National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination in-situ x-ray

  1. In-situ stoichiometry determination using x-ray fluorescence generated by reflection-high-energy-electron-diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenan, Cameron; Chandril, Sandeep; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Myers, T. H. [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    A major challenge in the stoichiometric growth of complex oxide compounds is the control of the relative compositions of the constituent materials. A potential avenue for compositional analysis during growth is the use of x-ray fluorescence generated during reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements. Using this technique, relative compositions of Y and Mn in molecular beam epitaxy grown YMnO{sub 3} samples were studied. Comparing the results with Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy suggests that the technique has the potential for real-time analysis of elemental fluxes and stoichiometry control during sample growth.

  2. Phase formation sequences in the silicon-phosphorous system : determined by in-situ synchrotron andj conventional x-ray diffraction measurements and predicted by a theoretical model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, J. R. A.; Clevenger, L.; Madsen, L. D.; Hultman, L.; Li, X.-H.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C.; Roy, R. A.; Cabral, C., Jr.; Morales, G.; Ludwig, K. L.; Stephenson, G. B.; Hentzell, H. T. G.; Materials Science Division; Linkoeping Univ.; IBM T. J. Watson Research Center; Boston Univ.

    1997-01-01

    The phase formation sequences of Si-P alloy thin films with P concentrations between 20 and 44 at. % have been studied. The samples were annealed at progressively higher temperatures and the newly formed phases were identified both after each annealing step by ex-situ conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) and continuously by in-situ synchrotron XRD. It was found that Si was the only phase to form in a sample with 20 at.% P since the evaporation of P at the crystallization temperature prevented phosphides from forming. For a sample with 30at.% P, the Si{sub 12}P{sub 5} phase formed prior to the SiP phase. For samples with 35 and 44at.%P, the formation of SiP preceded the formation of the Si{sub 12}P{sub 5} phase. The experimentally determined phase formation sequences were successfully predicted by a proposed model. According to the model, the first and second crystalline phases to form are those with the lowest and next-lowest crystallization temperatures of the competing compounds predicted by the Gibbs free-energy diagram.

  3. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 25 February 2015 00:00 Plastic solar cells...

  4. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology...

  5. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for electrochemical reactions in ordinary solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Takuya [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 333-0012 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobata, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Keisuke [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Noguchi, Hidenori [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 333-0012 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kawasaki, Tadahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Uosaki, Kohei [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2013-09-09

    In situ electrochemical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus, which allows XPS at solid/liquid interfaces under potential control, was constructed utilizing a microcell with an ultra-thin Si membrane, which separates vacuum and a solution. Hard X-rays from a synchrotron source penetrate into the Si membrane surface exposed to the solution. Electrons emitted at the Si/solution interface can pass through the membrane and be analyzed by an analyzer placed in vacuum. Its operation was demonstrated for potential-induced Si oxide growth in water. Effect of potential and time on the thickness of Si and Si oxide layers was quantitatively determined at sub-nanometer resolution.

  6. IN SITU SURFACE X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES OF ELECTROSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,J.X.; ADZIC,R.R.; OCKO,B.M.

    1998-07-01

    A short review of the application of surface x-ray scattering techniques to the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is presented. Recent results on metal, halide, and metal-halide adlayers with three specific systems: Bi on Au(100) and Au(110); Br on Au(100) and Ag(100); and the coadsorption of Tl with Br or I on Au(111), are given as an illustration. Factors affecting ordering of pure metal and halide adlayers and the metal-halide surface compounds are discussed in some detail.

  7. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  8. Electrochemical cell for in-situ x-ray characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, D.H.; Ingersoll, D.; Rodriguez, M.A.

    1998-08-04

    An electrochemical cell suitable for in-situ XRD analysis is presented. Qualitative information such as phase formation and phase stability can be easily monitored using the in-situ cell design. Quantitative information such as lattice parameters and kinetic behavior is also straightforward. Analysis of the LiMn&sub2;O&sub4; spinel using this cell design shows that the lattice undergoes two major structural shrinkages at approx. 4.0 V and approx. 4.07 V during charging. These shrinkages correlate well with the two electrochemical waves observed and indicate the likelihood of two separate redox processes which charging and discharging.

  9. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, David M. (Voorheesville, NY); Gibson, Walter M. (Voorheesville, NY); Huang, Huapeng (Latham, NY)

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  10. In Situ X-Ray Probing Reveals Fingerprints of Surface Platinum Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-08-24

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pt L{sub 3} edge is a useful probe for Pt-O interactions at polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. We show that XAS using the high energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) mode, applied to a well-defined monolayer Pt/Rh(111) sample where the bulk penetrating hard x-rays probe only surface Pt atoms, provides a unique sensitivity to structure and chemical bonding at the Pt-electrolyte interface. Ab initio multiple-scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code and complementary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results indicate that the commonly observed large increase of the white-line at high electrochemical potentials on PEMFC cathodes originates from platinum oxide formation, whereas previously proposed chemisorbed oxygen-containing species merely give rise to subtle spectral changes.

  11. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamzadah, Soheila [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Petty, Tom J. [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Biomedical Graduate Studies Genomics and Computational Biology Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); De Almeida, Victor [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Nishimura, Taisuke [Department of Plant Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, CEA-CNRS-University J. Fourier, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 1 (France); Halazonetis, Thanos D., E-mail: thanos.halazonetis@unige.ch [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  12. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact AssessmentsImprovingIn Case ofIn Situ X-RayIn Situ

  13. Strains in Thermally Growing Alumina Films Measured in-situ usingSynchrotron X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, P.Y.; Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W.

    2006-01-02

    Strains in thermally grown oxides have been measured in-situ, as the oxides develop and evolve. Extensive data have been acquired from oxides grown in air at elevated temperatures on different model alloys that form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Using synchrotron x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source (Beamline 12BM, Argonne National Laboratory), Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from the oxidizing specimen were recorded every 5 minutes during oxidation and subsequent cooling. The diffraction patterns were analyzed to determine strains in the oxides, as well as phase changes and the degree of texture. To study a specimen's response to stress perturbation, the oxidizing temperature was quickly cooled from 1100 to 950 C to impose a compressive thermal stress in the scale. This paper describes this new experimental approach and gives examples from oxidized {beta}-NiAl, Fe-20Cr-10Al, Fe-28Al-5Cr and H{sub 2}-annealed Fe-28Al-5Cr (all at. %) alloys to illustrate some current understanding of the development and relaxation of growth stresses in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  14. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hsiung [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (?20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected.

  15. Diffraction imaging for in-situ characterization of double-crystal x-ray monochromators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Heald, Steve M; Brewe, Dale; Meron, Mati

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the Bragg reflected x-ray beam is proposed and validated as an in-situ method for characterization of performance of double-crystal monochromators under the heat load of intense synchrotron radiation. A sequence of images is collected at different angular positions on the reflectivity curve of the second crystal and analyzed. The method provides rapid evaluation of the wavefront of the exit beam, which relates to local misorientation of the crystal planes along the beam footprint on the thermally distorted first crystal. The measured misorientation can be directly compared to results of finite element analysis. The imaging method offers an additional insight on the local intrinsic crystal quality over the footprint of the incident x-ray beam.

  16. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues, Mario S; LE Denmat, Simon; Chevrier, Joel; Felici, Roberto; Comin, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    We show how the in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies (SPM) with X-ray microbeams enables many new experiments in the synchrotron radiation domain. Our instrument is based on an optics free AFM/STM that can be directly installed on most of the SR X-ray end stations. The instrument can be simply used for AFM imaging of the investigated sample or it can be used for detection of photoemitted electrons with a sharp STM like tungsten tip, thus leading to locally measure the EXAFS signal. Alternatively one can measure the photons absorbed by the tip, thus locally detecting diffraction. In this paper, we show examples of both measurements. We also describe the experimental setup and the tip-beam interaction that is a key point for alignment procedures. We finally show how these features can be exploited in an extended variety of domains, nanosciences and nanomechanics, just to name a few.

  17. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIn MemoriamInIn Situ X-Ray

  18. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact AssessmentsImprovingIn Case ofIn Situ X-Ray

  19. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact AssessmentsImprovingIn Case ofIn Situ X-RayIn

  20. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

    1999-06-15

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

  1. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

  2. In Situ Diffuse Reflectance IR Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Fast Catalytic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N Marinkovic; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    A new instrument for synchronous in situ investigations of catalytic materials by IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopies was designed and built at the X18A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides analytical tools for solving structural, electronic and kinetic problems in catalysis science by two complementary methods. Among the features attractive for catalysis research are the broad range of catalytically active elements that can be investigated (starting with Ni and beyond), the wide range of reaction conditions (temperatures up to 873 K, various reactive gases) and time scales (starting from tens of seconds). The results of several representative experiments that illustrate the attractive capabilities of the new set-up are discussed.

  3. Dynamic in-situ X-ray Diffraction of Catalyzed Alanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, K.J.; Sandrock, G.; Thomas, G.J.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery that hydrogen can be reversible absorbed and desorbed from NaAlH{sub 4} by the addition of catalysts has created an entirely new prospect for lightweight hydrogen storage. NaAlH{sub 4} releases hydrogen through the following set of decomposition reactions: NaAlH{sub 4} {r_arrow} 1/3({alpha}-Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6}) + 2/3Al + H{sub 2} {r_arrow} NaH + Al + 3/2H{sub 2}. These decomposition reactions as well as the reverse recombination reactions were directly observed using time-resolved in-situ x-ray powder diffraction. These measurements were performed under conditions similar to those found in PEM fuel cell operations (hydrogen absorption: 50--70 C, 10--15 bar Hz, hydrogen resorption: 80--110 C, 5--100 mbar H{sub 2}). Catalyst doping was found to dramatically improve kinetics under these conditions. In this study, the alanate was doped with a catalyst by dry ball-milling NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mol.% solid TiCl{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction clearly showed that TiCl{sub 3} reacts with NaAlH{sub 4} to form NaCl during the doping process. Partial desorption of NaAlH{sub 4} was even observed to occur during the catalyst doping process.

  4. A microelectromechanical load sensor for in situ electron and x-ray microscopy tensile testing of nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    is required. Here we report a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) designed for the tensile testingA microelectromechanical load sensor for in situ electron and x-ray microscopy tensile testing November 2004; published online 28 December 2004) We report on the performance of a microelectromechanical

  5. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55?GPa at 300?K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0}?=?174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, ?{sub G}{sup TO?}=?1.26 and ?{sub G}{sup LO?}=?1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which ?{sub G}{sup TO?}>??{sub G}{sup LO?}??1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant ? is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???0.25 at 0.1?MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???2.5 at 45?GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  6. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A.I.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Marinkovic, N.; Chen, J.G.; Barrio, L.; Si, R.; Lopez Camara, A.; Estrella, A.M.; Rodriguez, J.A.

    2011-08-05

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  7. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis:Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Frenkel; Q Wang; N Marinkovic; J Chen; L Barrio; R Si; A Lopez Camara; A Estella; J Rodriquez; J Hanson

    2011-12-31

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  8. Combined in Situ X-ray absorption and diffuse reflectance infraredspectroscopy: An attractive tool for catalytic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, N.S.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, Q.; Barrio, L.; Khalid, S.; et.al.

    2010-11-24

    Catalysis investigations are often followed in a range of spectroscopic techniques. While diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) can be done on a bench-top instrument, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques, such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) require synchrotron light. In order to ensure the same conditions during in situ catalysis for each method, a combined XAS/DRIFTS has been developed at beamline X18A at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A rapid-scan FTIR spectrometer capable of both mid- and far-infrared measurements is equipped with an arm to redirect the IR beam outside the spectrometer. An in situ reaction chamber, equipped with glassy carbon windows for X-ray light and a KBr window for IR light passage is installed firmly on the arm. The reaction cell can be heated to 600 C and allows passage of gases through the catalyst so that both XAS and DRIFTS techniques can be done simultaneously in controlled environment conditions. Together with a fast-moving monochromator for quick-EXAFS and mass-spectrometric residual gas analysis, this new tool is a powerful method for testing catalytic reactions in real time.

  9. USE OF DIAGNOSTIC X-RAY FOR DETERMINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in such studies because of the great amount of tipie and effort required in dissection of vertebral columns of individual fish, but provide a permanent record of the vertebral column for future referenceUSE OF DIAGNOSTIC X-RAY FOR DETERMINING VERTEBRAL NUMBERS OF FISH Marine Biological Labo

  10. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device. © 2007

  11. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical absorption of deuterium into palladium by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron-wiggler radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, D.D.; Hagans, P.L.; Skelton, E.F.; Qadri, S.B.; Nagel, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    With low energy x-rays, such as those from a Cu x-ray tube, only the outer few microns of a metallic sample can be probed. This low penetrating power prohibits structural studies from being carried out on the interior of an electrode in an electrochemical cell because of absorption by the cell material, electrodes and the electrolyte. The work described in this paper circumvents this problem by utilizing high energy, high brightness x-rays produced on the superconducting wiggler beam line, X-17C, at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The penetrating power of the higher energy x-rays allowed Pd diffraction spectra to be obtained in-situ on a 1 mm diameter Pd wire cathode during electrolysis of heavy water. Moreover, the beam (28 x 28 {micro}m in cross-section) allowed diffraction spectra to be acquired as a function of distance across the sample. Spectra were recorded in 50 {micro}m steps from the edge of the Pd wire to its core. This was done at 2 minute intervals as a function of electrolysis time. The {alpha}-{beta} phase transition induced in the Pd while deuterium was electrochemically absorbed was observed by monitoring the Pd-(422) diffraction peaks. Results allowed the diffusion rate and the diffusivity of deuterium atoms in the Pd wire to be determined. Other features of the structural changes associated with the absorption of deuterium into Pd are reported.

  12. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayr, P.

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal ...

  13. Enhanced water window x-ray emission from in situ formed carbon clusters irradiated by intense ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarty, U.; Rao, B. S.; Arora, V.; Upadhyay, A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Mukherjee, C.; Gupta, P. D. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 Madhya Pradesh (India)] [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2013-07-29

    Enhanced water window x-ray emission (23–44 Å) from carbon clusters, formed in situ using a pre-pulse, irradiated by intense (I > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) ultra-short laser pulse, is demonstrated. An order of magnitude x-ray enhancement over planar graphite target is observed in carbon clusters, formed by a sub-ns pre-pulse, interacting with intense main pulse after a delay. The effect of the delay and the duration of the main pulse is studied for optimizing the x-ray emission in the water window region. This x-ray source has added advantages of being an efficient, high repetition rate, and low debris x-ray source.

  14. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIn MemoriamInIn SituIn Situ

  15. TENDER-ENERGY SPATIALLY RESOLVED AND IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Spectroelectrochemical cell design for in-situ measurements of fuel-cell catalyst at controlled electrochemical potential and under gas flow, all compatible with low-energy fluorescence-mode XAS measurements. · Real fuel" in review. . · Energy Materials: Photovoltaic, fuel-cell, battery and superconducting (nano

  16. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

  17. Multiferroic CuCrO? under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Alka B. Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-10-07

    The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO? has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34 GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ~23 GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, ?{sub c} = 1.26 × 10?³(1) GPa?¹ and a-axis compressibility, ?{sub a} = 8.90 × 10?³(6) GPa?¹. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B? = 156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B?{sup ’} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ~24 GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

  18. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIn MemoriamInIn Situ

  19. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIn MemoriamInIn SituIn

  20. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIn MemoriamInIn SituInIn

  1. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact AssessmentsImprovingIn Case ofIn SituIn The

  2. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Yongtao E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng; Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Welch, David

    2014-07-07

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (?P{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ´} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}=174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (?K{sub T}/?T){sub P}=-0.060(8) GPa K?¹ and at constant volume (?K{sub T}/?T){sub V}=-0.046(8) GPa K?¹, the volumetric thermal expansivity ?{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10??+0.3(2)×10??T (K?¹), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (??/?P){sub T}=(?2.0±0.4)×10?? K?¹ GPa?¹. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature ??=276.6 K gives ??=1.27(8) and K{sub T0}=171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q=3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ~5 GPa as has been reported previously.

  3. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, via Marzolo 1, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Meneghini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze, via della Vasca Navale 84, Universita di Roma TRE, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  4. Changes in Delta-Plutonium Due to Aging as Observed by Continuous in-situ X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw, Cheng K.; Wall, Mark A.; Chung, Brandon W. [MSTD-CMS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The aging in plutonium is predominantly caused by its internal self irradiation. The self-irradiation in Pu-239 is by the decay process of transmuting the Pu atom into uranium atom and emitting an {alpha}-particle. Most of the lattice damage comes from the uranium recoil resulting in Frenkel type defects consisting of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, helium in growth and defect clusters and possibly even though it is not yet observed, the generation of voids. As part of the stockpile stewardship, it is important to understand the changes in the structure and microstructures and their correlations to the physical properties. Changes in the physical properties has direct relationship to the quality of the structure, in terms of formation of defects and defect clustering, accumulation of voids, grain boundaries, phase changes and etc. which can adversely affects the stability of the material. These changes are very difficult to monitor because of the high activity of the sample, high atomic number making x-ray and synchrotron probe into the bulk very difficult (neutron probe is not feasible) and the long life time which normally requires decades to measure. In this paper we describe the development of an in-situ in-house transmission X-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental technique used to monitor the structural changes in these materials. This technique calls for a very thin sample of less that 2 {mu}m and to accelerate the aging process due to self-irradiation, spiked alloy of 7.5 weight percent of Pu-238 is used. This is equivalent to roughly 17 times the normal rate of aging. Current results suggest that over a period of 2.8 equivalent years, an increase of 0.5% in unit cell parameter is observed. The increase appears to be an abrupt jump at about 1.1 equivalent years, brought about by the collapsing of the atoms from the interstitials to the lattice sites. Further data analysis is on the way. (authors)

  5. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  6. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Robert M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cohen, Isadore (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  7. In situ x-ray scattering study on the evolution of Ge island morphology and relaxation for low growth rate: Advanced transition to superdomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, M.-I. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee/SP2M/NRS, CEA Grenoble, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); ID01/ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Schuelli, T. U.; Renaud, G. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee/SP2M/NRS, CEA Grenoble, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Wintersberger, E.; Chen, G.; Bauer, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter- und Festkrperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria); Holy, V. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-15

    The kinetics of the growth of Ge superdomes and their facets on Si(001) surfaces are analyzed as a function of deposited Ge thickness for different growth temperatures and at a low growth rate by in situ grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering in combination with in situ grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. At a low growth rate, intermixing is found to be enhanced and superdomes are formed already at lower coverages than previously reported. In addition, we observe that at the dome-to-superdome transition, a large amount of material is transferred into dislocated islands, either by dome coalescence or by anomalous coarsening. Once dislocated islands are formed, island coalescence is a rare event and introduction of dislocations is preferred. The superdome growth is thus stabilized by the insertion of dislocations during growth.

  8. A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Weiss

    2012-08-02

    This is the final technical report for the SBIR Phase I project titled 'A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays.' Experiments using diffraction of synchrotron radiation that help scientists understand engineering material failure modes, such as fracture and fatigue, require specialized machinery. This machinery must be able to induce these failure modes in a material specimen while adhering to strict size, weight, and geometric limitations prescribed by diffraction measurement techniques. During this Phase I project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) developed one such machine capable of applying uniaxial mechanical loading to a material specimen in both tension and compression, with zero backlash while transitioning between the two. Engineers currently compensate for a lack of understanding of fracture and fatigue by employing factors of safety in crucial system components. Thus, mechanical and structural parts are several times bigger, thicker, and heavier than they need to be. The scientific discoveries that result from diffraction experiments which utilize sophisticated mechanical loading devices will allow for broad material, weight, fuel, and cost savings in engineering design across all industries, while reducing the number of catastrophic failures in transportation, power generation, infrastructure, and all other engineering systems. With an existing load frame as the starting point, the research focused on two main areas: (1) the design of a specimen alignment and gripping system that enables pure uniaxial tension and compression loading (and no bending, shear, or torsion), and (2) development of a feedback control system that is adaptive and thus can maintain a load set point despite changing specimen material properties (e.g. a decreasing stiffness during yield).

  9. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  10. In situ determination of lithium ion cathode/electrolyte interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In situ determination of lithium ion cathodeelectrolyte interface thickness and composition as a function of charge. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In situ...

  11. In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of electrochemical corrosion of copper in aqueous NaHCO3 solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Peng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Borondics, Ferenc; Glans, Per-Anders; West, Mark W.; Chang, Ching-Lin; Salmeron, Miquel; Guo, Jinghua

    2010-03-31

    A novel electrochemical setup has been developed for soft x-ray absorption studies of the electronic structure of electrode materials during electrochemical cycling. In this communication we illustrate the operation of the cell with a study of the corrosion behavior of copper in aqueous NaHCO3 solution via the electrochemically induced changes of its electronic structure. This development opens the way for in situ investigations of electrochemical processes, photovoltaics, batteries, fuel cells, water splitting, corrosion, electrodeposition, and a variety of important biological processes.

  12. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  13. In situ dehydration behavior of zeolite-like pentagonite: A single-crystal X-ray study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danisi, Rosa Micaela; Armbruster, Thomas; Lazic, Biljana

    2013-01-15

    The structural modifications upon heating of pentagonite, Ca(VO)(Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}){center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (space group Ccm2{sub 1}, a=10.3708(2), b=14.0643(2), c=8.97810(10) A, V=1309.53(3) A{sup 3}) were investigated by in situ temperature dependent single-crystal X-ray structure refinements. Diffraction data of a sample from Poona district (India) have been measured in steps of 25 up to 250 Degree-Sign C and in steps of 50 Degree-Sign C between 250 and 400 Degree-Sign C. Pentagonite has a porous framework structure made up by layers of silicate tetrahedra connected by V{sup 4+}O{sub 5} square pyramids. Ca and H{sub 2}O molecules are extraframework occupants. Room temperature diffraction data allowed refinement of H positions. The hydrogen-bond system links the extraframework occupants to the silicate layers and also interconnects the H{sub 2}O molecules located inside the channels. Ca is seven-fold coordinated forming four bonds to O of the tetrahedral framework and three bonds to extraframework H{sub 2}O. The H{sub 2}O molecule at O9 showing a high displacement parameter is not bonded to Ca. The dehydration in pentagonite proceeds in three steps. At 100 Degree-Sign C the H{sub 2}O molecule at O8 was released while O9 moved towards Ca. As a consequence the displacement parameter of H{sub 2}O at O9 halved compared to that at room temperature. The unit-cell volume decreased to 1287.33(3) A{sup 3} leading to a formula with 3H{sub 2}O per formula unit (pfu). Ca remained seven-fold coordinated. At 175 Degree-Sign C Ca(VO)(Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}){center_dot}3H{sub 2}O transformed into a new phase with 1H{sub 2}O molecule pfu characterized by doubling of the c axis and the monoclinic space group Pn. Severe bending of specific T--O--T angles led to contraction of the porous three-dimensional framework. In addition, H{sub 2}O at O9 was expelled while H{sub 2}O at O7 approached a position in the center of the channel. The normalized volume decreased to 1069.44(9) A{sup 3}. The Ca coordination reduced from seven- to six-fold. At 225 Degree-Sign C a new anhydrous phase with space group Pna2{sub 1} but without doubling of c had formed. Release of H{sub 2}O at O7 caused additional contraction of T--O--T angles and volume reduction (V=1036.31(9) A{sup 3}). Ca adopted five-fold coordination. During heating excursion up to 400 Degree-Sign C this anhydrous phase remained preserved. Between room temperature and 225 Degree-Sign C the unit-cell volume decreased by 21% due to dehydration. The dehydration steps compare well with the thermo-gravimetric data reported in the literature. - Graphical abstract: Pentagonite structure at room temperature and at 225 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the relationship between the removal of H{sub 2}O molecules and structural modifications of the framework of pentagonite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pentagonite undergoes phase transitions upon heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze similarities and differences between pentagonite and related structures.

