Second, engineering was applied only to those ideas which had hope of falling within those cost boundaries. The use of thin-film plastics appeared most attractive according to these criteria. The nature of the marketing and distribution network can be expected to have a strong impact on the final installed cost of the collector; the proposed design has characteristics which could make possible a reduced price markup.

  19. Low-Cost Solar-Array Project. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of the LSA Silicon Material Task is to establish a chemical process for producing silicon at a rate and price commensurate with the production goals of the LSA project for solar-cell modules. As part of the overall Silicon Material Task, Union Carbide developed the silane-silicon process and advanced the technology to the point where it has a definite potential for providing high-purity polysilicon on a commercial scale at a price of $14/kg by 1986 (1980 dollars). This work, completed under Phases I and II of the contract, provided a firm base for the Phase III Program (initiated in April 1979) aimed at establishing the practicality of the process by pursuing the following specific objectives: (1) design, fabricate, install, and operate an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) sized for 100 MT/yr to obtain extensive performance data to establish the data base for the design of commercial facilities; (2) perform support research and development to provide an information base usable for the EPSDU and for technological design and economic analysis for potential scale-up of the process; and (3) perform iterative economic analyses of the estimated product cost for the production of semiconductor-grade silicon in a facility capable of producing 1000 MT/yr. This process for preparing semiconductor-grade silicon in the EPSDU from metallurgical-grade (M-G) silicon is based on a well-integrated arrangement of purification steps that provides a cost-effective process system. The three basic steps entail converting M-G silicon to trichlorosilane, redistributing the trichlorosilane to produce silane, and thermally decomposing the silane to form amorphous silicon powder. The powder is then melted and the molten silicon is cast to polycrystalline for subsequent use in fabricating solar cells. Progress is reported in detail. (WHK)

  20. Automatic position calculating imaging radar with low-cost synthetic aperture sensor for imaging layered media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mast, Jeffrey E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system for analyzing structures comprises a radar transmitter and receiver connected to a timing mechanism that allows a radar echo sample to be taken at a variety of delay times for each radar pulse transmission. The radar transmitter and receiver are coupled to a position determining system that provides the x,y position on a surface for each group of samples measured for a volume from the surface. The radar transmitter and receiver are moved about the surface to collect such groups of measurements from a variety of x,y positions. Return signal amplitudes represent the relative reflectivity of objects within the volume and the delay in receiving each signal echo represents the depth at which the object lays in the volume and the propagation speeds of the intervening material layers. Successively deeper z-planes are backward propagated from one layer to the next with an adjustment for variations in the expected propagation velocities of the material layers that lie between adjacent z-planes.

  1. Automatic position calculating imaging radar with low-cost synthetic aperture sensor for imaging layered media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mast, J.E.

    1998-08-18

    An imaging system for analyzing structures comprises a radar transmitter and receiver connected to a timing mechanism that allows a radar echo sample to be taken at a variety of delay times for each radar pulse transmission. The radar transmitter and receiver are coupled to a position determining system that provides the x,y position on a surface for each group of samples measured for a volume from the surface. The radar transmitter and receiver are moved about the surface to collect such groups of measurements from a variety of x,y positions. Return signal amplitudes represent the relative reflectivity of objects within the volume and the delay in receiving each signal echo represents the depth at which the object lays in the volume and the propagation speeds of the intervening material layers. Successively deeper z-planes are backward propagated from one layer to the next with an adjustment for variations in the expected propagation velocities of the material layers that lie between adjacent z-planes. 10 figs.

  2. Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan W.; Rosemeier, Cory A.; Mayers, David; Singh, Jogender

    2013-12-02

    Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

  3. The Homogeneus Forcing of Mercury Oxidation to provide Low-Cost Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kramlich; Linda Castiglone

    2007-06-30

    Trace amounts of mercury are found in all coals. During combustion, or during thermal treatment in advanced coal processes, this mercury is vaporized and can be released to the atmosphere with the ultimate combustion products. This has been a cause for concern for a number of years, and has resulted in a determination by the EPA to regulate and control these emissions. Present technology does not, however, provide inexpensive ways to capture or remove mercury. Mercury that exits the furnace in the oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) is known to much more easily captured in existing pollution control equipment (e.g., wet scrubbers for SO{sub 2}), principally due to its high solubility in water. Work funded by DOE has helped understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to mercury oxidation in furnaces. The scenario is as follows. In the flame the mercury is quantitatively vaporized as elemental mercury. Also, the chlorine in the fuel is released as HCl. The direct reaction Hg+HCl is, however, far too slow to be of practical consequence in oxidation. The high temperature region does supports a small concentration of atomic chlorine. As the gases cool (either in the furnace convective passes, in the quench prior to cold gas cleanup, or within a sample probe), the decay in Cl atom is constrained by the slowness of the principal recombination reaction, Cl+Cl+M{yields}Cl{sub 2}+M. This allows chlorine atom to hold a temporary, local superequilibrium concentration . Once the gases drop below about 550 C, the mercury equilibrium shifts to favor HgCl{sub 2} over Hg, and this superequilibrium chlorine atom promotes oxidation via the fast reactions Hg+Cl+M{yields}HgCl+M, HgCl+Cl+M{yields}HgCl{sub 2}+M, and HgCl+Cl{sub 2}{yields}HgCl{sub 2}+Cl. Thus, the high temperature region provides the Cl needed for the reaction, while the quench region allows the Cl to persist and oxidize the mercury in the absence of decomposition reactions that would destroy the HgCl{sub 2}. Promoting mercury oxidation is one means of getting moderate-efficiency, 'free' mercury capture when wet gas cleanup systems are already in place. The chemical kinetic model we developed to describe the oxidation process suggests that in fuel lean gases, the introduction of trace amounts of H{sub 2} within the quench region leads to higher Cl concentrations via chain branching. The amount of additive, and the temperature at the addition point are critical. We investigated this process in a high-temperature quartz flow reactor. The results do indicate a substantial amount of promotion of oxidation with the introduction of relatively small amounts of hydrogen at around 1000 K ({approx}100 ppm relative to the furnace gas). In practical systems the source of this hydrogen is likely to be a small natural gas steam reformer. This would also produce CO, so co-injection of CO was also tested. The CO did not provide any additional promotion, and in some cases led to a reduction in oxidation. We also examined the influence of NO and SO{sub 2} on the promotion process. We did not see any influence under the conditions examined. The present results were for a 0.5 s, isothermal plug flow environment. The next step should be to determine the appropriate injection point for the hydrogen and the performance under realistic temperature quench conditions. This could be accomplished first by chemical kinetic modeling, and then by tunnel flow experiment.

  4. Development of Low Cost Gas Atomization of Precursor Powders for Simplified ODS Alloy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Iver

    2014-08-05

    A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was developed in this project to enable production (at our partner’s facility) a precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE) containing intermetallic compound (IMC) phase. Consolidation and heat-treatment experiments were performed at Ames Lab to promote the exchange of oxygen from the surface oxide to the RE intermetallic to form nano-metric oxide dispersoids. Alloy selection was aided by an internal oxidation and serial grinding experiments at Ames Lab and found that Hf-containing alloys may form more stable dispersoids than Ti-containing alloy, i.e., the Hf-containing system exhibited five different oxide phases and two different intermetallics compared to the two oxide phases and one intermetallic in the Ti-containing alloys. Since the simpler Ti-containing system was less complex to characterize, and make observations on the effects of processing parameters, the Ti-containing system was selected by Ames Lab for experimental atomization trials at our partner. An internal oxidation model was developed at Ames Lab and used to predict the heat treatment times necessary for dispersoid formation as a function of powder size and temperature. A new high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) nozzle was developed at Ames Lab with the aim of promoting fine powder production at scales similar to that of the high gas-flow and melt-flow of industrial atomizers. The atomization nozzle was characterized using schlieren imaging and aspiration pressure testing at Ames Lab to determine the optimum melt delivery tip geometry and atomization pressure to promote enhanced secondary atomization mechanisms. Six atomization trials were performed at our partner to investigate the effects of: gas atomization pressure and reactive gas concentration on the particle size distribution (PSD) and the oxygen content of the resulting powder. Also, the effect on the rapidly solidified microstructure (as a function of powder size) was investigated at Ames Lab as a function of reactive gas composition and bulk alloy composition. The results indicated that the pulsatile gas atomization mechanism and a significantly enhanced yield of fine powders reported in the literature for this type of process were not observed. Also it was determined that reactive gas may marginally improve the fine powder yield but further experiments are required. The oxygen content in the gas also did not have any detrimental effect on the microstructure (i.e. did not significantly reduce undercooling). On the contrary, the oxygen addition to the atomization gas may have mitigated some potent catalytic nucleation sites, but not enough to significantly alter the microstructure vs. particle size relationship. Overall the downstream injection of oxygen was not found to significantly affect either the particle size distribution or undercooling (as inferred from microstructure and XRD observations) but injection further upstream, including in the gas atomization nozzle, remains to be investigated in later work.