  14. Low-level determination of plutonium by gamma and L x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitsche, H.; Gatti, R.C.; Lee, S.C.

    1991-04-01

    we have developed an analytical method for detection of {sup 239}Pu in aqueous samples at concentrations as low as 10{sup {minus}10} M. This nuclear counting technique utilizes the uranium L X-rays, which follow the alpha decay of plutonium. Because L X-rays are specific for the element and not for the individual isotopes, the isotopic composition of the plutonium sample must be known. The counting efficiency in the 11--23 keV range is determined from a plutonium standard, and the concentration of the sample is then calculated from the L X-ray count and the isotopic composition. The total L X-ray count is corrected for possible contributions from other radionuclides present as impurities by measuring the low-energy gamma spectrum for each contaminant to establish specific photon/X-ray ratios. The ratios are important when {sup 241}Pu and {sup 242}Pu are measured, because the respective decay chain members produce non-U L X-rays. This new method can replace the use of labor-intensive radiochemical separation techniques and elaborate activation methods for analysis of {sup 239}Pu in aqueous samples. It is also applicable for assaying plutonium in liquid wastes that pose possible hazards to the environment.

  15. Argon Adsorption on MCM-41 Mesoporous Crystal Studied by In Situ Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    -701, Korea, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, New Jersey 08801 powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at SPring-8. The diffraction intensity data is analyzed. The proposed method of interpretation of XRD data allows one to calculate the density ratio between the silica

  16. In situ apparatus for the study of clathrate hydrates relevant to solar system bodies using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Sarah J; Evans, Aneurin; Parker, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are believed to play a significant role in various solar system environments, e.g. comets, and the surfaces and interiors of icy satellites, however the structural factors governing their formation and dissociation are poorly understood. We demonstrate the use of a high pressure gas cell, combined with variable temperature cooling and time-resolved data collection, to the in situ study of clathrate hydrates under conditions relevant to solar system environments. Clathrates formed and processed within the cell are monitored in situ using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction allows the formation of clathrate hydrates to be observed as CO2 gas is applied to ice formed within the cell. Complete conversion is obtained by annealing at temperatures just below the ice melting point. A subsequent rise in the quantity of clathrate is observed as the cell is thermally cycled. Four regions between 100-5000cm-1 are present in the Raman spectra that carry feature...

  17. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  18. In Situ Observation of Water Dissociation with Lattice Incorporation at FeO Particle Edges Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xingyi; Lee, Junseok; Wang, Congjun; Matranga, Christopher; Aksoy, Funda; Liu, Zhi

    2011-03-15

    The dissociation of H2O and formation of adsorbed hydroxyl groups, on FeO particles grown on Au(111) were identified with in situ,: X:ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at water pressures ranging from 3 x 10-8 to 0.1 Torr. The facile dissociation of H2O takes place at FeO particle edges, and it was successfully observed in situ With atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The in situ STM studies show that adsorbed hydroxyl groups were formed exclusively along the edges of the FeO particles with the 0 atom becoming directly incorporated into the oxide crystalline lattice The STM results are consistent with coordinatively unsaturated ferrous (CUF) sites along the FeO particle edge causing the observed reactivity with H2O. Our results also directly illustrate how structural defects and under.-coordinated sites participate in chemical reactions.

  19. In-situ synchrotron energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction study of thin Pd foils with Pd:D and Pd:H concentrations up to 1:1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Dominguez, D. D.; Qadri, S. B.; Hubler, G. K.; Violante, V.; Hu, J. Z.; He, J. H.

    2012-10-15

    Time resolved, in-situ, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was performed in an electrolysis cell during electrochemical loading of palladium foil cathodes with hydrogen and deuterium. Concentrations of H:Pd (D:Pd) up to 1:1 in 0.1 M LiOH (LiOD) in H{sub 2}O (D{sub 2}O) electrolyte were obtained, as determined by both the Pd lattice parameter and cathode resistivity. In addition, some indications on the kinetics of loading and deloading of hydrogen from the Pd surface were obtained. The alpha-beta phase transformations were clearly delineated but no new phases at high concentration were determined.

  20. In-situ x-ray diffraction study of the growth of highly strained epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinsheimer, J.; Callori, S. J.; Ziegler, B.; Bein, B.; Dawber, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Chinta, P. V.; Ashrafi, A.; Headrick, R. L. [Department of Physics, Cook Physical Science Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Cook Physical Science Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

    2013-12-09

    In-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction was performed during the growth of BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates using both off-axis RF magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition techniques. It was found that the films were ferroelectric during the growth process, and the presence or absence of a bottom SrRuO{sub 3} electrode played an important role in the growth of the films. Pulsed laser deposited films on SrRuO{sub 3} displayed an anomalously high tetragonality and unit volume, which may be connected to the previously predicted negative pressure phase of BaTiO{sub 3}.

  1. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xiquian [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pan, Huilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Zhou, Yongning [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Northrup, Paul [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Bak, Seongmin [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, Mingzhao [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk University-Seoul, Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, (Republic of Korea); Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Dept. of Chemistry, MA (United States); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Tianpin [Argonne National Laboratory, X-ray Science Division, Lemont, IL (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-25

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density Li–S batteries (2600 W h kg?¹) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during charge–discharge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 < x ? 8). It is reported that the long-chain polysulfides can be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called “shuttle effect” is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the Li–S batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some Li–S cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of Li–S batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in Li–S batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in Li–S cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in Li–S battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of Li–S batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the Li–S cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the Li–S reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding Li–S chemistry and designing effective strategies for Li–S batteries.

  2. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xiquian; Pan, Huilin; Zhou, Yongning; Northrup, Paul; Xiao, Jie; Bak, Seongmin; Liu, Mingzhao; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Qu, Deyang; Liu, Jun; et al

    2015-03-25

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density Li–S batteries (2600 W h kg?¹) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during charge–discharge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 more »be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called “shuttle effect” is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the Li–S batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some Li–S cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of Li–S batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in Li–S batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in Li–S cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in Li–S battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of Li–S batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the Li–S cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the Li–S reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding Li–S chemistry and designing effective strategies for Li–S batteries.« less

  3. In-situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction study of the growth of CuO nanowires by annealing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Deb, S. K.; Sant, Tushar; Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2013-10-14

    The in-situ growth of CuO nanowires was studied by Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to observe the mechanism of growth. The study was carried out for comparison at two temperatures—at 500 °C, the optimum temperature of the nanowires growth, and at 300 °C just below the temperature range of the growth. The in situ observation revealed the successive oxidation of Cu foil to Cu{sub 2}O layer and finally to CuO layer. Further analysis showed the presence of a compressive stress in CuO layer due to interface at CuO and Cu{sub 2}O layers. The compressive stress was found to increase with the growth of the nanowires at 500 °C while it relaxed with the growth of CuO layer at 300 °C. The present results do not support the existing model of stress relaxation induced growth of nanowires. Based on the detailed Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, and EDXRD results, a microstructure based growth model has been suggested.

  4. Evolution of Crack-Tip Transformation Zones in Superelastic Nitinol Subjected to in Situ Fatigue. a Fracture Mechanics And Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, S.W.; Mehta, A.; Pelton, A.R.; Ritchie, R.O.; /UC, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    The ultrahigh spatial resolution ({approx}1 {micro}m{sup 2}) of synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction is combined with fracture mechanics techniques to directly measure in situ three-dimensional strains, phases and crystallographic alignment ahead of a growing fatigue crack (100 cycles in situ) in superelastic Nitinol. The results provide some surprising insights into the growth of cracks in phase-transforming material at the microscale. Specifically, despite a macroscopic superelastic strain recovery of 6-8% associated with the phase transformation, individual austenite grains experience local strains of less than 1.5%. This observation indicates that it is the localized process of the accommodation of the transformation and subsequent loading of the martensite that provide the main source of the large recoverable strains. Furthermore, the plastic region ahead of the crack is composed of deformed martensite. This micromechanical transformation process is dependent upon the material texture, and directly influences the transformation zone size/shape as well as the crack path.

  5. A x-ray radiography-densitometry technique for the quantitative determination of metal deposit profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, F.G.; Iacovangelo, C.D.

    1984-03-01

    The application of x-ray radiography in conjunction with high resolution optical densitometry for the quantitative determination of metal deposit profiles parallel and perpendicular to the substrate surface is described. The principles of the technique and the range of its applicability are discussed. The technique is applied to the study of zinc deposition on highly porous carbon foams from circulating aqueous zinc bromide solutions. The effect of substrate pore size on the zinc distribution is explored. Zinc is found to deposit predominantly on the porous substrate/electrolyte and substrate/current collector interfaces. Smaller pore size favors smoother and more uniform deposits throughout the substrate.

  6. Changes in delta-Plutonium due to self-irradiation aging observed by Continuous in-situ X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw, C K; Chung, B W; Wall, M A

    2007-01-05

    The aging in plutonium is predominantly caused by its internal self-irradiation. The self-irradiation in Pu-239 is by the decay process of transmuting the Pu atom into uranium atom and emitting an {alpha}-particle. Most of the lattice damage comes from the uranium recoil resulting in Frenkel-type defects consisting of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, helium in-growth and defect clusters and possibly even though it is not yet observed, the generation of voids. As part of the stockpile stewardship, it is important to understand the changes in the structure and microstructures and their correlations to the physical properties. Changes in the physical properties have a direct relationship to the quality of the structure, in terms of formation of defects and defect clustering, accumulation of voids, grain boundaries, phase changes and etc. which can adversely affect the stability of the material. These changes are very difficult to monitor because of the high activity of the sample, high atomic number making x-ray and synchrotron probe into the bulk very difficult (neutron probe is not feasible) and the long life time which normally requires decades to measure. In this paper we describe the development of an in-situ in-house transmission x-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental technique used to monitor the structural changes in these materials. This technique calls for a very thin sample of less that 2 mm and to accelerate the aging process due to self-irradiation, spiked alloy of 7.5 weight percent of Pu-238 is used. This is equivalent to roughly 17 times the normal rate of aging. Current results suggest that over a period of 2.8 equivalent years, an increase of 0.5% in unit cell parameter is observed. The increase appears to be an abrupt jump at about 1.1 equivalent years, brought about by the collapsing of the atoms from the interstitials to the lattice sites. Further data analysis is on the way.

  7. Cation Movements during Dehydration and NO2 Desorption in a Ba-Y,FAU zeolite: an in situ Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-02-28

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were used to probe the interactions between BaY, FAU zeolite frameworks and H2O or NO2 molecules. These results provided information about the migration of the Ba2+ cations in the zeolite framework during dehydration and during NO2 adsorption/desorption processes in a water free zeolite. In the hydrated structure water molecules form four double rings of hexagonal ice-like clusters [(H2O)6] in the 12-ring openings of the super-cage. These water rings interacted with the cations and the zeolite framework through four cation/water clusters centered over the four 6-membered rings of the super-cage (site II). Interpenetrating tetrahedral water clusters [(H2O)4] and tetrahedral Ba+2 cation clusters were observed in the sodalite cage. Consistent with the reported FT-IR results, three different ionic NOx species (NO+, NO+-NO2, and NO3-) were observed following NO2 adsorption by the dehydrated Ba-Y,FAU zeolite. The structure of the water and the NOx species were correlated with the interactions between the adsorbates, the cations, and the framework. The population of Ba2+ ions at different cationic positions strongly depended on the amount of bound water or NOx species. Both dehydration and NO2 adsorption/desorption resulted in facile migration of Ba2+ ions among the different cationic positions. Data obtained in this work have provided direct evidence for the Ba2+ cation migration to accommodate the binding of gas molecules. This important feature may play a pivotal role in the strong binding of NO2 to Ba-Y,FAU zeolite, a prerequisite for high catalytic activity in lean NOx reduction catalysis.

  8. Determination of the polarization state of x rays with the help of anomalous transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, K. S. Uschmann, I.; Förster, E.; Marx, B.; Paulus, G. G.; Stöhlker, T.

    2014-04-14

    Besides intensity and direction, the polarization of an electromagnetic wave provides characteristic information on the crossed medium. Here, we present two methods for the determination of the polarization state of x rays by polarizers based on anomalous transmission (Borrmann effect). Using a polarizer-analyzer setup, we have measured a polarization purity of less than 1.5?×?10{sup ?5}, three orders of magnitude better than obtained in earlier work. Using the analyzer crystal in multiple-beam case with slightly detuned azimuth, we show how the first three Stokes parameters can be determined with a single angular scan. Thus, polarization analyzers based on anomalous transmission make it possible to detect changes of the polarization in a range from degrees down to arcseconds.

  9. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Harris E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walsh, Stuart D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DuFrane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carroll, Susan A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  10. In situ wettability determination improves formation evalution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desbrandes, R. )

    1989-08-01

    Wettability is an important petrophysic parameter which affects capillary pressure, relative permeability, electric properties, water cut production, waterflood behavior, and enhanced recovery. This article describes in situ wettability laboratory experiments and field studies. A laboratory model has been built with a 12-ft long 4-in. clear plastic pipe. A 1 7/8-in. slotted plastic liner has been placed on one side. Ottawa sand F-95 has been packed in the annulus either nontreated, in its naturally water wet condition, or after a silane treatment to render it oil wet. Provided in the sand pack for measurement are 12 pressure pickups with an accurate Omega digital pressure gage. A typical pressure profile recorded during oil drive in a water saturated water wet sand pack is shown. The front was left to stabilize for 60 days. A pressure profile recorded during a water drive in an oil saturated oil wet sand pack is shown. The abrupt change from the water pressure gradient can be seen clearly for the water wet and the oil wet sand. It occurs exactly as expected. The measurements show that the change occurs in less than 4 in. which is the distance between two pressure pickups.

  11. Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

  12. In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Hoffman, D M; van Buuren, T; Lauderbach, L; Ilavsky, J; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Overturf, G; Fried, L

    2008-02-06

    TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for much of the volume expansion caused by temperature cycling. These voids are in the predicted size regime for hot-spot formation during ignition and detonation, and thus an experimental measure of these voids is important feedback for hot-spot theory and for determining the relationship between void size distributions and detonation properties. Also, understanding the mechanism of ratchet growth allows future choice of explosive/binder mixtures to minimize these types of changes to explosives, further extending PBX shelf life. This paper presents the void size distributions of LX-17, UFTATB, and PBXs using commercially available Cytop M, Cytop A, and Hyflon AD60 binders during temperature cycling between -55 C and 70 C. These void size distributions are derived from ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), a technique sensitive to structures from about 10 nm to about 2 mm. Structures with these sizes do not appreciably change in UFTATB, indicating voids or cracks larger than a few microns appear in UFTATB during temperature cycling. Compared to Kel-F 800 binders, Cytop M and Cytop A show relatively small increases in void volume from 0.9% to 1.3% and 0.6% to 1.1%, respectively, while Hyflon fails to prevent irreversible volume expansion (1.2% to 4.6%). Computational mesoscale models of ratchet growth and binder wetting and adhesion properties point to mechanisms of ratchet growth, and are discussed in combination with the experimental results.

  13. Modeling and in-situ X-Ray video microscopy of confined equiaxed grain growth in Al-Cu Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; The University of Iowa, IA 52242, U.S.A. Keywords towards the cold stage at constant velocity by a stepping motor. The experiments were carried out setup together with an introduction to the basic principles of high-energy synchrotron X-ray imaging can

  14. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  15. Molecular Structures of Fulvalenes Derived from Methylidenecycloproparenes: X-ray Structure Determinations and ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apeloig, Yitzhak

    Molecular Structures of Fulvalenes Derived from Methylidenecycloproparenes: X-ray Structure methylidenecyclopropabenzene 3, the derived parent tria-, penta-, and heptafulvalene derivatives 4-6, and the crystalline derivatives 7, 8, and 9. The hydrocarbons are found to be polar, and the cycloproparenylidene moiety acts

  16. Polarization periodicity in the B1 columnar phase determined by resonant x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folcia, C.L.; Pindak, R.; Ortega, J.; Etxebarria, J.; Pan, L.; Wang, S.; Huang, C.C.; Ponsinet, V.; Barois, P. and Gimeno, N.

    2011-07-14

    We report structural results that evidence the polarization distribution of the blocks in the columnar phase of an achiral bent-core liquid crystal. The study was performed using resonant x-ray diffraction at the sulfur K edge on oriented samples aligned on substrates. The extra periodicity is revealed through the violation of the systematic extinction rule of the structural symmetry group along the experimentally accessible diffraction direction. Further data obtained from the polarization analysis of a resonant reflection give information concerning the transition mechanism between B{sub 1} and B{sub 2} phases.

  17. Polarization Periodicity in the B(1) Columnar Phase Determined by Resonant X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C Folcia; J Ortega; J Etxebarria; L Pan; S Wang; C Huang; V Ponsinet; P Barois; R Pindak; N Gimeno

    2011-12-31

    We report structural results that evidence the polarization distribution of the blocks in the columnar phase of an achiral bent-core liquid crystal. The study was performed using resonant x-ray diffraction at the sulfur K edge on oriented samples aligned on substrates. The extra periodicity is revealed through the violation of the systematic extinction rule of the structural symmetry group along the experimentally accessible diffraction direction. Further data obtained from the polarization analysis of a resonant reflection give information concerning the transition mechanism between B{sub 1} and B{sub 2} phases.

  18. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S., E-mail: satyajit@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, 208016 (India)

    2014-05-15

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ?0.9 nms{sup ?1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  19. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  20. Ground-state wave function of plutonium in PuSb as determined via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Janoschek, M.; Haskel, D.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-01-14

    Measurements of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Pu M?,? edges of the ferromagnet PuSb are reported. Using bulk magnetization measurements and a sum rule analysis of the XMCD spectra, we determine the individual orbital [?L = 2.8(1)?B/Pu] and spin moments [?S = –2.0(1)?B/Pu] of the Pu 5f electrons for the first time. Atomic multiplet calculations of the XMCD and XANES spectra reproduce well the experimental data and are consistent with the experimental value of the spin moment. These measurements of Lz and Sz are in excellent agreement with the values thatmore »have been extracted from neutron magnetic form factor measurements, and confirm the local character of the 5f electrons in PuSb. We demonstrate that a split M? as well as a narrow M? XMCD signal may serve as a signature of 5f electron localization in actinide compounds.« less

  1. Ground-state wave function of plutonium in PuSb as determined via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janoschek, M.; Haskel, D.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Pu M?,? edges of the ferromagnet PuSb are reported. Using bulk magnetization measurements and a sum rule analysis of the XMCD spectra, we determine the individual orbital [?L = 2.8(1)?B/Pu] and spin moments [?S = ?2.0(1)?B/Pu] of the Pu 5f electrons for the first time. Atomic multiplet calculations of the XMCD and XANES spectra reproduce well the experimental data and are consistent with the experimental value of the spin moment. These measurements of ?Lz? and ?Sz? are in excellent agreement with the values that have been extracted from neutron magnetic form factor measurements, and confirm the local character of the 5f electrons in PuSb. Finally, we demonstrate that a split M? as well as a narrow M? XMCD signal may serve as a signature of 5f electron localization in actinide compounds.

  2. Determination of x-ray spectra from Al attenuation data by imposing a priori physical features of the spectrum: Theory and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado, Victor [Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad Complutense 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    The determination of the spectral distribution of an x-ray beam from attenuation measurements in a narrow beam is an ill-conditioned problem that has aroused great interest since it was first proposed by Silberstein in 1932. In this work, the explicit reconstruction of the spectral distribution directly from the attenuation curve, without differentiating it, is carried out by a maximum likelihood method that allows one to impose a priori physical features of an x-ray spectral distribution, such as the positiveness of the solution, the boundness of its support, and the position and shape of the spikes and edges associated with the characteristic radiation. The numerical simulations made and the experimental validation of the proposed method have shown that it is possible to reconstruct x-ray spectra that, having a realistic shape, accurately fit the attenuation curve and predict the energy fluence. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of spectra including the K x rays of W is less accurate than the reconstruction of spectra including L x rays of W or K x rays of Mo, even when a priori information about the position and shape of the spikes and edges associated with the characteristic radiation is used.

  3. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumptionmore »by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.« less

  4. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bak, Seong Min [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Senanayake, Sanjaya D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering; Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering] (ORCID:0000000162786369); Zhang, Lulu [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  5. Temperature, pressure, and size dependence of Pd-H interaction in size selected Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles: In-situ X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Kulriya, P. K.

    2014-03-21

    In this study, in-situ X-ray diffraction has been carried out to investigate the effect of temperature and pressure on hydrogen induced lattice parameter variation in size selected Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles. The nanoparticles of three different mobility equivalent diameters (20, 40, and 60?nm) having a narrow size distribution were prepared by gas phase synthesis method. In the present range of temperature (350?K to 250?K) and pressure (10{sup ?4} to 100 millibars), no ? (H/Pd???0.03) ? ? (H/Pd???0.54) phase transition is observed. At temperature higher than 300?°C or pressure lower than 25 millibars, there is a large difference in the rate at which lattice constant varies as a function of pressure and temperature. Further, the lattice variation with temperature and pressure is also observed to depend upon the nanoparticle size. At lower temperature or higher pressure, size of the nanoparticle seems to be relatively less important. These results are explained on the basis of the relative dominance of physical absorption and diffusion of H in Pd alloy nanoparticles at different temperature and pressure. In the present study, absence of ? ? ? phase transition points towards the advantage of using Pd-alloy nanoparticles in applications requiring long term and repeated hydrogen cycling.

  6. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, G. Störmer, M.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Höche, D.; Lorenz, U.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A.; Becker, H.-W.; Haese-Seiller, M.; Moulin, J.-F.; Pomm, M.; Randau, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.

    2015-01-21

    Due to the present shortage of {sup 3}He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with {sup 3}He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid {sup 10}B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings of up to 2??m thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system. The {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical {sup 10}B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black {sup 3}He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of {sup 3}He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative {sup 3}He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.

  7. In-situ x-ray diffraction and resistivity analysis of CoSi{sub 2} phase formation with and without a Ti interlayer at rapid thermal annealing rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, C. Jr.; Clevenger, L.A.; Stephenson, G.B.; Brauer, S.; Morales, G.; Ludwig, K.F. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    It has been demonstrated, using synchrotron radiation, that at rapid thermal annealing rates (3 C/s) the 2formation of CoSi{sub 2} shifts to higher temperatures when a thin Ti interlayer is placed between Co and polycrystalline Si. It has also been shown that the Ti interlayer reduces the temperature range between the start of CoSi formation and CoSi{sub 2} formation (i.e. the range over which CoSi is present). 13 nm of Co deposited by physical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Si with and without either a 2 nm or 3.4 nm interlayer of Ti was analyzed in-situ by monitoring x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak intensity as a function of temperature using monochromatic radiation from a synchrotron beam line and by monitoring resistivity as a function of temperature i a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system. The XRD analysis indicates that the phase formation proceeds from CoSi to CoSi{sub 2} in a temperature range that decreases from about 200 C to 140 C to 115 C with pure Co, Co/2 nm Ti and Co/3.4 nm Ti films respectively. The onset of the CoSi formation increases by about 135 C and 160 C for Co/2 nm Ti and Co/3.4 nm Ti compared to pure Co. The CoSi temperature range decreases from about 75 C in pure Co to less than 50 C in Co/Ti. In-situ RTA resistance along with in-situ XRD analysis indicates that the onset formation temperatures for CoSi are about 440 C, 575 C and 600 C and the temperatures for the completion of CoSi{sub 2} formation are about 640 C, 715 C and 715 C for Co, Co/2 nm Ti and Co/3.4 nm Ti films respectively. The results are consistent with he Ti interlayer acting as a diffusion barrier during the initial stages of the Co-Si reaction.

  8. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wolf, Emil [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States

    2010-09-01

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  9. Explosives under pressure - the crystal structure of gamma-RDX as determined by high-pressure X-ray and neutron diffraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, A.J.; Oswald, Iain D H; Francis, A.R.; Pulham, Colin

    Using a combination of X-ray single crystal and neutron powder diffraction, the crystal structure of the high-pressure ?-form of RDX has been determined at 5.2 GPa and shows that the RDX molecules adopt different conformations ...

  10. Determining Orientational Structure of Diamondoid Thiols Attached to Silver Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Lee, J I; Fabbri, J D; Wang, D; Nielsen, M; Randel, J C; Schreiner, P R; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J P; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Melosh, N A; van Buuren, T

    2008-10-07

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is a powerful tool for determination of molecular orientation in self-assembled monolayers and other surface-attached molecules. A general framework for using NEXAFS to simultaneously determine molecular tilt and twist of rigid molecules attached to surfaces is presented. This framework is applied to self-assembled monolayers of higher diamondoid, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures. Diamondoid monolayers chemisorbed on metal substrates are known to exhibit interesting electronic and surface properties. This work compares molecular orientation in monolayers prepared on silver substrates using two different thiol positional isomers of [121]tetramantane, and thiols derived from two different pentamantane structural isomers, [1212]pentamantane and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane. The observed differences in monolayer structure demonstrate the utility and limitations of NEXAFS spectroscopy and the framework. The results also demonstrate the ability to control diamondoid assembly, in particular the molecular orientational structure, providing a flexible platform for the modification of surface properties with this exciting new class of nanodiamond materials.

  11. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  12. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01

    EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORE~ SURVEY METER FOR TIIE QUANTITATIVE DEPERMINATI(gq OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by MARY CATHERINE FEHRENBACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1984 MAJOR SUBJECI': INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORES~ SURVEY METER FOR THE QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATIGN OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by h...

  13. Systematics of ground-state quadrupole moments of odd-A deformed nuclei determined with muonic M x rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Steffen, R.M.; Shera, E.B.; Reuter, W.; Hoehn, M.V.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    The ground-state quadrupole moments of /sup 151/Eu, /sup 153/Eu, /sup 159/Tb, /sup 163/Dy, /sup 167/Er, /sup 177/Hf, /sup 179/Hf, /sup 191/Ir, and /sup 193/Ir were determined by measuring the quadrupole hyperfine-splitting energies of muonic M x rays. The results are Q = 0.903(10) e b for /sup 151/Eu, Q = 2.412(21) e b for /sup 153/Eu, Q = 1.432(8) e b for /sup 159/Tb, Q = 2.648(21) e b for /sup 163/Dy, Q = 3.565(29) e b for /sup 167/Er, Q = 3.365(29) e b for /sup 177/Hf, Q = 3.793(33) e b for /sup 179/Hf, Q = 0.816(9) e b for /sup 191/Ir, and Q = 0.751(9) e b for /sup 193/Ir. The present quadrupole moments, compared with values obtained from electronic-atom hyperfine measurements, show that the Sternheimer correction factors used in the rare-earth electronic-atom analysis are unreliable. Systematics of deformation parameters ..beta../sub 2/ calculated from the present quadrupole moments for odd-A nuclei, and from B(E2) values of Coulomb excitation measurements for even-A nuclei, also indicate that the largest deformation change so far known exists between /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu. Except at the onset of nuclear deformation, the deformation parameters of the odd-A nuclei are quite consistent with those of the even-A neighbors.

  14. Mass fractal characteristics of silica sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donatti, D.A.; Vollet, D.R.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Mesquita, A.; Silva, T.F.P. [Unesp-Universidade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 178 CEP, 13500-970 Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-01-01

    A sample series of silica sonogels was prepared using different water-tetraethoxysilane molar ratio (r{sub w}) in the gelation step of the process in order to obtain aerogels with different bulk densities after the supercritical drying. The samples were analyzed by means of small-angle x-ray-scattering (SAXS) and nitrogen-adsorption techniques. Wet sonogels exhibit mass fractal structure with fractal dimension D increasing from {approx}2.1 to {approx}2.4 and mass-fractal correlation length {xi} diminishing from {approx}13 nm to {approx}2 nm, as r{sub w} is changed in the nominal range from 66 to 6. The process of obtaining aerogels from sonogels and heat treatment at 500 deg. C, in general, increases the mass-fractal dimension D, diminishes the characteristic length {xi} of the fractal structure, and shortens the fractal range at the micropore side for the formation of a secondary structured particle, apparently evolved from the original wet structure at a high resolution level. The overall mass-fractal dimension D of aerogels was evaluated as {approx}2.4 and {approx}2.5, as determined from SAXS and from pore-size distribution by nitrogen adsorption, respectively. The fine structure of the 'secondary particle' developed in the obtaining of aerogels could be described as a surface-mass fractal, with the correlated surface and mass-fractal dimensions decreasing from {approx}2.4 to {approx}2.0 and from {approx}2.7 to {approx}2.5, respectively, as the aerogel bulk density increases from 0.25 (r{sub w}=66) up to 0.91 g/cm{sup 3} (r{sub w}=6)

  15. Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

  16. Molecular structures of fluid phase phosphatidylglycerol bilayers as determined by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    neutron and X-ray scattering Jianjun Pan a, , Frederick A. Heberle a , Stephanie Tristram-Nagle b Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 378316100 Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 378316453, USA e Canadian

  17. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the superposition of mass fluxes due to Fickian diffusion, thermodiffusion (Soret effect), and electromigration, which in turn are a consequence of a superposition of chemical, temperature, and electrical potential gradients. On the other hand, we propose defect pile-up at particle-particle contacts and subsequent tunneling as a mechanism creating the 'burst-mode' discontinuous densification at the singularities observed at 847 and 905 Degree-Sign C.

  18. Multiscale determination of in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi Karam, Samantha, 1973-

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we address the problem of determining in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs using borehole logs and surface seismic reflection data. The dissertation covers four subtopics. The first is the ...

  19. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources (NGLSs). Although NGLSs will not displace synchrotrons from their role they do offer exciting new capabilities which can be understood from the physics of the light production in each device.

  20. Soft X-ray microflares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzoeva, I K

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray solar bursts are studied. Weak bursts with powers up to 10-8 W/m2 were detected. All the events were confirmed by GOES observations. Parameters of these microflares are determined. A physical mechanism for the low-intensity solar events is discussed.

  1. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  2. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  3. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  4. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  5. Conduction band offset at GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission and charge-corrected x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W. F.; Nishimula, T.; Nagashio, K.; Kita, K.; Toriumi, A.

    2013-03-11

    We report a consistent conduction band offset (CBO) at a GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) and charge-corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). IPE results showed that the CBO value was larger than 1.5 eV irrespective of metal electrode and substrate type variance, while an accurate determination of valence band offset (VBO) by XPS requires a careful correction of differential charging phenomena. The VBO value was determined to be 3.60 {+-} 0.2 eV by XPS after charge correction, thus yielding a CBO (1.60 {+-} 0.2 eV) in excellent agreement with the IPE results. Such a large CBO (>1.5 eV) confirmed here is promising in terms of using GeO{sub 2} as a potential passivation layer for future Ge-based scaled CMOS devices.

  6. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  7. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Petrosian, Vahe'; Singal, Jack; Ostrowski, Michal, E-mail: mdainott@stanford.edu, E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu, E-mail: jacks@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl, E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.pl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stanford University, Via Pueblo Mall 382, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 9.5, can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential to test cosmological models. Dainotti's analysis of GRB Swift afterglow light curves with known redshifts and a definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest-frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). Here, we present an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good light curves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely, their cosmological evolution, we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, the origin of which is still unknown. The present result could help to clarify the debated nature of the plateau emission.

  8. X-ray Microtomography Determination of Air?Water Interfacial Area?Water Saturation Relationships in Sandy Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Harrold, Katherine H.; Lieb-Lappen, Ross M. (Middlebury)

    2008-08-06

    In this work, total smooth air-water interfacial areas were measured for a series of nine natural and model sandy porous media as a function of water saturation using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Interfacial areas decreased linearly with water saturation, while the estimated maximum interfacial area compared favorably to the media geometric surface areas. Importantly, relative interfacial area (i.e., normalized by geometric surface area) versus water saturation plots for all media collapsed into a single linear cluster (r{sup 2} = 0.93), suggesting that geometric surface area is an important, and perhaps sufficient, descriptor of sandy media that governs total smooth interfacial area?water saturation relationships. Measured relationships were used to develop an empirical model for estimating interfacial area-water saturation relationships for sandy porous media. Model-based interfacial area estimates for independent media were generally slightly higher than interfacial areas measured using aqueous-phase interfacial tracer methods, which may indicate that microtomography captures regions of the air-water interface that are not accessible to aqueous-phase interfacial tracers. The empirical model presented here requires only average particle diameter and porosity as input parameters and can be used to readily estimate air-water interfacial area?water saturation relationships for sandy porous media.

  9. X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis, Eric N.; Keane, Denis T.

    2010-12-15

    In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

  10. X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Electromagnetic Relations Radioactivity and Radiation Protection Useful Formulas CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home in PDF format Data Booklet Authors CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home Privacy and Security Notice Please

  11. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  12. X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell J. Smith

    2003-07-15

    We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher than that expected from X-ray binaries, by a factor 2-10; the excess suggests these galaxies have retained their hot gaseous haloes. The source with the highest L_X / L_B ratio is of unusual optical morphology with prominent sharp-edged shells. Notwithstanding these few exceptions, the cluster population overall exhibits X-ray properties consistent with their emission being dominated by X-ray binaries. We conclude that in rich cluster environments, interaction with the ambient intra-cluster medium acts to strip most galaxies of their hot halo gas.

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. Band Gap Energy of Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cell Absorbers Determined by Soft X-Ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar, M.

    2010-01-01

    OF CHALCOPYRITE THIN FILM SOLAR CELL ABSORBERS DETERMINED BYchalcopyrite thin film solar cell absorbers significantlyof chalcopyrite thin film solar cell absorbers. excitation

  15. High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera and Yaron Danon, the usefulness of an x-ray source is determined by its yield and endpoint energy. In x-ray fluorescence, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well

  16. Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns (CXIDB ID 20)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Starodub, D.

    2013-03-25

    This deposition includes the diffraction images generated by the paired polystyrene spheres in random orientations. These images were used to determine and phase the single particle diffraction volume from their autocorrelation functions.

  17. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  18. Evaluation of field-portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of lead contamination on small-arms firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.F.; Taylor, J.D.; Bass, D.A.; Zellmer, D.; Rieck, M.

    1995-02-01

    Field analytical methods for the characterization of lead contamination in soil are being developed. In this study, the usefulness of a commercially available, field-portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is evaluated for determining the extent of lead contamination in soils on small-arms firing ranges at a military installation. This field screening technique provides significant time and cost savings for the study of sites with lead-contaminated soil. Data obtained with the XRF unit in the field are compared with data obtained from soil samples analyzed in an analytical laboratory by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results indicate that the field-portable XRF unit evaluated in this study provides data that are useful in determining the extent and relative magnitude of lead contamination. For the commercial unit used in this study, improvements in the spectral resolution and in the limit of detection would be required to make the unit more than just a screening tool.

  19. The Influence of Spatial Variation in Chromatin Density Determined by X-ray Tomograms on the Time to Find DNA Binding Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel A. Isaacson; Carolyn A. Larabell; Mark A. Le Gros; David M. McQueen; Charles S. Peskin

    2013-08-19

    In this work we examine how volume exclusion caused by regions of high chromatin density might influence the time required for proteins to find specific DNA binding sites. The spatial variation of chromatin density within mouse olfactory sensory neurons is determined from soft X-ray tomography reconstructions of five nuclei. We show that there is a division of the nuclear space into regions of low-density euchromatin and high-density heterochromatin. Volume exclusion experienced by a diffusing protein caused by this varying density of chromatin is modeled by a repulsive potential. The value of the potential at a given point in space is chosen to be proportional to the density of chromatin at that location. The constant of proportionality, called the volume exclusivity, provides a model parameter that determines the strength of volume exclusion. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the mean time for a protein to locate a binding site localized in euchromatin is minimized for a finite, non-zero volume exclusivity. For binding sites in heterochromatin, the mean time is minimized when the volume exclusivity is zero (the protein experiences no volume exclusion). An analytical theory is developed to explain these results. The theory suggests that for binding sites in euchromatin there is an optimal level of volume exclusivity that balances a reduction in the volume searched in finding the binding site, with the height of effective potential barriers the protein must cross during the search process.

  20. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest singleX-Ray

  1. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  2. Scattering Density Profile Model of POPG Bilayers as Determined by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Holland, B [University of Guelph; Gray, C.G [University of Guelph; Tomberli, B [Brandon University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiment, both small-angle neutron (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), to determine the precise structure of bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), a lipid commonly encountered in bacterial membranes. Experiment and simulation are used to develop a one-dimensional scattering density profile (SDP) model suitable for the analysis of experimental data. The joint refinement of such data (i.e., SANS and SAXS) results in the area per lipid that is then used in the fixed-area simulations. In the final step, the direct comparison of simulated-to-experimental data gives rise to the detailed structure of POPG bilayers. From these studies we conclude that POPG s molecular area is 66.0 +/- 1.3 ^2, its overall bilayer thickness is 36.7 +/- 0.7 , and its hydrocarbon region thickness is 27.9 ( 0.6 , assuming a simulated value of 1203 ^3 for the total lipid volume.

  3. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Thomas M. Lapierre, Alain Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)?m in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  4. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmittivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmittivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach provides non-invasive in-situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmittivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments and can also pave the way to novel schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  5. Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gongora, Cesar Augusto

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of in-situ stress distribution within reservoir sandstones and the surrounding formations is recognized as one of the most important factors in the design and analysis of hydraulic fractures. In-situ stress ...

  6. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  7. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  8. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  9. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  10. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  11. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  12. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  13. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Henke, B. L.; Gullikson, E. M.; Davis, J. C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  14. X-ray fluorescence mapping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-Ray ScienceX-Ray

  15. Structure of a B{sub 6}-like phase formed from bent-core liquid crystals determined by microbeam x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Sungmin; Tokita, Masatoshi; Takanishi, Yoichi; Takezoe, Hideo; Watanabe, Junji

    2007-10-15

    We studied the structure of the B{sub x} phase formed from the short terminal homolog, 1,3-(4-bromobenzene) bis[4-(4-n-butoxyphenylliminomethyl)benzoate] (4Br-P-4-O-PIMB), by focusing a microbeam of x ray on the well-developed fan-shaped texture. From the highly oriented x-ray patterns detected at the two states of DC-ON and DC-OFF, the B{sub x} structure was definitely illustrated. It is a kind of frustrated one similar to the B{sub 1} phase: the molecules lie perpendicularly to the layer, and the frustration takes place perpendicularly to the bent direction. Unlike in the B{sub 1} phase, however, the size of the resulting antidomain is not definite, but fluctuates from position to position as observed in the B{sub 6} phase.

  16. Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure determination of N-p-methylphenyl-4-benzoyl-3,4-diphenyl-2-azetidinone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabak, Mehmet; Senoez, Huelya; Elmali, Ayhan; Adar, Vildan; Svoboda, Ingrid; Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla

    2010-12-15

    The title compound, C{sub 29}H{sub 23}NO{sub 2}, has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at two different temperatures (303 K and 120 K) and wavelengths (MoK{sub {alpha}} and CuK{sub {alpha}}). The non-centrosymmetric hexagonal crystal structure contains four-membered planar {beta}-lactam ring with an unusually long C-C bond. The {beta}-lactam ring is almost planar.

  17. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  18. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  19. Method and apparatus for in situ determination of permeability and porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagus, Peter L. (Olivehain, CA); Peterson, Edward W. (Del Mar, CA)

    1982-10-12

    A method and apparatus for in situ measurement of flow characteristics in boreholes or the like is disclosed for determining various formation characteristics such as permeability, particularly in the range of approximately 100-1,000 microdarcies and lower. One embodiment of the method and apparatus contemplates formation of a test interval in the borehole by a pair of expandable packers, additional guard zones being formed in the borehole at either end of the test interval by two additional guard packers, suitable flow conditions being simultaneously and separately measured within the test interval and each of the guard zones in order to permit determination of multidirectional components of permeability, porosity and other characteristics of the particular formation. Another embodiment contemplates whole hole testing where similar data is developed for a test interval formed between a single packer and the end of the borehole and one guard zone formed by a single additional guard packer. The method and apparatus of this invention are particularly contemplated for obtaining unambiguous measurements of multidirectional flow in low permeability formations.

  20. In situ Nanotomography and Operando Transmission X-ray Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology for electric vehicles requires dramatic increases in performance. The lithium-ion battery technology used in portable electronics and electric vehicles has seen only...

  1. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  2. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  3. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  4. A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Received November 10, 2005; E-mail: quake@stanford.edu Recently microfluidic technologies have emerged microfluidic crystallization devices do not allow the post- crystallization addition of cryoprotectant

  5. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary I. (Sunnyvale, CA); Maccagno, Pierre (Stanford, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  6. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  7. Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks in X-rays - a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ud-Doula, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  8. X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, Helmut (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) [Max Planck Institute for Metals Research

    2007-05-02

    Solid-liquid interfaces play an important role in many areas of current and future technologies, and in our biosphere. They play a key role in the development of nanofluidics and nanotribology, which sensitively depend on our knowledge of the microscopic structures and phenomena at the solid-liquid interface. The detailed understanding of how a fluid meets a wall is also a theoretical challenge. In particular, the phenomena at repulsive walls are of interest, since they affect many different phenomena, such as water-repellent surfaces or the role of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. Recent x-ray reflectivity studies of various solid-liquid interfaces have disclosed rather intriguiing phenomena, which will be discussed in this lecture: premelting of ice in contact with silica; liquid Pb in contact with Si; water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. These experiments, carried out with high-energy x-ray microbeams, reveal detailed insight into the liquid density profile closest to the wall. A detailed insight into atomistic phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is also a prerequisite in the microscopic control of electrochemical reactions at interfaces. Recent x-ray studies show the enormous future potential of such non-destructive analytical tools for the in situ observation of (electro-)chemical surface reactions. This lecture will review recent x-ray experiments on solid-liquid interfaces.

  9. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  10. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  11. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  12. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  13. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting that iodine contrast based imaging and visualization of interventional devices could potentially be optimized for dose using similar x-ray beam spectra.

  14. Changes in the Atomic Structure through Glass Transition Observed by X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The glass transition involves a minor change in the internal energy, and yet the physical and mechanical properties of a glass change dramatically. In order to determine the evolution of the atomic structure through the glass transition, we employed in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements as a function of temperature on a model material: Zr-Cu-Al metallic glass. We found that the thermal expansion at the atomic level is smaller than the macroscopic thermal expansion, and significantly increases above the glass transition temperature. The observed changes in the pair-distribution function (PDF) are explained in terms of the fluctuations in the local atomic volume and their change through the glass transition.

  15. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort by sound monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elkington, W. Brice (Grand Junction, CO)

    1978-01-01

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring for sound produced in the retort, preferably by monitoring for sound at at least two locations in a plane substantially normal to the direction of advancement of the processing zone. Monitoring can be effected by placing a sound transducer in a well extending through the formation adjacent the retort and/or in the fragmented mass such as in a well extending into the fragmented mass.

  16. X-ray emission from O stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2008-02-01

    Young O stars are strong, hard, and variable X-ray sources, properties which strongly affect their circumstellar and galactic environments. After ~1 Myr, these stars settle down to become steady sources of soft X-rays. I use high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and MHD modeling to show that young O stars like theta-1 Ori C are well explained by the magnetically channeled wind shock scenario. After their magnetic fields dissipate, older O stars produce X-rays via shock heating in their unstable stellar winds. Here too I use X-ray spectroscopy and numerical modeling to confirm this scenario. In addition to elucidating the nature and cause of the O star X-ray emission, modeling of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of O supergiants provides strong evidence that mass-loss rates of these O stars have been overestimated.