  5. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  6. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2013-02-11

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. Low-Cost Nano-Patterning Process Makes Millions of Holes in Silver Film, Boosting Light-Capturing Qualities of Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    NREL researchers have demonstrated a simple, low-cost way to pattern nano-sized holes in thin silver films in order to trap light waves and boost the transmission of photons into usable energy.

  8. Low-cost electrochemical treatment of indium tin oxide anodes for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui Cheng, Chuan, E-mail: chengchuanhui@dlut.edu.cn; Shan Liang, Ze; Gang Wang, Li; Dong Gao, Guo; Zhou, Ting; Ming Bian, Ji; Min Luo, Ying [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Tong Du, Guo, E-mail: dugt@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a simple low-cost approach as an alternative to conventional O{sub 2} plasma treatment to modify the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for use in organic light-emitting diodes. ITO is functionalized with F{sup ?} ions by electrochemical treatment in dilute hydrofluoric acid. An electrode with a work function of 5.2?eV is achieved following fluorination. Using this electrode, a maximum external quantum efficiency of 26.0% (91?cd/A, 102?lm/W) is obtained, which is 12% higher than that of a device using the O{sub 2} plasma-treated ITO. Fluorination also increases the transparency in the near-infrared region.

  9. Chemical gel barriers as low-cost alternative to containment and in situ cleanup of hazardous wastes to protect groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    Chemical gel barriers are being considered as a low-cost alternative for containment and in situ cleanup of hazardous wastes to protect groundwater. Most of the available gels in petroleum application are non-reactive and relative impermeable, providing a physical barriers for all fluids and contaminants. However, other potential systems can be envisioned. These systems could include gels that are chemically reactive and impermeable such that most phase are captured by the barriers but the contaminants could diffuse through the barriers. Another system that is chemically reactive and permeable could have potential applications in selectivity capturing contaminants while allowing water to pass through the barriers. This study focused on chemically reactive and permeable gel barriers. The gels used in experiment are DuPont LUDOX SM colloidal silica gel and Pfizer FLOPAAM 1330S hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) gel.

  10. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells Award Number: DE-EE0005436 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

  11. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells Award Number: DE-EE0005436 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

  12. CX-007691: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding will support development of Compact Dynamic Phase Angle Regulators (CD-PAR), a compact, low-cost power flow controller integrated with custom-wound transformers to control ...

  13. A low cost, high energy density and long cycle life potassium-sulfur battery for grid-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Bowden, Mark E.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2015-08-15

    Alkali metal-sulfur batteries are attractive for energy storage applications because of their high energy density. Among the batteries, lithium-sulfur batteries typically use liquid in the battery electrolyte, which causes problems in both performance and safety. Sodium-sulfur batteries can use a solid electrolyte such as beta alumina but this requires a high operating temperature. Here we report a novel potassium-sulfur battery with K+-conducting beta-alumina as the electrolyte. Our studies indicate that liquid potassium exhibits much better wettability on the surface of beta-alumina compared to liquid sodium at lower temperatures. Based on this observation, we develop a potassium-sulfur battery that can operate at as low as 150°C with excellent performance. In particular, the battery shows excellent cycle life with negligible capacity fade in 1000 cycles because of the dense ceramic membrane. This study demonstrates a new battery with a high energy density, long cycle life, low cost and high safety, which is ideal for grid-scale energy storage.

  14. Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Jeannine

    2013-08-31

    TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

  15. SHELXT – Integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    SHELXT automates routine small-molecule structure determination starting from single-crystal reflection data, the Laue group and a reasonable guess as to which elements might be present. The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms.

  16. Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Phillip

    2014-11-01

    Air Products is carrying out a scope of work under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications.” The Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) includes a Task 4f in which a Decision Point shall be reached, necessitating a review of Tasks 2-5 with an emphasis on Task 4f. This Topical Report constitutes the Decision Point Application pertaining to Task 4f. The SOPO under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 is aimed at furthering the development of the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen production process toward a demonstration scale facility known as the Oxygen Development Facility (ODF). It is anticipated that the completion of the current SOPO will advance the technology significantly along a pathway towards enabling the design and construction of the ODF. Development progress on several fronts is critical before an ODF project can commence; this Topical Report serves as an early update on the progress in critical development areas. Progress was made under all tasks, including Materials Development, Ceramic Processing Development, Engineering Development, and Performance Testing. Under Task 4f, Air Products carried out a cost and performance study in which several process design and cost parameters were varied and assessed with a process model and budgetary costing exercise. The results show that the major variables include ceramic module reliability, ITM operating temperature, module production yield, and heat addition strategy. High-temperature compact heat exchangers are shown to contribute significant cost benefits, while directly firing into the feed stream to an ITM are even a mild improvement on the high-temperature recuperation approach. Based on the findings to-date, Air Products recommends no changes to the content or emphasis in the current SOPO and recommends its completion prior to another formal assessment of these factors.

  17. An integrated approach for determining plutonium mass in spent fuel assemblies with nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Fensin, Mike L; Menlove, Howard O

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of reasons for quantifying plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel. Below, five motivations are listed: (1) To verify the Pu content of spent fuel without depending on unverified information from the facility, as requested by the IAEA ('independent verification'). New spent fuel measurement techniques have the potential to allow the IAEA to recover continuity of knowledge and to better detect diversion. (2) To assure regulators that all of the nuclear material of interest leaving a nuclear facility actually arrives at another nuclear facility ('shipper/receiver'). Given the large stockpile of nuclear fuel at reactor sites around the world, it is clear that in the coming decades, spent fuel will need to be moved to either reprocessing facilities or storage sites. Safeguarding this transportation is of significant interest. (3) To quantify the Pu in spent fuel that is not considered 'self-protecting.' Fuel is considered self-protecting by some regulatory bodies when the dose that the fuel emits is above a given level. If the fuel is not self-protecting, then the Pu content of the fuel needs to be determined and the Pu mass recorded in the facility's accounting system. This subject area is of particular interest to facilities that have research-reactor spent fuel or old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. It is also of interest to regulators considering changing the level at which fuel is considered self-protecting. (4) To determine the input accountability value at an electrochemical processing facility. It is not expected that an electrochemical reprocessing facility will have an input accountability tank, as is typical in an aqueous reprocessing facility. As such, one possible means of determining the input accountability value is to measure the Pu content in the spent fuel that arrives at the facility. (5) To fully understand the composition of the fuel in order to efficiently and safely pack spent fuel into a long-term repository. The NDA of spent fuel can be part of a system that cost-effectively meets the burnup credit needs of a repository. Behind each of these reasons is a regulatory structure with MC&A requirements. In the case of the IAEA, the accountable quantity is elemental plutonium. The material in spent fuel (fissile isotopes, fission products, etc.) emits signatures that provide information about the content and history of the fuel. A variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are available to quantify these signatures. The effort presented in this paper is investigation of the capabilities of 12 NDA techniques. For these 12, none is conceptually capable of independently determining the Pu content in a spent fuel assembly while at the same time being able to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of rods. For this reason the authors are investigating the capability of 12 NDA techniques with the end goal of integrating a few techniques together into a system that is capable of measuring Pu mass in an assembly. The work described here is the beginning of what is anticipated to be a five year effort: (1) two years of modeling to select the best technologies, (2) one year fabricating instruments and (3) two years measuring spent fuel. This paper describes the first two years of this work. In order to cost effectively and robustly model the performance of the 12 NDA techniques, an 'assembly library' was created. The library contains the following: (a) A diverse range of PWR spent fuel assemblies (burnup, enrichment, cooling time) similar to that which exists in spent pools today and in the future. (b) Diversion scenarios that capture a range of possible rod removal options. (c) The spatial and isotopic detail needed to accurately quantify the capability of all the NDA techniques so as to enable integration. It is our intention to make this library available to other researchers in the field for inter-comparison purposes. The performance of each instrument will be quantified for the full assembly library for measurements in three different media: air, water and borated water. The 12 NDA techniques being researched are the following: Delayed Gamma, Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection.