  17. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingInImaging and

  18. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  19. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazé, Yaël; Petit, Véronique; Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan; Cohen, David; Ud-Doula, Asif; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ?60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  20. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  1. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  2. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  3. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore »deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  4. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE NEXT GEMINGA, PSR J1836+5925

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, L. C. C.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Li, K. T. [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Takata, J. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Hu, C. P.; Chou, Y. [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Yen, D. C. C., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Mathematics, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-20

    We report recent XMM-Newton investigations of PSR J1836+5925, the ''next Geminga'', which determined an X-ray pulsation of ?173.3 ms. Its X-ray periodicity is consistent with the ?-ray ephemeris at the same epoch. The X-ray folded light curve has a sinusoidal structure that is different from the double-peaked ?-ray pulse profile. We have also analyzed the X-ray phase-averaged spectra which shows that the X-ray emission from PSR J1836+5925 is thermal dominant. This suggests that the X-ray pulsation mainly originates from the modulated hot spot on the stellar surface.

  5. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  6. Miniature lightweight x-ray optics (MiXO) for surface elemental composition mapping of asteroids and comets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jaesub

    2016-01-01

    The compositions of diverse planetary bodies are of fundamental interest to planetary science, providing clues to the formation and evolutionary history of the target bodies and the Solar system as a whole. Utilizing the X-ray fluorescence unique to each atomic element, X-ray imaging spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool of the chemical and mineralogical compositions of diverse planetary bodies. Until now the mass and volume of focusing X-ray optics have been too large for resource-limited in-situ missions, so near-target X-ray observations of planetary bodies have been limited to simple collimator-type X-ray instruments. We introduce a new Miniature lightweight Wolter-I focusing X-ray Optics (MiXO) using metal-ceramic hybrid X-ray mirrors based on electroformed nickel replication and plasma thermal spray processes. MiXO can enable compact, powerful imaging X-ray telescopes suitable for future planetary missions. We illustrate the need for focusing X-ray optics in observing relatively small planetary bod...

  7. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 ?m FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore »data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  8. X-ray microscopy. Beyond ensemble averages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ice, Gene E.; Budai, John D.

    2015-06-23

    This work exemplifies emerging tools to characterize local materials structure and dynamics, made possible by powerful X-ray synchrotron and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  9. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  10. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  11. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-RayX-RayX-RayX-Ray

  12. Suzaku Reveals Helium-burning Products in the X-ray Emitting Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Murashima; M. Kokubun; K. Makishima; J. Kotoku; H. Murakami; K. Matsushita; K. Hayashida; K. Arnaud; K. Hamaguchi; H. Matsumoto

    2006-07-07

    BD+303639, the brightest planetary nebula at X-ray energies, was observed with Suzaku, an X-ray observatory launched on 2005 July 10. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer, the K-lines from C VI, O VII, and O VIII were resolved for the first time, and C/O, N/O, and Ne/O abundance ratios determined. The C/O and Ne/O abundance ratios exceed the solar value by a factor of at least 30 and 5, respectively. These results indicate that the X-rays are emitted mainly by helium shell-burning products.

  13. Eta Car and Its Surroundings: the X-ray Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; K. Hamaguchi

    2007-03-02

    X-ray emission from the supermassive star Eta Carinae (\\ec) originates from hot shocked gas produced by current stellar mass loss as well as ejecta from prior eruptive events. Absorption of this emission by cool material allows the determination of the spatial and temporal distribution of this material. Emission from the shocked gas can provide important information about abundances through the study of thermal X-ray line emission. We discuss how studies of the X-ray emission from Eta Car at a variety of temporal, spatial and spectral scales and resolutions have helped refine our knowledge of both the continuous and discrete mass loss from the system, and its interactions with more extended material around the star.

  14. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; et al

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore »microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  15. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lawrence, Robert M.; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Grant, Thomas D.; Liu, Haiguang; James, Daniel; Nelson, Garrett; Subramanian, Ganesh; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ~700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ~40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is a pertinent step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  16. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W. (Schenectady, NY); Cain, Dallas E. (Scotia, NY)

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  17. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Concave Accretion Discs and X-ray Reprocessing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Blackman

    1999-03-16

    Spectra of Seyfert Is are commonly modelled as emission from an X-ray illuminated flat accretion disc orbiting a central black hole. This provides both a reprocessed and direct component of the X-ray emission as required by observations of individual objects and possibly a fraction of the cosmological X-ray background. There is some observational motivation to at least consider the role that an effectively concave disc surface might play: (1) a reprocessed fraction $\\gsim 1/2$ in some Seyferts and possibly in the X-ray background, and (2) the commonality of a sharp iron line peak for Seyferts at 6.4KeV despite a dependence of peak location on inclination angle for flat disc models. Here it is shown that a concave disc may not only provide a larger total fraction of reprocessed photons, but can also reprocess a much larger fraction of photons in its outer regions when compared to a flat disc. This reduces the sensitivity of the 6.4KeV peak location to the inner disc inclination angle because the outer regions are less affected by Doppler and gravitational effects. If the X-ray source is isotropic, the reprocessed fraction is directly determined by the concavity. If the X-ray source is anisotropic, the location of iron line peak can still be determined by concavity but the total reflected fraction need not be as large as for the isotropic emitter case. The geometric calculations herein are applicable to general accretion disc systems illuminated from the center.

  19. X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, Miriam Ilana

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

  20. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Kaya; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A; Alexander, David M; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, Didier; Barriere, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with $\\Gamma\\sim1.3$-$2.3$ up to ~50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe K$\\alpha$ fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broad-band X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density ($\\sim10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws wi...

  1. Determination of gene expression patterns using high-throughput RNA in situ hybridizaion to whole-mount Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiszmann, R.; Hammonds, A.S.; Celniker, S.E.

    2009-04-09

    We describe a high-throughput protocol for RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) to Drosophila embryos in a 96-well format. cDNA or genomic DNA templates are amplified by PCR and then digoxigenin-labeled ribonucleotides are incorporated into antisense RNA probes by in vitro transcription. The quality of each probe is evaluated before ISH using a RNA probe quantification (dot blot) assay. RNA probes are hybridized to fixed, mixed-staged Drosophila embryos in 96-well plates. The resulting stained embryos can be examined and photographed immediately or stored at 4oC for later analysis. Starting with fixed, staged embryos, the protocol takes 6 d from probe template production through hybridization. Preparation of fixed embryos requires a minimum of 2 weeks to collect embryos representing all stages. The method has been used to determine the expression patterns of over 6,000 genes throughout embryogenesis.

  2. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  3. Synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography during compression loading of cellular materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Henderson, Kevin; Stannard, Tyler; Williams, Jason J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Robinson, Mathew W. C.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-04-29

    Three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT) of in situ dynamic processes provides internal snapshot images as a function of time. Tomograms are mathematically reconstructed from a series of radiographs taken in rapid succession as the specimen is rotated in small angular increments. In addition to spatial resolution, temporal resolution is important. Thus temporal resolution indicates how close together in time two distinct tomograms can be acquired. Tomograms taken in rapid succession allow detailed analyses of internal processes that cannot be obtained by other means. This article describes the state-of-the-art for such measurements acquired using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source.

  4. X-rays from Hot Subdwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mereghetti, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the high sensitivity of the instruments on board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, it has become possible to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs. The small but growing sample of hot subdwarfs detected in X-rays includes binary systems, in which the X-rays result from wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low mass stars provide information which can be useful also for our understanding of the winds of more luminous and massive early-type stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems.

  5. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  6. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of tin over the energy range of 29-60 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonge, Martin D. de; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Paterson, David; Kanter, Elliot P.; Southworth, Stephen H.; Young, Linda; Beno, Mark A.; Linton, Jennifer A.; Jennings, Guy [X-Ray Operations and Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron Project, Major Projects Victoria, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); BESSRC-CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60 keV to 0.04-3 % accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2 %. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f{sub 2} is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2 % persist between calculated and observed values.

  7. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

    1983-09-26

    Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

  8. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  9. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yennawar, Hemant [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Møller, Magda [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gillilan, Richard [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yennawar, Neela, E-mail: nhy1@psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The X-ray crystal structure and a small-angle X-ray scattering solution structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase have been determined. The details of the interactions that enable the tetramer scaffold to be the functional biological unit have been analyzed. The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer that superposes well with that seen in hSDH (despite belonging to a different space group) and obeying the 222 crystal symmetry is seen in slSDH. An acetate molecule is bound in the active site, coordinating to the active-site zinc through a water molecule. Glycerol, a substrate of slSDH, also occupies the substrate-binding pocket together with the acetate designed by nature to fit large polyol substrates. The substrate-binding pocket is seen to be in close proximity to the tetramer interface, which explains the need for the structural integrity of the tetramer for enzyme activity. Small-angle X-ray scattering was also used to identify the quaternary structure of the tetramer of slSDH in solution.

  10. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  11. X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-RayX-ray

  12. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  13. X-ray Spectral Properties of the BAT AGN Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Winter; R. Mushotzky; C. S. Reynolds; J. Tueller

    2008-08-04

    The 9-month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog provides the first unbiased (log N_H = 0.03) AGN. In this paper, we present the collected X-ray properties (0.3 - 12keV) for the 153 AGN detected. In addition, we examine the X-ray properties for a complete sample of non-beamed sources, above the Galactic plane. Of these, 45% are best fit by simple power law models while 55% require the more complex partial covering model. One of our goals was to determine the fraction of "hidden" AGN, which we define as sources with scattering fractions Marshall et al. 1980). From the log N-log S relationship, we show that we are complete to log S < -11 in the 2-10 keV band. Both the collected X-ray properties of our uniform sample and the log N-log S relationship will now provide valuable input to X-ray background models for z ~ 0. (abridged)

  14. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  15. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  16. Research and Design of a Sample Heater for Beam Line 6-2c Transmission X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policht, Veronica; /Loyola U., Chicago /SLAC

    2012-08-27

    There exists a need for environmental control of samples to be imaged by the Transmission X-Ray Microscope (TXM) at the SSRLs Beam Line 6-2c. In order to observe heat-driven chemical or morphological changes that normally occur in situ, microscopes require an additional component that effectively heats a given sample without heating any of the microscope elements. The confinement of the heat and other concerns about the heaters integrity limit which type of heater is appropriate for the TXM. The bulk of this research project entails researching different heating methods used previously in microscopes, but also in other industrial applications, with the goal of determining the best-fitting method, and finally in designing a preliminary sample heater.

  17. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  18. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments and Methods X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods Print To be held as part of SPIE. http:spie.orgOP318 August 28-29, 2013; San Diego, California, USA...

  19. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  20. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  1. An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Chiang

    2002-02-12

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the hard X-ray continuum above $\\sim 50$ keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft $\\gamma$-ray telescopes, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  2. Swift monitoring of NGC 5548: X-ray reprocessing and short term UV/optical variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHardy, I M; Dwelly, T; Connolly, S; Lira, P; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Gelbord, J; Breedt, E; Arevalo, P; Uttley, P

    2014-01-01

    Lags measured from correlated X-ray/UV/optical monitoring of AGN allow us to determine whether UV/optical variability is driven by reprocessing of X-rays or X-ray variability is driven by UV/optical seed photon variations. We present the results of the largest study to date of the relationship between the X-ray, UV and optical variability in an AGN with 554 observations, over a 750d period, of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 with Swift. There is a good overall correlation between the X-ray and UV/optical bands, particularly on short timescales (tens of days). These bands lag the X-ray band with lags which are proportional to wavelength to the power 1.23+/-0.31. This power is very close to the power (4/3) expected if short timescale UV/optical variability is driven by reprocessing of X-rays by a surrounding accretion disc. The observed lags, however, are longer than expected from a standard Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disc with X-ray heating, given the currently accepted black hole mass and accretion rate values, ...

  3. In situ determination of lithium ion cathode/electrolyte thickness and composition as a function of charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report the first experimental in situ determination of the thickness and estimated composition of a condensed electrode/electrolyte interface at various states of charge for the high voltage Li-ion cathode LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 by exploiting the power of neutron reflectometry.1 Understanding the electrode/electrolyte interface is critical to developing an understanding of interfacial reactions needed to model transport phenomena and predict more stable electrolytes for electrochemical cells.2,3 However, developing the ability to control interfacial reactions in electrochemical cells is arguably one of the most critical challenges confronting researchers focused on energy storage and conversion reactions as well as liquid phase reactions such as photocatalysts and biomass conversion.2 For example, in electrochemical energy storage systems, such as batteries, the reactions between a solid electrode and a liquid electrolyte can lead to the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), which directly mediates the stability, durability and safety of the cell. Controlling these interfacial reactions is essential to developing new, durable, and higher energy storage systems needed in the future.

  4. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  5. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  6. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  7. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrova, Tz. B., E-mail: lina.petrova@nrl.navy.mil; Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17}?W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  8. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A. (Sungkyunkwan); (UTSMC)

    2010-08-26

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  9. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R.

    1997-12-01

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  10. COMPARISON OF LEAD CONCENTRATION IN SURFACE SOIL BY INDUCTED COUPLED PLASMA/OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTROMETRY AND X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    COMPARISON OF LEAD CONCENTRATION IN SURFACE SOIL BY INDUCTED COUPLED PLASMA/OPTICAL EMISSION-en-Halatte, France roseline.bonnard@ineris.fr) Keywords : soil lead concentration, soil samples, in situ measurements, X-ray fluorescence, ICP/OES ABSTRACT The lead concentration in the surface soil of a French village

  11. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  12. Statistical Analysis of X-ray Speckle at the NSLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ophelia K. C. Tsui; S. G. J. Mochrie; L. E. Berman

    1997-09-30

    We report a statistical analysis of the static speckle produced by illuminating a disordered aerogel sample by a nominally coherent x-ray beam at wiggler beamline X25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The results of the analysis allow us to determine that the coherence delivered to the X25 hutch is within 35% of what is expected. The rate of coherent photons is approximately two times smaller than expected on the basis of the X25 wiggler source brilliance.

  13. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced x-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Rubehn; G. J. Wozniak; L. Phair; L. G. Moretto; Kin M. Yu

    1996-09-23

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced x-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition.

  14. Determining Relative f and d Orbital Contributions to M?Cl Covalency in MCl62– (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and UOCl5 Using Cl K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minasian, Stefan G.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Martin, Richard L.; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Shuh, David K.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Yang, Ping

    2012-03-09

    Chlorine K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and ground-state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) were used to probe electronic structure for O{sub h}-MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}(M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and C{sub 4v}-UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, and to determine the relative contributions of valence 3d, 4d, 5d, 6d, and 5f orbitals in M-Cl bonding. Spectral interpretations were guided by time-dependent DFT calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths, which agree well with the experimental XAS spectra. The data provide new spectroscopic evidence for the involvement of both 5f and 6d orbitals in actinide-ligand bonding in UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}. For the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, where transitions into d orbitals of t{sub 2g} symmetry are spectroscopically resolved for all four complexes, the experimentally determined Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond increases from 8.3(4)% (TiCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}) to 10.3(5)% (ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), 12(1)% (HfCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), and 26 18(1)% (UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}). Chlorine K-edge XAS spectra of UOCl{sub 5}{sup -} provide additional insights into the transition assignments by 27 lowering the symmetry to C{sub 4v}, where five pre-edge transitions into both 5f and 6d orbitals are observed. For UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, the XAS data 28 suggest that orbital mixing associated with the U 5f orbitals is considerably lower than that of the U 6d orbitals. For both UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}29 and UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, the ground-state DFT calculations predict a larger 5f contribution to bonding than is determined experimentally. 30 These findings are discussed in the context of conventional theories of covalent bonding for d- and f-block metal complexes.

  15. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  16. Pyroelectric crystal-based X-ray diffractometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Louis Edward

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use of an Amptek Cool-X X-ray Generator for an instructional tool in the physics of x-rays, as well as a source for x-rays for crystal diffraction experiments. The x-ray source is a solid-state two-phase ...

  17. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent #12;eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di#11;racting properties of a x-ray di#11;racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti#12;c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the #12;eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's #12;rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  18. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  19. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  20. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X

  1. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  2. X-ray Point Source Populations Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morihana, Kumiko; Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of the X-ray astronomy, which is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra Bulge Field (Revnivtsev et al., 2009,2011), we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard band continuum and Fe K\\alpha line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-...

  3. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Havrilla, George J. (Los Alamos, NM); Mann, Grace (Hong Kong, HK)

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  4. A NEW CORRELATION BETWEEN GRB X-RAY FLARES AND THE PROMPT EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonbas, E. [Department of Physics, University of Adiyaman, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); MacLachlan, G. A.; Shenoy, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Parke, W. C., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    From a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi and Swift missions, we have extracted the minimum variability timescales for temporal structures in the light curves associated with the prompt emission and X-ray flares. A comparison of this variability timescale with pulse parameters such as rise times, determined via pulse-fitting procedures, and spectral lags, extracted via the cross-correlation function, indicates a tight correlation between these temporal features for both the X-ray flares and the prompt emission. These correlations suggest a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission in GRBs.

  5. Nucleosynthesis in Type I X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Parikh; J. José; G. Sala; C. Iliadis

    2012-11-26

    Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions that occur in the envelopes of accreting neutron stars. Detailed observations of these phenomena have prompted numerous studies in theoretical astrophysics and experimental nuclear physics since their discovery over 35 years ago. In this review, we begin by discussing key observational features of these phenomena that may be sensitive to the particular patterns of nucleosynthesis from the associated thermonuclear burning. We then summarize efforts to model type I X-ray bursts, with emphasis on determining the nuclear physics processes involved throughout these bursts. We discuss and evaluate limitations in the models, particularly with regard to key uncertainties in the nuclear physics input. Finally, we examine recent, relevant experimental measurements and outline future prospects to improve our understanding of these unique environments from observational, theoretical and experimental perspectives.

  6. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  7. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; et al

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting schememore »is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.« less

  8. X-ray scattered halo around IGR J17544–2619

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Junjie; Ling, Zhixing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan, E-mail: zhangsn@ihep.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-04-10

    X-ray photons coming from an X-ray point source not only arrive at the detector directly, but also can be strongly forward-scattered by the interstellar dust along the line of sight (LOS), leading to a detectable diffuse halo around the X-ray point source. The geometry of small-angle X-ray scattering is straightforward, namely, the scattered photons travel longer paths and thus arrive later than the unscattered ones; thus, the delay time of X-ray scattered halo photons can reveal information of the distances of the interstellar dust and the point source. Here we present a study of the X-ray scattered halo around IGR J17544–2619, which is one of the so-called supergiant fast X-ray transients. IGR J17544–2619 underwent a striking outburst when observed with Chandra on 2004 July 3, providing a near ?-function light curve. We find that the X-ray scattered halo around IGR J17544–2619 is produced by two interstellar dust clouds along the LOS. The one that is closer to the observer gives the X-ray scattered halo at larger observational angles, whereas the farther one, which is in the vicinity of the point source, explains the halo with a smaller angular size. By comparing the observational angle of the scattered halo photons with that predicted by different dust grain models, we are able to determine the normalized dust distance. With the delay times of the scattered halo photons, we can determine the point source distance, given a dust grain model. Alternatively, we can discriminate between the dust grain models, if the point source distance is known independently.

  9. X-ray Clusters at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Gioia

    1997-11-30

    As the largest gravitationally bound structures known, clusters provide clear constraints on the formation of structure and on the composition of the universe. Despite their extreme importance for cosmology the number of clusters at high redshift (z > 0.75) is rather small. There are only a few X-ray emitting examples reported and a handful of optically-selected ones. These clusters can provide stringent constrains on theories of large scale structure formation, if they are massive enough. I will review the status of these distant X-ray selected clusters. These objects are of special importance because their X-ray emission implies that they are massive, comparable to low redshift examples, and their existence is problematic for some theories of structure formation.

  10. Universal X-ray emissivity of the stellar population in early-type galaxies: unresolved X-ray sources in NGC 3379

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Revnivtsev; E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; W. Forman; C. Jones

    2008-06-27

    We use deep Chandra observations to measure the emissivity of the unresolved X-ray emission in the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379. After elimination of bright, low-mass X-ray binaries with luminosities >10^{36 erg/sec, we find that the remaining unresolved X-ray emission is characterized by an emissivity per unit stellar mass L_x/M_stars ~8.2x10^{27} erg/s/M_sun in the 0.5-2 keV energy band. This value is in good agreement with those previousely determined for the dwarf elliptical galaxy M32, the bulge of the spiral galaxy M31 and the Milky Way, as well as with the integrated X-ray emissivity of cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries in the Solar neighborhood. This strongly suggests that i) the bulk of the unresolved X-ray emission in NGC 3379 is produced by its old stellar population and ii) the old stellar populations in all galaxies can be characterized by a universal value of X-ray emissivity per unit stellar mass or per unit K band luminosity.

  11. X-ray enhancement and long-term evolution of swift J1822.3–1606

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benli, Onur; Çal??kan, ?.; Ertan, Ü.; Alpar, M. A. [Sabanc? University, Orhanl?-Tuzla, ?stanbul 34956 (Turkey); Trümper, J. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Geissenbachstrasse, 85740 Garching bei München (Germany); Kylafis, N. D., E-mail: onurbenli@sabanciuniv.edu [Physics Department and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the X-ray enhancement and the long-term evolution of the recently discovered second 'low-B magnetar' Swift J1822.3-1606 in the frame of the fallback disk model. During a soft gamma burst episode, the inner disk matter is pushed back to larger radii, forming a density gradient at the inner disk. Subsequent relaxation of the inner disk could account for the observed X-ray enhancement light curve of Swift J1822.3-1606. We obtain model fits to the X-ray data with basic disk parameters similar to those employed to explain the X-ray outburst light curves of other anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters. The long period (8.4 s) of the neutron star can be reached by the effect of the disk torques in the long-term accretion phase ((1-3) × 10{sup 5} yr). The currently ongoing X-ray enhancement could be due to a transient accretion epoch, or the source could still be in the accretion phase in quiescence. Considering these different possibilities, we determine the model curves that could represent the long-term rotational and the X-ray luminosity evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, which constrain the strength of the magnetic dipole field to the range of (1-2) × 10{sup 12} G on the surface of the neutron star.