  18. Commercialization Plan Support for Development of Low Cost Vacuum Insulating Glazing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-449

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dameron, Arrelaine

    2015-07-09

    During the duration of this CRADA, V-Glass and NREL will partner in testing, analysis, performance forecasting, costing, and evaluation of V-Glass’s GRIPWELD™ process technology for creating a low cost hermetic seal for conventional and vacuum glazing. Upon successful evaluation of hermeticity, V-Glass’s GRIPWELD™ will be evaluated for its potential use in highly insulating window glazing.

  19. Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

    2009-08-03

    There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

  20. CX-009154: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-009154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-up of Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09052012 ...

  1. NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heaters. Water heating energy use represents the second largest energy demand for homes nationwide, offering an opportunity for innovative solar water heating (SWH) technologies to offset energy use and costs. In the Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) outlined a strategy to expand the SWH market. Recognizing that

  2. Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated PV Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradins, P.

    2011-10-01

    In this CRADA, NREL's Silicon group members performed the following research activities: (1) investigation of the role of hydrogen in growth of a mixed-phase nc-Si:H/a-Si:H material; (2) role of hydrogen in light-induced degradation of a-Si:H and development of Staebler-Wronski effect resistive a-Si:H; and (3) performing characterizations of UniSolar's a-Si:H and nc-Si materials, with goal to help optimizing large-area uniformity and quality of the UniSolar's nanocrystalline Si:H.

  3. Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-14

    ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.

  4. Project Profile: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated PV Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solexel-OC team is developing a BIPV roofing shingle product that includes low-profile solar modules and a unique attachment system that will be fastened directly to the roof and incorporates...

  5. Final project report - CRADA with United Solar Technologies and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL-021): Thin film materials for low-cost high performance solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Bennett, W.D.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this project were as follows: To develop and evaluate promising low-cost dielectric and polymer-protected thin-film reflective metal coatings to be applied to preformed continuously-curved solar reflector panels to enhance their solar reflectance, and to demonstrate protected solar reflective coatings on preformed solar concentrator panels. The opportunity for this project arose from a search by United Solar Technologies (UST) for organizations and facilities capable of applying reflective coatings to large preformed panels. PNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this collaborative project.

  6. Final Technical Progress Report: High-Efficiency Low-Cost Thin-Film GaAs Photovoltaic Module Development Program; July 14, 2010 - January 13, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattos, L.

    2012-03-01

    This is the final technical progress report of the High-Efficiency Low-Cost Thin-Film GaAs Photovoltaic Module Development Program. Alta Devices has successfully completed all milestones and deliverables established as part of the NREL PV incubator program. During the 18 months of this program, Alta has proven all key processes required to commercialize its solar module product. The incubator focus was on back end process steps directed at conversion of Alta's high quality solar film into high efficiency 1-sun PV modules. This report describes all program deliverables and the work behind each accomplishment.

  7. CX-100085 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Fuel Flexible Hybrid Reformer Electrolyte Purifier (REP) for Distributed Production of Low-Cost, Low Greenhouse Gas Hydrogen Award Number: DE-EE0006669 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 8/4/2014 Location(s): Connecticut Office(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-001308: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost Integrated Substrate for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Lighting (Allison Park)CX(s) Applied: A2, A9Date: 03/19/2010Location(s): Allison Park, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-001310: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost Integrated Substrate for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Lighting (Ewing)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/19/2010Location(s): Ewing, New JerseyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-001309: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost Integrated Substrate for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Lighting (Monroeville)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/19/2010Location(s): Monroeville, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-001307: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost Integrated Substrate for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Lighting (Harmar)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/19/2010Location(s): Harmar, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-100240 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells Award Number: DE-EE0005436 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 05/18/2015 Location(s): CA Office(s): Golden Field Office

  13. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of a Minimum Soiling Level to Affect Photovoltaic Devices Patrick D. Burton and Bruce H. King Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 USA...

  14. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  15. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Mr. Ramin

    2014-01-01

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test building in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. This article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.

  16. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Mr. Ramin

    2014-01-01

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test buildingmore » in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. This article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.« less

  17. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  18. Low cost supplemental, wind-heating for rural buildings. Final report, 1 October 1981-31 September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-11-14

    To obtain the supplemental electric heat, a cheap electric generator or alternator is needed to provide the electricity. Used or rebuilt car alternators are plentiful and relatively cheap. A car alternator requires at least a thousand rpm to operate, but the windmill rotor turns much slower. To obtain the necessary rpm's a 26 inch bicycle wheel, as a pulley for a V-belt, was mounted to the bottom of the rotor. The wheel drove a 4 inch pulley mounted to an 8 inch pulley. The 8 inch then drove the alternator by a second V-belt for a net speed step up of 13:1. The dc for the alternator field came from a 12 V bicycle generator and a full wave bridge. When done right, the bicycle generator does not excite the field until there is sufficient wind (and not before, which would stall-out the rotor). A windmill and car alternator system is basically unstable. The system is always overshooting or undershooting that stable rpm which would match wind speed to rotor rpm to alternator rpm, so that wind energy input just matches electrical heat energy output. The first techniques used to gain stability is shown in Figure 3. It essentially used three separate stages of either type I or II to switch in resistive loads in successive stages. For example, at low wind speeds, the alternator voltage would be low and none of the stages would turn on. As wind speed increased the alternator voltage would increase with the result that the first stage would turn on providing heat. The most successful circuit is shown in Figure 4. It had the advantages of: identical stages using commonly and easily attainable parts; in the field it was very easy to determine and adjust the cut-in threshold of each stage; the diodes not only acted as a heating load themselves; but the diodes also provided automatic overspeed braking by ''short circuiting'' the alternator which causes a steep increase in alternator drag.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Advanced low-cost SIC and GaN wide...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced low-cost SiC and GaN wide...

  1. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) low cost generator design using power MOSFET and Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit as high voltage DC source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, M. Y.; Widita, R.

    2014-09-30

    Purpose: Non-ionizing radiation therapy for cancer using pulsed electric field with high intensity field has become an interesting field new research topic. A new method using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a novel means to treat cancer. Not like the conventional electroporation, nsPEFs able to create nanopores in all membranes of the cell, including membrane in cell organelles, like mitochondria and nucleus. NsPEFs will promote cell death in several cell types, including cancer cell by apoptosis mechanism. NsPEFs will use pulse with intensity of electric field higher than conventional electroporation, between 20100 kV/cm and with shorter duration of pulse than conventional electroporation. NsPEFs requires a generator to produce high voltage pulse and to achieve high intensity electric field with proper pulse width. However, manufacturing cost for creating generator that generates a high voltage with short duration for nsPEFs purposes is highly expensive. Hence, the aim of this research is to obtain the low cost generator design that is able to produce a high voltage pulse with nanosecond width and will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Method: Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit will boost the input of 220 volt AC into high voltage DC around 1500 volt and it will be combined by a series of power MOSFET as a fast switch to obtain a high voltage with nanosecond pulse width. The motivation using Cockcroft-Walton multiplier is to acquire a low-cost high voltage DC generator; it will use capacitors and diodes arranged like a step. Power MOSFET connected in series is used as voltage divider to share the high voltage in order not to damage them. Results: This design is expected to acquire a low-cost generator that can achieve the high voltage pulse in amount of ?1.5 kV with falltime 3 ns and risetime 15 ns into a 50? load that will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Further detailed on the circuit design will be explained at presentation.

  2. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

  3. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricty - FY-02 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A. This is the third in a series of Annual Reports for this project, the others are also listed in Appendix A as FY-00 and FY-01 Annual Reports.

  4. Low Cost Non-Reactive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as chemical reactors, and oil and chemical processing systems); wear resistant surfaces and other tribological uses; and medical applications (such as, prosthetics and implants). ...

  5. Low Cost Titanium ? Propulsion Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  6. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  7. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USFs PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  8. Towards low-cost high-efficiency GaAs photovoltaics and photoelectrodes grown via vapor transport from a solid source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucher, Jason; Ritenour, Andrew; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2013-04-29

    Towards low-cost high-efficiency GaAs photovoltaics and photoelectrodes grown via vapor transport from a solid source GaAs is an attractive material for thin-film photovoltaic applications, but is not widely used for terrestrial power generation due to the high cost of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques typically used for growth. Close space vapor transport is an alternative that allows for rapid growth rates of III-V materials, and does not rely on the toxic and pyrophoric precursors used in MOCVD. We characterize CSVT films of GaAs using photoelectrochemical current-voltage and quantum efficiency measurements. Hole diffusion lengths which exceed 1.5 um are extracted from internal quantum efficiency measurements using the Gartner model. Device physics simulations suggest that solar cells based on these films could reach efficiencies exceeding 24 %. To reach this goal, a more complete understanding of the electrical properties and characterization of defects will be necessary, including measurements on complete solid-state devices. Doping of films is achieved by using source material containing the desired impurity (e.g., Te or Zn). We discuss strategies for growing III-V materials on inexpensive substrates that are not lattice-matched to GaAs.

  9. Insolation integrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, John J.; Rudge, George T.

    1980-01-01

    An electric signal representative of the rate of insolation is integrated to determine if it is adequate for operation of a solar energy collection system.

  10. The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

    2008-06-24

    The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

  11. Effect of calcination temperature on structural and photocatalyst properties of nanofibers prepared from low-cost natural ilmenite mineral by simple hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpraditpan, Athapon; Wirunmongkol, Thanakorn; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Nanofibers were prepared from low-cost ilmenite mineral via simple hydrothermal. High photocatalyst nanofibers were prepared via post heat treatment method. The nanofibers calcined at 100700 C for 2 h maintained nanofiber structure. The calcined nanofibers at 400 C showed the highest photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Titanate nanofibers were synthesized via the hydrothermal method (120 C for 72 h) using natural ilmenite mineral (FeTiO{sub 3}) as the starting material. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescent (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) for specific surface area. The nanofibers were 2090 nm in diameter and 27 ?m in length. The as-synthesized nanofibers calcined at 300400 C showed TiO{sub 2} (B) whereas the nanofibers calcined at 500 C revealed a mixture of two phases of TiO{sub 2} (B) and anatase. The nanofibers calcined at high temperature of 6001000 C showed a mixture of tri-crystalline of anatase, rutile, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The rutile phase increased with increasing calcination temperature. The nanofibers calcined at 300700 C maintained their structure while the morphology of the nanofibers calcined at 8001000 C transformed into submicron rod-like structure. This increase of calcination temperature led to the phase transformation from thermodynamically metastable anatase to the most stable form of rutile phase. The crystallite size of prepared samples increased with increasing calcination temperature. Interestingly, with increasing calcination temperature, the absorption edge of the prepared samples shows an obvious shift to visible light region due to the change of crystallite phase and increased crystallite size. Therefore, the band gap energy of the prepared samples became narrower with increasing calcination temperature. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the nanofibers calcined at 400 C for 2 h was found to be not merely higher than those of the commercially available TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles powders (P-25, JRC-01, and JRC-03) but also the highest of all the samples in this study.

  12. An Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-11

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize MCrAlY bond coats for syngas/hydrogen turbine applications using a low-cost electrolytic codeposition process. Prealloyed CrAlY-based powders were codeposited into a metal matrix of Ni, Co or Ni-Co during the electroplating process, and a subsequent post-deposition heat treatment converted it to the MCrAlY coating. Our research efforts focused on: (1) investigation of the effects of electro-codeposition configuration and parameters on the CrAlY particle incorporation in the NiCo-CrAlY composite coatings; (2) development of the post-deposition heat treating procedure; (3) characterization of coating properties and evaluation of coating oxidation performance; (4) exploration of a sulfurfree electroplating solution; (5) cost analysis of the present electrolytic codeposition process. Different electro-codeposition configurations were investigated, and the rotating barrel system demonstrated the capability of depositing NiCo-CrAlY composite coatings uniformly on the entire specimen surface, with the CrAlY particle incorporation in the range 37-42 vol.%. Post-deposition heat treatment at 1000-1200 °C promoted interdiffusion between the CrAlY particles and the Ni-Co metal matrix, resulting in β/γ’/γ or β/γ’ phases in the heat-treated coatings. The results also indicate that the post-deposition heat treatment should be conducted at temperatures ≤1100 °C to minimize Cr evaporation and outward diffusion of Ti. The electro-codeposited NiCrAlY coatings in general showed lower hardness and surface roughness than thermal spray MCrAlY coatings. Coating oxidation performance was evaluated at 1000-1100 °C in dry and wet air environments. The initial electro-codeposited NiCoCrAlY coatings containing relatively high sulfur did not show good oxidation resistance. After modifications of the coating process, the cleaner NiCoCrAlY coating exhibited good oxidation performance at 1000 °C during the 2,000 1-h cyclic oxidation test. A sulfur-free fluoboratebased plating solution was explored in order to reduce the sulfur level in the electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. However, chemical reactions occurred between the CrAlY powder and the fluoborate plating solution, resulting in dark powdery coatings. The fluoborate-based plating bath can thus only be used to codeposit more inert particles (e.g., oxides or carbides) instead of the present Al-containing metallic particles.

  13. High-Power Zinc-Air Energy Storage: Enhanced Metal-Air Energy Storage System with Advanced Grid-Interoperable Power Electronics Enabling Scalability and Ultra-Low Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: Fluidic is developing a low-cost, rechargeable, high-power module for Zinc-air batteries that will be used to store renewable energy. Zinc-air batteries are traditionally found in small, non-rechargeable devices like hearing aids because they are well-suited to delivering low levels of power for long periods of time. Historically, Zinc-air batteries have not been as useful for applications which require periodic bursts of power, like on the electrical grid. Fluidic hopes to fill this need by combining the high energy, low cost, and long run-time of a Zinc-air battery with new chemistry providing high power, high efficiency, and fast response. The battery module could allow large grid-storage batteries to provide much more power on very short demandthe most costly kind of power for utilitiesand with much more versatile performance.

  14. Application of non-radiometric methods to the determination of plutonium. Literature review conducted for the Buried Waste Integrated Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C.

    1992-03-05

    This literature review was motivated by discussions that took place during a review of contamination control technologies proposed for INEL (buried waste). It should be a useful tool in identifying non-radiation measurement techniques for Pu and Am such as ICP-MS, which should fulfill the following criteria: apparatus must be field deployable; up to 100 samples per day; and lower levels of detection and required time must be listed. The sensitivity of ICP and RIMS is compared against that needed for contamination monitoring at INEL. Only Pu-241, with a required detection limit of 400 ppt, would challenge the sensitivity of ICP-MS; Pu-238 would be easily determined. The need to determine Pu-238 and Am-241 in the presence of U-238 and Pu-241 seems to preclude the possibility of using laser ablation ICP-MS for Pu monitoring. ICP-AES and -LEAFS methods may not have enough sensitivity to determine Pu-238 at 2 ppb level with confidence, but RIMS (resonance ionization mass spectroscopy) should be adequate. 47 refs, figs.

  15. CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    976: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a High-Concentration Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 09/20/2010 Location(s): Arvada, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide federal funding to SkyFuel to develop and demonstrate an advanced low-cost Concentrated Solar Power

  16. Low-cost CuInSe{sub 2} submodule development. Final subcontract report, 9 July 1990--31 January 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C.

    1992-10-01

    Aim of this project is development and demonstration of processing steps necessary for fabrication of high efficiency CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells and sub-modules by the two-stage technique (also called the selenization method.) During this period, we have optimized the processing parameters of this method and demonstrated CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS/ZnO devices with a 1{endash}4 cm{sup 2} area and up to 12.4% active area efficiency. We have also developed a novel approach for the preparation of Cu/In precursors that improved the stoichiometric and morphological uniformity in these films. We have developed processing steps and tooling for handling up to 1 ft{sup 2} size substrates and as a result of these efforts demonstrated our first monolithically integrated sub-module of 1 ft{sup 2} area. 16 figs, 1 tab, 15 refs.

  17. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  18. Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lof, G.O.G.; Westhoff, M.A.; Karaki, S.

    1984-02-01

    During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House III at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller provided by Arkla Industries is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 300-l (80-gal) hot water tank. For solar heat supply to the cooling system, plastic thin film collectors developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory were installed on the roof of Solar House III. Failure to withstand stagnation temperatures forced replacement of solar energy with an electric heat source. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several US climates by use of the model.