  12. Unidirectional Freezing of Ceramic Suspensions: In Situ Xray Investigation of the Effects of Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Unidirectional Freezing of Ceramic Suspensions: In Situ Xray Investigation of the Effects Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Using in situ X-ray radiography, we investigated unidirectional freezing-templating, strongly modified freezing dynamics during the solidification process. We observed and identified different

  13. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  14. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Ray Imaging inX-Ray

  15. PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- Stateelement matrices by x-ray for shale retort: Quarterly of the

  16. One-Up On L1: Can X-rays Provide Longer Advanced Warning of Solar Wind Flux Enhancements Than Upstream Monitors?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Collier; T. E. Moore; S. L. Snowden; K. D. Kuntz

    2005-02-17

    Observations of strong solar wind proton flux correlations with ROSAT X-ray rates along with high spectral resolution Chandra observations of X-rays from the dark Moon show that soft X-ray emission mirrors the behavior of the solar wind. In this paper, based on an analysis of an X-ray event observed by XMM-Newton resulting from charge exchange of high charge state solar wind ions and contemporaneous neutral solar wind data, we argue that X-ray observations may be able to provide reliable advance warning, perhaps by as much as half a day, of dramatic increases in solar wind flux at Earth. Like neutral atom imaging, this provides the capability to monitor the solar wind remotely rather than in-situ.

  17. X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

    2011-12-31

    Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

  18. A Search for X-ray Counterparts of Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic search for X-ray counterparts of radio pulsars. The search was accomplished by cross-correlating the radio timing positions of all radio pulsars from the ATNF pulsar database (version 1.54) with archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations publicly released by August 1st 2015. In total, 171 of the archival XMM-Newton observations and 215 of the archival Chandra datasets where found to have a radio pulsar serendipitously in the field of view. From the 283 radio pulsars covered by these datasets we identified 19 previously undetected X-ray counterparts. For 6 of them the statistics was sufficient to model the energy spectrum with one- or two-component models. For the remaining new detections and for those pulsars for which we determined an upper limit to their counting rate we computed the energy flux by assuming a Crab-like spectrum. Additionally, we derived upper limits on the neutron stars' surface temperature and on the non-thermal X-ray efficiency for those pulsars for which the sp...

  19. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  20. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  1. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Peter A. (Arvada, CO)

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  2. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2014-06-13

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  3. HEW simulations and quantification of the microroughness requirements for X-ray telescopes by means of numerical and analytical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, D; Pareschi, G

    2015-01-01

    Future X-ray telescopes like SIMBOL-X will operate in a wide band of the X-ray spectrum (from 0.1 to 80 keV); these telescopes will extend the optical performances of the existing soft X-ray telescopes to the hard X-ray band, and in particular they will be characterized by a angular resolution (conveniently expressed in terms of HEW, Half-Energy- Width) less than 20 arcsec. However, it is well known that the microroughness of the reflecting surfaces of the optics causes the scattering of X-rays. As a consequence, the imaging quality can be severely degraded. Moreover, the X-ray scattering can be the dominant problem in hard X-rays because its relevance is an increasing function of the photon energy. In this work we consistently apply a numerical method and an analytical one to evaluate the X-ray scattering impact on the HEW of an X-ray optic, as a function of the photon energy: both methods can also include the effects of figure errors in determining the final HEW. A comparison of the results obtained with th...

  4. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  5. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  6. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  7. Proposed new accelerator design for homeland security x-ray applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clayton, James; Shedlock, Daniel; Langeveld, Willem G.J.; Bharadwaj, Vinod; Nosochkov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Two goals for security scanning of cargo and freight are the ability to determine the type of material that is being imaged, and to do so at low radiation dose. One commonly used technique to determine the effective Z of the cargo is dual-energy imaging, i.e. imaging with different x-ray energy spectra. Another technique uses the fact that the transmitted x-ray spectrum itself also depends on the effective Z. Spectroscopy is difficult because the energy of individual x rays needs to be measured in a very high count-rate environment. Typical accelerators for security applications offer large but short bursts ofmore »x-rays, suitable for current-mode integrated imaging. In order to perform x-ray spectroscopy, a new accelerator design is desired that has the following features: 1) increased duty factor in order to spread out the arrival of x-rays at the detector array over time; 2) x-ray intensity modulation from one delivered pulse to the next by adjusting the accelerator electron beam instantaneous current so as to deliver adequate signal without saturating the spectroscopic detector; and 3) the capability to direct the (forward peaked) x-ray intensity towards high-attenuation areas in the cargo (“fan-beam-steering”). Current sources are capable of 0.1% duty factor, although usually they are operated at significantly lower duty factors (~0.04%), but duty factors in the range 0.4-1.0% are desired. The higher duty factor can be accomplished, e.g., by moving from 300 pulses per second (pps) to 1000 pps and/or increasing the pulse duration from a typical 4 ?s to 10 ?s. This paper describes initial R&D to examine cost effective modifications that could be performed on a typical accelerator for these purposes, as well as R&D for fan-beam steering.« less

  8. Proposed new accelerator design for homeland security x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, James; Shedlock, Daniel; Langeveld, Willem G.J.; Bharadwaj, Vinod; Nosochkov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Two goals for security scanning of cargo and freight are the ability to determine the type of material that is being imaged, and to do so at low radiation dose. One commonly used technique to determine the effective Z of the cargo is dual-energy imaging, i.e. imaging with different x-ray energy spectra. Another technique uses the fact that the transmitted x-ray spectrum itself also depends on the effective Z. Spectroscopy is difficult because the energy of individual x rays needs to be measured in a very high count-rate environment. Typical accelerators for security applications offer large but short bursts of x-rays, suitable for current-mode integrated imaging. In order to perform x-ray spectroscopy, a new accelerator design is desired that has the following features: 1) increased duty factor in order to spread out the arrival of x-rays at the detector array over time; 2) x-ray intensity modulation from one delivered pulse to the next by adjusting the accelerator electron beam instantaneous current so as to deliver adequate signal without saturating the spectroscopic detector; and 3) the capability to direct the (forward peaked) x-ray intensity towards high-attenuation areas in the cargo (“fan-beam-steering”). Current sources are capable of 0.1% duty factor, although usually they are operated at significantly lower duty factors (~0.04%), but duty factors in the range 0.4-1.0% are desired. The higher duty factor can be accomplished, e.g., by moving from 300 pulses per second (pps) to 1000 pps and/or increasing the pulse duration from a typical 4 ?s to 10 ?s. This paper describes initial R&D to examine cost effective modifications that could be performed on a typical accelerator for these purposes, as well as R&D for fan-beam steering.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  10. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  11. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light...

  12. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  13. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  14. Staff Research Physicist (X-Ray Spectroscopy) | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    position to work on X-ray spectroscopy, atomic physics, X-ray instrumentation, and high energy density physics. Near-term research goals include participating in the design,...

  15. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  16. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  17. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and X-ray emission studies on iron-bearing silicate perovskite under high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Speciale, Sergio; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Dera, Przemek; Lavina, Babara; Watson, Heather C.

    2010-06-22

    Iron-bearing silicate perovskite is believed to be the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle. Recent studies have shown that Fe{sup 2+} exists predominantly in the intermediate-spin state with a total spin number of 1 in silicate perovskite in the lower part of the lower mantle. Here we have measured the spin states of iron and the pressure-volume relation in silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}] at pressure conditions relevant to the lowermost mantle using in situ X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction in a diamond cell. Our results showed that the intermediate-spin Fe{sup 2+} is stable in the silicate perovskite up to {approx} 125 GPa but starts to transition to the low-spin state at approximately 135 GPa. Concurrent X-ray diffraction measurements showed a decrease of approximately 1% in the unit cell volume in the silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}], which is attributed to the intermediate-spin to the low-spin transition. The transition pressure coincides with the pressure conditions of the lowermost mantle, raising the possibility of the existence of the silicate perovskite phase with the low-spin Fe{sup 2+} across the transition from the post-perovskite to the perovskite phases in the bottom of the D{double_prime} layer.

  18. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G. [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pan, Xiaochuan [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Pelizzari, Charles [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Jaeger, Heinrich M., E-mail: h-jaeger@uchicago.edu [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52?mm resolution in a (60 mm){sup 3} field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  19. X-rays from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2002-08-28

    A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

  20. X-ray power and yield measurements at the refurbished Z machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M. C., E-mail: micjone@sandia.gov; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hohlfelder, R.; Jennings, C. A.; Johnson, D. W.; Jones, B.; Lopez, M. R.; MacArthur, J.; Mills, J. A.; Preston, T.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M.; Spencer, D.; Sinars, D. B.; Porter, J. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Advancements have been made in the diagnostic techniques to measure accurately the total radiated x-ray yield and power from z-pinch implosion experiments at the Z machine with high accuracy. The Z machine is capable of outputting 2 MJ and 330 TW of x-ray yield and power, and accurately measuring these quantities is imperative. We will describe work over the past several years which include the development of new diagnostics, improvements to existing diagnostics, and implementation of automated data analysis routines. A set of experiments on the Z machine were conducted in which the load and machine configuration were held constant. During this shot series, it was observed that the total z-pinch x-ray emission power determined from the two common techniques for inferring the x-ray power, a Kimfol filtered x-ray diode diagnostic and the total power and energy diagnostic, gave 449 TW and 323 TW, respectively. Our analysis shows the latter to be the more accurate interpretation. More broadly, the comparison demonstrates the necessity to consider spectral response and field of view when inferring x-ray powers from z-pinch sources.

  1. Kaonic hydrogen X-ray measurement in SIDDHARTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2012-01-23

    Kaonic hydrogen atoms provide a unique laboratory to probe the kaon-nucleon strong interaction at the energy threshold, allowing an investigation of the interplay between spontaneous and explicit chiral symmetry breaking in low-energy QCD. The SIDDHARTA Collaboration has measured the $K$-series X rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and has determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction induced shift and width of the $1s$ atomic energy level. This result provides vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  2. An Ultradeep High Resolution X-ray Image of M101 The X-ray Source Population in a Late-type Spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q D; Pietsch, W; Immler, Stefan; Pietsch, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray source population of the face-on spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457). Within a field of radius 17' (36 kpc at the distance of 7.2 Mpc), covered by an ultradeep (229 ks) ROSAT HRI image, 51 X-ray sources are detected with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 3.5. About half of these sources are associated with the galaxy. We determine the average luminosity distribution of the sources. We have examined spatial, spectral, and timing properties of the X-ray sources. In particular, we have explored the nature of various superluminous X-ray sources with luminosities significantly greater than the Eddington limit for a $\\sim 1.6 M_\\odot$ object (neutron star). These X-ray sources, detected in various ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations, are not transients and appear to result from recent massive star formation in outer spiral arms. 3 superluminous PSPC sources are associated with giant HII complexes and are clearly resolved. 2 other superluminous RHRI sources are likely associated with shell-like sup...

  3. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kuster; H. Bräuninger; S. Cébrian; M. Davenport; C. Elefteriadis; J. Englhauser; H. Fischer; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; F. H. Heinsius; D. H. H. Hoffmann; G. Hoffmeister; J. N. Joux; D. Kang; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; T. Papaevangelou; C. Lasseur; A. Lippitsch; G. Lutz; J. Morales; A. Rodríguez; L. Strüder; J. Vogel; K. Zioutas

    2007-05-10

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  4. Portable Parallel Beam X-Ray Diffraction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than 50 pounds, and uses about 50 watts of power. The X-Beam uses polycapillary x-ray optics to collect x-rays over a large solid angle from a low-power x-ray source and to form...

  5. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    .A. & Svergun D.I. (1987). Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering. NY: Plenum PressSmall Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences o - Use of small angle X-ray scattering instrumentation o - Programs that you will use SAXS (BRUKER AXS) PRIMUS (Konarev, Volkov, Koch

  6. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  7. Monitoring x-ray beam damage on lipid films by an integrated Brewster angle microscope/x-ray diffractometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    Polyunsaturated lipids with conjugated tails are easily dam- aged by x-ray irradiation in the presence of oxygen samples and thin films has been detected since the beginning of x-ray studies. Dam- age to lipid samples

  8. High efficiency, high quality x-ray optic based on ellipsoidally bent highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal for ultrafast x-ray diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uschmann, I.; Nothelle, U.; Foerster, E.; Arkadiev, V.; Langhoff, N.; Antonov, A.; Grigorieva, I.; Steinkopf, R.; Gebhardt, A

    2005-08-20

    By the use of a thin highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal (HOPG) bent to a high-performance ellipsoidal shape it was possible to focus monochromatic x-rays of 4.5 keV photon energy with an efficiency of 0.0033, which is 30 times larger than for previously used bent crystals. Isotropic TiK{sub a}lpha radiation of a 150 {mu}m source was focused onto a 450 {mu}m spot. The size of the focal spot can be explained by broadening due to the mosaic crystal rocking curve. The rocking curve width (FWHM) of the thin graphite foil was determined to 0.11 deg. . The estimated temporal broadening of an ultrashort Kalpha pulse by the crystal is not larger than 300 fs. These properties make the x-ray optic very attractive for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray measurements.

  9. Optical properties of AlAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} alloys determined by in situ ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D. [Nano-Optical Property Laboratory and Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J. J.; Lee, E. H.; Bae, M. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J. [Center for Opto-Electronic Convergence Systems, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Liang, C.-T.; Chang, Y.-C. [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    We report pseudodielectric function data <{epsilon}> = <{epsilon}{sub 1}> + i<{epsilon}{sub 2}> from 0.74 to 6.48 eV of oxide-free AlAsSb alloys that are the closest representation to date of the intrinsic bulk dielectric response {epsilon} of the material. Measurements were performed on 1.3 {mu}m thick films grown on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Data were obtained with the films in situ to avoid oxidation artifacts. Critical-point structures were identified by band-structure calculations done with the linear augmented Slater-type orbital method. Crossings of transitions at the {Gamma}- and X-points and the {Gamma}- and L-points with composition were observed.

  10. In situ determination of /sup 241/Am on Enewetak Atoll. Date of survey: July 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.; Fritzsche, A.E.; Jaffe, R.J.; Villaire, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    An in situ gamma ray spectrometer system was operated at Enewetak Atoll from July 1977 to December 1979 in support of the Enewetak Cleanup Project. The system employed a high purity germanium planar detector suspended at a height of 7.4 m above ground. Conversion factors were established to relate measured photopeak count rate data to source concentration in the soil. Data obtained for /sup 241/Am, together with plutonium-to-americium ratios obtained from soil sample analyses, were used to establish area-averaged surface (0 to 3 cm) transuranic concentration values. In areas which exceeded cleanup criteria, measurements were made in an iterative fashion to guide soil removal until levels were reduced below the cleanup criteria. Final measurements made after soil removal had been completed were used to document remaining surface transuranic concentration values and to establish external exposure rate levels due to /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co.

  11. Experimental investigation of beam heating in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Experimental investigation of beam heating in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope and an accuracy of Æ1 C has been fabricated for scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM). Here we describe at temperatures near their respective melting points as a means of checking for possible sample heating caused

  12. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  13. HgMn Stars as apparent X-ray emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Mathys, G

    1998-01-01

    In the ROSAT all-sky survey 11 HgMn stars were detected as soft X-ray emitters (Berghoefer, Schmitt & Cassinelli 1996). Prior to ROSAT, X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory had suggested that stars in the spectral range B5-A7 are devoid of X-ray emission. Since there is no X-ray emitting mechanism available for these stars (also not for HgMn stars), the usual argument in the case of an X-ray detected star of this spectral type is the existence of an unseen low-mass companion which is responsible for the X-ray emission. The purpose of the present work is to use all available data for our sample of X-ray detected HgMn stars and conclude on the nature of possible companions.

  14. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  15. Metrology for the advancement of x-ray optics at the ALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    S. Yuan et al. , X-ray Optics and Instrumentation 2010,in X-ray and Neutron Optics, Springer, Berlin S. G. AlcockX-ray beam metrology and X-ray optic alignment by Hartmann

  16. X-ray Selected Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella M. Gioia

    1996-01-21

    This paper given at the meeting on "Mapping, Measuring and Modelling the Universe" presents three topics: 1) the study of the clusters and groups of galaxies found serendipitously in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region of the ROSAT all-sky survey; 2) the highest redshift clusters found in the EMSS (up to z=0.82) and the cosmological implications of their very existence; 3) the gravitational lensing in the EMSS X-ray selected clusters of galaxies observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  17. SMB, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Home »

  18. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Home

  19. SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

  20. SMB, X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray

  1. X-Ray Microscopy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingIn the

  2. X-ray Microscopy and Imaging: FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray

  3. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Ray Imaging in

  4. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Ray Imaging

  5. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray Imaging in

  6. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray Imaging

  7. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray ImagingLensless

  8. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray

  9. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  10. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  11. Dissociation of the benzene molecule by UV and soft X-rays in circumstellar environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Boechat-Roberty; R. Neves; S. Pilling; A. F. Lago; G. G. B. de Souza

    2008-11-30

    Benzene molecules, present in the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618, are ionized and dissociated by UV and X-ray photons originated from the hot central star and by its fast wind. Ionic species and free radicals produced by these processes can lead to the formation of new organic molecules. The aim of this work is to study the photoionization and photodissociation processes of the benzene molecule, using synchrotron radiation and time of flight mass spectrometry. Mass spectra were recorded at different energies corresponding to the vacuum ultraviolet (21.21 eV) and soft X-ray (282-310 eV) spectral regions. The production of ions from the benzene dissociative photoionization is here quantified, indicating that C6H6 is more efficiently fragmented by soft X-ray than UV radiation, where 50% of the ionized benzene molecules survive to UV dissociation while only about 4% resist to X-rays. Partial ion yields of H+ and small hydrocarbons such as C2H2+, C3H3+ and C4H2+ are determined as a function of photon energy. Absolute photoionization and dissociative photoionization cross sections have also been determined. From these values, half-life of benzene molecule due to UV and X-ray photon fluxes in CRL 618 were obtained.

  12. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  13. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ?5 keV to ?10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  15. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 92106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r{sup 2} of signal mean to kV: 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, and 0.99 for 0.1-mm Sn, 0.2-mm Cu, 1.5-mm Al, and 0.05-mm Ag, respectively; r{sup 2} of signal variance to kV: 0.99 for all four filters). The comparison of the signal and noise (mean, variance, and NPS) between the simulated and measured air scan images suggested that this model was reasonable in predicting accurate signal statistics of air scan images using absolute percent error. Overall, the model was found to be accurate in estimating signal statistics and spatial correlation between the detector elements of the images acquired with indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors. Conclusions: The semiempirical linear model of the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors was described and validated with images of air scans. The model was found to be a useful tool in understanding the signal and noise transfer within indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector systems.

  16. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Dalton, D. Allen; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-11-15

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {mu}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10 000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {mu}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  17. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ?10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup ?1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (?40??s) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  18. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  19. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  20. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  1. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  2. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Halbig, James K. (Los Alamos, NM); Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Klosterbuer, Shirley F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  3. ISOCAM Photometry of Narrow-Line X-ray Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Law-Green; A. Zezas; M. J. Ward; C. Boisson

    1998-12-23

    Mid-infrared photometry of the hosts of Narrow-Line X-ray Galaxies at 6 microns and 12 microns has been attempted with ISOCAM. No conclusive detections have been made. This implies that these are quiescent objects with little or no active star-formation. Neither X-ray binaries nor starburst-driven superwinds are consistent explanations for the X-ray emission in these objects. We conclude that these NLXGs are predominantly AGN-powered.

  4. X-ray transmission movies of spontaneous dynamic events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Holmes, M.; Novak, A.; Oschwald, D.; Dolgonos, P.; Qualls, B.

    2014-11-15

    We describe a new x-ray radiographic imaging system which allows for continuous x-ray transmission imaging of spontaneous dynamic events. We demonstrate this method on thermal explosions in three plastic bonded formulations of the energetic material octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. We describe the x-ray imaging system and triggering developed to enable the continuous imaging of a thermal explosion.

  5. X-ray interferometry with spherically bent crystals (abstract)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in manufacturing high-quality spherically bent crystals allows highly monochromatic x-ray beams to be produced, and allows efficient x-ray imaging with {mu}m-scale resolution. This article explores some of the constraints for x-ray interferometry utilizing spherically bent crystals and laser-produced plasma sources, and discusses several shearing interferometer concepts that might be experimentally investigated.

  6. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  7. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  8. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  9. X-ray micromodulated luminescence tomography in dual-cone ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-01

    Jul 16, 2014 ... source, a polycapillary lens, and an electron multiplying charge coupled device ... sources generate x-rays by accelerating electrons into high-z.

  10. X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sprays X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerpowell.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  11. Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic Techniques Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Gang Chen Seminar:...

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of...

  13. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dissociation of strong acid revisited:...

  14. Simulating Wavefront Correction via Deformable Mirrors at X-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: X-ray Adaptive Optics, San Diego, CA, United States, Aug 14 - Aug 14, 2012 Research Org: Lawrence Livermore...

  15. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy has become an important tool in understanding the electronic structure of materials. Resonant absorption edges in the soft x-ray regime are especially interesting...

  16. A Record Run for the APS X-ray Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signals that comprise radiation interlock systems protecting personnel and equipment; * Beam diagnostics controlling multiple x-ray beams simultaneously while utilizing more than...

  17. Insight into obscure transition uncovered by X-rays | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of X-ray techniques. This transition has ramifications for material design for electronics and sensors. The transition between being electrically conductive (metallic) at...

  18. Advances in X-Ray Diagnostics of Diesel Fuel Sprays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent advances in high-speed X-ray imaging has shown several distinct behaviors of commercial fuel injectors that cannot be seen with more conventional techniques.

  19. X-ray image reconstruction from a diffraction pattern alone

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marchesini, Stefano

    X-ray diffraction pattern of a sample of 50 nm colloidal gold particles, recorded at a wavelength of 2.1 nm.

  20. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were able to directly observe redox processes in thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxide electrocatalysts using surface-sensitive, x-ray absorption spectroscopy while...

  1. Electronic structure of titania aerogels: Soft x-ray absorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Electronic structure of titania aerogels: Soft x-ray absorption study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic structure of titania aerogels: Soft...

  2. X-ray Emission from Isolated Be Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2000-08-22

    I discuss the X-ray observations of Be stars, and how their properties compare to non-emission B stars. I focus on several specific stars that show high flux levels and variability but also report on several interesting survey results. The Be X-ray properties are discussed in the context of wind-shock X-ray emission from normal OB stars as well as in the context of general mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the Be phenomenon. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of the spectral diagnostics that will be available from the new generation of X-ray telescopes.

  3. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  4. X-ray microscopy at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-Ray ScienceX-RayX-ray

  5. Development of all-solid-state flash x-ray generator with photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xun, Ma; Jianjun, Deng; Hongwei, Liu; Jianqiang, Yuan; Jinfeng, Liu; Bing, Wei; Yanling, Qing; Wenhui, Han; Lingyun, Wang; Pin, Jiang; Hongtao, Li

    2014-09-15

    A compact, low-jitter, and high repetitive rate all-solid-state flash x-ray generator making use of photo conductive semiconductor switches was developed recently for the diagnostic purpose of some hydrokinetical experiments. The generator consisted of twelve stages of Blumlein pulse forming networks, and an industrial cold cathode diode was used to generate intense x-ray radiations with photon energy up to 220 keV. Test experiments showed that the generator could produce >1 kA electron beam currents and x-ray pulses with ?40 ns duration under 100 Hz repetitive rates at least (limited by the triggering laser on hand), also found was that the delay time of the cathode explosive emission is crucial to the energy transfer efficiency of the whole system. In addition, factors affecting the diode impedance, how the switching synchronization and diode impedance determining the allowable operation voltage were discussed.

  6. Mapping Metals Incorporation of a Whole Single Catalyst Particle Using Element Specific X-ray Nanotomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meirer, Florian; Morris, Darius T.; Kalirai, Sam; Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-02

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy has been used to determine the 3D structure of a whole individual fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle at high spatial resolution and in a fast, noninvasive manner, maintaining the full integrity of the particle. Using X-ray absorption mosaic imaging to combine multiple fields of view, computed tomography was performed to visualize the macropore structure of the catalyst and its availability for mass transport. We mapped the relative spatial distributions of Ni and Fe using multiple-energy tomography at the respective X-ray absorption K-edges and correlated these distributions with porosity and permeability of an equilibrated catalyst (E-cat) particle.more »Both metals were found to accumulate in outer layers of the particle, effectively decreasing porosity by clogging of pores and eventually restricting access into the FCC particle.« less

  7. Mapping Metals Incorporation of a Whole Single Catalyst Particle Using Element Specific X-ray Nanotomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meirer, Florian; Morris, Darius T.; Kalirai, Sam; Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-02

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy has been used to determine the 3D structure of a whole individual fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle at high spatial resolution and in a fast, noninvasive manner, maintaining the full integrity of the particle. Using X-ray absorption mosaic imaging to combine multiple fields of view, computed tomography was performed to visualize the macropore structure of the catalyst and its availability for mass transport. We mapped the relative spatial distributions of Ni and Fe using multiple-energy tomography at the respective X-ray absorption K-edges and correlated these distributions with porosity and permeability of an equilibrated catalyst (E-cat) particle. Both metals were found to accumulate in outer layers of the particle, effectively decreasing porosity by clogging of pores and eventually restricting access into the FCC particle.

  8. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi-chun

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state ...

  9. In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10.1002ange.201402311 Contacts: Hirohito Ogasawara, SSRL May Ling Ng, SUNCAT Sarp Kaya, JCAP (currently Ko University (Turkey)) PDF Version: PDF icon artificialphotosynthesis...

  10. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland) Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland) Universitt Konstanz, M647, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany) Publication Date:...

  11. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an OPV solution onto a spinning substrate to spread the solution into a thin film (spin coating). In commercial roll-to-roll printing, the OPV "ink" is deposited through a slot...

  12. Scanning AC nanocalorimetry combined with in-situ X-ray Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125

  13. Tracking the catalyzed growth process of nanowires by in situ x-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    capacity.4­7 Silicon nanowires have also found application in solar cells, both as ab- sorber data could be collected during growth. The nanowires were grown in an Anton-Paar HTK1200 oven

  14. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dry Flexible, lightweight, and inexpensive, plastic solar cells (known as organic photovoltaics, or "OPVs" for short) can conceivably be used in all manner of ways, from...

  15. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy of Lanthanum Manganite Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    fuel cells (SOFC) under long term cathodic or anodic polarization, termed `current conditioning. Introduction The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has potential to produce energy with high efficiency, especially when used for combined heat and power generation. SOFC using yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ

  16. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeatureCleanperformanceCareers Imagematerials

  17. In Situ Grazing-Incidence Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Study of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)CurvesAnodic Materials inSciTech Connect

  18. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)CurvesAnodic Materials inSciTech

  19. In situ Nanotomography and Operando Transmission X-ray Microscopy of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIna miningInInInInNo

  20. In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218

  1. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Studies for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing the RichardBudgetIowaOctober

  2. Hexakis(4-phormylphenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene: X-ray and DFT-calculated structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albayrak, Cigdem Kosar, Basak; Odabasoglu, Mustafa; Bueyuekguengoer, Orhan

    2010-12-15

    The crystal structure of hexakis(4-phormylphenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene is determined by using X-ray diffraction and then the molecular structure is investigated with density functional theory (DFT). X-Ray study shows that the title compound has C-H-{pi} interaction with phosphazene ring. The molecules in the unit cell are packed with Van der Waals and dipole-dipole interactions and the molecules are packed in zigzag shaped. Optimized molecular geometry is calculated with DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. The results from both experimental and theoretical calculations are compared in this study.

  3. X-ray diffraction study of the structure of detonation nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozerin, A. N. Kurkin, T. S.; Ozerina, L. A.; Dolmatov, V. Yu.

    2008-01-15

    The spatial structure of aggregates formed by detonation nanodiamonds is investigated using the wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The effective sizes of crystallites and the crystallite size distribution function are determined. The shape of scattering aggregates is restored from the small-angle X-ray scattering data. An analysis of the results obtained allowed the conclusion that the nanodiamond aggregates have an extended spatial structure composed of nine to ten clusters, each involving four to five crystallites with a crystal lattice of the diamond type.

  4. Optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Burenin; I. F. Bikmaev; M. G. Revnivtsev; J. A. Tomsick; S. Yu. Sazonov; M. N. Pavlinskiy; R. A. Sunyaev

    2008-10-14

    We present the results of the optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707 trough the spectroscopic observations of its optical counterpart with RTT150 telescope. Accurate position of the X-ray source, determined using Chandra observations, allowed us to associate this source with the faint optical object (m_R=~20.4), which shows broad H_\\alpha emission line in its optical spectrum. Therefore we conclude that the source IGRJ18257-0707 is a type 1 Seyfert galaxy at redshift z=0.037.

  5. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab-scale XCT data acquisition and data processing methods • 3D characterization of glass-bead mock plastic-bonded-explosive stimulant.

  6. Insertion mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides into supported phospholipid membranes revealed by X-ray and neutron reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    25913c X-Ray and neutron reflectivity measurements on systems composed of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3 by X-ray and neutron reflection D. Choi,a J. H. Moon,b H. Kim,a B. J. Sung,a M. W. Kim,b G. Y. Tae,c S to determine the mechanism of membrane translocation. By monitoring the structural changes of the bilayers

  7. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-10-26

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  8. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: A current snapshot

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-10-23

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtainedmore »through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.« less

  9. Optimization of X-ray Radiographic Imaging Birsen Yazici, Il-Young Son, An Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazici, Birsen

    Visible Human CT data set. To produce a realistic image, the software simulates quantum noise, blurring effects to the patient. All radiographic x-ray examinations require the selection of beam parameters, which affect both by an observer with respect to a quantitative image quality criteria and determine if the images meet

  10. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: A current snapshot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-10-23

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.

  11. Weighting Features to Recognize 3D Patterns of Electron Density in X-ray Protein Crystallography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioerger, Thomas R.

    Weighting Features to Recognize 3D Patterns of Electron Density in X-ray Protein Crystallography features to recognize 3D patterns of electron density to determine protein structures. We present SLIDER, Texas A&M University 2 Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, Texas A&M University 1 {kgopal

  12. An In Situ Method for Determination of Current Distribution in PEM Fuel Cells Applied to a Direct Methanol Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    can contribute to knowledge and understanding of key phenomena including water management and species of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 flooding can, to a great extent, determine overall cell performance.21,22 Water management in the DMFC

  13. Constraints on jet X-ray emission in low/hard state X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-03-31

    We show that the combination of the similarities between the X-ray properties of low luminosity accreting black holes and accreting neutron stars, combined with the differences in their radio properties argues that the X-rays from these systems are unlikely to be formed in the relativistic jets. Specifically, the spectra of extreme island state neutron stars and low/hard state black holes are known to be indistinguishable, while the power spectra from these systems are known to show only minor differences beyond what would be expected from scaling the characteristic variability frequencies by the mass of the compact object. The spectral and temporal similarities thus imply a common emission mechanism that has only minor deviations from having all key parameters scaling linearly with the mass of the compact object, while we show that this is inconsistent with the observations that the radio powers of neutron stars are typically about 30 times lower than those of black holes at the same X-ray luminosity. We also show that an abrupt luminosity change would be expected when a system makes a spectral state transition from a radiatively inefficient jet dominated accretion flow to a thin disk dominated flow, but that such a change is not seen.

  14. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori; Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (?E/E ? 5 × 10{sup ?3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ?3 × 10{sup ?3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  15. ON THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THEORETICAL AND X-RAY CONCENTRATION-MASS RELATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasia, E. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Borgani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Trieste, Sezione di Astronomia, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Ettori, S.; Meneghetti, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Mazzotta, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133, Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    In the past 15 years, the concentration-mass relation has been investigated diffusely in theoretical studies. On the other hand, only recently has this relation been derived from X-ray observations. When that happened, the results caused a certain level of concern: the X-ray normalizations and slopes were found significantly dissimilar from those predicted by theory. We analyzed 52 galaxy clusters and groups, simulated with different descriptions of the physical processes that affect the baryonic component, with the purpose of determining whether these discrepancies are real or induced by biases in the computation of the concentration parameter or in the determination of the selection function of the cluster sample for which the analysis is carried out. In particular, we investigate how the simulated concentration-mass relation depends (1) on the radial range used to derive the concentration; (2) on the presence of baryons in the simulations, and on the effect of star formation and feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Finally, we evaluate (3) how the results differ when adopting an X-ray approach for the analysis and (4) how the selection function based on X-ray luminosity can impact the results. All effects studied go in the direction of alleviating the discrepancy between observations and simulations, although with different significance: while the choice of the radial range to fit the profiles and the inclusion of the baryonic component play only a minor role, the X-ray approach to reconstruct the mass profiles and the selection of the cluster sample have a strong impact on the resulting concentration-mass relation. Extending the fit to the most central regions or reducing the fitting radius from the virial boundary to the typical X-ray external radius causes an increase of the normalization in radiative simulations by 5%-10%. In the second case, we measure a slope that is up to twice steeper than that derived by using the typical theoretical radial range. Radiative simulations including only supernova feedback produce 30% higher concentrations than the dark matter case. Such a difference is largely reduced when including the effect of AGN feedback. The concentration-mass relation derived from the X-ray synthetic catalog is significantly steeper due to the combination of several different effects, such as environment, dynamical state and dynamical history of the clusters, bias in mass and temperature measurements, and their dependence on the radius and on the mass of the system. Finally, selecting clusters according to their X-ray luminosity produces a net increase in both normalization and slope of the relation, since at fixed mass, the most luminous clusters are also the most concentrated.

  16. X-rays from magnetically channeled winds of OB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2008-01-30

    OB stars with strong radiation-driven stellar winds and large-scale magnetic fields generate strong and hard X-ray emission via the Magnetically Channeled Wind Shock (MCWS) mechanism. In this brief paper, I describe four separate X-ray diagnostics of the MCWS mechanism in OB stars, with applications to the prototype young O star, theta-1 Ori C.

  17. Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    , Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF CRUCIS: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    a corona; clear presence of UV driven wind at moderate temperatures; lack of wind X-ray absorption edges the years, consen- sus has thus instead favored an Intrinsic Wind Shock (IWS) model, in which the X-ray emission comes from shocks distributed throughout the wind, most likely arising from the strong, intrinsic

  19. X-rays from Hot Stars: Stellar Astronomy Research with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    emission lines Hot stars*: massive outflows ("stellar winds") ­ are the x-rays associated with these winds can actually take an image of its "wind nebula" ­ in all other cases, we infer the presence of a wind a model for fitting the detailed shapes of x-ray emission line profiles from hot star winds The very hot

  20. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  1. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  2. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  3. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  4. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  5. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  6. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  7. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  8. Millisecond oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muno, Michael Patrick, 1975-

    2002-01-01

    I analyze 68 oscillation trains detected in a search of 159 thermonuclear bursts from eight neutron star X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. I use all data that were public as of September 2001. ...

  9. Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of energetic electrons in solar flares: event of 2003 to nonthermal energies are seen via microwave and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona. Imaging sophisticated and fully dedicated solar radio telescope operating at microwave frequencies (17 & 34 GHz) capable

  10. X-ray Structure of Novamyl, the Five-Domain "Maltogenic" R-Amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus: Maltose and Acarbose Complexes at 1.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-ray Structure of Novamyl, the Five-Domain "Maltogenic" R-Amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus "maltogenic" R-amylase, Novamyl, has been determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.7 Å. Unlike conventional R-amylases from glycoside hydrolase family 13, Novamyl exhibits the five-domain structure more

  11. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  12. ZAP! The X-Ray Laser is Born

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, Daniel

    2009-11-17

    SLAC has converted its giant particle accelerator into the world's first X-ray laser. By a billion fold the world's brightest X-ray source, the laser packs a trillion photons into pulses as short as a millionth of a billionth of a second. The ultra-bright, ultra-short X-ray pulses will drive a wide range of new experiments, as scientists strip electrons from atoms, photograph single molecules and make movies of chemical reactions. How has SLAC accomplished such feats of X-ray wizardry? Attend this public lecture to learn about the basics of an X-ray laser, the technologies at SLAC that make it possible, and the exciting new experiments now underway.

  13. ESTIMATE OF SOLAR MAXIMUM USING THE 1-8 Å GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES X-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 Å band from 1986 to the present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and the date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in solar cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in spring 2013.

  14. Estimate of Solar Maximum using the 1-8 \\AA$\\,$Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites X-ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, L M

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 \\AA$\\,$band from 1986 - present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in Solar Cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in Spring 2013.

  15. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Peter D. (Santa Fe, NM); Claytor, Thomas N. (White Rock, NM); Berry, Phillip C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Charles R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  16. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B. )

    1992-02-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths.

  17. A seven-crystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Nordlund, D.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Bergmann, U.

    2013-05-15

    We present a multicrystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer ({approx}5-18 keV) recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The instrument is set at the wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two liquid nitrogen cooled monochromators - Si(111) and Si(311) - as well as collimating and focusing optics. The spectrometer consists of seven spherically bent crystal analyzers placed on intersecting vertical Rowland circles of 1 m of diameter. The spectrometer is scanned vertically capturing an extended backscattering Bragg angular range (88 Degree-Sign -74 Degree-Sign ) while maintaining all crystals on the Rowland circle trace. The instrument operates in atmospheric pressure by means of a helium bag and when all the seven crystals are used (100 mm of projected diameter each), has a solid angle of about 0.45% of 4{pi} sr. The typical resolving power is in the order of (E/{Delta}E){approx}10 000. The spectrometer's high detection efficiency combined with the beamline 6-2 characteristics permits routine studies of x-ray emission, high energy resolution fluorescence detected x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of very diluted samples as well as implementation of demanding in situ environments.

  18. In situ UV-visible assessment of extent of reduction during oxidation reactions on oxide catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    of Chemical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1462, USA. E-mail: iglesia to increase with increasing VOx domain size and propane/O2 ratio. Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanes by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy.3 Our efforts to detect reduced centers during propane ODH

  19. Bent Crystal X-Ray Mirrors for Time-Resolved Experiments with Femtosecond Laser-Produced X-ray Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    Bent Crystal X-Ray Mirrors for Time-Resolved Experiments with Femtosecond Laser-Produced X@iep.physik.uni-essen.de Abstract. In the last few years, bent crystal X-ray mirrors have played an important role in time, for example, with the help of toroidally bent crystals which allow a monochromatic point-to-point imaging

  20. X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETS AND COMETS: RELATIONSHIP WITH SOLAR X-RAYS AND SOLAR WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETS AND COMETS: RELATIONSHIP WITH SOLAR X-RAYS AND SOLAR WIND ANIL BHARDWAJ extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany 6 Applied Physics Laboratory, John Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 planets Jupiter and Saturn in the energy range of 0.2-2 keV. These flares are found to occur in tandem

  1. Millimeter, Microwave, Hard X--ray and Soft X--ray Observations of Energetic Electron Populations in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Millimeter, Microwave, Hard X--ray and Soft X--ray Observations of Energetic Electron Populations in Solar Flares M. R. Kundu 1 , S. M. White 1 , N. Gopalswamy 1 and J. Lim 1,2 1 Dept. of Astronomy, Univ. of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 2 Solar Astronomy 264--33, Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125 Submitted

  2. Deep x-ray lithography for micromechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guckel, H. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Extensions of the German LIGA process have brought about fabrication capability suitable for cost effective production of precision engineered components. The process attributes allow fabrication of mechanical components which are not capable of being made via conventional subtractive machining methods. Two process improvements have been responsible for this extended capability which involve the areas of thick photoresist application and planarization via precision lapping. Application of low-stress x-ray photoresist has been achieved using room temperature solvent bonding of a preformed photoresist sheet. Precision diamond lapping and polishing has provided a flexible process for the planarization of a wide variety of electroplated metals in the presence of photoresist. Exposure results from the 2.5 GeV National Synchrotron Light Source storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that structural heights of several millimeter and above are possible. The process capabilities are also well suited for microactuator fabrication. Linear and rotational magnetic microactuators have been constructed which use coil winding technology with LIGA fabricated coil forms. Actuator output forces of 1 milliNewton have been obtained with power dissipation on the order of milliWatts. A rotational microdynamometer system which is capable of measuring torque-speed data is also discussed.

  3. X-ray spectral states of microquasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Malzac; Renaud Belmont

    2008-10-25

    We discuss the origin of the dramatically different X-ray spectral shapes observed in the Low Hard State (LHS: dominated by thermal comptonisation) and the High Soft State (HSS: dominated by the accretion disc thermal emission and non-thermal comptonisation in the corona). We present numerical simulations using a new code accounting for the so-called synchrotron boiler effect. These numerical simulations when compared to the data allow us to constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona. For the hard state of Cygnus X-1 we find a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). On the other hand, our results also point toward proton temperatures that are substantially lower than typical temperatures of the ADAF models. Finally, we show that in both spectral states Comptonising plasma could be powered essentially through power-law acceleration of non-thermal electrons, which are then partly thermalised by the synchrotron and Coulomb boiler. This suggests that, contrary to current beliefs, the corona of the HSS and that of the LHS could be of very similar nature. The differences between the LHS and HSS coronal spectra would then be predominantly caused by the strong disc soft cooling emission which is present in the HSS and absent in the LHS.

  4. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: a current snapshot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-11-01

    The current and the attainable coverage by X-ray structures of proteins and their functions on the scale of the ‘protein universe’ are estimated. A detailed analysis of the coverage across nearly 2000 proteomes from all superkingdoms of life and functional annotations is performed, with particular focus on the human proteome and the family of GPCR proteins. Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.

  5. Protein crystallography: From X-ray diffraction spots to a three dimensional image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Berendzen, J.

    1998-02-25

    Proteins are remarkable molecular machines that are essential for life. They can do many things ranging from the precise control of blood clotting to synthesizing complex organic compounds. Pictures of protein molecules are in high demand in biotechnology because they are important for applications such as drug discovery and for engineering enzymes for commercial use. X-ray crystallography is the most common method for determining the three-dimensional structures of protein molecules. When a crystal of a protein is placed in an X-ray beam, scattering of X-rays off the ordered molecules produces a diffraction pattern that can be measured on a position-sensitive CCD or image-plate detector. Protein crystals typically contain thousands of atoms and the diffraction data are generally measured to relatively low resolution. Consequently the direct methods approaches generally cannot be applied. Instead, if the crystal is modified by adding metal atoms at specific sites or by tuning the wavelength of the X-rays to cross an absorption edge of a metal atom in the crystal, then the information from these additional measurements is sufficient to first identify the /locations of the metal atoms. This information is then used along with the diffraction data to make a three-dimensional picture of electron densities. This picture can be used to determine the position of most or all of the atoms in the protein.

  6. CX-009554: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-situ X-ray Nanocharacterization of Defect Kinetics in Chalcogenide Solar Cell CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/04/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Guedel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2012-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L{sub x} ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v{sub {infinity}}). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L{sub x} with wind luminosity L{sub wind} = (1/2)M-dot v{sup 2}{sub {infinity}}, suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  8. NSLS-II X-Ray Diagnostics Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ILINSKI, P.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and recording components.

  9. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

    1990-09-11

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

  10. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Charles K. (Chicago, IL); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Solem, Johndale C. (Los Alamos, NM); Haddad, Waleed S. (Chicago, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

  11. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauvin, M; Jackson, M; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kiss, M; Kole, M; Mikhalev, V; Moretti, E; Olofsson, G; Rydström, S; Takahashi, H; Lind, J; Strömberg, J -E; Welin, O; Iyudin, A; Shifrin, D; Pearce, M

    2015-01-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25 - 240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the...

  12. A Model for the X-Ray and UV Emission from Seyfert Galaxies and Galactic Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Haardt; Laura Maraschi; Gabriele Ghisellini

    1994-05-26

    We propose that the X--ray emission from radio quiet AGN and galactic black holes is due to Comptonization of soft thermal photons emitted by the underlying accretion disk in localized structures (blobs). The power per unit area produced by the blobs, impinging on the disk, can easily dominate the radiation internally produced by the disk. In this case the electron temperature and the high energy spectrum can be determined in a similar way as in the previously studied homogeneous model (Haardt \\& Maraschi 1991). However in the present model: a) the emitted spectrum is largely independent of the {\\it fraction} of gravitational power dissipated in the blobs; b) the X--ray spectrum can be harder depending on a form factor of the blobs; c) the UV (or soft X--ray for galactic objects) luminosity that is not intercepted by the blobs can be larger than the X--ray luminosity. In the framework of a simplified accretion disk $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo model, we make order of magnitude estimates of the number of active blobs, their size, luminosity and hence their compactness, finding values in agreement with what is observed. The expected UV to X--ray spectra and correlations of X--ray and UV light curves are discussed.

  13. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, D.

    1991-01-01

    We review the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on the rare earth metal holmium. When the incident incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L{sub III} absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering and resonant integer harmonics are observed. These results are analyzed within the theory of x-ray resonance exchange scattering assuming electric dipole (2p {yields} 5d) and quadrupole (2p {yields} 4f) transitions among atomic orbitals. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  15. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  16. Optical and X-ray Variability of Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, A C

    2015-01-01

    Here we report our recent results of variability studies in optical and X-ray bands of three blazars namely 3C 273, PKS 2155 - 304 and BL Lacertae with XMM-Newton. We found large amplitude optical to X-rays variability in 3C 273, and PKS 2155 - 304 on year time scale. In 3C 273, we noticed that synchrotron cooling and particle acceleration are at work at different epoch of observations. In PKS 2155 - 304, spectral energy distribution from optical to X-ray is fitted with LPPL (log parabolic + power law) model. In BL Lacertae, optical flux and degree of polarization were anti-correlated.

  17. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A., E-mail: a-physics2001@yahoo.com; Tibai, Z. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary)] [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary) [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Szentagothai Research Centre, University of Pecs, Pecs-7624 (Hungary); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-03-15

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  18. X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tavani

    1997-03-24

    We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

  19. Laser-Produced Coherent X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Umstadter

    2007-01-31

    We study the generation of x-rays from the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-intense laser pulse either directly or via laser generated ion channels. The laser pulse acts as the accelerator and wiggler leading to an all-optical synchrotron-like x-ray source. The mm sized accelerator and micron-sized wiggler leads to a compact source of high brightness, ultrafast x-rays with applications in relativistic nonlinear optics, ultrafast chemistry, biology, inner-shell electronic processes and phase transitions.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power >X-RayX-RayX-Ray

  1. SU-E-I-01: A Fast, Analytical Pencil Beam Based Method for First Order X-Ray Scatter Estimation of Kilovoltage Cone Beam X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J; Bourland, J [Wake Forest University, Winston-salem, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analytically estimate first-order x-ray scatter for kV cone beam x-ray imaging with high computational efficiency. Methods: In calculating first-order scatter using the Klein-Nishina formula, we found that by integrating the point-to-point scatter along an interaction line, a “pencil-beam” scatter kernel (BSK) can be approximated to a quartic expression when the imaging field is small. This BSK model for monoenergetic, 100keV x-rays has been verified on homogeneous cube and cylinder water phantoms by comparing with the exact implementation of KN formula. For heterogeneous medium, the water-equivalent length of a BSK was acquired with an improved Siddon's ray-tracing algorithm, which was also used in calculating pre- and post- scattering attenuation. To include the electron binding effect for scattering of low-kV photons, the mean corresponding scattering angle is determined from the effective point of scattered photons of a BSK. The behavior of polyenergetic x-rays was also investigated for 120kV x-rays incident to a sandwiched infinite heterogeneous slab phantom, with the electron binding effect incorporated. Exact computation and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for comparisons, using the EGSnrc code package. Results: By reducing the 3D volumetric target (o(n{sup 3})) to 2D pencil-beams (o(n{sup 2})), the computation expense can be generally lowered by n times, which our experience verifies. The scatter distribution on a flat detector shows high agreement between the analytic BSK model and exact calculations. The pixel-to-pixel differences are within (-2%, 2%) for the homogeneous cube and cylinder phantoms and within (0, 6%) for the heterogeneous slab phantom. However, the Monte Carlo simulation shows increased deviation of the BSK model toward detector periphery. Conclusion: The proposed BSK model, accommodating polyenergetic x-rays and electron binding effect at low kV, shows great potential in efficiently estimating the first-order scatter from small imaging fields. We are investigating more thoroughly to improve performance and explore applications.

  2. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    and nonradiologists in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometrymorphometry studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

  3. X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumental drifts, and systematic errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumentalUSA Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Nationaland reflecting x-ray optics suitable for micro- and nano-

  4. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

  5. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  6. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Studies of Rapidly Evolving Nanoscale Interfacial Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yeling

    2013-01-01

    Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.grazing incidence x-ray and neutron scattering from ordered

  7. Analysis of Order Formation in Block Copolymer Thin Films Using Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virgili, Justin M.; Tao, Yuefei; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of X-Ray and Neutron Scattering in Polymer Science.µ t for X-ray and neutron scattering experiments is unity;18 In classical scattering of light, X-rays or neutrons the

  8. X-ray scattering studies of structure and dynamics of surfaces and interfaces of polymeric liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Evanescent X-ray and Neutron Scattering. Springer-Verlag,Methods of X-ray and neutron scattering in polymer science.Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.

  9. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, P.

    2010-01-01

    with polarized soft X-ray photons Peter Fischer and Mi -polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-rayhigh intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of

  10. A New Scheme for Stigmatic X-ray Imaging with Large Magnification...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F; Beiersdorfer, P; Wang, E; Sanchez del Rio, M; Caughey, T A 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY X-ray Imaging X-ray Imaging This paper describes a new x-ray scheme for...

  11. X-ray Emission from Ionized Wind-Bubbles around Wolf-Rayet Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V

    2015-01-01

    Using a code that employs a self-consistent method for computing the effects of photoionization on circumstellar gas dynamics, we model the formation of wind-driven nebulae around massive Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our algorithm incorporates a simplified model of the photo-ionization source, computes the fractional ionization of hydrogen due to the photoionizing flux and recombination, and determines self-consistently the energy balance due to ionization, photo-heating and radiative cooling. We take into account changes in stellar properties and mass-loss over the star's evolution. Our multi-dimensional simulations clearly reveal the presence of strong ionization front instabilities. Using various X-ray emission models, and abundances consistent with those derived for W-R nebulae, we compute the X-ray flux and spectra from our wind bubble models. We show the evolution of the X-ray spectral features with time over the evolution of the star, taking the absorption of the X-rays by the ionized bubble into account. O...

  12. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  13. The X-ray Lightcurve of the Supermassive star eta Carinae, 1996--2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corcoran, M F; Liburd, J K; Morris, D; Gull, T R; Madura, T I; Teodoro, M; Moffat, A F J; Richardson, N D; Russell, C M P; Pollock, A M T; Owocki, S P

    2015-01-01

    Eta Carinae is the nearest example of a supermassive, superluminous, unstable star. Mass loss from the system is critical in shaping its circumstellar medium and in determining its ultimate fate. Eta Car currently loses mass via a dense, slow stellar wind and possesses one of the largest mass loss rates known. It is prone to episodes of extreme mass ejection via eruptions from some as-yet unspecified cause; the best examples of this are the large-scale eruptions which occurred in 19th century. Eta Car is a colliding wind binary in which strong variations in X-ray emission and in other wavebands are driven by the violent collision of the wind of eta Car-A and the fast, less dense wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. X-ray variations are the simplest diagnostic we have to study the wind-wind collision and allow us to measure the state of the stellar mass loss from both stars. We present the X-ray lightcurve over the last 20 years from ROSAT observations and monitoring with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer...

  14. Does the optical-to-X-ray energy distribution of quasars depend on optical luminosity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Yuan; J. Siebert; W. Brinkmann

    1998-05-09

    We report on a detailed analysis of the correlation between the optical-UV (Lo) and X-ray (Lx) luminosities of quasars by means of Monte Carlo simulations, using a realistic luminosity function. We find, for a quasar population with an intrinsically constant, mean X-ray loudness alpha_ox, that the simulated alpha_ox - Lo relation can exhibit various `apparent' properties, including an increasing alpha_ox with Lo, similar to what has been found from observations. The determining factor for this behavior turns out to be the relative strength of the dispersions of the luminosities, i.e. their deviations from the mean spectral energy distribution at the optical and X-ray bands, such that a dispersion larger for the optical luminosity than for the X-ray luminosity tends to result in an apparent correlation. We suggest that the observed alpha_ox - Lo correlation can be attributed, at least to some extent, to such an effect, and is thus not an underlying physical property. The consequences of taking into account the luminosity dispersions in an analysis of the observed luminosity correlations is briefly discussed. We note that similar considerations might also apply for the Baldwin effect.

  15. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  16. Pressure-induced valence change in YbAl3: a combined high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering and theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E D; Kumar, R S; Svane, A; Vaitheeswaran, G; Nicol, M F; Kanchana, V; Hu, M; Cornelius, A L

    2008-01-01

    High resolution x-ray absorption (XAS) experiments in the partial fluorescence yield mode (PFY) and resonant inelastic x-ray emission (RXES) measurements under pressure were performed on the intermediate valence compound YbAl{sub 3} up to 38 GPa. The results of the Yb L{sub 3} PFY-XAS and RXES studies show a smooth valence increase in YbAl{sub 3} from 2.75 to 2.93 at ambient to 38 GPa. In-situ angle dispersive synchrotron high pressure x-ray diffraction experiments carried out using a diamond cell at room temperature to study the equation of state showed the ambient cubic phase stable up to 40 GPa. The results obtained from self-interaction corrected local spin density functional calculations to understand the pressure effect on the Yb valence and compressibility are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Simultaneous near-field and far-field imaging of the 11.9-nm Ni-like Sn soft-x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, F.; Braud, M.; Balmer, J.E.; Nilsen, J.; Bajt, S.

    2004-07-01

    We report on two-dimensional near-field imaging experiments of the 11.9-nm Sn x-ray laser that were performed with a set of Mo/Y multilayer mirrors having reflectivities of up to {approx}45% at normal and at 45 deg. incidence. Second-moment analysis of the x-ray laser emission was used to determine values of the x-ray beam propagation factor M{sup 2} for a range of irradiation parameters. The results reveal a reduction of M{sup 2} with increasing prepulse amplitude. The spatial size of the output is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than previously measured for the 14.7-nm Pd x-ray laser, while the distance of the x-ray emission with respect to the target surface remains roughly the same.

  18. Achieving hard X-ray nanofocusing using a wedged multilayer Laue...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    anticipate that continuous development on wedged MLLs will advance x-ray nanofocusing optics to new frontiers and enrich capabilities and opportunities for hard X-ray microscopy....

  19. Phase Tomography Using X-ray Talbot Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momose, A.; Yashiro, W.; Moritake, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y. [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hattori, T. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2007-01-19

    A biological tomography result obtained with an X-ray Talbot interferometer is reported. An X-ray Talbot interferometer was constructed using an amplitude grating fabricated by X-ray lithography at the LIGA beamline of NewSUBARU and gold electroplating. The pitch and pattern thickness of the grating were 8 {mu}m and 30 {mu}m, respectively. The effective area was 20 x 20 mm2, which was entirely illuminated with a wide beam available at the medium-length beamline 20B2 of SPring-8, allowing the acquisition of a three-dimensional tomogram of almost the whole body of a fish. The resulting image obtained with 17.7 keV X-rays revealed organs with bones in the same view.

  20. Performance enhancement approaches for a dual energy x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Evans, J.P.O. , “Stereoscopic dual energy imaging for targetCrawford, C.R. , “Dual Energy Volumetric X-ray Tomographicimages in 4–10 MeV Dual- energy customs system for material

  1. X-ray emission from the terrestrial magnetosheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Ina Picket; Cravens, Thomas Edward

    2003-04-29

    [1] X-rays are generated throughout the terrestrial magnetosheath as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and geocoronal neutrals. The solar wind ions resulting from these collisions are left in highly excited...

  2. Active pixel sensors for X-ray astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Matthew (Matthew L.)

    2005-01-01

    An active pixel sensor array, APS-1, has been fabricated for the purpose of scientific x-ray detection. This thesis presents the results of testing the device. Alternate design architectures are explored. Recommendations ...

  3. Accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars observed with INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurizio Falanga

    2007-11-07

    I review the properties of three X-ray accreting millisecond pulsars observed with INTEGRAL. Out of seven recently discovered accretion-powered pulsars (one discovered by INTEGRAL), three were observed with the INTEGRAL satellite up to 300 keV. Detailed timing and spectral results will be presented, including data obtained during the most recent outburst of the pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455. Accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars are key systems to understand the spin and accretion history of neutron stars. They are also a good laboratory in which to study the source spectra, pulse profile, and phase shift between X-ray pulses in different energy ranges which give additional information of the X-ray production processes and emission environment.

  4. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  5. X-ray obscuration in local Universe AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Guainazzi

    2006-10-31

    I review the constraints that X-ray observations impose on the physical properties and the geometrical distribution of cold absorbing gas in nearby obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), as well as their implications for AGN structure models.

  6. Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare stones with the power to attract iron. Moreover, when...

  7. The Ulysses Catalog of Solar Hard X-Ray Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranquille, C.; Hurley, K.; Hudson, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Sturrock, P.A. (ed. ) Solar Flares: A Monograph from SkylabSmith E.V.P. : 1963, Solar Flares, Macmillan, New York.Catalog of Solar Hard X-Ray Flares Table 1 (Continued. )

  8. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  9. X-Ray Propagation in Tapered Waveguides: Simulation and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    [1,2]. X-ray waveguides (WG) have been designed and fabricated as planar layered systems (1D-WG) [3. The propagation in the stuctures is studied by numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation (PWE), as used

  10. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this paper, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser...

  11. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-01-01

    can be used instead of HC FEL. In the following illustra-UM is now tuned for resonant FEL interaction with the 32-nmAttosecond X-Ray Pulses from the FEL Alexander A. Zholents,

  12. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  13. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  14. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (22.1 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt class laser pulses interacting with a Kr gas jet and a silver foil, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity of flat Highly...

  15. X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials June 22, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Imaging and data analysis techniques offer new approach to probing material properties In a new...

  16. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2000; 29: 178186

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    (micro-PIXE) were obtained for different chemical elements for natural and synthetic emeralds. Eighty crystal. These (a) demonstrated the power of micro-PIXE in reveal- ing inclusions in emeralds, which the power of micro-PIXE in the in situ study of minerals. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  17. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W. (Albuquerque, NM); Turman, Bobby N. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaye, Ronald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  18. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2010-01-08

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  19. New focusing multilayer structures for X-ray plasma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibishkin, M S; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, N N; Chernov, V V; Chkhalo, N I; Kazakov, E D; Shevelko, A P

    2008-02-28

    New focusing short-period multilayer structures are developed which opens up wide possibilities for X-ray and VUV spectroscopy. Multilayer structures are deposited on a flat surface of a mica crystal which is then bent to a small-radius cylinder. The use of this structure in a von Hamos spectrometer for X-ray laser plasma diagnostics is demonstrated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, I. Matias; Combe, Gaeel; Foray, Pierre; Flin, Frederic; Lesaffre, Bernard [Universite de Grenoble, 3SR Lab, UMR 5521 Grenoble-INP, UJF-Grenoble 1, CNRS, Grenoble, France CEN, CNRM-GAME UMR 3589, Meteo France - CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2013-06-18

    Pile foundations of offshore platforms, wind and water turbines are typically subjected to a variety of cyclic loading paths due to their complex environment. While many studies focus on global pile behaviour, the soil-pile interface is explored here by a micromechanical study of the soil layer in contact with the pile surface. This work is devoted to the analysis of frozen post-mortem silica sand samples recovered at the pile interface following installation and cyclic loading tests in a calibration chamber using x-ray tomography. An experimental procedure developed for three dimensional (3D) snow imaging was adapted for the recovery of the in-situ sand samples to preserve their structure during tomography scans. 3D images at a pixel size of 7 {mu}m were then obtained using a cryogenic cell. Results confirm the presence of a shear band at the pile surface as well as void ratios changes in the direction of the pile's radius.

  1. Evaluation of partial coherence correction in X-ray ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Parks, Daniel; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Kevan, Stephen D.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-02-23

    Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CDI) and X-ray ptychography both heavily rely on the high degree of spatial coherence of the X-ray illumination for sufficient experimental data quality for reconstruction convergence. Nevertheless, the majority of the available synchrotron undulator sources have a limited degree of partial coherence, leading to reduced data quality and a lower speckle contrast in the coherent diffraction patterns. It is still an open question whether experimentalists should compromise the coherence properties of an X-ray source in exchange for a higher flux density at a sample, especially when some materials of scientific interest are relatively weak scatterers. Amore »previous study has suggested that in CDI, the best strategy for the study of strong phase objects is to maintain a high degree of coherence of the illuminating X-rays because of the broadening of solution space resulting from the strong phase structures. In this article, we demonstrate the first systematic analysis of the effectiveness of partial coherence correction in ptychography as a function of the coherence properties, degree of complexity of illumination (degree of phase diversity of the probe) and sample phase complexity. We have also performed analysis of how well ptychographic algorithms refine X-ray probe and complex coherence functions when those variables are unknown at the start of reconstructions, for noise-free simulated data, in the case of both real-valued and highly-complex objects.« less

  2. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  3. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  4. The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit o...

  5. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bonito; S. Orlando; G. Peres; F. Favata; R. Rosner

    2006-10-17

    Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. We performed an extensive exploration of a wide space of the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. We performed a set of bidimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely the thermal conduction and the radiative losses. Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular we find that the case of a protostellar jet less dense than the ambient medium reproduces well the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (vsh = 500 km/s), detectable with Chandra. Furthermore our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  6. Quasimonochromatic x-ray backlighting on the COrnell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, P. F.; Greenly, J. B.; Gourdain, P. A.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2010-10-15

    Monochromatic x-ray backlighting has been employed with great success for imaging of plasmas with strong self-emission such as x-pinches and wire array z-pinches. However, implementation of a monochromatic backlighting system typically requires extremely high quality spherically bent crystals which are difficult to manufacture and can be prohibitively expensive. Furthermore, the crystal must have a direct line of sight to the object, which typically emits copious amounts of radiation and debris. We present a quasimonochromatic x-ray backlighting system which employs an elliptically bent mica crystal as the dispersive element. In this scheme a narrow band of continuum radiation is selected for imaging, instead of line radiation in the case of monochromatic imaging. The flat piece of mica is bent using a simple four-point bending apparatus that allows the curvature of the crystal to be adjusted in situ for imaging in the desired wavelength band. This system has the advantage that it is very cost effective, has a large aperture, and is extremely flexible. The principles of operation of the system are discussed and its performance is analyzed.

  7. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F,more »in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.« less

  8. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  9. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  10. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many â?? you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability weâ??d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDDâ??s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detectorâ??s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

  11. Data Selection Criteria for Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron Star Radii with X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozel, Feryal; Guver, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    Data selection and the determination of systematic uncertainties in the spectroscopic measurements of neutron star radii from thermonuclear X-ray bursts have been the subject of numerous recent studies. In one approach, the uncertainties and outliers were determined by a data-driven Bayesian mixture model, whereas in a second approach, data selection was performed by requiring that the observations follow theoretical expectations. We show here that, due to inherent limitations in the data, the theoretically expected trends are not discernible in the majority of X-ray bursts even if they are present. Therefore, the proposed theoretical selection criteria are not practical with the current data for distinguishing clean data sets from outliers. Furthermore, when the data limitations are not taken into account, the theoretically motivated approach selects a small subset of bursts with properties that are in fact inconsistent with the underlying assumptions of the method. We conclude that the data-driven selection...

  12. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A., E-mail: cswenson@astro.psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ?1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ?50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of ?t/t ? 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  13. The spectral evolution of impulsive solar X-ray flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2004-07-20

    The time evolution of the spectral index and the non-thermal flux in 24 impulsive solar hard X-ray flares of GOES class M was studied in RHESSI observations. The high spectral resolution allows for a clean separation of thermal and non-thermal components in the 10-30 keV range, where most of the non-thermal photons are emitted. Spectral index and flux can thus be determined with much better accuracy than before. The spectral soft-hard-soft behavior in rise-peak-decay phases is discovered not only in the general flare development, but even more pronounced in subpeaks. An empirically found power-law dependence between the spectral index and the normalization of the non-thermal flux holds during the rise and decay phases of the emission peaks. It is still present in the combined set of all flares. We find an asymmetry in this dependence between rise and decay phases of the non-thermal emission. There is no delay between flux peak and spectral index minimum. The soft-hard-soft behavior appears to be an intrinsic signature of the elementary electron acceleration process.

  14. Synchrotron X-ray Investigations of Mineral-Microbe-Metal Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2008-06-06

    Interactions between microbes and minerals can play an important role in metal transformations (i.e. changes to an element's valence state, coordination chemistry, or both), which can ultimately affect that element's mobility. Mineralogy affects microbial metabolism and ecology in a system; microbes, in turn, can affect the system's mineralogy. Increasingly, synchrotron-based X-ray experiments are in routine use for determining an element's valence state and coordination chemistry, as well as for examining the role of microbes in metal transformations.

  15. Water destruction by X-rays in young stellar objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Stauber; J. K. Jorgensen; E. F. van Dishoeck; S. D. Doty; A. O. Benz

    2006-02-06

    We study the H2O chemistry in star-forming environments under the influence of a central X-ray source and a central far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. The gas-phase water chemistry is modeled as a function of time, hydrogen density and X-ray flux. To cover a wide range of physical environments, densities between n_H = 10^4-10^9 cm^-3 and temperatures between T = 10-1000 K are studied. Three different regimes are found: For T water abundance is of order 10^-7-10^-6 and can be somewhat enhanced or reduced due to X-rays, depending on time and density. For 100 K 10^-3 ergs s-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^4 yrs) and for F_X > 10^-4 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^5 yrs). At higher temperatures (T > 250 K) and hydrogen densities, water can persist with x(H2O) ~ 10^-4 even for high X-ray fluxes. The X-ray and FUV models are applied to envelopes around low-mass Class 0 and I young stellar objects (YSOs). Water is destroyed in both Class 0 and I envelopes on relatively short timescales (t ~ 5000 yrs) for realistic X-ray fluxes, although the effect is less prominent in Class 0 envelopes due to the higher X-ray absorbing densities there. FUV photons from the central source are not effective in destroying water. The average water abundance in Class I sources for L_X > 10^27 ergs s^-1 is predicted to be x(H2O) < 10^-6.

  16. X-ray emitting young stars in the Orion Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric D. Feigelson; Patrick Broos; James A. Gaffney III; Gordon Garmire; Lynne A. Hillenbrand; Steven H. Pravdo; Leisa Townsley; Yohko Tsuboi

    2002-03-19

    The Orion Nebula Cluster and the molecular cloud in its vicinity have been observed with the ACIS-I detector on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory with 23 hours exposure. We detect 1075 X-ray sources: 91% are spatially associated with known stellar members of the cluster, and 7% are newly identified deeply embedded cloud members. This provides the largest X-ray study of a pre-main sequence stellar population. We examine here the X-ray properties of Orion young stars as a function of mass. Results include: (a) the discovery of rapid variability in the O9.5 31 M_o star \\theta^2A Ori, and several early B stars, inconsistent with the standard model of X-ray production in small wind shocks; (b) support for the hypothesis that intermediate-mass mid-B through A type stars do not themselves produce significant X-ray emission; (c) confirmation that low-mass G- through M-type T Tauri stars exhibit powerful flaring but typically at luminosities considerably below the `saturation' level; (d) confirmation that the presence or absence of a circumstellar disk has no discernable effect on X-ray emission; (e) evidence that T Tauri plasma temperatures are often very high with T >= 100 MK, even when luminosities are modest and flaring is not evident; and (f) detection of the largest sample of pre-main sequence very low mass objects showing high flaring levels and a decline in magnetic activity as they evolve into L- and T-type brown dwarfs.

  17. High-pressure cells for in situ multi-anvil experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinenweber, K.; Mosenfelder, J.; Diedrich, T.; Soignard, E.; Sharp, T.G.; Tyburczy, J.A.; Wang, Y.

    2008-10-14

    A new series of high-pressure cells for in situ multi-anvil experiments is described. The cells are based on the conventional COMPRES cells, but modifications are made to improve the passage of X-rays. The modifications include cutting slits in parts of the assemblies that have very high X-ray absorption, such as lanthanum chromite and rhenium, the use of low-Z thermal insulation, such as forsterite, in place of zirconia, and the partial replacement of zirconia by MgO equatorial windows combined with a mullite octahedron. Details of the designs, thermal characterizations, and examples of the application of these cells are described.

  18. IN-SITU XRD OF OPERATING LSFC CATHODES: DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-11-19

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) research capability has been developed that facilitates measuring the electrochemical performance of an operating SOFC while simultaneously performing x-ray diffraction on its cathode. The evolution of this research tool’s development is discussed together with a description of the instrumentation used for in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of operating SOFC cathodes. The challenges that were overcome in the process of developing this capability, which included seals and cathode current collectors, are described together with the solutions that are presently being applied to mitigate them.

  19. X-Ray Spectroscopy: An Experimental Technique to Measure Charge State Distribution Right at the Ion-Solid Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Charge state distributions of $^{56}$Fe and $^{58}$Ni projectile ions passing through thin carbon foils have been studied in the energy range of 1.44 - 2.69 MeV/u using a novel method from the x-ray spectroscopy technique. Interestingly the charge state distribution in the bulk show Lorentzian behavior instead of usual Gaussian distribution. Further, different parameters of charge state distribution like mean charge state, distribution width and asymmetric parameter are determined and compared with the empirical calculations and ETACHA predictions. It is found that the x-ray measurement technique is appropriate to determine the mean charge state right at the interaction zone or in the bulk. Interestingly, empirical formalism predicts much lower projectile mean charge states compare to x-ray measurements which clearly indicate multi-electron capture from the target surface. The ETACHA predictions and experimental results are found to be comparable for energies $\\geq$ 2 MeV/u.

  20. Tools for a Theoretical X-ray Beamline J. J. Rehr*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Tools for a Theoretical X-ray Beamline J. J. Rehr* Department of Physics University of Washington, France 22 October 2010 #12;X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline #12;Tools for a Theoretical X-ray Beamline · GOAL Theoretical X-ray Beamline: 2. Tools for EXAFS and XANES, EELS, XMCD, ... 3. DFT/MD-TOOLS 4. Next generation

  1. Chemical Shifts in X-ray and Photo-Electron Spectroscopy: A Historical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Ingvar

    Chemical Shifts in X-ray and Photo-Electron Spectroscopy: A Historical review Ingvar Lindgren 1 Introduction 2 2 Chemical shift in X-ray spectroscopy 2 2.1 Discovery of the chemical shift in X-ray spectroscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Interpretation of the chemical shift in X-ray spectroscopy

  2. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benzerara, K; Tyliszczak, T

    2007-01-01

    Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

  3. X-Ray Diagnostics for the Levitated Dipole Jennifer L. Ellsworth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to utilize two x-ray diagnostics. An x-ray pulse height analyzer will measure the energy spectrum will be discussed. The x-ray pulse height analyzer and x-ray camera are vital to analyzing the first plasmas acquisition and electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.3.3 DXP4C2X Multichannel Analyzer Camac

  4. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    polymer photoresists by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology

  5. In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States)

    2007-02-02

    Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni ({approx}25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

  6. LOFT: the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Tomaso M

    2012-01-01

    LOFT, the large observatory for X-ray timing, is a new mission concept competing with other four candidates for a launch opportunity in 2022-2024. LOFT will be performing high-time resolution X-ray observations of compact objects, combining for the first time an unprecedented large collecting area for X-ray photons and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based X-ray instruments (down to 200 eV FWHM at 6 keV). The operating energy range is 2-80 keV. The main science goals of LOFT are the measurement of the neutron stars equation of states and the test of General Relativity in the strong field regime. The breakthrough capabilities of the instruments on-board LOFT will permit to open also new discovery windows for a wide range of Galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources. In this contribution, we provide a general description of the mission concept and summarize its main scientific capabilities.

  7. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; ,

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  8. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  9. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siddons, D.P.; Johnson, E.D.; Guckel, H.; Klein, J.L.

    1997-10-21

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures. 21 figs.

  10. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siddons, David Peter (Shoreham, NY); Johnson, Erik D. (Ridge, NY); Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); Klein, Jonathan L. (Madison, WI)

    1997-10-21

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures.

  11. Correlated X-ray/Ultraviolet/Optical Variability in NGC 6814

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troyer, Jon; Cackett, Edward; Bentz, Misty; Goad, Michael; Horne, Keith; Seals, James

    2015-01-01

    We present results of a 3-month combined X-ray/UV/optical monitoring campaign of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6814. The object was monitored by Swift from June through August 2012 in the X-ray and UV bands and by the Liverpool Telescope from May through July 2012 in B and V. The light curves are variable and significantly correlated between wavebands. Using cross-correlation analysis, we compute the time lag between the X-ray and lower energy bands. These lags are thought to be associated with the light travel time between the central X-ray emitting region and areas further out on the accretion disc. The computed lags support a thermal reprocessing scenario in which X-ray photons heat the disc and are reprocessed into lower energy photons. Additionally, we fit the lightcurves using CREAM, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code for a standard disc. The best-fitting standard disc model yields unreasonably high super-Eddington accretion rates. Assuming more reasonable accretion rates would result in significantly under-pre...

  12. ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul, 34956 (Turkey)

    2012-10-20

    We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

  13. X-ray Polarimetry - a Tool for the Galactic center diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    Was the Milky Way galaxy a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the past? Can we find traces of remnant structures supporting this idea? What is the three-dimensional arrangement of matter around our central supermassive black hole? A number of fundamental questions concerning our own Galactic center remain controversial. To reveal the structure of the high-energy sky around our galactic core, a technique more sensitive to the morphology of the emitters than spectroscopy is needed. In this lecture note, I describe how X-ray polarimetry can open a new observational window by precisely measuring the three-dimensional position of the scattering material in the Galactic center. The observed polarization degree and polarization position angle would also determine unambiguously the primary source of emission and trace the centennial history of our supermassive black hole by detecting echoes of its past activity thanks to astrophysical mirrors. Finally, the synergy between X-ray polarimetry and infrared a...

  14. Hard X-Ray Imaging of Individual Spectral Components in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Krucker, Säm

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially-invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically-determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities wi...

  15. Twisted X-rays: incoming waveforms yielding discrete diffraction patterns for helical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesecke, Gero; Jüstel, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Conventional X-ray methods use incoming plane waves and result in discrete diffraction patterns when scattered at crystals. Here we find, by a systematic method, incoming waveforms which exhibit discrete diffraction patterns when scattered at helical structures. As examples we present simulated diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and tobacco mosaic virus. The new incoming waveforms, which we call twisted waves due to their geometric shape, are found theoretically as closed-form solutions to Maxwell's equations. The theory of the ensuing diffraction patterns is developed in detail. A twisted analogue of the Von Laue condition is seen to hold, with the peak locations encoding the symmetry and the helix parameters, and the peak intensities indicating the electronic structure in the unit cell. If suitable twisted X-ray sources can in the future be realized experimentally, it appears from our mathematical results that they will provide a powerful tool for directly determining the detailed atomic structure of ...

  16. Discovery of Pulsed X-rays from the SMC Transient RX J0052.1-7319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Finger; D. J. Macomb; R. C. Lamb; T. A. Prince; M. J. Coe; N. J. Haigh

    2001-07-09

    Coherent 65 mHz pulsations in the X-ray flux of the Small Magellantic Cloud (SMC) transient source RX J0052.1-7319 have been detected by us in an analysis of ROSAT data. We report on the pulsations we detected in ROSAT HRI data and simultaneous detection of these pulses in hard X-rays using BATSE data. The BATSE data show an outburst of the source lasting 60 days. We report on optical observations of the candidate companion, and a new source position we determined from the HRI data, which is consistent with the candidate's location. From the measured fluxes and observed frequency derivatives we exclude the possiblity that the pulsar is in the foreground of the SMC, and show that an accretion disk is present during the outburst, which peaked near Eddington luminosity.

  17. Hard X-rays from Emission Line Galaxies and the X-ray Background: A Test for Advection Dominated Accretion with Radio Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insu Yi; Stephen P. Boughn

    1997-10-14

    Recent studies of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) have suggested the possible existence of a population of relatively faint sources with hard X-ray spectra; however, the emission mechanism remains unclear. If the hard X-ray emission is from the radiatively inefficient, advection dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) around massive black holes in galactic nuclei, X-ray luminosity and radio luminosity satisfy the approximate relation $L_R\\sim 7\\times 10^{35}(\

  18. Contrasting behaviour from two Be/X-ray binary pulsars: insights into differing neutron star accretion modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, L J; Hill, A B; Coe, M J; Corbet, R H D; Bird, A J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4s and 85.4s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and ...

  19. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (more »to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (« less

  20. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limites soft x-ray nanofocusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merthe, Daniel; Goldberg, Kenneth; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory; Rakawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-10-21

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing.The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  1. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2010-10-15

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum.

  2. A method of measuring gold nanoparticle concentrations by x-ray fluorescence for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Di; Li Yuhua; Wong, Molly D.; Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper reports a technique that enables the quantitative determination of the concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) through the accurate detection of their fluorescence radiation in the diagnostic x-ray spectrum. Methods: Experimentally, x-ray fluorescence spectra of 1.9 and 15 nm GNP solutions are measured using an x-ray spectrometer, individually and within chicken breast tissue samples. An optimal combination of excitation and emission filters is determined to segregate the fluorescence spectra at 66.99 and 68.80 keV from the background scattering. A roadmap method is developed that subtracts the scattered radiation (acquired before the insertion of GNP solutions) from the signal radiation acquired after the GNP solutions are inserted. Results: The methods effectively minimize the background scattering in the spectrum measurements, showing linear relationships between GNP solutions from 0.1% to 10% weight concentration and from 0.1% to 1.0% weight concentration inside a chicken breast tissue sample. Conclusions: The investigation demonstrated the potential of imaging gold nanoparticles quantitatively in vivo for in-tissue studies, but future studies will be needed to investigate the ability to apply this method to clinical applications.

  3. Archaeometrical studies using X-ray fluorescence methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauna, Catalina; Constantinescu, B.; Constantin, F.; Bugoi, R.; Stan, D.; Vasilescu, A. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, 077125, Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-04-26

    Elemental analysis contributes to authentication (knowing the elemental composition and considering the information about the usual composition of the objects in different historical periods it can be established if the item is original or fake), provenance studies (minor and trace elements indicates ores origin and 'consequently' mines location), (relative) dating of archaeological objects (e.g. for painted items--the chemical recipes for pigments can offer information about the age of objects). The paper gives a general layout for the NIPNE Archaeometry Laboratory's applications using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), micro--Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (micro-PIXE), micro-Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-Ray Fluorescence (micro--SR-XRF) methods.

  4. The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing: LOFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzo, E

    2013-01-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing, is a new space mission concept devoted to observations of Galactic and extra-Galactic sources in the X-ray domain with the main goals of probing gravity theory in the very strong field environment of black holes and other compact objects, and investigating the state of matter at supra-nuclear densities in neutron stars. The instruments on-board LOFT, the Large area detector and the Wide Field Monitor combine for the first time an unprecedented large effective area (~10 m2 at 8 keV) sensitive to X-ray photons mainly in the 2-30 keV energy range and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based telescopes (down to 200 eV at 6 keV). LOFT is currently competing for a launch of opportunity in 2022 together with the other M3 mission candidates of the ESA Cosmic Vision Program.

  5. Non-thermal X-ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Vink

    2004-09-21

    Recent studies of narrow, X-ray synchrotron radiating filaments surrounding young supernova remnants indicate that magnetic fields strengths are relatively high, B ~ 0.1 mG, or even higher, and that diffusion is close to the Bohm limit. I illustrate this using Cas A as an example. Also older remnants such as RCW 86 appear to emit X-ray synchrotron radiation, but the emission is more diffuse, and not always confined to a region close to the shock front. I argue that for RCW 86 the magnetic field is likely to be low (B ~ 17 microGauss), and at the location where the shell emits X-ray synchrotron radiation the shock velocity is much higher than the average shock velocity of ~600 km/s.

  6. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E.J.; Huntington, C.M.; Trantham, M.R.; Keiter, P.A; Drake, R.P.; Montgomery, David; Benage, John F.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  7. X-ray radiography with highly charged ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marrs, Roscoe E. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An extremely small (1-250 micron FWHM) beam of slow highly charged ions deexciting on an x-ray production target generates x-ray monochromatic radiation that is passed through a specimen and detected for imaging. The resolution of the x-ray radiograms is improved and such detection is achieved with relatively low dosages of radiation passing through the specimen. An apparatus containing an electron beam ion trap (and modifications thereof) equipped with a focusing column serves as a source of ions that generate radiation projected onto an image detector. Electronic and other detectors are able to detect an increased amount of radiation per pixel than achieved by previous methods and apparati.

  8. Quiescent X-ray emission from an evolved brown dwarf ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Stelzer

    2004-09-27

    I report on the X-ray detection of Gl569Bab. During a 25ksec Chandra observation the binary brown dwarf is for the first time spatially separated in X-rays from the flare star primary Gl569A. Companionship to Gl569A constrains the age of the brown dwarf pair to ~300-800 Myr. The observation presented here is only the second X-ray detection of an evolved brown dwarf. About half of the observing time is dominated by a large flare on Gl569Bab, the remainder is characterized by weak and non-variable emission just above the detection limit. This emission -- if not related to the afterglow of the flare -- represents the first detection of a quiescent corona on a brown dwarf, representing an important piece in the puzzle of dynamos in the sub-stellar regime.

  9. Application of a PWFA to an X-ray FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israeli, Yasmine; Reiche, Sven; Pedrozzi, Marco; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing demand for X-ray Free-electron lasers (FELs) in various science fields, in particular for those with short pulses, larger photon fluxes and shorter wavelengths. The level of X-ray power and the pulse energy depend on the amount of electron bunch energy. Increasing the latter will increase the power of the radiating X-rays. Using numerical simulations we explore the possibility of using a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) scheme to increase the electron beam energy of an existing FEL facility without significantly increasing the accelerator length. In this paper we use parameters of the SwissFEL beam. The simulations are carried out in 2D cylindrical symmetry using the code OSIRIS. Initial results show an energy gain of ~2 GeV after propagation of 0.5 m in the plasma with a relative energy spread of ~1%.

  10. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  11. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  12. The X-ray Telescope of the CAST Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kotthaus; H. Braeuninger; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; D. Kang; M. Kuster; G. Lutz; L. Strueder

    2005-11-14

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) searches for solar axions employing a 9 Tesla superconducting dipole magnet equipped with 3 independent detection systems for X-rays from axion-photon conversions inside the 10 m long magnetic field. Results of the first 6 months of data taking in 2003 imply a 95 % CL upper limit on the axion-photon coupling constant of 1.16x10(-10) GeV(-1) for axion masses CAST is a X-ray telescope consisting of a Wolter I type mirror system and a fully depleted pn-CCD as focal plane detector. Exploiting the full potential of background suppression by focussing X-rays emerging from the magnet bore, the axion sensitivity obtained with telescope data taken in 2004, for the first time in a controlled laboratory experiment, will supersede axion constraints derived from stellar energy loss arguments.

  13. X-ray vs. water maser emission in AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castangia, P; Kadler, M; Henkel, C; Greenhill, L; Tueller, J

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between X-ray and water maser emission in AGN have been recently reported. However, the lack of systematic studies affects the confidence level of these results. In the following, we introduce a project aimed at studying all the water maser sources believed to be associated with AGN activity through X-ray data obtained with the XRT and BAT instruments on-board the Swift satellite. Preliminary results of this work indicate a promising rate of XRT detections allowing us to refine follow-up observing strategies focused on investigating the nuclei of individual galaxies and deriving, on statistical basis, the main characteristics of water maser hosts. In addition, a cross-correlation between our sample and the BAT 22-months all-sky survey provides an exceptionally high detection rate at hard X-ray energies when compared to other AGN-related catalogs.

  14. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  15. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bird, Charles R. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rockett, Paul D. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1987-01-01

    An x-ray source having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events.

  16. High efficiency of soft X-ray radiation reprocessing in supersoft X-ray sources due to multiple scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Suleimanov; F. Meyer; E. Meyer-Hofmeister

    2003-02-19

    Detailed analysis of the lightcurve of CAL 87 clearly has shown that the high optical luminosity comes from the accretion disc rim and can only be explained by a severe thickening of the disc rim near the location where the accretion stream impinges. This area is irradiated by the X-rays where it faces the white dwarf. Only if the reprocessing rate of X-rays to optical light is high a luminosity as high as observed can be understood. But a recent detailed study of the soft X-ray radiation reprocessing in supersoft X-ray sources has shown that the efficiency is not high enough. We here propose a solution for this problem. As already discussed in the earlier lightcurve analysis the impact of the accretion stream at the outer disc rim produces a ``spray'', consisting of a large number of individual gas blobs imbedded in a surrounding corona. For the high mass flow rate this constitutes an optically thick vertically extended screen at the rim of the accretion disc. We analyse the optical properties of this irradiated spray and find that the multiple scattering between these gas blobs leads to an effective reprocessing of soft X-rays to optical light as required by the observations.

  17. Joint H-alpha and X-Ray Observations of Massive X-Ray Binaries. III. The Be X-ray Binaries HDE 245770 = A 0535+26 and X Persei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. D. Grundstrom; T. S. Boyajian; C. Finch; D. R. Gies; W. Huang; M. V. McSwain; D. P. O'Brien; R. L. Riddle; M. L. Trippe; S. J. Williams; D. W. Wingert; R. A. Zaballa

    2007-02-12

    We present results from an H-alpha monitoring campaign of the Be X-ray binary systems HDE 245770 = A 0535+26 and X Per. We use the H-alpha equivalent widths together with adopted values of the Be star effective temperature, disk inclination, and disk outer boundary to determine the half-maximum emission radius of the disk as a function of time. The observations of HDE 245770 document the rapid spectral variability that apparently accompanied the regeneration of a new circumstellar disk. This disk grew rapidly during the years 1998 - 2000, but then slowed in growth in subsequent years. The outer disk radius is probably truncated by resonances between the disk gas and neutron star orbital periods. Two recent X-ray outbursts appear to coincide with the largest disk half-maximum emission radius attained over the last decade. Our observations of X Per indicate that its circumstellar disk has recently grown to near record proportions, and concurrently the system has dramatically increased in X-ray flux, presumably the result of enhanced mass accretion from the disk. We find that the H-alpha half-maximum emission radius of the disk surrounding X Per reached a size about six times larger than the stellar radius, a value, however, that is well below the minimum separation between the Be star and neutron star. We suggest that spiral arms excited by tidal interaction at periastron may help lift disk gas out to radii where accretion by the neutron star companion becomes more effective.

  18. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yael Naze; Gregor Rauw

    2008-08-25

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and iron, but they are less conclusive for the magnesium abundance (solar-like?). While no significant changes occur during the XMM-Newton observation, variability in the X-ray domain is detected on the long-term range. The formation radius of the X-ray emission is loosely constrained to <5 R_sol, which allows for a range of models (wind-shock, corona, magnetic confinement,...) though not all of them can be reconciled with the softness of the spectrum and the narrowness of the lines.

  19. X Ray Precursors in SGRs: Precessing Gamma Jet Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2001-05-18

    Weak isolated X-ray precursor events before the main Gamma Ray Burst, GRB, and also rare Soft Gamma Repeaters, SGR, events are in complete disagreement with any Fireball, or Magnetar, one-shoot explosive scenarios. Fireball model in last two years has been deeply modified into a fountain beamed Jet exploding and interacting on external shells to explain GRB fine time structure. On the contrary earlier we proposed a unified scenario for both GRBs-SGRs where a precessing Gamma Jet (of different intensity) and its geometrical beaming is the source of both GRB and SGRs wide morphology. GRBs are peaked SNs Jet spinning and precessing observed along the thin Jet axis. Their mysterious weak X precursors bursts, corresponding to non-negligible energy powers, up to million Supernova ones for GRB, are gamma Jet tails beamed off-axis, observed at X-Ray tails. They are rare, about (3-6)% of all GRBs, but not unique at all. Comparable brief X-ray precursor flashes occurred in rarest and most detailed SGRs events as the 27 and the 29 August 1998 event from SGR 1900+14. The same source has been in very power-full activity on recent 18 April 2001 once again preceded by X-Ray precursors. These events are inconsistent with any Fireball or Magnetar-Mini-Fireball models. We interpret them naturally as earlier marginal blazing of outlying X conical precessing Jet, an off-axis tails surrounding a narrower gamma precessing Jet. Only when the light-house Jet is in on-axis blazing mode toward the Earth we observe the harder power-full SGR event. We predict such a rich X-Ray precursor signals (more numerous then gamma ones) during Soft Gamma Repeater peak activities; they should be abundant and within detection threshold by a permanent monitoring SGRs by Beppo-Sax WFC or Chandra X ray satellites while at peak activity.

  20. Real-time synchrotron x-ray studies of low- and high-temperature nitridation of c-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yiyi; Oezcan, Ahmet S.; Ludwig, Karl F. Jr. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Oezaydin, Goezde [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Moustakas, Theodore D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L. [Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); Siddons, D. Peter [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The plasma nitridation kinetics of c-plane sapphire at both low (200-300 deg. C) and high (750 deg. C) substrate temperatures was examined using grazing-incidence real-time x-ray diffraction, in situ x-ray reflection and in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). These monitored the evolution of the nitride thickness, strain, and surface structure during nitridation. The evolution of the AlN(1010) peak showed that the heteroepitaxial strain in the first layer of nitride is already significantly relaxed relative to the substrate. Subsequent layers grow with increasing relaxation. In both the high- and low-temperature nitridation cases, the results suggest that the early stage nitridation is governed by a complex nucleation and growth process. Nitridation at both temperatures apparently proceeds in a two-dimensional growth mode with the initial nucleating islands consisting of several monolayers which grow laterally. At low temperature the growth slows or even stops after impingement of the nucleating islands covering the surface, possibly due to low diffusivities through the existing layer. Initial formation and growth rates of nucleating islands at high temperatures are comparable to those at low temperatures, but subsequent growth into the substrate is significantly enhanced over the low temperature case, consistent with activation energies of 0.1-0.25 eV.