  19. Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

    2014-09-30

    An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

  20. Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell membranes, was given by Michel Foure of Arkema at a meeting on new fuel cell projects in February 2007.

  1. Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  2. Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  3. Low Cost Carbon Fiber from Renewable Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  4. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory Award Number:0595-1612 | January 15, 2013 | Ganapathi Thin Film mirror is 40-50% cheaper and 60% lighter than SOA * Project leverages extensive space...

  5. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  6. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  7. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2004-05-18

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  8. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2003-07-22

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  9. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Jet Propulsion Laboratory Project Leader: Dr. Gani Ganapathi gani.b.ganapathi@jpl.nasa.gov Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper,...

  10. Low Cost Carbon Fiber from Renewable Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  11. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  12. Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenbury, Erwin T.; Burke, Gerald J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Stever, Robert D.; Governo, George K.; Mullenhoff, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

  13. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  14. Low-Cost MHTES Systems for CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory's low cost solar technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    1984-09-01

    The problems identified in early study - cost, architectural compatibility, and reliability - were not likely to be solved with conventional practices in the solar industry. BNL then embarked upon an iterative development process towards a solution founded on the methodology which establish a set of key guidelines for the research. With the derivation of cost goals ($5 to $6 per square foot, installed) and performance targets (consistent with conventional technology) it was considered important to use sophisticated industrial product development technologies to achieve the desired results. The normal industrial practice to reduce cost, for example, is to reduce material intensity, strive for simplicity in design and apply as much mass production as possible. This approach revealed the potential of polymer films as a basic construction material for solar collectors. Further refinements to reduce cost were developed, including the perfection of a non-pressurized absorber/heat exchanger and the adaptability of a printable optical selective surface. Additional significant advantages were acquired through application of a monocoque construction technique borrowed from the aircraft industry. The procedures used, including important support from industry to help identify materials and guide fabrication techniques, eventually resulted in construction and successful testing of a thin polymer film solar collector. To achieve the overall objectives of viable solar economics some system concepts have been explored by BNL. Consistent with the cost goals mentioned, it is believed that the low pressure designs pursued will be successful. Designs for the storage tank and distribution system that have been pursued include the use of polymer film lined sheet metal for the storage tanks and plastic pipe.

  16. Low-Cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PEER Review Meeting Washington, D.C. May 6-7, 2014 This presentation does not contain any ... simple limited tolerance machining step * Stacks parts to achieve different ...

  17. Progress Report 15, December 1979-April 1980, and proceedings of the fifteenth Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period December 1979 to April 1980 is reported. Reports on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering; and operations are included. Also, a report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held April 2 and 3, 1980, are included.

  18. Low-cost spray-processed Ag{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}InS{sub 2} nano-films: Structural and functional investigation within the Lattice Compatibility Theory framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gherouel, D.; Yumak, A.; Znaidi, M.; Bouzidi, A.; Boubaker, K.; Yacoubi, N.; Amlouk, M.

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub x}Ag{sub 1−x}InS{sub 2} with a minimal lattice mismatch between absorbers and buffers. • The lattice compatibility for understanding silver–copper kinetics. • Controlled and enhanced spray pyrolisis method as a low-cost synthesis protocol. - Abstract: This work deals with some structural and optical investigations about Cu{sub x}Ag{sub 1−x}InS{sub 2} alloys sprayed films and the beneficial effect of copper incorporation in AgInS{sub 2} ternary matrices. The main purpose of this work is to obtain the band gap energy E{sub g} as well as different lattice parameters. The studied properties led to reaching minimum of lattice mismatch between absorber and buffer layers within solar cell devices. As a principal and original finding, the lattice compatibility between both silver and copper indium disulfide structures has been proposed as a guide for understanding kinetics of these materials crystallization.

  19. Technical Approach for Determining Key Parameters Needed for Modeling the Performance of Cast Stone for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-03-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) and its contractors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are conducting a development program to develop / refine the cementitious waste form for the wastes treated at the ETF and to provide the data needed to support the IDF PA. This technical approach document is intended to provide guidance to the cementitious waste form development program with respect to the waste form characterization and testing information needed to support the IDF PA. At the time of the preparation of this technical approach document, the IDF PA effort is just getting started and the approach to analyze the performance of the cementitious waste form has not been determined. Therefore, this document looks at a number of different approaches for evaluating the waste form performance and describes the testing needed to provide data for each approach. Though the approach addresses a cementitious secondary aqueous waste form, it is applicable to other waste forms such as Cast Stone for supplemental immobilization of Hanford LAW. The performance of Cast Stone as a physical and chemical barrier to the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) from solidification of Hanford liquid low activity waste (LAW) and secondary wastes processed through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is of critical importance to the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) total system performance assessment (TSPA). The effectiveness of cementitious waste forms as a barrier to COC release is expected to evolve with time. PA modeling must therefore anticipate and address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Most organizations responsible for disposal facility operation and their regulators support an iterative hierarchical safety/performance assessment approach with a general philosophy that modeling provides the critical link between the short-term understanding from laboratory and field tests, and the prediction of repository performance over repository time frames and scales. One common recommendation is that experiments be designed to permit the appropriate scaling in the models. There is a large contrast in the physical and chemical properties between the Cast Stone waste package and the IDF backfill and surrounding sediments. Cast Stone exhibits low permeability, high tortuosity, low carbonate, high pH, and low Eh whereas the backfill and native sediments have high permeability, low tortuosity, high carbonate, circumneutral pH, and high Eh. These contrasts have important implications for flow, transport, and reactions across the Cast Stone – backfill interface. Over time with transport across the interface and subsequent reactions, the sharp geochemical contrast will blur and there will be a range of spatially-distributed conditions. In general, COC mobility and transport will be sensitive to these geochemical variations, which also include physical changes in porosity and permeability from mineral reactions. Therefore, PA modeling must address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Section 2 of this document reviews past Hanford PAs and SRS Saltstone PAs, which to date have mostly relied on the lumped parameter COC release conceptual models for TSPA predictions, and provides some details on the chosen values for the lumped parameters. Section 3 provides more details on the hierarchical modeling strategy and processes and mechanisms that control COC release. Section 4 summarizes and lists the key parameters for which numerical values are needed to perform PAs. Section 5 provides brief summaries of the methods used to measure the needed parameters and references to get more details.

  20. Progress Report 16 for the period April-September 1980, and the proceedings of the 16th Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April to September 1980, is reported in detail. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations is described. A report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held September 24 and 25, 1980 are included.

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: California | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... February 25, 2016 CX-100493 Categorical Exclusion Determination Integrated Glass Coating ... February 25, 2016 CX-100514 Categorical Exclusion Determination Crop Protection Utilizing ...

  2. High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver Lead Performer: Lumileds, LLC - San Jose, CA DOE Total Funding: $1,499,346 Cost Share: $499,783 Project Term: 9/1/2014 - 2/29/2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project will develop a high-voltage light engine integrating low-cost, high-power patterned sapphire substrate flip-chip (PSS-FC) architecture LEDs with

  3. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Providing Clean, Low-Cost, Onsite Distributed Generation at Very High Fuel Efficiency This project integrated a gas-fired, simple-cycle 100 kilowatt (kW) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra-low nitrogen oxide (NOx) gas-fired burner (ULNB) to develop a combined heat and power (CHP) assembly called the Boiler Burner Energy

  4. CX-012434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Titanium Casting Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

  6. DOE ER63951-3 Final Report: An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Pfiffner

    2010-06-28

    The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

  7. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to increase CO conversion and produce more hydrogen than a standard water gas shift reactor would. Substantial improvements in substrate and membrane performance were achieved in another DOE project (DE-FC26-07NT43054). These improved membranes were used for testing in a water gas shift environment in this program. The amount of net H2 generated (defined as the difference of hydrogen produced and fed) was greater than would be produced at equilibrium using conventional water gas shift reactors up to 75 psig because of the shift in equilibrium caused by continuous hydrogen removal. However, methanation happened at higher pressures, 100 and 125 psig, and resulted in less net H2 generated than would be expected by equilibrium conversion alone. An effort to avoid methanation by testing in more oxidizing conditions (by increasing CO2/CO ratio in a feed gas) was successful and net H2 generated was higher (40-60%) than a conventional reactor at equilibrium at all pressures tested (up to 125 psig). A model was developed to predict reactor performance in both cases with and without methanation. The required membrane area depends on conditions, but the required membrane area is about 10 ft2 to produce about 2000 scfh of hydrogen. The maximum amount of hydrogen that can be produced in a membrane reactor decreased significantly due to methanation from about 2600 scfh to about 2400 scfh. Therefore, it is critical to eliminate methanation to fully benefit from the use of a membrane in the reaction. Other modeling work showed that operating a membrane reactor at higher temperature provides an opportunity to make the reactor smaller and potentially provides a significant capital cost savings compared to a shift reactor/PSA combination.

  8. Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

  9. CRADA final report: Technical assessment of roll-to-roll operation of lamination process, thermal treatment, and alternative carbon fiber precursors for low-cost, high-efficiency manufacturing of flow battery stacks and other energy devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus; Madden, Thomas; Wood, III, David L; Muth, Thomas R.; Warrington, Curtis; Ozcan, Soydan; Manson, Hunter; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Smith, Mark A.; Lu, Yuan; Loretz, Jeremy

    2015-09-23

    Among the various stationary-storage technologies under development, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer the greatest potential to deliver inexpensive, scalable, and efficient grid-scale electrical-energy storage. Unlike traditional sealed batteries, in a flow battery power and energy are decoupled. Cell area and cell count in the stack determine the device power, and the chemical storage volume determines the total energy. Grid-scale energy-storage applications require megawatt-scale devices, which require the assembly of hundreds of large-area, bipolar cells per power plant. The cell-stack is the single system component with the largest impact on capital cost (due to the large number of highly engineered components) and operating costs (determined by overall round-trip efficiency).

  10. CX-100106: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    06: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100106: Categorical Exclusion Determination Design and Field Testing of Manufactural Advanced Low-Cost Receiver for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Award Number: DE-EE0006813 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 10/16/2014 Location(s): Vermont Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Norwich Technologies to address 30-yr service life, ease of manufacturability

  11. Reliability Considerations from Integration of Smart Grid

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 2010 potentially low cost (synergy with PEVs). 32 ... at the distribution level to secure system ... IVVC enables voltage and VAr management of distribution grid ...

  12. Procurement Integrity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ------------------------------Chapter 3.1 (Dec 2015) 1 Procurement Integrity [Reference: 41 U.S.C. 423, FAR 3.104, DEAR 903.104] Overview This section discusses the requirements of the Procurement Integrity Act and its impact on Federal employees. Background The Department of Energy (DOE), like most federal agencies, purchases many products and services from the private sector. To preserve the integrity of the Federal procurement process and assure fair treatment of bidders, offerors and

  13. Procurement Integrity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To preserve the integrity of the Federal procurement process and assure fair treatment of bidders, offerors and contractors, laws govern the procurement process and the manner in ...

  14. A Texas project illustrates the benefits of integrated gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philcox, J.; Fenner, G.W.

    1997-07-14

    Gasification can be an attractive option for converting a variety of petroleum feedstocks to chemicals. Natural gas is commonly sued to produce acetic acid, isocyanates, plastics, and fibers. But low-cost, bottom-of-the-barrel feeds, such as vacuum resid, petroleum coke, and asphaltenes, also can be used. In any case, gasification products include synthesis gas, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, steam, carbon dioxide, and power. The more a gasification facility is integrated with utilities and other non-core operations of a production complex, the more economical the products are for all consumers. The paper discusses gasification of natural gas, light hydrocarbons (ethane, propanes, and butanes), and heavy hydrocarbons (distillates, heavy residues, asphalts, coals, petroleum coke). The paper then describes a Texas City Gasification Project, which gasifies methane to produce carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and alcohol. The plant is integrated with a cogeneration plant. Economics are discussed.

  15. Procurement Integrity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ---...Chapter 3.1 (Dec 2015) 1 Procurement Integrity Reference: 41 U.S.C. 423, FAR 3.104, DEAR 903.104 Overview This section discusses the requirements ...

  16. CX-010462: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Low Cost Environmentally Friendly Synthetic Approaches toward Core-Shell Structured Micro CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/10/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-010460: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Low Cost Environmentally Friendly Synthetic Approaches toward Core-Shell Structured Micro CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/11/2013 Location(s): District of Columbia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-011732: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SRI International -Direct Low-Cost Production of Titanium Alloys CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

  19. CX-003198: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Efficiency Low Cost Solar Cells (HELSOLAR)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/04/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  20. CX-004132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicle PartsCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): Fletcher, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. CX-004960: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boeing Research and Technology -Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage GridCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/13/2010Location(s): Kent, WashingtonOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  2. CX-010461: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Light Emitting Diode Luminaires CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/11/2013 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-004959: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Primus Power -Low Cost, High Performance, 50-Year ElectrodesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/14/2010Location(s): Alameda, CaliforniaOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  4. CX-009024: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Low Cost Receivers for Solar Parabolic Trough CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.17 Date: 08/09/2012 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-004249: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost High Concentration Photovoltaic Power Systems for Utility Power GenerationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 10/14/2010Location(s): Aurora, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. CX-011020: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-011021: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-012528: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41845 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-009170: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Arc-Fault Detection and Protection for Photovoltaic Systems-Tigo Energy, Inc. CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: CX: none Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  10. CX-003197: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost High Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power GenerationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 07/26/2010Location(s): Pomona, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  11. CX-010239: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 02/14/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-009125: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/02/2012 Location(s): California, California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-004012: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Low Cost Microchannel Heat ExchangerCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Sunnydale, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  14. CX-003696: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Thermal CollectorCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 09/10/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  15. CX-003461: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-Cost Wet Gas Compressor for Stripper Gas WellsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/23/2010Location(s): Cambridge, MassachusettsOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-011089: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-cost, Highly Transparent Flexible Low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows ... low-e coating film to enable electrochromic windows with increased energy savings. ...

  17. CX-009891: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITN Energy Systems - Low-cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building ... Funding will support development of electrochromic (EC) film manufacturing process at ...

  18. Steam generator with integral downdraft dryer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochmuth, F.W.

    1992-02-01

    On June 30, 1989, a financial assistance award was granted by the United State Department of Energy, the purpose of which was to study and evaluate the technical aspect, the economic viability, and commercial possibilities of a new furnace design for burning high moisture cellulose type fuels. The new design is an invention by F.W. Hochmuth, P.Eng. and has received United States Patents Nos. 4,480, 557 and 4,502,397. It was conceived as a method to improve the general operation and efficiency of waste wood burning boilers, to avoid the use of stabilizing fuels such as oil or gas, and to reduce objectionable stack emissions. A further objective was to obtain such benefits at relatively low cost by integrating all new material requirements within the furnace itself thereby avoiding the need for costly external equipment. The proposed integral down-draft dryer avoids the use of external dryer systems that are very expensive, have high power consumption, and require a large amount of maintenance. This document provides the details of this invention.

  19. Low-Cost Energy Efficiency Goes Block-to-Block

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An innovative pilot program in Minneapolis, Minnesota, focuses on rallying whole communities around energy efficiency, one neighborhood at a time. Through the program, area residents cash in on a home energy-efficiency upgrade that saves them roughly $130 on their annual energy bill.

  20. Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Versus Electric (% Savings) Zone 1 - Houston, TX 24.9% 38.8% 63.8% 61.4% Zone 1 - Atlanta, GA -2.6% 44.1% 51.7% 57.2% Zone 2 - Chicago, IL -28.3% 35.0% 38.7% 39.9% Zone 3 - ...

  1. Low-cost Wireless Sensors for Building Monitoring Applications

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... ORNL's R&D Platform Driving Industries: SHARP, HP, Plastic Logic, Dow Chemical, DuPont, FlexTech, Philips Current wireless sensor Platform: 150 300node Proposed Advanced ...

  2. Low-cost, Rapid DNA Sequencing Technique - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More ... The nucleic acid strand transport mechanism located on the dielectric surface of the ...

  3. Accessing Low-Cost Capital Through Securitization (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.

    2014-10-01

    Poster for Solar Power International conference presents information on NREL's effort to open capital markets through securitization via Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) working group's efforts.

  4. High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Grown...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of crystalline GaN growth in ESG Results and Accomplishments HRXRD vs reference SEM surface view 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 0 10 20 30 40 50 Deposition rate ...

  5. Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The system is capable of reaching a temperature of 230 C, a typical nozzle temperature for extruding ABS polymers, in 17 seconds. A prototype system was built at ORNL and sent to ...

  6. Low Cost TiO2 Nanoparticles - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing SummaryCurrent methods of producing titanium dioxide nanoparticles ... elegant and economically advantageous method to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles. ...

  7. Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Taylor, John S.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    2003-11-21

    Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

  8. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-01stephenson.pdf More ...

  9. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es013thurston2010o...

  10. Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon cspreviewmeeting042413...

  11. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reflector Composite For Improved LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime Teather, Eric 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE The overall...

  12. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Long Island HTS Power Cable Long Island HTS Power Cable This project involves the demonstration of a hightemperature superconducting (HTS) power cable in the Long Island Power grid, spanning nearly half a mile and serving as a permanent link in the Long Island Power Authority's (LIPA) grid network. The cable represents the world's first installation of a superconducting cable in a live grid at transmission voltages. PDF icon Long Island HTS Power Cable More Documents & Publications HTS Cable

  14. High Thermal Conductivity Polymer Composites for Low-Cost Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    future heat exchanger development. (1 year project - ... available state of the art) Enable replacement of ... transfer UTRC Innovation Process CURRENT ...

  15. Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  16. Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean, in-cylinder combustion can be enabled by a micro-variable circular orifice, dual mode PCCI, dew film combustion, and a novel combustion chamber design PDF icon ...

  17. Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    513ganapathi.pdf More Documents & Publications 2014 SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book: Concentrating Solar Power 2014 SunShot Initiative Peer Review Report

  18. Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell stacks, was given at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

  19. Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... been expressed from the following countries: - Germany, Austria, South Africa, Mexico, Spain Goal Status Installed Cost: bw 1,000 and 3,000 Current installed cost estimated at ...

  20. Nonequilibrium Thermoelectrics: Low-Cost, High-Performance Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials selection and processing has led to the development of several systems with a figure of merit, ZT, of nearly unity. By using non-equilibrium techniques, we have ...

  1. Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

    2013-07-02

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

  2. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Jet Propulsion Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  3. Project Profile: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reduced operation and maintenance costs and a lower overall unit cost of the reflector assembly. ... Innovation The current LS3-sized mirrors use only 55%-65% of the available ...

  4. Project Profile: Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tubes Offers better performance at lower cost: optical efficiency improved by 5%, ... Innovation Norwich Technologies' diverse advances in materials and coatings are capable ...

  5. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The research explored scale-up of coating systems and generated understanding of processing required for high volume manufacturing applications. The work demonstrated how coating ...

  6. Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Impact The current high manufacturing cost of OLED lighting is a major barrier to market acceptance. The project goal is to be able to supply affordable, high-quality ...

  7. Low Cost Heliostat Development Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusek, Stephen M.

    2014-04-21

    The heliostat field in a central receiver plant makes up roughly one half of the total plant cost. As such, cost reductions for the installed heliostat price greatly impact the overall plant cost and hence the plant’s Levelized Cost of Energy. The general trend in heliostat size over the past decades has been to make them larger. One part of our thesis has been that larger and larger heliostats may drive the LCOE up instead of down due to the very nature of the precise aiming and wind-load requirements for typical heliostats. In other words, it requires more and more structure to precisely aim the sunlight at the receiver as one increases heliostat mirror area and that it becomes counter-productive, cost-wise, at some point.

  8. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  9. Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-041 Kick-Off Meeting for New Fuel Cell Projects CARISMA: A Networking Project for High Temperature PEMFC MEA Activities ...

  10. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced collectors. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  11. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  12. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  13. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity ... for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain ...

  14. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  15. Fast Low-Cost Multiple Sensor Readout System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter-Lewis, David; Krennich, Frank; Le Bohec, Stephane; Petry, Dirk; Sleege, Gary

    2004-04-06

    A low resolution data acquisition system is presented. The data acquisition system has a plurality of readout modules serially connected to a controller. Each readout module has a FPGA in communication with analog to digital (A/D) converters, which are connected to sensors. The A/D converter has eight bit or lower resolution. The FPGA detects when a command is addressed to it and commands the A/D converters to convert analog sensor data into digital data. The digital data is sent on a high speed serial communication bus to the controller. A graphical display is used in one embodiment to indicate if a sensor reading is outside of a predetermined range.

  16. High-Quality, Low-Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... useable in the production of solid-state lighting, high-brightness LEDs, and laser diodes. ... and developing fow models to optimize ion transport to the growth surface of the GaN seed. ...

  17. Final Report- Low Cost High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar absorbing coating is a key enabling technology to achieve hightemperature high-efficiency concentrating solar power operation. A high-performance solar absorbing material must simultaneously meet all the following three stringent requirements: high thermal efficiency (usually measured by figure of merit), hightemperature durability, and oxidation resistance. The objective of this research is to employ a highly scalable process to fabricate and coat black oxide nanoparticles onto solar absorber surface to achieve ultra-high thermal efficiency.

  18. Hydrogen Leak Detection – Low-Cost Distributed Gas Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the April 3, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar "America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen Detection Technologies".

  19. Low-cost conformable storage to maximize vehicle range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) are currently the leading fuel contenders for converting vehicles from gasoline and diesel to alternative fuels. Two factors that inhibit conversion are additional vehicle costs and reduced range compared to gasoline. In overcoming these barriers, a key element of the alternative fuel system becomes the storage tank for these pressurized fuels. Using cylindrical pressure vessels is the conventional approach, but they do not package well in the available vehicle volume. Thiokol Corporation has developed and is now producing a conformable (non-cylindrical) aluminum storage system for LPG vans. This system increases fuel storage in a given rectangular envelope. The goal of this project was to develop the technology for a lower cost conformable tank made of injection-molded plastic. Much of the cost of the aluminum conformable tank is in the fabrication because several weld seams are required. The injection-molding process has the potential to greatly reduce the fabrication costs. The requirements of a pressurized fuel tank on a vehicle necessitate the proper combination of material properties. Material selection and tank design must be optimized for maximum internal volume and minimum material use to be competitive with other technologies. The material and the design must also facilitate the injection-molding process. Prototype tanks must be fabricated to reveal molding problems, prove solutions, and measure results. In production, efficient fabrication will be key to making these tanks cost competitive. The work accomplished during this project has demonstrated that conformable LPG tanks can be molded with thermoplastics. However, to achieve a competitive tank, improvements are needed in the effective material strength. If these improvements can be made, molded plastics should produce a lower cost tank that can store more LPG on a vehicle than conventional cylinders.

  20. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2002-01-01

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  1. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2005-01-25

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  2. Project Profile: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SunTrough, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing a new class of solar concentrators with geometries and manufacturability that can significantly reduce the fully installed cost of the solar collector field.

  3. Adaptive PCCI with Variable Orifice Injector for Low Cost High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference ... (MVCO) Fuel Injector for Zoned Low Temperature Combustion Advanced High Efficiency ...

  4. Retro-Commissioning Increases Data Center Efficiency at Low Cost

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Achieved at SRS Basic Retro-Cx: 1. Eliminated electric reheat. 2. Turned off humidification devices. 3. Tuned floor tile airflow. 4. Turned off three CRAC units. Total estimated savings ≅ 1,400,000 kWh/year Retro-Cx cost at SRS: Engineering consultant: preliminary, on-site, and follow-up work including data measurements and retrieval. SRS on-site facilities personnel and engineering support. Total estimated cost ≅ $25,000 Simple Payback at SRS: Estimated, at $0.045/kWh = 2.5 months. taken

  5. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Norwich Technologies is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  6. AMO Announces Funding Opportunity for Low-Cost, Energy Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Advisors on Science and Technology. Report to the President on Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing. Web. July 2012. Addthis Related Articles...

  7. Low Cost Near Infrared Selective Plasmonic Smart Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Format 13 Temperature Modulation Using Flush NIR Selective Smart Panes With Improved Seals and Busbar Prototype devices were functional at temperature extremes above ASTM Standards...

  8. Low Cost, Stable Switchable Mirrors: Lithium Ion Mirrors with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These energy saving devices have advantages over traditional absorbing electrochromics for radiant energy control because of their large dynamic range in both transmission and ...

  9. Low Cost, High Impact Cable Condition Monitoring System Improves...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Plant Operations, Safety, and Systems Reliability Small Business Innovation Research ... Plant Operations, Safety, and Systems Reliability Analysis and Measurement Services ...

  10. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicle Parts | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm047_stike_2012

  11. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicle Parts | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm047_stike_2011

  12. Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lm

  13. A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Cist; Alan Schutz

    2005-03-30

    A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

  14. Hydrogen leak detection - low cost distributed gas sensors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and sensitive enough to detect concentrations well below the LFL; * have a rapid response time as well as provide historical information of leaks; and * have a long useful ...

  15. Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Partners, Subcontractors, and Collaborators: * Bauer Associates: Thermal modeling from SolidWorks CAD models * Arnprior Manufacturing: Fabrication of production nozzle * Joel ...

  16. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    parts because Cummins typical production volumes are too low to allow injection molded plastic parts to be cost effective with the amortized cost of the injection molding tooling. ...

  17. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantums then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel systems performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of smart tanks that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of Cool Fuel technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  18. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicle Parts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm047stike2011

  19. Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  20. Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... we use "terminated cluster growth". * Nanoparticles (copper, vanadium) have been synthesized and analyzed * First oxide nanoparticles have been made and deposited as a film ...

  1. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon process_development_nanostructured_pv.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing Processes and Applications to Accelerate Commercial Use of Nanomaterials, January 2011 2012 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program 2013 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Evaluation Volume 4 | Department of

  2. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    would need to be developed. Previous work has sought to use lignin from pulp and paper mills as a feedstock for carbon fiber, with varying levels of success. Current...

  3. Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    producing hydrogen and electricity. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) conducts comprehensive efforts to overcome the technological, economic, and institutional ...

  4. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  5. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 – October 1, 2009

  6. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicle Parts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  7. Providing Clean, Low-Cost, Onsite Distributed Generation at Very...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heat and power (CHP) assembly called the Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST). ... in annual Boiler Burner Electrical System Technology (BBEST) for packaged boilers. ...

  8. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Doshi, Parag; Tate, John Keith; Mejia, Jose; Chen, Zhizhang

    1998-06-16

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure.

  9. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, A.; Doshi, P.; Tate, J.K.; Mejia, J.; Chen, Z.

    1998-06-16

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO{sub x}. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure. 28 figs.

  10. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Chen, Zhizhang; Doshi, Parag

    1996-01-01

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 16.9% have been achieved. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x.

  11. Low-cost evacuated-tube solar collector. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beecher, D. T.

    1981-02-10

    A prototype design for an evacuated tube air cooled solar collector module has been completed. A product cost study, based on the production of 60,000 of the prototype modules per year (approx. 1,000,000 square feet annually), estimates that the module as shipped would have a cost at inventory of $7.09 to $7.40 per square foot of aperture. Computer programs were developed to predict the optical and thermal performance of the module. Antireflective coatings (porous aluminum oxide) which could be formed by spraying or dipping were demonstrated but degraded more rapidly when exposed to a high humidity ambient than acid etched films. A selective black chromium oxide multi-layered graded film was vapor deposited which had an absorptivity of about 0.9 and an emissivity of 0.03. When the film was heated to temperatures of 400/sup 0/C in a gettered vacuum for as little as 24 hours, however, irreversible changes took place both between and within coating layers which resulted in ..cap alpha.. decreasing to about 0.73 and epsilon increasing to 0.14. The product cost studies indicate that module design changes are warranted to reduce product cost prior to tooling for production.

  12. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, Katherine; Dalton, Luke; Roemer, Andy; Carter, Blake; Niedzwiecki, Mike; Manco, Judith; Anderson, Everett; Capuano, Chris; Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhao, Wei

    2014-02-05

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  13. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  14. Pathways to low-cost electrochemical energy storage: a comparison...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy storage is increasingly seen as a valuable asset for electricity grids composed of high fractions of intermittent sources, such as wind power or, in developing economies, ...

  15. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

  16. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    Federal buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water.[2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514.

  17. Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contains information from the TAP Webcast on June 24, 2009 on clean renewable energy bonds from Claire Kreycik on feed-in tariffs, an economic resource for developing renewable energy.

  18. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  19. Pathways to Low-Cost Electrochemical Energy Storage: A Comparison...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Aqueous and Nonaqueous Flow Batteries Comparison of available design space for aqueous and nonaqueous flow batteries to meet long term stationary storage cost goals. ...

  20. Developing Low-Cost, Highly Efficient Heat Recovery for Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    higher electrical effciency than an ... of hybrid fuel cell systems also make them a suitable power source for urban and ... for material stability, strength, and ...

  1. Low-Cost, Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lead Performer: ITN Energy Systems - Littleton, CO Partners: -- Electric Power Research Institute - Palo Alto, CA -- ... More Documents & Publications CX-011089: Categorical ...

  2. Low cost solar energy collection for cooling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    1981-06-01

    Solar energy collector designs utilizing thinfilm polymeric materials in the absorber and glazing are now under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The objective is dramatic cost reduction consistent with acceptable performance and life. Originally intended for low temperature applications (< 100/sup 0/F), these collectors now appear capable of high temperature applications including desiccant and absorption cooling (150/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/ F). The performance and economics of the thin-film collector are compared with those of conventional flat-plate designs in cooling applications.

  3. Deploying Low-Cost Suspension Heliostats | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineers Renew Five-Year Partnership to Advance Hydropower | Department of Energy NEWS MEDIA CONTACT 202-586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of the Army for Civil Works announced today that the three agencies have extended their partnership to advance hydropower development for an additional five years. The renewal agreement signed today commits the agencies to a specific, ambitious agenda for

  4. Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Storage in CSP Plants | Department of Energy 413_goswami.pdf More Documents & Publications High Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Halide and Oxy-halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids

  5. Utilizing Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Oak Ridge National Laboratory held on June 26, 2012

  6. On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.; Halsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

  7. RADIATION INTEGRATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, F.M.; Wilson, H.N.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation detecting and measuring systems, particularly a compact, integrating, background monitor, are discussed. One of the principal features of the system is the use of an electrometer tube where the input of the tube is directly connected to an electrode of the radiation detector and a capacitor is coupled to the tube input. When a predetermined quantity of radiation has been integrated, a trigger signal is fed to a recorder and a charge is delivered to the capacitor to render the tube inoperative. The capacitor is then recharged for the next period of operation. With this arrangement there is a substantial reduction in lead lengths and the principal components may be enclosed and hermetically sealed to insure low leakage.

  8. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Integrated PV and Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As solar power plants proliferate, the variability and uncertainty of the solar resource poses challenges for integrating PV with electric power systems at both the distribution and bulk system levels. In response to these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has issued a notice of intent (NOI) to release the SunShot Sustainable and Holistic IntegratioN of Energy storage and Solar (SHINES) funding opportunity. SHINES will enable the holistic design, development, and widespread sustainable deployment of low-cost, flexible, and reliable energy storage solutions, and will strive to successfully integrate these solutions into PV power plants. SHINES projects can also focus on demand response and load management to achieve target metrics.

  9. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  10. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Systems Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-level system integration New distribution scenarios such as household DC systems and residential-scale generation and storage integrated with home energy management systems. ...

  11. Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arah Schuur Program Manager Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) April 22, 2014 Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) 2 Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) Mission...

  12. Manufacturing Process for OLED Integrated Substrate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1214 2. Low cost sputtered anode, 415 3. IEL, EEL, IELEEL evaluation, 715 4. Process optimization, 716 Budget: Total DOE to date: 841,351 Total future DOE : 1,504,287 ...

  13. CX-003980: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-003980: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integration of Advanced Logistical Systems ... a comprehensive biomass supply chain system through collecting and deliver of ...

  14. CX-009166: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-009166: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial ...

  15. CX-001207: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-001207: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demonstration for ... of UltraBattery modules, integrated in a turnkey battery energy storage system (BESS). ...

  16. Emerging Issues and Challenges with Integrating High Levels of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Increasing the use of grid-flexibility options (improved grid management, demand response, and energy storage) could enable 25% or higher penetration of PV at low costs (see ...

  17. NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Integrated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurements and Characterization Capabilities Integrated Measurements and Characterization Capabilities The Integrated Measurements and Characterization cluster tool in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for measuring and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. Contact Pete Sheldon for more details on these capabilities. Basic Cluster Tool Capabilities Sample Handling Ultra-high-vacuum robot Transport pod: allows

  18. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office ... Overview of the Residential Integration Program Research Implementation tools ...

  19. Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-03-01

    The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

  20. CX-011379: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid Power, LLC--An Ultra High Energy, Safe and Low-Cost All Solid-State Rechargeable Battery for Electric Vehicles CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/22/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado, Michigan, Utah, New Mexico Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy