Sample records for determination in-situ x-ray

  1. In-situ stoichiometry determination using x-ray fluorescence generated by reflection-high-energy-electron-diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenan, Cameron; Chandril, Sandeep; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Myers, T. H. [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge in the stoichiometric growth of complex oxide compounds is the control of the relative compositions of the constituent materials. A potential avenue for compositional analysis during growth is the use of x-ray fluorescence generated during reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements. Using this technique, relative compositions of Y and Mn in molecular beam epitaxy grown YMnO{sub 3} samples were studied. Comparing the results with Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy suggests that the technique has the potential for real-time analysis of elemental fluxes and stoichiometry control during sample growth.

  2. In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Swygenhoven, Helena, E-mail: helena.vanswygenhoven@psi.ch; Van Petegem, Steven

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

  3. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 25 February 2015 00:00 Plastic solar cells...

  4. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian, E-mail: Kilian.DevlooCasier@Ugent.be; Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  5. Abundance and Charge State of Implanted Solar Wind Transition Metals in Individual Apollo 16 and 17 Lunar Soil Plagioclase Grains Determined In Situ Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M. (NIU); (UofC)

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report (1) a new method for determining the relative abundances in situ of Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni in implanted solar wind in individual Apollo 16 and 17 lunar plagioclases via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and (2) the charge states of these metals. By virture of its mass alone, the Sun provides a representative composition of the solar system and can be used as a background against which to gauge excesses or deficiencies of specific components. One way of sampling the Sun is by measuring solar wind implanted ions in lunar soil grains. Such measurements are valuable because of their long exposure ages which compliment shorter time scale collections, such as those obtained by the Genesis spacecraft. Kitts et al. sought to determine the isotopic composition of solar Cr by analyzing the solar wind implanted into plagioclase grains from Apollo 16 lunar soils. The isotopic composition of the solar wind bearing fraction was anomalous and did not match any other known Cr isotopic signature. This could only be explained by either (1) an enrichment in the solar wind of heavy Cr due to spallation in the solar atmosphere or (2) that the Earth and the various parent bodies of the meteorites are distinct from the Sun and must have formed from slightly different mixes of presolar materials. To help resolve this issue, we have developed a wholly independent method for determining the relative abundances of transition metals in the solar wind implanted in individual lunar soil grains. This method is based on in situ abundance measurements by microbeam x-ray fluorescence in both the implantation zone and bulk grains using the synchrotron x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (GSECARS sector 13) at Argonne National Laboratory. Here, we report results for Apollo 16 and 17 plagioclase grains. Additionally, a micro-XANES technique was used to determine charge states of the implanted Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni.

  6. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for electrochemical reactions in ordinary solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Takuya [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 333-0012 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobata, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Keisuke [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Noguchi, Hidenori [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 333-0012 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kawasaki, Tadahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Uosaki, Kohei [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ electrochemical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus, which allows XPS at solid/liquid interfaces under potential control, was constructed utilizing a microcell with an ultra-thin Si membrane, which separates vacuum and a solution. Hard X-rays from a synchrotron source penetrate into the Si membrane surface exposed to the solution. Electrons emitted at the Si/solution interface can pass through the membrane and be analyzed by an analyzer placed in vacuum. Its operation was demonstrated for potential-induced Si oxide growth in water. Effect of potential and time on the thickness of Si and Si oxide layers was quantitatively determined at sub-nanometer resolution.

  7. In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial Photosynthesis Monday, June 30, 2014 Plants and other organisms use a process called photosynthesis to produce...

  8. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL...

  9. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Susan M [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mull, Derek L [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  10. IN SITU SURFACE X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES OF ELECTROSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,J.X.; ADZIC,R.R.; OCKO,B.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of the application of surface x-ray scattering techniques to the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is presented. Recent results on metal, halide, and metal-halide adlayers with three specific systems: Bi on Au(100) and Au(110); Br on Au(100) and Ag(100); and the coadsorption of Tl with Br or I on Au(111), are given as an illustration. Factors affecting ordering of pure metal and halide adlayers and the metal-halide surface compounds are discussed in some detail.

  11. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ?300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

  12. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy of Lanthanum Manganite Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    . Introduction The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has potential to produce energy with high efficiency, especiallyIn Situ Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy of Lanthanum Manganite Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes Kee fuel cells (SOFC) under long term cathodic or anodic polarization, termed `current conditioning

  13. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamzadah, Soheila [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Petty, Tom J. [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Biomedical Graduate Studies Genomics and Computational Biology Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); De Almeida, Victor [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Nishimura, Taisuke [Department of Plant Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, CEA-CNRS-University J. Fourier, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 1 (France); Halazonetis, Thanos D., E-mail: thanos.halazonetis@unige.ch [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  14. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M., E-mail: Kathrin.lange@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Institute of Solar Fuels, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Golnak, R.; Xiao, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Institute of Methods for Material Development, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  15. Development of in situ, at-wavelength metrology for soft x-ray nano-focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the at-wavelength tests, and an original alignment method that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a FWHM focused spot size of ~;;120 nm, at 1-nm soft x-ray wavelength.

  16. Solution spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, M.R.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Song, I. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ fluorescence XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements of bulk solution species during constant-potential electrolysis is described. The cell performance was demonstrated by the collection of europium L{sub 3}-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) throughout the course of electrolysis of an aqueous solution of EuCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The europium L{sub 3}-edge resonances reported here for the Eu{sup III} and Eu{sup II} ions demonstrate that their 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 5d electronic transition probabilities are not the same.

  17. Diffraction imaging for in-situ characterization of double-crystal x-ray monochromators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Heald, Steve M; Brewe, Dale; Meron, Mati

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging of the Bragg reflected x-ray beam is proposed and validated as an in-situ method for characterization of performance of double-crystal monochromators under the heat load of intense synchrotron radiation. A sequence of images is collected at different angular positions on the reflectivity curve of the second crystal and analyzed. The method provides rapid evaluation of the wavefront of the exit beam, which relates to local misorientation of the crystal planes along the beam footprint on the thermally distorted first crystal. The measured misorientation can be directly compared to results of finite element analysis. The imaging method offers an additional insight on the local intrinsic crystal quality over the footprint of the incident x-ray beam.

  18. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ X-Ray

  19. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ X-RayIn

  20. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ X-RayInIn

  1. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

  2. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

  3. Note: Experiments in hard x-ray chemistry: In situ production of molecular hydrogen and x-ray induced combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai Ligang; Liu Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center (HiPSEC) and Department of Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4002 (United States); Park, Changyong [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60437 (United States); Hatchett, David [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully loaded H{sub 2} into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. In a second set of studies, radiation-assisted release of O{sub 2} from KCLO{sub 3}, H{sub 2} release from NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and reaction of these gases in a mixture of the reactants to form liquid water using x-rays at ambient conditions was observed. Similar observations were made using a KCLO{sub 3} and NaBH{sub 4} mixture. Depending on reaction conditions, an explosive or far slower reaction producing water was observed.

  4. Design and operation of an in situ high pressure reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bare, S. R.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S. D.; Mickelson, G. E.; Modica, F. S.; UOP LLC; EXAFS Analysis

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and initial operation of an in situ catalysis reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at high pressure is described. The design is based on an x-ray transparent tube fabricated from beryllium. This forms a true plug flow reactor for catalysis studies. The reactor is coupled to a portable microprocessor-controlled versatile feed system, and incorporates on-line analysis of reaction products. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a NiRe/carbon catalyst at 4 bar are used to illustrate the performance of the reactor.

  5. Design and Operation of an In Situ High Pressure Reaction Cell for X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bare, Simon R.; Mickelson, G. E.; Modica, F. S. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL, 60016 (United States); Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 6044 (United States)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and initial operation of an in situ catalysis reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at high pressure is described. The design is based on an x-ray transparent tube fabricated from beryllium. This forms a true plug flow reactor for catalysis studies. The reactor is coupled to a portable microprocessor-controlled versatile feed system, and incorporates on-line analysis of reaction products. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a NiRe/carbon catalyst at 4 bar are used to illustrate the performance of the reactor.

  6. Reactive sputter magnetron reactor for preparation of thin films and simultaneous in situ structural study by X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buergi, J.; Molleja, J. Garcia; Feugeas, J. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR), Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Neuenschwander, R. [Laboratorio Nacional Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Kellermann, G. [Departamento de Fisica (Universidade Federal do Parana), Caixa Postal 19044, CEP81531-990 Curitiba (Brazil); Craievich, A. F. [Instituto de Fisica (Universidade de Sao Paulo), Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, CEP05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the designed reactor is (i) to obtain polycrystalline and/or amorphous thin films by controlled deposition induced by a reactive sputtering magnetron and (ii) to perform a parallel in situ structural study of the deposited thin films by X-ray diffraction, in real time, during the whole growth process. The designed reactor allows for the control and precise variation of the relevant processing parameters, namely, magnetron target-to-sample distance, dc magnetron voltage, and nature of the gas mixture, gas pressure and temperature of the substrate. On the other hand, the chamber can be used in different X-ray diffraction scanning modes, namely, {theta}-2{theta} scanning, fixed {alpha}-2{theta} scanning, and also low angle techniques such as grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray reflectivity. The chamber was mounted on a standard four-circle diffractometer located in a synchrotron beam line and first used for a preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of AlN thin films during their growth on the surface of a (100) silicon wafer.

  7. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of foreign metal ions in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, D.A.; Scherson, D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Antonio, M.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Carr, R. (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States))

    1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of the structural and electronic properties of hydrous oxide films of composite (9:1) Ni/Co and (9:1) Ni/Fe, prepared by electrodeposition, have been examined in alkaline electrolytes using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). An analysis of the X-ray absorption near the edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for the Co and Fe K-edges of these composite hydrous oxides revealed that, regardless of the oxidation state of nickel sites in the films, the guest metal ions are present as Co[sup 3+] and Fe[sup 3+] and that the cobalt-oxygen distance d(Co-O) = 1.9 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom] and d(Fe-O) = 1.92 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom]. The latter values are in excellent agreement with d(Me-O) (Me = Co or Fe) in CoOOH and [beta]- and [gamma]-FeOOH, respectively, determined by conventional X-ray diffraction. Two clearly defined Me-Ni first coordination shells could be observed in the Fourier transforms (FT) of the K-edge EXAFS of the guest metal recorded at a potential at which both Ni[sup 2+] and Ni[sup 3+] sites are expected to be present. 28 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayr, P.

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal ...

  9. In-situ microscale through-silicon via strain measurements by synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction exploring the physics behind data interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xi [The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Thadesar, Paragkumar A.; Oh, Hanju; Bakir, Muhannad S. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Taylor, Christine L.; Sitaraman, Suresh K. [The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ microscale thermomechanical strain measurements have been performed in combination with synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction to understand the fundamental cause of failures in microelectronics devices with through-silicon vias. The physics behind the raster scan and data analysis of the measured strain distribution maps is explored utilizing the energies of indexed reflections from the measured data and applying them for beam intensity analysis and effective penetration depth determination. Moreover, a statistical analysis is performed for the beam intensity and strain distributions along the beam penetration path to account for the factors affecting peak search and strain refinement procedure.

  10. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of accelerated carbonation of a synthetic calcium-?silicate?-hydrate gel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morandeau, Antoine E.; White, Claire E. (Princeton)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel is the main binder component in hydrated ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste, and is known to play a crucial role in the carbonation of cementitious materials, especially for more sustainable alternatives containing supplementary cementitious materials. However, the exact atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of C–S–H gel remain unknown. Here, we investigate the local atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of a synthetic calcium–silicate–hydrate gel exposed to pure CO? vapour, using in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and subsequent pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. By analysing both the reciprocal and real-space scattering data as the C–S–H carbonation reaction progresses, all phases present during the reaction (crystalline and non-crystalline) have been identified and quantified, with the results revealing the emergence of several polymorphs of crystalline calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite) in addition to the decalcified C–S–H gel. Furthermore, the results point toward residual calcium being present in the amorphous decalcified gel, potentially in the form of an amorphous calcium carbonate phase. As a result of the quantification process, the reaction kinetics for the evolution of the individual phases have been obtained, revealing new information on the rate of growth/dissolution for each phase associated with C–S–H gel carbonation. Moreover, the investigation reveals that the use of real space diffraction data in the form of PDFs enables more accurate determination of the phases that develop during complex reaction processes such as C–S–H gel carbonation in comparison to the conventional reciprocal space Rietveld analysis approach.

  11. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700?°C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bale, Hrishikesh A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B. [Teledyne Scientific Company, Thousand Oaks, California 91360 (United States); Ritchie, Robert O., E-mail: roritchie@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300?°C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750?°C.

  12. Enhanced water window x-ray emission from in situ formed carbon clusters irradiated by intense ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarty, U.; Rao, B. S.; Arora, V.; Upadhyay, A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Mukherjee, C.; Gupta, P. D. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 Madhya Pradesh (India)] [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced water window x-ray emission (23–44 Å) from carbon clusters, formed in situ using a pre-pulse, irradiated by intense (I > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) ultra-short laser pulse, is demonstrated. An order of magnitude x-ray enhancement over planar graphite target is observed in carbon clusters, formed by a sub-ns pre-pulse, interacting with intense main pulse after a delay. The effect of the delay and the duration of the main pulse is studied for optimizing the x-ray emission in the water window region. This x-ray source has added advantages of being an efficient, high repetition rate, and low debris x-ray source.

  13. In situ small angle x-ray studies of coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, K F

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made the first 12 months of a planned 36 month project on small angle x-ray studies of coal and char pore structure. Model carbon studies have been employed to demonstrate the usefulness of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) in monitoring the structural changes in porous carbonaceous materials during gasification. Scattering data from particles gasified to varying levels of conversion show increases in the micropore sizes with conversion. This is also supported by surface area measurements by SAXS showing a maximum at intermediate conversion in agreements with previous studies by conventional means. The application of SAXS to PSOC coal samples is also demonstrated. Existing models for the porous structure have been reviewed and percolation theory has been selected as a consistent framework for both the modelling and the data analysis. This theory will make it possible to describe the porous structure in terms of its geometry and connectivity, rather than being limited to a fixed geometry as in conventional approaches. Two graduate students and the PI have been trained in SAXS and the associated theory. Results from the model carbon studies have been published. 18 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

  15. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid, S.; Caliebe, W.; Siddons, P.; So, I.; Clay, b.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Frenkel, A.; Marinkovicl, N.; Hould, N.; ginder-Vogel, M.; Landrot, G.L.; Sparks, D.L.; Ganjoo, A.

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  16. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarma, Abhisakh; Sanyal, Milan K., E-mail: milank.sanyal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 10{sup 7}. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  17. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patridge, Christopher J. [NRC/NRL Cooperative Research Associate, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Love, Corey T., E-mail: corey.love@nrl.navy.mil [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Swider-Lyons, Karen E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Twigg, Mark E. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Code 6812, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ramaker, David E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6189, U.S. Naval Research laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The local structure of nanoscale (?10–40 nm) LiCoO{sub 2} is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO{sub 2} nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (??) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a ?? EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO{sub 2}. • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2} and difference spectra. • Full multiple scattering calculations are used to support ?? analysis.

  18. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure QEXAFS and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure- tion spectroscopy XAS was developed in energy dispersive and quick extended x-ray absorption fine

  19. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ

  20. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn SituIn

  1. In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: YourIn-Situ

  2. Monitoring simultaneously the growth of nanoparticles and aggregates by in situ ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammler, Hendrik K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Kohls, Douglas J.; Agashe, Nikhil; Ilavsky, Jan [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, ML F23, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 540 Engineering Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0012 (United States); UNICAT, Advanced Photon Source, Building 438D, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering can provide information about primary particles and aggregates from a single scattering experiment. This technique is applied in situ to flame aerosol reactors for monitoring simultaneously the primary particle and aggregate growth dynamics of oxide nanoparticles in a flame. This was enabled through the use of a third generation synchrotron source (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne IL, USA) using specialized scattering instrumentation at the UNICAT facility which is capable of simultaneously measuring nanoscales to microscales (1 nm to 1 {mu}m). More specifically, the evolution of primary-particle diameter, mass-fractal dimension, geometric standard deviation, silica volume fraction, number concentration, radius of gyration of the aggregate, and number of primary particles per aggregate are measured along the flame axis for two different premixed flames. All these particle characteristics were derived from a single and nonintrusive measurement technique. Flame temperature profiles were measured in the presence of particles by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermophoretic sampling was used to visualize particle growth with height above the burner as well as in the radial direction.

  3. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of water on metals and oxides at ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmeron, Miquel; Yamamoto, S.; Bluhm, H.; Andersson, K.; Ketteler, G.; Ogasawara, H.; Salmeron, M.; Nilsson, A.

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing the elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. Conventional XPS experiments have been limited to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions due to a short mean free path of electrons in a gas phase. The recent advances in instrumentation coupled with third-generation synchrotron radiation sources enables in-situ XPS measurements at pressures above 5 Torr. In this review, we describe the basic design of the ambient pressure XPS setup that combines differential pumping with an electrostatic focusing. We present examples of the application of in-situ XPS to studies of water adsorption on the surface of metals and oxides including Cu(110), Cu(111), TiO2(110) under environmental conditions of water vapor pressure. On all these surfaces we observe a general trend where hydroxyl groups form first, followed by molecular water adsorption. The importance of surface OH groups and their hydrogen bonding to water molecules in water adsorption on surfaces is discussed in detail.

  4. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Yongtao, E-mail: yongtao.zou@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Qi, Xintong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting [Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Li, Xuefei [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry of the Ministry of Education, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Welch, David [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (?P{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ´} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}=174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (?K{sub T}/?T){sub P}=-0.060(8) GPa K?¹ and at constant volume (?K{sub T}/?T){sub V}=-0.046(8) GPa K?¹, the volumetric thermal expansivity ?{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10??+0.3(2)×10??T (K?¹), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (??/?P){sub T}=(?2.0±0.4)×10?? K?¹ GPa?¹. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature ??=276.6 K gives ??=1.27(8) and K{sub T0}=171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q=3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ~5 GPa as has been reported previously.

  5. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, via Marzolo 1, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Meneghini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze, via della Vasca Navale 84, Universita di Roma TRE, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  6. Lipid Bilayer Structure Determined by the Simultaneous Analysis of Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    Lipid Bilayer Structure Determined by the Simultaneous Analysis of Neutron and X-Ray Scattering) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers by simultaneously analyzing x-ray and neutron scattering data. The neutron data electron and neutron scattering density profiles. A key result of the analysis is the molecular surface

  7. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Robert M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cohen, Isadore (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  8. A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Weiss

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the SBIR Phase I project titled 'A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays.' Experiments using diffraction of synchrotron radiation that help scientists understand engineering material failure modes, such as fracture and fatigue, require specialized machinery. This machinery must be able to induce these failure modes in a material specimen while adhering to strict size, weight, and geometric limitations prescribed by diffraction measurement techniques. During this Phase I project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) developed one such machine capable of applying uniaxial mechanical loading to a material specimen in both tension and compression, with zero backlash while transitioning between the two. Engineers currently compensate for a lack of understanding of fracture and fatigue by employing factors of safety in crucial system components. Thus, mechanical and structural parts are several times bigger, thicker, and heavier than they need to be. The scientific discoveries that result from diffraction experiments which utilize sophisticated mechanical loading devices will allow for broad material, weight, fuel, and cost savings in engineering design across all industries, while reducing the number of catastrophic failures in transportation, power generation, infrastructure, and all other engineering systems. With an existing load frame as the starting point, the research focused on two main areas: (1) the design of a specimen alignment and gripping system that enables pure uniaxial tension and compression loading (and no bending, shear, or torsion), and (2) development of a feedback control system that is adaptive and thus can maintain a load set point despite changing specimen material properties (e.g. a decreasing stiffness during yield).

  9. Phases of underpotentially deposited Hg on Au(111): An in situ surface X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an in situ surface X-ray diffraction study of the underpotential deposition (UPD) of mercury on Au(111). We have observed three UPD phases present at potentials prior to bulk mercury deposition. These phases consist of two well-ordered intermediate states and what appears to be either a fully discharged two-dimensional liquid Hg layer or a monolayer of an amorphous Hg-Au alloy. Both ordered intermediate phases have hexagonal structures with lattice vectors that are rotated 30{degree} from those of the Au(111) substrate. The first phase (phase I), present at a potential of +0.68 V, was only observed on fresh flame-annealed Au(111) electrodes and appears to be an open incommensurate structure with a lattice constant of 3.86 {+-} 0.03 A. This phase appears to be metastable since it changes to a second ordered phase (phase II) after a certain time. The second phase has a more compact lattice with a = 3.34 {+-} 0.01 A and appears to be a commensurate 2x2 structure with 2/3 of the Hg atoms at threefold hollow sites and 1/3 on atop sites. Similar to the first one, this phase is also metastable and can be transformed to a final, fully discharged, state of a two-dimensional liquid Hg layer or an amorphous Hg-Au alloy. The entire Hg UPD process, from Hg{sup 2+} to the fully discharged metallic Hg layer, agrees well with a multistep mechanism based on previous electrochemical kinetic studies on polycrystalline Au electrodes. 31 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. In situ X-ray investigation of changing barrier growth temperatures on InGaN single quantum wells in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Guangxu, E-mail: g-ju@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Honda, Yoshio [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tabuchi, Masao [Synchrotron Radiation Research Centre, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Takeda, Yoshikazu [Synchrotron Radiation Center, Aichi Science and Technology Foundation, Seto, Aichi 489-0965 (Japan); Nagoya Industrial Science Research Institute, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0819 (Japan); Amano, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Akasaki Research Center, Nagoya University, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of GaN quantum barriers with changing growth temperatures on the interfacial characteristics of GaN/InGaN single quantum well (SQW) grown on GaN templates by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy were in situ investigated by X-ray crystal truncation rod (CTR) scattering and X-ray reflectivity measurements at growth temperature using a laboratory level X-ray diffractometer. Comparing the curve-fitting results of X-ray CTR scattering spectra obtained at growth temperature with that at room temperature, the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N with indium composition less than 0.11 was stabile of the indium distribution at the interface during the whole growth processes. By using several monolayers thickness GaN capping layer to protect the InGaN well layer within temperature-ramping process, the interfacial structure of the GaN/InGaN SQW was drastically improved on the basis of the curve-fitting results of X-ray CTR scattering spectra, and the narrow full width at half-maximum and strong luminous intensity were observed in room temperature photoluminescence spectra.

  11. ON THE USE OF EXTENDED X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE SPECTROSCOPY TO DETERMINE THE BONDING CONFIGURATIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    ON THE USE OF EXTENDED X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE SPECTROSCOPY TO DETERMINE THE BONDING Rights Reserved #12;ON THE USE OF EXTENDED X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE SPECTROSCOPY TO DETERMINE

  12. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  13. Influence of the cobalt particle size in the CO hydrogenation reaction studied by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herranz, Tirma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobalt, nanoparticles, Fischer-Tropsch, X-ray absorption (oxides [5] and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis [6,7]. Itswhich is inactive for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This oxide

  14. Method of determining the x-ray limit of an ion gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jr., David (Bellport, NY); Lanni, Christopher P. (Shirley, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion gauge having a reduced "x-ray limit" and means for measuring that limit. The gauge comprises an ion gauge of the Bayard-Alpert type having a short collector and having means for varying the grid-collector voltage. The "x-ray limit" (i.e. the collector current resulting from x-rays striking the collector) may then be determined by the formula: ##EQU1## where: I.sub.x ="x-ray limit", I.sub.l and I.sub.h =the collector current at the lower and higher grid voltage respectively; and, .alpha.=the ratio of the collector current due to positive ions at the higher voltage to that at the lower voltage.

  15. In situ apparatus for the study of clathrate hydrates relevant to solar system bodies using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Sarah J; Evans, Aneurin; Parker, Julia E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clathrate hydrates are believed to play a significant role in various solar system environments, e.g. comets, and the surfaces and interiors of icy satellites, however the structural factors governing their formation and dissociation are poorly understood. We demonstrate the use of a high pressure gas cell, combined with variable temperature cooling and time-resolved data collection, to the in situ study of clathrate hydrates under conditions relevant to solar system environments. Clathrates formed and processed within the cell are monitored in situ using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction allows the formation of clathrate hydrates to be observed as CO2 gas is applied to ice formed within the cell. Complete conversion is obtained by annealing at temperatures just below the ice melting point. A subsequent rise in the quantity of clathrate is observed as the cell is thermally cycled. Four regions between 100-5000cm-1 are present in the Raman spectra that carry feature...

  16. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  17. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels Using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Palmer, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and growth of sigma ( ) phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hour isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In-situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogrov (JMAK) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMAK exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0; however, toward the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMAK exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMAK equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high-temperature value to room temperature.

  18. In situ x-ray absorption fine structure and optical reflectance studies of electrodeposited nickel hydrous oxide films in alkaline electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y.; Bae, I. T.; Mo, Y.; Antonio, M. R.; Scherson, D. A.; Chemistry; Case Western Reserve Univ.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and optical reflectance spectroscopy (RS) have been used to examine in situ electronic and structural aspects of nickel hydrous oxide, a-Ni(OH)2(hyd), electrodes supported on gold in alkaline electrolytes as a function of their state of charge. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of a-Ni(OH)2(hyd) electrodes in the uncharged (UC, or discharged) and overcharged (OC, or fully charged) states yielded, in each case, a single set of two distinct nearest-neighbor shells, with distances, d(Ni-O)1 = 2.05 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} and d(Ni-Ni)1 = 3.11 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} for UC, and d(Ni-O)1 = 1.87 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} and d(Ni-Ni)1 = 2.83 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} for OC. The in situ EXAFS of films allowed to self-discharge following overcharge could be fit with contributions from both sets of shells, suggesting that only two types of nickel sites are sufficient to account for the redox chemistry of this material. These data, in addition to information derived both from quantitative X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and optical RS in the visible range, indicate that the excess anodic charge, i.e., beyond the one-electron oxidation of Ni2+ sites, observed during the first oxidation of freshly prepared a-Ni(OH)2(hyd) electrodes may not be related to oxidation state changes involving nickel sites in the lattice, and, therefore, do not support the existence of nickel sites with a formal oxidation state higher than three for charged or overcharged electrodes in this media.

  19. High temperature x ray diffraction determination of the body-centered-cubicface-centered-cubic transformation temperature in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    , generators, transformers, sensors,1 and, more recently, for magnetic refrigeration.4­6 Recently 16 February 2012) In situ high-temperature x ray diffraction and magnetization measurements were.1063/1.3675990] INTRODUCTION Fe-Ni alloys have been extensively studied, due to their technologically important magnetic

  20. In-situ stress analysis with X-Ray diffraction for yield locus characterization of sheet metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Güner, A.; Tekkaya, A. E. [Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction, TU Dortmund University, Baroper Str. 301, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Zillmann, B.; Lampke, T. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemnitz University of Technology, Erfenschlager Strasse 73 D-09125 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A main problem in the field of sheet metal characterization is the inhomogeneous plastic deformation in the gauge regions of specimens which causes the analytically calculated stresses to differ from the sought state of stress acting in the middle of the gauge region. To overcome this problem, application of X-Ray diffraction is analyzed. For that purpose a mobile X-ray diffractometer and an optical strain measurement system are mounted on a universal tensile testing machine. This enables the recording of the whole strain and stress history of a material point. The method is applied to uniaxial tension tests, plane strain tension tests and shear tests to characterize the interstitial free steel alloy DC06. The applicability of the concepts of stress factors is verified by uniaxial tension tests. The experimentally obtained values are compared with the theoretical values calculated with crystal elasticity models utilizing the orientation distribution functions (ODF). The relaxation problem is addressed which shows itself as drops in the stress values with the strain kept at a constant level. This drop is analyzed with elasto-viscoplastic material models to correct the measured stresses. Results show that the XRD is applicable to measure the stresses in sheet metals with preferred orientation. The obtained yield locus is expressed with the Yld2000–2D material model and an industry oriented workpiece is analyzed numerically. The comparison of the strain distribution on the workpiece verifies the identified material parameters.

  1. Methodology for Optimal In Situ Alignment and Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction-Limited Focusing of Soft X-Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merthe, Daniel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mirrors, x-rays, x-ray optics, synchrotron radiation,beamline, Kirkpatrick-Baez, metrology of x-ray opticsand Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction-Limited

  2. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkert, A., E-mail: andreas.benkert@kit.edu, E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-v.-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Universität Würzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gemeinschaftslabor für Nanoanalytik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Blum, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), 4505 Maryland Parkway, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), 4505 Maryland Parkway, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Meyer, F. [Universität Würzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)] [Universität Würzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Wilks, R. G. [Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Yang, W. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bär, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), 4505 Maryland Parkway, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), 4505 Maryland Parkway, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States); Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Insitut für Physik und Chemie, Brandenburgische Technische Universität Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); and others

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600?°C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO{sub 2} sample behind a mixture of N{sub 2} and He gas at atmospheric pressure.

  3. In situ measurement of electromigration-induced transient stress in Pb-free Sn-Cu solder joints by synchrotron radiation based X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Tu, King-Ning; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromigration-induced hydrostatic elastic stress in Pb-free SnCu solder joints was studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray white beam microdiffraction. The elastic stresses in two different grains with similar crystallographic orientation, one located at the anode end and the other at the cathode end, were analyzed based on the elastic anisotropy of the Beta-Sn crystal structure. The stress in the grain at the cathode end remained constant except for temperature fluctuations, while the compressive stress in the grain at the anode end was built-up as a function of time during electromigration until a steady state was reached. The measured compressive stress gradient between the cathode and the anode is much larger than what is needed to initiate Sn whisker growth. The effective charge number of Beta-Sn derived from the electromigration data is in good agreement with the calculated value.

  4. In situ measurement of electromigration-induced transient stress in Pb-free Sn-Cu solder joints by synchrotron radiation based X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Tu, King-Ning; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromigration-induced hydrostatic elastic stress in Pb-free SnCu solder joints was studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray white beam microdiffraction. The elastic stresses in two different grains with similar crystallographic orientation, one located at the anode end and the other at the cathode end, were analyzed based on the elastic anisotropy of the {beta}-Sn crystal structure. The stress in the grain at the cathode end remained constant except for temperature fluctuations, while the compressive stress in the grain at the anode end was built-up as a function of time during electromigration until a steady state was reached. The measured compressive stress gradient between the cathode and the anode is much larger than what is needed to initiate Sn whisker growth. The effective charge number of {beta}-Sn derived from the electromigration data is in good agreement with the calculated value.

  5. Novel Application of X-ray Computed Tomography: Determination of Gas/Liquid Contact Area and Liquid Holdup in Structured Packing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldridge, R. Bruce

    Novel Application of X-ray Computed Tomography: Determination of Gas/Liquid Contact Area and Liquid Company, 1 Neumann Way-M/D Q8, Cincinnati, Ohio 45215 X-ray computed tomography (CT) was utilized Principles of X-ray Computed Tomography. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to noninvasively

  6. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xiquian [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pan, Huilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Zhou, Yongning [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Northrup, Paul [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Bak, Seongmin [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, Mingzhao [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk University-Seoul, Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, (Republic of Korea); Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Dept. of Chemistry, MA (United States); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Tianpin [Argonne National Laboratory, X-ray Science Division, Lemont, IL (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density Li–S batteries (2600 W h kg?¹) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during charge–discharge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 < x ? 8). It is reported that the long-chain polysulfides can be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called “shuttle effect” is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the Li–S batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some Li–S cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of Li–S batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in Li–S batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in Li–S cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in Li–S battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of Li–S batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the Li–S cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the Li–S reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding Li–S chemistry and designing effective strategies for Li–S batteries.

  7. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xiquian; Pan, Huilin; Zhou, Yongning; Northrup, Paul; Xiao, Jie; Bak, Seongmin; Liu, Mingzhao; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Qu, Deyang; Liu, Jun; et al

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density Li–S batteries (2600 W h kg?¹) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during charge–discharge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 more »be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called “shuttle effect” is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the Li–S batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some Li–S cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of Li–S batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in Li–S batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in Li–S cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in Li–S battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of Li–S batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the Li–S cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the Li–S reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding Li–S chemistry and designing effective strategies for Li–S batteries.« less

  8. An in situ x-ray spectroscopic study of Mo?{sup +} speciation in supercritical aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Hao [Missouri State University, Springfield, MO (United States); Mayanovic, Robert A. [Missouri State University, Springfield, MO (United States); Anderson, Alan J. [St. Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada); Meredith, Peter R. [St. Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ XRF and Mo K-edge XAS measurements were made on the ID20-B beam line at the APS on MoO? in 1 M H?O? aqueous solution, at temperatures between 400 and 600 °C. The samples were analyzed using a modified Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. Our XRF measurements show that MoO? is highly soluble in the supercritical H?O? aqueous fluid. Analysis of XAS spectra shows that the Mo?{sup +} ion exhibits consistent speciation in the H?O? aqueous solution at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C.

  9. In situ X-ray diffraction strain-controlled study of Ti–Nb–Zr and Ti–Nb–Ta shape memory alloys: crystal lattice and transformation features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinskiy, S. [École de technologie supérieure, 1100, Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3 (Canada); National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, 4, Leninskiy prosp., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Prokoshkin, S. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, 4, Leninskiy prosp., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Brailovski, V., E-mail: vladimir.brailovski@etsmtl.ca [École de technologie supérieure, 1100, Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3 (Canada); Inaekyan, K. [École de technologie supérieure, 1100, Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3 (Canada); Korotitskiy, A. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, 4, Leninskiy prosp., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase and structure transformations in biomedical Ti–21.8Nb–6.0Zr (TNZ) and Ti–19.7Nb–5.8Ta (TNT) shape memory alloys (at.%) under and without load in the ? 150 to 100 °S temperature range are studied in situ using an original tensile module for a low-temperature chamber of an X-ray diffractometer. Alpha?- and beta-phase lattice parameters, the crystallographic resource of recovery strain, phase and structure transformation sequences, and microstress appearance and disappearance are examined, compared and discussed. For both alloys, the crystallographic resource of recovery strain decreases with temperature increase to become 4.5% for TNZ and 2.5% for TNT alloy (at RT). Loading at low temperatures leads to additional ??-phase formation and reorientation. Heating under load, as compared to strain-free heating, affects the reverse transformation sequence of both alloys in different ways. For TNZ alloy, strain-free heating results in simultaneous ??? and ???? transformations, whereas during heating under stress, they are sequential: ? + ???? precedes ????. For TNT alloy, strain-free heating results in reverse ???? transformation, whereas during heating under stress, ???? transformation is preceded by ??-phase reorientation. - Highlights: • Comparative in situ XRD analysis of Ti–Nb–Zr(Ta) shape memory alloys is realized. • Lattice parameters of ?- and ??-phases are calculated in the ? 150 to + 100 °C range. • The higher the temperature, the lower the ???? transformation strain. • Loading at low temperatures results in ??-phase formation and reorientation. • Transformation sequences upon heating with and without loading are different.

  10. The determination of Os and Ir by delayed X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillay, A.E.; Mashilo, N. (Univ. of Witwatersrand (South Africa))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed X-ray spectrometry preceded by fast neutron activation, is a relatively novel application and its capabilities as an analytical tool for the specific determination of Os and Ir in small powdered samples was evaluated. The investigation took the form of a feasibility study which relied heavily on the high sensitivity of the detector used. Detection of the delayed X-rays was achieved with a 100 mm{sup 2} Ge detector whose ability to produce optimum photopeak-to-noise ratios formed the basis exploited in this investigation. Analytical conditions are demonstrated over a range of concentrations for the elements of interest and the potential of the technique for application to the general routine analysis of Os and Ir is discussed. The authors indicate that interferences from the sample matrix can be suppressed to a degree which makes the method almost independent of the matrix. This and other attractive features make the technique a strong rival to conventional activation analysis.

  11. In situ Ru K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies of electroprecipitated ruthenium dioxide films with relevance to supercapacitor applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Y.; Antonio, M. R.; Stefan, I. C.; Scherson, D. A.; Chemistry; Case Western Reserve Univ.

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications in electronic and structural aspects of RuO{sub 2} films electroprecipitated onto Au electrodes induced by changes in the applied potential have been examined in situ in aqueous 0.50 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by Ru K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Fourier transform of the k{sup 3}-weighted extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), k{sup 3}x(k), for the film polarized at +1.20V vs RHE is characterized by two shells attributed to Ru-O and Ru-Ru interactions with average distances of 1.94(1) and 3.12(2) {angstrom}, respectively, in agreement with results obtained ex situ for Ru{sup 4+} in hydrous RuO{sub 2} by other groups. In contrast, films in the reduced state, i.e., +0.40 V vs RHE, yielded only a single shell ascribed to a Ru-O interaction at 2.02(1) {angstrom} with no evidence for a distant Ru-Ru shell. The long Ru-O distance is in agreement with that reported earlier for the hydrous Ru{sup 3+} ion [Ru-(OH{sub 2}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} in the solid state. Moreover, the difference between the average Ru-O bond lengths for the reduced and oxidized films is consistent with the difference in the ionic radii of Ru{sup 3+} and Ru{sup 4+}. On this basis it has been suggested that films in the reduced state contain Ru{sup 3+} sites, consistent with the electrochemical results, in a phase with apparently less order beyond the Ru-O coordination sphere than for hydrous RuO{sub 2}.

  12. Determining the Nature of Faint X-Ray Sources from the ASCA Galactic Center Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutovinov, A A; Karasev, D I; Shimansky, V V; Burenin, R A; Bikmaev, I F; Vorobyev, V S; Tsygankov, S S; Pavlinsky, M N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the identification of six objects from the ASCA Galactic center and Galactic plane surveys: AXJ173548-3207, AXJ173628-3141, AXJ1739.5-2910, AXJ1740.4-2856, AXJ1740.5-2937, AXJ1743.9-2846. Chandra, XMM-Newton, and XRT/Swift X-ray data have been used to improve the positions of the optical counterparts to these sources. Thereafter, we have carried out a series of spectroscopic observations of the established optical counterparts at the RTT-150 telescope. Analysis of X-ray and optical spectra as well as photometric measurements in a wide wavelength range based on optical and infrared catalogs has allowed the nature of the program sources to be determined. Two X-ray objects have been detected in the error circle of AXJ173628-3141: one is a coronally active G star and the other may be a symbiotic star, a red giant with an accreting white dwarf. Three sources (AXJ1739.5-2910, AXJ1740.5-2937, AXJ1743.9-2846) have turned out to be active G-K stars, presumably RS CVn objects, one (AXJ1740.4-2...

  13. Optimizing Synthesis of Na2Ti2SiO7 - 2H2O (Na-CST) and Ion Exchange Pathways for Cs0.4H1.6Ti2SiO7 - H2O (Cs-CST) Determined from in situ Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celestian,A.; Medvedev, D.; Tripathi, A.; Parise, J.; Clearfield, A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of wide angle diffraction data collected in situ during previous synthesis of Na-CST (Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}-2H{sub 2}O) showed initial crystallization of a precursor phase (SNT) at 30 C followed by conversion to CST after 1 h at 220 C. In situ studies of Cs{sup +} ion exchange into the H{sup +} form of CST showed a site-by-site ion exchange pathway accompanied by a simultaneous structural transition from P4{sub 2}/mbc (cell parameters a = 11.0690(6) Angstroms, c = 11.8842(6) Angstroms) to P4{sub 2}/mcm (cell parameters a = 7.847(2) Angstroms, c = 11.9100(6) Angstroms). After approximately 18% Cs{sup +} exchange into site designated Cs2 in space group P4{sub 2}/mcm, a site designated Cs1 in space group P4{sub 2}/mcm began to fill at the center of the 8MR windows until a maximum of approximately 22% exchange was achieved for Cs1. Bond valence sums of site Cs1 to framework O{sup 2-} are 1.00 v.u., while bond valence sums of site Cs2 to framework O{sup 2-} are 0.712 v.u. suggesting Cs1 to have a more stable bonding environment.

  14. GEOC Thursday, March 25, 2010 192 -In situ characterization of environmental redox reactions using quick-scanning X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    quick-scanning X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS) Donald L Sparks, Dr. Matthew Ginder-Vogel, Dr. In this presentation, we will describe the use of quick X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at a subsecond time by calculated rate constants that do not change with concentration. In addition to using X-ray absorption near

  15. An in situ cell to study phase transitions in individual aerosol particles on a substrate using scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huthwelker, T.; Zelenay, V.; Birrer, M.; Krepelova, A.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Tzvetkov, G. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Vernooij, M. G. C. [Environmental Mineralogy, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 6, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new in situ cell to study phase transitions and chemical processes on individual aerosol particles in the x-ray transmission microscope at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss light source has been built. The cell is machined from stainless steel and aluminum components and is designed to be used in the standard mount of the microscope without need of complicated rearrangements of the microscope. The cell consists of two parts, a back part which contains connections for the gas supply, heating, cooling devices, and temperature measurement. The second part is a removable clip, which hosts the sample. This clip can be easily exchanged and brought into a sampling unit for aerosol particles. Currently, the cell can be operated at temperatures ranging from -40 to +50 deg. C. The function of the cell is demonstrated using two systems of submicron size: inorganic sodium bromide aerosols and soot originating from a diesel passenger car. For the sodium bromide we demonstrate how phase transitions can be studied in these systems and that O1s spectra from aqueous sodium bromide solution can be taken from submicron sized particles. For the case of soot, we demonstrate that the uptake of water onto individual soot particles can be studied.

  16. Thermal equation of state of solid naphthalene to 13 GPa and 773 K: In situ X-ray diffraction study and first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Likhacheva, Anna Y., E-mail: alih@igm.nsc.ru [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Rashchenko, Sergey V.; Chanyshev, Artem D.; Litasov, Konstantin D. [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation) [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Department of Geology and Geophysics, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Inerbaev, Talgat M. [Department of Physics and Technical Science, Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan)] [Department of Physics and Technical Science, Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Kilin, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a wide range of P-T conditions, such fundamental characteristics as compressibility and thermoelastic properties remain unknown for most classes of organic compounds. Here we attempt to clarify this issue by the example of naphthalene as a model representative of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The elastic behavior of solid naphthalene was studied by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction up to 13 GPa and 773 K and first principles computations to 20 GPa and 773 K. Fitting of the P-V experimental data to Vinet equation of state yielded T 0 = 8.4(3) GPa and T' = 7.2 (3) at V0 = 361 Å(3), whereas the thermal expansion coefficient was found to be extremely low at P > 3 GPa (about 10(-5) K(-1)), in agreement with theoretical estimation. Such a diminishing of thermal effects with the pressure increase clearly demonstrates a specific feature of the high-pressure behavior of molecular crystals like PAHs, associated with a low energy of intermolecular interactions.

  17. The application of soft X-ray microscopy to the in-situ analysis of sporopollenin/sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wirick, S. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft X-ray imaging and carbon near edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy (C-NEXAFS) has been used for the in-situ analysis of sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments extending from recent up to high volatile A bituminous coal. The acquisition of chemically based images (contrast based on the 1s - 1{pi}* transition of unsaturated carbon), revealed a homogeneous chemical structure in the spore exine. C-NEXAFS microanalysis indicates chemical structural evolution in sporopollenin/sporinite with increases in maturation. The most significant change in the C-NEXAFS spectrum is an increase in unsaturated carbon, presumably aromatic, with rank. The rate of aromatization in sporinite exceeds that of the surrounding vitrinite. Increases in the concentration of unsaturated carbon are compensated by losses of aliphatic and hydroxylated aliphatic carbon components. Carboxyl groups are present in low and variable concentrations. Absorption due to carboxyl persists in the most mature specimen in this series, a high volatile A rank coal. The reactions which drive sporopollenin chemical structural evolution during diagenesis presumably involve dehydration, Diels-Alder cyclo-addition, and dehydrogenation reactions which ultimately lead to a progressively aromatized bio/geopolymer.

  18. In-Situ Observations of Sigma Phase Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Specht, E

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation was used to directly observe the transformation of ferrite, austenite and sigma phases during heating and cooling of 2205 duplex stainless steel. Sigma formed during the initial stages of heating, dissolved as the temperature was increased, and reformed on cooling. The dissolution temperature of sigma was measured to be 985 C {+-} 2.8 C at a heating rate of 0.25 C/s, and the kinetics of sigma formation at 850 C was determined to be slower after dissolving at 1000 C than before.

  19. In-Situ Observations of Sigma Phase Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Palmer, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation was used to directly observe the transformation of ferrite, austenite and sigma phases during heating and cooling of 2205 duplex stainless steel. Sigma formed during the initial stages of heating, dissolved as the temperature was increased, and reformed on cooling. The dissolution temperature of sigma was measured to be 985 2.8 C at a heating rate of 0.25 C/s, and the kinetics of sigma formation at 850 Cwas determined to be slower after dissolving at 1000 C than before.

  20. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Harris E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walsh, Stuart D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DuFrane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carroll, Susan A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  1. Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

  2. Maximum Entropy Method and Charge Flipping, a Powerful Combination to Visualize the True Nature of Structural Disorder from in situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samy, A.; Dinnebier, R; van Smaalen, S; Jansen, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a systematic approach, the ability of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to reconstruct the most probable electron density of highly disordered crystal structures from X-ray powder diffraction data was evaluated. As a case study, the ambient temperature crystal structures of disordered {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] and {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[CO{sub 3}] and ordered {delta}-K{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] were investigated in detail with the aim of revealing the 'true' nature of the apparent disorder. Different combinations of F (based on phased structure factors) and G constraints (based on structure-factor amplitudes) from different sources were applied in MEM calculations. In particular, a new combination of the MEM with the recently developed charge-flipping algorithm with histogram matching for powder diffraction data (pCF) was successfully introduced to avoid the inevitable bias of the phases of the structure-factor amplitudes by the Rietveld model. Completely ab initio electron-density distributions have been obtained with the MEM applied to a combination of structure-factor amplitudes from Le Bail fits with phases derived from pCF. All features of the crystal structures, in particular the disorder of the oxalate and carbonate anions, and the displacements of the cations, are clearly obtained. This approach bears the potential of a fast method of electron-density determination, even for highly disordered materials. All the MEM maps obtained in this work were compared with the MEM map derived from the best Rietveld refined model. In general, the phased observed structure factors obtained from Rietveld refinement (applying F and G constraints) were found to give the closest description of the experimental data and thus lead to the most accurate image of the actual disorder.

  3. Dissimilar behavior of technetium and rhenium in borosilicate waste glass as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukens, Wayne W.; McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy with a relativeuncertainty of 4%. XRF analyses utilized an ARL 9400X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with XRF composition values

  4. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  5. DETERMINING NEUTRON STAR MASSES AND RADII USING ENERGY-RESOLVED WAVEFORMS OF X-RAY BURST OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Ka Ho; Lamb, Frederick K. [Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States); Miller, M. Coleman [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Sudip, E-mail: fkl@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, precise measurements of the mass M and radius R of neutron stars can yield uniquely valuable information about the still uncertain properties of cold matter at several times the density of nuclear matter. One method that could be used to measure M and R is to analyze the energy-dependent waveforms of the X-ray flux oscillations seen during some thermonuclear bursts from some neutron stars. These oscillations are thought to be produced by X-ray emission from hotter regions on the surface of the star that are rotating at or near the spin frequency of the star. Here we explore how well M and R could be determined by generating and analyzing, using Bayesian techniques, synthetic energy-resolved X-ray data that we produce assuming a future space mission having 2-30 keV energy coverage and an effective area of 10 m{sup 2}, such as the proposed Large Observatory for X-Ray Timing or Advanced X-Ray Timing Array missions. We find that waveforms from hot spots within 10° of the rotation equator usually constrain both M and R with an uncertainty of about 10%, if there are 10{sup 6} total counts from the spot, whereas waveforms from spots within 20° of the rotation pole provide no useful constraints. The constraints we report can usually be achieved even if the burst oscillations vary with time and data from multiple bursts must be used to obtain 10{sup 6} counts from the hot spot. This is therefore a promising method to constrain M and R tightly enough to discriminate strongly between competing models of cold, high-density matter.

  6. Using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the local structure and oxygen ion conduction mechanism in (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})O{sub 3-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Takanori, E-mail: tknitoh@seimichemical.co.jp [AGC SeimiChemical Co., Ltd., 3-2-10 Chigasaki, Chigasaki City, Kanagawa 253-8585 (Japan); Nakayama, Masanobu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-city, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the local structure and oxygen ion conduction mechanism in (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) as a function of the oxygen partial pressure (P(O{sub 2})), in situ the Co and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was measured at elevated temperatures of 900 and 1000 K. The reduction of the Co and Fe valence, i.e., the oxygen content (3-{delta}) in LSCF, followed the change of P(O{sub 2}) from 1 to 10{sup -4} atm during{approx}4000 s. The quantitative analysis of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that the Fe valence was higher than the Co valence at oxidative condition ({delta} Almost-Equal-To 0) in LSCF. Whereas the Co valence decreased more than the Fe valence after reduction of P(O{sub 2}) at both 900 and 1000 K. From the relaxation plots of the valence and the oxygen content (3-{delta}) for Co and Fe after changing P(O{sub 2}), we successfully determined D{sub chem} and E{sub a} of an oxygen ion migration around Co and Fe in LSCF. A structural model with and without oxygen vacancies and an oxygen ion conduction mechanism for LSCF are proposed based on these results. - Graphical abstract: A structural model with and without oxygen vacancies, and the oxygen ion conduction mechanism of LSCF were speculated. In other words, oxygen vacancies would form more preferentially around Co than Fe from the results of in situ XAS analysis during reduction, and oxygen ions needs to pass through at the vicinity of Fe from the results of D{sub chem} and E{sub a}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the oxygen ion conduction mechanism in (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using in situ X-ray absorption for study of valence and oxygen diffusion coefficient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen vacancies should be preferentially localized around Co in LSCF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of the dynamics parameters for Co and Fe are close to each other.

  7. X-ray Variability and Period Determinations in the Eclipsing Polar DP Leo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Robinson; F. A. Cordova

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of ROSAT observations for the eclipsing magnetic cataclysmic binary DP Leo provides constraints on the origin, size, temperature, variability and structure of the soft X-ray emission region on the surface of the white dwarf. These data, when combined with prior observations, show a progression of approximately 2 degrees per year in the impact position of the accretion stream onto the white dwarf. One explanation for the observed drift in stream position is that a magnetic activity cycle on the secondary produces orbital period oscillations. These oscillations result in an orbital period which cycles above and below the rotational period of the nearly synchronous white dwarf. The accretion stream and X-ray emission regions are modeled to fit the observational data. A distance to the system is also calculated. [An erroneous value for the cyclotron luminosity, included in an earlier paper version of the preprint, is corrected here.

  8. Nucleon density in the nuclear periphery determined with antiprotonic x-rays cadmium and tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, R; Czosnyka, T; Von Egidy, T; Gulda, K; Hartmann, F J; Jastrzebski, J J; Ketzer, B; Kisielinski, M; Klos, B; Kurcewicz, W; Lubinski, P; Napiorkowski, P J; Pienkowski, L; Smolanczuk, R; Widmann, E; Wycech, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The x-ray cascade from antiprotonic atoms was studied for 106Cd, 116Cd, 112Sn, 116Sn, 120Sn, and 124Sn. Widths and shifts of the levels due to strong interaction were deduced. Isotopic effects in the Cd and Sn isotopes are clearly seen. The results are used to investigate the nucleon density in the nuclear periphery. The deduced neutron distributions are compared with the results of the previously introduced radiochemical method and with HFB calculations.

  9. Coadsorption of sulfate/bisulfate anions with Hg cations during Hg underpotential deposition on Au(111): An in situ x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1997-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The first stage of mercury underpotential deposition on Au(111) electrodes in 0.10 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing 1.0 mM Hg{sup 2+} has been studied by synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques including grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and specular crystal truncation rod measurements. An ordered coadsorbed structure of sulfate/bisulfate anions and Hg cations was found at potentials between the first and second Hg UPD peaks (+0.80 V > E > +0.88 V vs Ag/AgCl(3 M KCl)). The coadsorption structure was found to consist of a compressed Hg honeycomb lattice with the honeycomb centers occupied by sulfate or bisulfate anions. The compression of the lattice is likely due to the formation of mercurous (Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+}) ions which have a much shorter Hg-Hg distance than that in frozen bulk Hg crystals. The net charge transferred under the first Hg UPD peak suggests that the chemical state of the species in the coadsorbed structure is likely Hg{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Our results indicate that both the chemical state of the mercury cations and the nature of the anions are important in the resulting electrodeposited structures. 38 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Rupture Orientation and Strain-induced Crystallization of Polymer Chain and Network in Vulcanized Polyisoprene During Uniaxial Deformation by in-situ Electron Spin Resonance(ESR) and Synchrotron X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Toki; R Takagi; M Ito; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Different network structures of vulcanized polyisoprene rubbers were studied by in-situ ESR and synchrotron X-ray during deformation to analyze the rupture, orientation, and strain-induced crystallization of polymer chains and network points. Rupture of network points occur, depending on network structure, and create an un-reversible change in vulcanized rubber. The flexibility of network points affects the possibility of rupture, polymer orientation and strain-induced crystallization. Peroxide vulcanized network is rigid and un-rupturable. Poly-sulfide rich vulcanized network is more flexible and less rupturable than mono-sulfide rich vulcanized network. Chain flexibility and rupturability of network points affect the strain-induced crystallization and stress-strain relation.

  11. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S., E-mail: satyajit@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, 208016 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ?0.9 nms{sup ?1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  12. Tin Valence and Local Environments in Silicate Glasses as Determined From X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeown,D.; Buechele, A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterize the tin (Sn) environments in four borosilicate glass nuclear waste formulations, two silicate float glasses, and three potassium aluminosilicate glasses. Sn K-edge XAS data of most glasses investigated indicate Sn4+O6 units with average Sn-O distances near 2.03 Angstroms. XAS data for a float glass fabricated under reducing conditions show a mixture of Sn4+O6 and Sn2+O4 sites. XAS data for three glasses indicate Sn-Sn distances ranging from 3.43 to 3.53 Angstroms, that suggest Sn4+O6 units linking with each other, while the 4.96 Angstroms Sn-Sn distance for one waste glass suggests clustering of unlinked Sn4+O6 units.

  13. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  14. Condensed matter astrophysics: A prescription for determining the species-specific composition and quantity of interstellar dust using x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Julia C.; Xiang, Jingen; Ravel, Bruce; Kortright, Jeffrey B; Flanagan, Kathryn

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a newtechnique for determining the quantity and composition of dust in astrophysical environments using<6 keV X-rays.We argue that high-resolution X-ray spectra as enabled by the Chandra and XMM-Newton gratings should be considered a powerful and viable new resource for delving into a relatively unexplored regime for directlydetermining dust properties: composition, quantity, and distribution.We present initial cross section measurements of astrophysically likely iron-based dust candidates taken at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source synchrotron beamline, as an illustrative tool for the formulation of our technique for determining the quantity and composition of interstellar dust with X-rays. (Cross sections for the materials presented here will be made available for astrophysical modeling in the near future.) Focused at the 700 eV Fe LIII and LII photoelectric edges, we discuss a technique for modeling dust properties in the soft X-rays using L-edge data to complement K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis techniques discussed by Lee& Ravel. The paper is intended to be a techniques paper of interest and useful to both condensed matter experimentalists andastrophysicists. For the experimentalists, we offer a new prescription for normalizing relatively low signal-to-noise ratio L-edge cross section measurements. For astrophysics interests, we discuss the use of X-ray absorption spectra for determining dust composition in cold and ionized astrophysical environments and a new method for determining species-specific gas and dust ratios. Possible astrophysical applications of interest, including relevance to Sagittarius A*, are offered. Prospects for improving on this work in future X-ray missions with higher throughput and spectral resolution are also presented in the context of spectral resolution goals for gratings and calorimeters, for proposed and planned missions such as Astro-H and the International X-ray Observatory.

  15. Determination of x-ray spectra from Al attenuation data by imposing a priori physical features of the spectrum: Theory and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado, Victor [Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad Complutense 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the spectral distribution of an x-ray beam from attenuation measurements in a narrow beam is an ill-conditioned problem that has aroused great interest since it was first proposed by Silberstein in 1932. In this work, the explicit reconstruction of the spectral distribution directly from the attenuation curve, without differentiating it, is carried out by a maximum likelihood method that allows one to impose a priori physical features of an x-ray spectral distribution, such as the positiveness of the solution, the boundness of its support, and the position and shape of the spikes and edges associated with the characteristic radiation. The numerical simulations made and the experimental validation of the proposed method have shown that it is possible to reconstruct x-ray spectra that, having a realistic shape, accurately fit the attenuation curve and predict the energy fluence. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of spectra including the K x rays of W is less accurate than the reconstruction of spectra including L x rays of W or K x rays of Mo, even when a priori information about the position and shape of the spikes and edges associated with the characteristic radiation is used.

  16. Non-matrix corrected organic sulfur determination by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy for western Kentucky coals and residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.P.; Freeman, G.B.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for non-matrix corrected organic sulfur analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been developed using petroleum coke standards. Typically, electron beam microanalysis is a rapid, nondestructive analytical technique to quantitatively measure organic sulfur in coal. The results show good correlation to ASTM values for numerous well characterized coals with a wide range in total and pyritic sulfur content. This direct analysis is capable of reducing error commonly associated with the present ASTM method which relies on an indirect measure of organic sulfur by difference. The precision of the organic sulfur values determined in the present study is comparable to that obtained by ZAF matrix corrected microanalysis. The energy dispersive microanalysis is capable of measuring micro as well as bulk organic sulfur levels.

  17. In-situ X-ray Diffraction combined with scanning AC nanocalorimetry applied to a Fe0.84Ni0.16 thin-film sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an average heating rate of 85 K/s and cooling rate of 275 K/s. The apparatus includes an array and an electric current is supplied through the tungsten heating element. The measured current and voltage are used to determine the power supplied to the sample, while the temperature of the sample is determined

  18. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumptionmore »by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.« less

  19. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bak, Seong Min [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Senanayake, Sanjaya D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering; Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering] (ORCID:0000000162786369); Zhang, Lulu [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  20. In-situ high-energy x-ray diffuse-scattering study of the phase transition in a Ni{sub 2}MnGa ferromagnetic shape-memory crystal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.; Yan-Dong, W.; Yang, R.; Yan-Dong, L.; Peter, L. K.; X-Ray Science Division; Northeastern Univ.; Univ. of Tennessee

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The full information on the changes in many crystallographic aspects, including the structural and microstructural characterizations, during the phase transformation is essential for understanding the phase transition and 'memory' behavior in the ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys. In the present article, the defects-related microstructural features connected to the premartensitic and martensitic transition of a Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal under a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa applied along the [110] crystallographic direction were studied by the in-situ high-energy X-ray diffuse-scattering experiments. The analysis of the characteristics of diffuse-scattering patterns around different sharp Bragg spots suggests that the influences of some defect clusters on the pressure-induced phase-transition sequences of Ni2MnGa are significant. Our experiments show that an intermediate phase is produced during the premartensitic transition in the Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal, which is favorable for the nucleation of a martensitic phase. The compression stress along the [110] direction of the Heusler phase can promote the premartensitic and martensitic transition of the Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal.

  1. Determining the Dust Extinction of Gamma-ray Burst Host Galaxies: A Direct Method Based on Optical and X-ray Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuan; Wei, Daming

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust extinction of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) host galaxies, containing important clues to the nature of GRB progenitors and crucial for dereddening, is still poorly known. Here we propose a straightforward method to determine the extinction of GRB host galaxies by comparing the observed optical spectra to the intrinsic ones extrapolated from the X-ray spectra. The rationale for this method is from the standard fireball model: if the optical flux decay index equals to that of the X-ray flux, then there is no break frequency between the optical and X-ray bands, therefore we can derive the intrinsic optical flux from the X-ray spectra. We apply this method to three GRBs of which the optical and X-ray fluxes have the same decay indices and another one with inferred cooling break frequency, and obtain the rest-frame extinction curves of their host galaxies. The derived extinction curves are gray and do not resemble any extinction curves of local galaxies (e.g. the Milk Way, the Small/Large Magellanic Clouds, or ...

  2. Determining the Dust Extinction of Gamma-ray Burst Host Galaxies: A Direct Method Based on Optical and X-ray Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan Li; Aigen Li; Daming Wei

    2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust extinction of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) host galaxies, containing important clues to the nature of GRB progenitors and crucial for dereddening, is still poorly known. Here we propose a straightforward method to determine the extinction of GRB host galaxies by comparing the observed optical spectra to the intrinsic ones extrapolated from the X-ray spectra. The rationale for this method is from the standard fireball model: if the optical flux decay index equals to that of the X-ray flux, then there is no break frequency between the optical and X-ray bands, therefore we can derive the intrinsic optical flux from the X-ray spectra. We apply this method to three GRBs of which the optical and X-ray fluxes have the same decay indices and another one with inferred cooling break frequency, and obtain the rest-frame extinction curves of their host galaxies. The derived extinction curves are gray and do not resemble any extinction curves of local galaxies (e.g. the Milk Way, the Small/Large Magellanic Clouds, or nearby starburst galaxies). The amount of extinction is rather large (with visual extinction $A_V$ $\\sim$ 1.6--3.4$\\magni$). We model the derived extinction curves in terms of the silicate-graphite interstellar grain model. As expected from the ``gray'' nature of the derived extinction curve, the dust size distribution is skewed to large grains. We determine, for the first time, the local dust-to-gas ratios of GRB host galaxies using the model-derived dust parameters and the hydrogen column densities determined from X-ray absorptions.

  3. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometry Sensitivity Excitation Sources 12 16 Spectrometers and Detectors SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING Health Effects of Welding THE PORTABLE X ? RAY FLUORESCENCE SURVEY METER METHODOLOGY RESULTS DISCUSSION OF RESULTS CAELUS I QblS RECQvfvt... Appendix C Basic Principle of AAS VITA Page 65 66 67 68 76 84 V1 11 LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. Transitions giving x-radiation 2. Fluorescent yield 3. Interaction of x-rays with matter 4. Particle size effects on x-ray intensity. . . 15 5...

  4. USING THE X-RAY DUST SCATTERING HALO OF CYGNUS X-1 TO DETERMINE DISTANCE AND DUST DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, Jingen

    We present a detailed study of the X-ray dust scattering halo of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 based on two Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observations. Using 18 different dust models, including ...

  5. Band offsets of TiZnSnO/Si heterojunction determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, R. J.; Jiang, Q. J.; Yan, W. C.; Feng, L. S.; Lu, B.; Ye, Z. Z. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, X. F. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Application, Ministry of Education, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, X. D. [Xinyi PV Products (Anhui) Holdings LTD, Xinyi PV Glass Industrial Zone, No. 2 Xinyi Road, ETDZ, Wuhu 241009 (China); Lu, J. G., E-mail: lujianguo@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Application, Ministry of Education, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was utilized to measure the valence band offset (?E{sub V}) of the TiZnSnO (TZTO)/Si heterojunction. TZTO films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using magnetron sputtering at room temperature. By using the Zn 2p{sub 3/2} and Sn 3d{sub 5/2} energy levels as references, the value of ?E{sub V} was calculated to be 2.69 ± 0.1 eV. Combining with the experimental optical energy band gap of 3.98 eV for TZTO extracted from the UV-vis transmittance spectrum, the conduction band offset (?E{sub C}) was deduced to be 0.17 ± 0.1 eV at the interface. Hence, the energy band alignment of the heterojunction was determined accurately, showing a type-I form. This will be beneficial for the design and application of TZTO/Si hybrid devices.

  6. Structure of a zeolite ZSM-5-Bithiophene complex as determined by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eylem, C.; Hriljac, J.A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R. [Du Pont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)] [Du Pont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a zeolite ZSM-5 complex with ca. 4 molecules/unit cell of bithiophene was determined by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In adopts monoclinic symmetry in space group P2{sub 1}/n ({alpha} unique) between room temperature and 25 K, with refined lattice parameters at 25 K of a = 20.0614(4), b = 19.8251(4), c = 13.3623(4) {Angstrom}, and a = 90.848(2){degrees}. Structural modeling and Rietveld refinements showed that there are two crystallographically unique bithiophene molecules, each with an occupancy factor of ca. 0.5. One bithiophene is localized at the center of the straight channels with one of the rings residing at the intersection with the sinusoidal channels. The other molecule lies in the sinusoidal channels and projects partially into the straight channels. The relationship between polythiophene chain length and the formation of conducting polythiophene molecular wires in the ZSM-5 framework is discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aspect ratio x-ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0953-89841825S17 Summary: the power ratio of beam splitting. With centralized remote control, heating and x-ray diffraction... for in situ x-ray diffraction at high...

  8. Hydrostatic Compression Curve for Triamino-Trinitrobenzene Determined to 13.0 GPa with Powder X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, Lewis L.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Hooks, Daniel E.; Dattelbaum, Dana M. (LANL)

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using powder X-ray diffraction in conjunction with a diamond anvil cell (DAC), the unit cell volume of triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) has been measured from ambient pressure to 13 GPa. The resultant isotherm is compared with previous theoretical (Byrd and Rice and Pastine and Bernecker) and experimental (Olinger and Cady) works. While all reports are consistent to approximately 2 GPa, our measurements reveal a slightly stiffer TATB material than reported by Olinger and Cady and an intermediate compressibility compared with the isotherms predicted by the two theoretical works. Analysis of the room temperature isotherm using the semi-empirical, Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, and Vinet equations of state (EOS) provided a determination of the isothermal bulk modulus (K{sub 0}) and its pressure-derivative (K{sub 0}') for TATB. From these fits to our P-V isotherm, from ambient pressure to 8 GPa, the average results for the zero-pressure bulk modulus and its pressure derivative were found to be 14.7 GPa and 10.1, respectively. For comparison to shock experiments on pressed TATB powder and its plastic-bonded formulation PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F 800), the isotherm was transformed to the pseudo-velocity U{sub s}-u{sub p} plane using the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. This analysis provides an extrapolated bulk sound speed, c{sub 0}=1.70 km s{sup -1}, for TATB and its agreement with a previous determination (c{sub 0}=1.43 km s{sup -1}) is discussed. Furthermore, our P-V and corresponding U{sub s}-u{sub p} curves reveal a subtle cusp at approximately 8 GPa. This cusp is discussed in relation to similar observations made for the aromatic hydrocarbons anthracene, benzene and toluene, graphite, and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  9. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORE~ SURVEY METER FOR TIIE QUANTITATIVE DEPERMINATI(gq OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by MARY CATHERINE FEHRENBACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1984 MAJOR SUBJECI': INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORES~ SURVEY METER FOR THE QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATIGN OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by h...

  10. Multiscale determination of in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi Karam, Samantha, 1973-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we address the problem of determining in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs using borehole logs and surface seismic reflection data. The dissertation covers four subtopics. The first is the ...

  11. Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

  12. Mass fractal characteristics of silica sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donatti, D.A.; Vollet, D.R.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Mesquita, A.; Silva, T.F.P. [Unesp-Universidade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 178 CEP, 13500-970 Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample series of silica sonogels was prepared using different water-tetraethoxysilane molar ratio (r{sub w}) in the gelation step of the process in order to obtain aerogels with different bulk densities after the supercritical drying. The samples were analyzed by means of small-angle x-ray-scattering (SAXS) and nitrogen-adsorption techniques. Wet sonogels exhibit mass fractal structure with fractal dimension D increasing from {approx}2.1 to {approx}2.4 and mass-fractal correlation length {xi} diminishing from {approx}13 nm to {approx}2 nm, as r{sub w} is changed in the nominal range from 66 to 6. The process of obtaining aerogels from sonogels and heat treatment at 500 deg. C, in general, increases the mass-fractal dimension D, diminishes the characteristic length {xi} of the fractal structure, and shortens the fractal range at the micropore side for the formation of a secondary structured particle, apparently evolved from the original wet structure at a high resolution level. The overall mass-fractal dimension D of aerogels was evaluated as {approx}2.4 and {approx}2.5, as determined from SAXS and from pore-size distribution by nitrogen adsorption, respectively. The fine structure of the 'secondary particle' developed in the obtaining of aerogels could be described as a surface-mass fractal, with the correlated surface and mass-fractal dimensions decreasing from {approx}2.4 to {approx}2.0 and from {approx}2.7 to {approx}2.5, respectively, as the aerogel bulk density increases from 0.25 (r{sub w}=66) up to 0.91 g/cm{sup 3} (r{sub w}=6)

  13. Automatic determination of optimal view for the visualization of coronary lesions by rotational X-ray angiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    word Rotational X-ray Angiography, Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty, Optimal View, 3D the cardiologist during the diagnostic stage but also during interventional coronary procedures so as to minimize of the interventional gesture. These tools relate to: - the 3D reconstruction of the coronary tree

  14. Molecular structures of fluid phase phosphatidylglycerol bilayers as determined by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    neutron and X-ray scattering Jianjun Pan a, , Frederick A. Heberle a , Stephanie Tristram-Nagle b Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 378316100 Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 378316453, USA e Canadian

  15. An in situ geophone-calibration method for broadband amplitude and phase determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peoples, Christopher James

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN IN SITU GEOPHONE-CALIBRATION METHOD FOR BROADBAND AMPLITUDE AND PHASE DETERMINATION A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER JAMES PEOPLES Approved as to style and content by: Steven, Harder (Chair of Committee) Antho F. angi (Member) Robert Beck Clark... (Member) Joe S. Watkins (Head of Department) May 1993 ABSTRACT An In Situ Geophone-Calibration Method for Broadband Amplitude and Phase Determination. (May 1993) Christopher James Peoples, B. S. , University of California, Riverside Chair...

  16. X-ray determination of threading dislocation densities in GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) films grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopp, Viktor S., E-mail: victor.kopp@pdi-berlin.de; Kaganer, Vladimir M. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Baidakova, Marina V.; Lundin, Wsevolod V.; Nikolaev, Andrey E.; Verkhovtceva, Elena V.; Yagovkina, Maria A. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cherkashin, Nikolay [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Densities of a- and a+c-type threading dislocations for a series of GaN films grown in different modes by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy are determined from the x-ray diffraction profiles in skew geometry. The reciprocal space maps are also studied. Theory of x-ray scattering from crystals with dislocations is extended in order to take into account contribution from both threading and misfit dislocations. The broadening of the reciprocal space maps along the surface normal and the rotation of the intensity distribution ellipse is attributed to misfit dislocations at the interface. We find that the presence of a sharp AlN/GaN interface leads to an ordering of misfit dislocations and reduces strain inhomogeneity in GaN films.

  17. Combined Application of QEM-SEM and Hard X-ray Microscopy to Determine Mineralogical Associations and Chemcial Speciation of Trace Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Grafe; M Landers; R Tappero; P Austin; B Gan; A Grabsch; C Klauber

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the application of quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy in combination with techniques commonly available at hard X-ray microprobes to define the mineralogical environment of a bauxite residue core segment with the more specific aim of determining the speciation of trace metals (e.g., Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) within the mineral matrix. Successful trace metal speciation in heterogeneous matrices, such as those encountered in soils or mineral residues, relies on a combination of techniques including spectroscopy, microscopy, diffraction, and wet chemical and physical experiments. Of substantial interest is the ability to define the mineralogy of a sample to infer redox behavior, pH buffering, and mineral-water interfaces that are likely to interact with trace metals through adsorption, coprecipitation, dissolution, or electron transfer reactions. Quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy coupled with micro-focused X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence, and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (mXANES) spectroscopy provided detailed insights into the composition of mineral assemblages and their effect on trace metal speciation during this investigation. In the sample investigated, titanium occurs as poorly ordered ilmenite, as rutile, and is substituted in iron oxides. Manganese's spatial correlation to Ti is closely linked to ilmenite, where it appears to substitute for Fe and Ti in the ilmenite structure based on its mXANES signature. Vanadium is associated with ilmenite and goethite but always assumes the +4 oxidation state, whereas chromium is predominantly in the +3 oxidation state and solely associated with iron oxides (goethite and hematite) and appears to substitute for Fe in the goethite structure.

  18. Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing January 2013. [1] In situ test of hydraulic fracturing (HF) provides the only way to observe in situ of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core

  19. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  20. Variable growth modes of CaF[sub 2] on Si(111) determined by x-ray photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denlinger, J.D.; Rotenberg, E. (Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Hessinger, U.; Leskovar, M. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Olmstead, M.A. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1993-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical discrimination of bulk and interface Ca 2[ital p] x-ray photoelectron diffraction modulations is used to identify three growth regimes during the initial stages of CaF[sub 2] epitaxy on Si(111). Low flux, high temperature conditions produce island growth atop a nonwetting, chemically reacted Ca-F interface layer. Changing the growth kinetics by increasing the flux produces more laminar growth. Lowering the substrate temperature produces a more stoichiometric CaF[sub 2] interface layer that results in immediate wetting and laminar growth.

  1. AugEX: AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY SPECTROMETER ON CHANDRAYAAN-2 ROVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bapat, Bhas

    for determining elemental composition which have a space heritage X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Particle-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) Expected Advantage: cover low Z elements with higher sensitivity than XRF or PIXE. ACHARYA-ray absorption or charged particle bombardment X-ray emission induced by X-ray absorption: XRF X-ray emission

  2. Morphology of gold nanoparticles determined by full-curve fitting of the light absorption spectrum. Comparison with X-ray scattering and electron microscopy data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Slyusarenko; Benjamin Abécassis; Patrick Davidson; Doru Constantin

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize the size and shape of gold nanoparticles. We present a full-spectrum model that yields reliable results for the commonly encountered case of mixtures of spheres and rods in varying proportions. We determine the volume fractions of the two populations, the aspect ratio distribution of the nanorods (average value and variance) and the interface damping parameter. We validate the model by checking the fit results against small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy data and show that correctly accounting for the polydispersity in aspect ratio is essential for a quantitative description of the longitudinal plasmon peak.

  3. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  4. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gongora, Cesar Augusto

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stress determination in the Travis Peak Formation, (2) the effect of shale has been considered in the correlation model, and (3) the model is easy to use once the lithology of the layer has been identified. This new model can be used to estimate in-situ...

  6. Determination of preferential molecular orientation in porphyrin-fullerene dyad ZnDHD6ee monolayers by the X-ray standing-wave method and X-ray reflectometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seregin, A. Yu., E-mail: seregin@gmail.com; D'yakova, Yu. A.; Yakunin, S. N.; Makhotkin, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Alekseev, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Tereschenko, E. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Tkachenko, N. V.; Lemmetyinen, H. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland)] [Tampere University of Technology (Finland); Feigin, L. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolayers of porphyrin-fullerene dyad molecules with zinc atoms incorporated into the porphyrin ring (ZnDHD6ee) on the surface of aqueous subphase and on Si substrates have been investigated by the X-ray standing-wave method and X-ray reflectometry. The experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions and on synchrotron radiation sources (KMC-2 station of BESSY II (Berlin) and Langmuir station at the National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute'). Depth distributions of Zn atoms and electron density in the monolayer film are calculated. On the basis of the analysis of these distributions, it is concluded that ZnDHD6ee dyad molecules in monolayers have preferential orientation. The data obtained indicate that the molecules in monolayer film retain their orientation when the monolayer is transferred from a liquid subphase surface onto a solid substrate.

  7. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Petrosian, Vahe'; Singal, Jack; Ostrowski, Michal, E-mail: mdainott@stanford.edu, E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu, E-mail: jacks@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl, E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.pl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stanford University, Via Pueblo Mall 382, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 9.5, can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential to test cosmological models. Dainotti's analysis of GRB Swift afterglow light curves with known redshifts and a definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest-frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). Here, we present an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good light curves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely, their cosmological evolution, we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, the origin of which is still unknown. The present result could help to clarify the debated nature of the plateau emission.

  8. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  9. ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, Justin, E-mail: jhanlon@orayainc.com; Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)] [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C{sub scat}) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C{sub mat}) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be performed with a source to detector distance of 20 cm even though the SAD is 15 cm during treatment. C{sub scat} varied from 1.102 to 1.106 within the range of depths of interest. The experimental variance among repeated measurements of C{sub mat} was larger than depth dependence, so C{sub mat} was estimated as1.019 for all depths of interest. Conclusions: Equipment selection, measurement techniques, and formalism for the determination of dose rate to the macula during stereotaxy for AMD have been determined and are strongly recommended by the authors of this paper to be used by clinical medical physicists.

  10. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  11. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-Ray Diagnostics X-Ray

  12. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  13. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

  14. X-ray microanalysis of hamster tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, A.J.; Roomans, G.M. (Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden))

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelia are of great interest if we are to understand the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystic fibrosis in which ion transport is abnormal. Concentrations of elements were determined in various subcellular regions of normal or isoproterenol-treated hamster tracheal epithelium, using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Samples of trachea were taken from animals under anesthesia and either frozen in situ or dissected and plunge frozen. Concentrations of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca were higher in cytoplasm and nuclei of control epithelial cells in dissected samples than in cryoneedle samples. Following treatment with isoproterenol, a large decrease in the concentration of Cl was observed. The results confirm that cyclic AMP-regulated chloride secretion is unaffected by anesthesia.

  15. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  16. X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell J. Smith

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher than that expected from X-ray binaries, by a factor 2-10; the excess suggests these galaxies have retained their hot gaseous haloes. The source with the highest L_X / L_B ratio is of unusual optical morphology with prominent sharp-edged shells. Notwithstanding these few exceptions, the cluster population overall exhibits X-ray properties consistent with their emission being dominated by X-ray binaries. We conclude that in rich cluster environments, interaction with the ambient intra-cluster medium acts to strip most galaxies of their hot halo gas.

  17. Band Gap Energy of Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cell Absorbers Determined by Soft X-Ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8] J.R. Tuttle et al. , Solar Cells 30, 21 (1991). [9] D.OF CHALCOPYRITE THIN FILM SOLAR CELL ABSORBERS DETERMINED BYchalcopyrite thin film solar cell absorbers significantly

  18. Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns (CXIDB ID 20)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Starodub, D.

    This deposition includes the diffraction images generated by the paired polystyrene spheres in random orientations. These images were used to determine and phase the single particle diffraction volume from their autocorrelation functions.

  19. Bandpass x-ray diode and x-ray multiplier detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorption-edge of an x-ray absorption filter and a quantum jump of a photocathode determine the bandpass characteristics of an x-ray diode detector. An anode, which collects the photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode, has enhanced amplification provided by photoelectron-multiplying means which include dynodes or a microchannel-plate electron-multiplier. Suppression of undesired high frequency response for a bandpass x-ray diode is provided by subtracting a signal representative of energies above the passband from a signal representative of the overall response of the bandpass diode.

  20. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  1. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  2. Fundamental Parameters of Low Mass X-ray Binaries II: X-Ray Persistent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Casares; Phil Charles

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of fundamental parameters in X-ray luminous (persistent) X-ray binaries has been classically hampered by the large optical luminosity of the accretion disc. New methods, based on irradiation of the donor star and burst oscillations, provide the opportunity to derive dynamical information and mass constraints in many persistent systems for the first time. These techniques are here reviewed and the latest results presented.

  3. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  4. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmittivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmittivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach provides non-invasive in-situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmittivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments and can also pave the way to novel schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  5. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study on Icosahedral Boron Arsenide (B12As2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Wu; H Zhu; D Hou; C Ji; C Whiteley; J Edgar; Y Ma

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The high pressure properties of icosahedral boron arsenide (B12As2) were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction measurements at pressures up to 25.5 GPa at room temperature. B12As2 retains its rhombohedral structure; no phase transition was observed in the pressure range. The bulk modulus was determined to be 216 GPa with the pressure derivative 2.2. Anisotropy was observed in the compressibility of B12As2-c-axis was 16.2% more compressible than a-axis. The boron icosahedron plays a dominant role in the compressibility of boron-rich compounds.

  6. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  7. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  8. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  9. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  10. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  11. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  12. A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Richard Allen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionized state or the physical processes occurring 15 in a high temperature plasma. There are many advantages to the use of the vacuum spark as an x-ray source; the simplicity of the machine is one. The x-ray output is within the range usable for x-ray... spark apparatus ha- been studied here to determine its applicability to x-ray lithography. A capacitor which stored approximately 3 KJ supplied most of the energy for the plasma. A Nd-YAG laser was used to supply electrons and metallic atoms...

  13. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kirian, Richard A.; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Schulz, Joachim; DePonte, Daniel P.; Weierstall, Uwe; Doak, R. Bruce; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme; Lomb, Lukas; Coppola, Nicola; Shoeman, Robert L.; Epp, Sascha W.; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Holl, Peter; Liang, Mengning; Barthelmess, Miriam; Caleman, Carl; Boutet, Sebastien; Bogan, Michael J.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Bostedt, Christoph; Bajt, Sasa; Gumprecht, Lars; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Schmidt, Carlo; Homke, Andre; Reich, Christian; Pietschner, Daniel; Struder, Lothar; Hauser, Gunter; Gorke, Hubert; Ullrich, Joachim; Herrmann, Sven; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe; Messerschmidt, Marc; Bozek, John D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Frank, Matthias; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Starodub, Dmitri; Williams, Garth J.; Hajdu, Janos; Timneanu, Nicusor; Seibert, M. Marvin; Andreasson, Jakob; Rocker, Andrea; Jonsson, Olof; Svenda, Martin; Stern, Stephan; Nass, Karol; Andritschke, Robert; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Krasniqi, Faton; Bott, Mario; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Grotjohann, Ingo; Holton, James M.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Neutze, Richard; Marchesini, Stefano; Fromme, Raimund; Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Andersson, Inger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Potdevin, Guillaume; Graafsma, Heinz; Nilsson, Bjorn; Spence, John C. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction ‘snapshots’ are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals (~200?nm to 2??m in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.

  14. Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, J.; Lockwood, G.; Selph, M; Shope, S.; Wehlburg, J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-rays* Currently the most common method to determine the contents of a package suspected of containing an explosive device is to use transmission radiography. This technique requires that an x-ray source and film be placed on opposite sides of the package. This poses a problem if the pachge is placed so that only one side is accessible, such as against a wall. There is also a threat to persomel and property since exTlosive devices may be "booby trapped." We have developed a method to x-ray a paclage using backscattered x-rays. This procedure eliminates the use of film behind the target. All of the detection is done from the same side as the source. When an object is subjected to x-rays, some of them iare scattered back towards the source. The backscattenng of x-rays is propordoml to the atomic number (Z) of the material raised to the 4.1 power. This 24"' dependence allows us to easily distinguish between explosives, wires, timer, batteries, and other bomb components. Using transmission radiography-to image the contents of an unknown package poses some undesirable risks. The object must have an x-ray film placed on the side opposite the x-ray source; this cannot be done without moving the package if it has been placed firmly against a wall or pillar. Therefore it would be extremely usefid to be able to image the contents of a package from only one side, without ever having to disturb the package itself. where E is the energy of the incoming x-ray. The volume of x-rays absorbed is important because it is, of course, directly correlated to the intensity of x-mys that will be scattered. Most of the x-rays that scatter will do so in a genemlly forward direction; however, a small percentage do scatter in a backward direction. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the various fates of x-rays directed into an object. The package that was examined in this ex~enment was an attache case made of pressed fiberboardwith a vinyl covering. It was approxirmtely 36 cm wide by 51 cm long by 13 cm deep. The case was placed on an aluminum sheet under the x-ray source. Because of the laborato~ setup, the attache case was rastered in the y-coordinate direction, while the x-ray source mstered in the x-coordinate direction. However, for field use, the x-ray source would of course raster in both the x- and y-coordinate directions, while the object under interrogation would remain stationary and undisturbed. A mobile system for use by law enforcement agencies or bomb disposal squads needs to be portable and somewhat durable. A 300 kV x-ray source should be sufficient for the task requirements and can be mounted on a mobile system. A robotic carriage could be used to transport the x-ray source and the CCD camera to the proximity of the suspect package. The controlling and data analyzing elements of the system' could then be maintained at a &tie distance from the possible explosive. F@re 8 shows a diagram of a conceptual design of a possible system for this type of use. The use of backscattered x-rays for interrogation of packages that may contain explosive devices has been shown to be feasible inthelaboratory. Usinga 150kVx-ray source anddetectors consisting of plastic scintillating material, all bomb components including the wiring were detectable. However, at this time the process requires more time than is desirable for the situations in which it will most likely be needed. Further development of the technology using CCD cameras, rather than the plastic stint illator detectors, shows promise of leading to a much faster system, as well as one with better resolution. Mounting the x- ray source and the CCD camera on a robotic vehicle while keeping the controlling and analyzing components and the opemting personnel a safe distance away from the suspect package will allow such a package to be examined at low risk to human life.

  15. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Henke, B.L.; Gullikson, E.M.; Davis, J.C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  16. Correlated long-term optical and X-ray variations in NGC 5548

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Uttley; Rick Edelson; Ian McHardy; Bradley M. Peterson; Alex Markowitz

    2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine the long-term optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC5548 with the X-ray light curve measured by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over 6 years, to determine the relationship between the optical and X-ray continua. The X-ray light curve is strongly correlated with the optical light curve on long (~year) time-scales. The amplitude of the long-term optical variability in NGC5548 is larger than that of the X-ray variability (after accounting for the host galaxy contribution), implying that X-ray reprocessing is not the main source of the optical/X-ray correlation. The correlated X-ray and optical variations in NGC5548 may be caused by instabilities in the inner part of the accretion flow, where both the X-ray and optical emission regions may be located.

  17. Flexibility of the zeolite RHO framework. In situ X-ray and neutron powder structural characterization of cation-exchanged BePO and BeAsORHO analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, T.M. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jones, G.A.; Galya, L.G.; Corbin, D.R.; Stucky, G.D. [DuPont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)] [DuPont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an extensive study of the non-aluminosilicate analogs of the zeolite RHO. This molecular sieve is of great interest commercially because of its catalytic properties. In the absence of rigid supporting structural subunits (smaller cages or channels), the aluminosilicate RHO exhibits atypical framework flexibility with large displacivere arrangements. The beryllophosphate and beryalloarsenate analogs are easily synthesized under very mild reaction conditions and therefore maybe of interest for inexpensive and rapid commercial production. However,t hey have decreased thermal stability. In an effort to increase thermal stability and explore framework flexibility, we have synthesized and characterized a series of analogs of the non-aluminosilicate RHO framework. All materials crystallize in the space group I23, ranging from a = 13.584-(2) A for Li-BePO RHO to a = 14.224(4) A for Ba-RbBeAsO RHO for hydrated phases. The extra framework cations are distributed over the double 8-ring, single 8-ring, and two single 6-ring sites. Partially and fully dehydrated phases were also studied for changes in framework stability. Predictive trends based on the type of cation exchanged into the framework were determined by {sup 9}Be and {sup 31}P MAS NMR. 50 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure determination of N-p-methylphenyl-4-benzoyl-3,4-diphenyl-2-azetidinone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabak, Mehmet, E-mail: kabak@eng.ankara.edu.tr [University of Ankara, Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering (Turkey); Senoez, Huelya [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Elmali, Ayhan [University of Ankara, Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering (Turkey); Adar, Vildan [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Svoboda, Ingrid [Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute of Material Science (Germany); Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla [Institute of Physics (Czech Republic)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compound, C{sub 29}H{sub 23}NO{sub 2}, has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at two different temperatures (303 K and 120 K) and wavelengths (MoK{sub {alpha}} and CuK{sub {alpha}}). The non-centrosymmetric hexagonal crystal structure contains four-membered planar {beta}-lactam ring with an unusually long C-C bond. The {beta}-lactam ring is almost planar.

  19. Aquat. Living Resour., 1993, 6, 285-289 In situ determination of the target strength of roach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillard, Jean

    Aquat. Living Resour., 1993, 6, 285-289 Notes In situ determination of the target strength of roach, the roach (Rutilus rutilus L.) consisting of three length classes, representing several cohorts. METHODS, and we pooled al1 the data; 110 fishes were caught (fig. 3). The population consisted only of roach

  20. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  1. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials.

  2. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  3. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  4. In situ Nanotomography and Operando Transmission X-ray Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fossil fuels with cleaner, renewable energy sources, rechargeable battery technology for electric vehicles requires dramatic increases in performance. The lithium-ion battery...

  5. Structures and transitions in solid O/sub 2/ to 13 GPa at 298 K by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, B.; Mills, R.L.; Roof R.B. Jr.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures and phase transitions in solid O/sub 2/ were studied at 298 K from 6 to 13 GPa using powder x-ray diffraction in an anvil cell. Pressures were determined from the compression of in situ NaF. X-ray photographs at various pressures showed patterns from five different phases of O/sub 2/, two of which were previously unreported. Values of the bulk modulus and volume were derived up to 11 GPa where transition to epsilon-O/sub 2/ occurs. A compromise fit to all available data indicates that epsilon-O/sub 2/ may be an orthorhombic distortion of delta-O/sub 2/.

  6. The determination of interfacial structure and phase transitions in Al/Cu and Al/Ni interfaces by means of surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrera, E.V. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science); Heald, S.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) was used to investigate the interfacial conditions of Al/Cu and Al/Ni shallow buried interfaces. Previous studies using glancing angle extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray reflectivity, photoemission, and SEXAFS produced conflicting results as to whether or not the interfaces between Al and Cu and Al and Ni were reacted upon room temperature deposition. In this study polycrystalline bilayers of Al/Cu and Al/Ni and trilayers of Al/Cu/Al and Al/Ni/Al were deposited on tantalum foil at room temperature in ultra high vacuum and analyzed to evaluate the reactivity of these systems on a nanometer scale. It become overwhelming apparent that the interfacial phase reactions were a function of the vacuum conditions. Samples deposited with the optimum vacuum conditions showed reaction products upon deposition at room temperature which were characterized by comparisons to standards and by least squares fitting the be CuAl{sub 2} and NiAl{sub 3} respectively. The results of this study that the reacted zone thicknesses were readily dependent on the deposition parameters. For both Al on Cu and Al on Ni as well as the metal on Al conditions 10{Angstrom} reaction zones were observed. These reaction zones were smaller than that observed for bilayers of Al on Cu (30{Angstrom}) and Al on Ni (60{Angstrom}) where deposition rates were much higher and samples were much thicker. The reaction species are evident by SEXAFS, where the previous photoemission studies only indicated that changes had occurred. Improved vacuum conditions as compared to the earlier experiments is primarily the reason reactions on deposition were seen in this study as compared to the earlier SEXAFS studies.

  7. The determination of interfacial structure and phase transitions in Al/Cu and Al/Ni interfaces by means of surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrera, E.V. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Heald, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) was used to investigate the interfacial conditions of Al/Cu and Al/Ni shallow buried interfaces. Previous studies using glancing angle extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray reflectivity, photoemission, and SEXAFS produced conflicting results as to whether or not the interfaces between Al and Cu and Al and Ni were reacted upon room temperature deposition. In this study polycrystalline bilayers of Al/Cu and Al/Ni and trilayers of Al/Cu/Al and Al/Ni/Al were deposited on tantalum foil at room temperature in ultra high vacuum and analyzed to evaluate the reactivity of these systems on a nanometer scale. It become overwhelming apparent that the interfacial phase reactions were a function of the vacuum conditions. Samples deposited with the optimum vacuum conditions showed reaction products upon deposition at room temperature which were characterized by comparisons to standards and by least squares fitting the be CuAl{sub 2} and NiAl{sub 3} respectively. The results of this study that the reacted zone thicknesses were readily dependent on the deposition parameters. For both Al on Cu and Al on Ni as well as the metal on Al conditions 10{Angstrom} reaction zones were observed. These reaction zones were smaller than that observed for bilayers of Al on Cu (30{Angstrom}) and Al on Ni (60{Angstrom}) where deposition rates were much higher and samples were much thicker. The reaction species are evident by SEXAFS, where the previous photoemission studies only indicated that changes had occurred. Improved vacuum conditions as compared to the earlier experiments is primarily the reason reactions on deposition were seen in this study as compared to the earlier SEXAFS studies.

  8. Application of neutron activation analysis and high resolution x-ray spectrometry for the determination of trace quantities of elements with short-lived activation products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John Richard

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its energy by ejecting an electron from the K, L, or M shell. As in the case of elect. ron capture, this vacated shell is filled by electrons from hi, ghez energy levels resulting in the emission of' characteristic x-rays. It was H. G. J. Mosely... interacts with orbital electrons. This interaction causes a transfer of energy and angular momentum to an orbital electron of the K, L or M shell, thus causing it to be ejected from the atom. The ejected "conversion electron" will be emitted...

  9. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  10. A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Received November 10, 2005; E-mail: quake@stanford.edu Recently microfluidic technologies have emerged microfluidic crystallization devices do not allow the post- crystallization addition of cryoprotectant

  11. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  12. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Hernandez, Michael [XScell corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  13. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal or ground-source heat pump (GHP) has been shown to be a very efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. GHPs exchange (reject or extract) heat with the earth by way of circulating water, rather than by use of circulating outdoor air, as with an air-source heat pump. The temperature of water entering a GHP is generally cooler than that of outdoor air when space cooling is required, and warmer than that of outdoor air when space heating is required. Consequently, the temperature lift across a GHP is less than the lift across an air-source heat pump. The lower temperature lift leads to greater efficiency, higher capacity at extreme outdoor air temperatures, and better indoor humidity control. These benefits are achieved, however, at the cost of installing a ground heat exchanger. In general, this cost is proportional to length of the heat exchanger, and for this reason there is an incentive to install the minimum possible length such that design criteria are met. The design of a ground heat exchanger for a GHP system requires, at a minimum, the operating characteristics of the heat pumps, estimates of annual and peak block loads for the building, and information about the properties of the heat exchanger: the size of the U-tubes, the grouting material, etc. The design also requires some knowledge of the thermal properties of the soil, namely thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and undisturbed soil temperature. In the case of a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) these properties generally vary with depth; therefore, in the design, effective or average thermal properties over the length of the borehole are usually sought. When the cost of doing so can be justified, these properties are measured in an in situ experiment: a test well is drilled to a depth on the same order as the expected depth of the heat pump heat exchangers; a U-tube heat exchanger is inserted and the borehole is grouted according to applicable state and local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short-term variations in heat input. Also, since the model is accurate even for short times, there is no n

  14. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  15. X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, Helmut (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) [Max Planck Institute for Metals Research

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-liquid interfaces play an important role in many areas of current and future technologies, and in our biosphere. They play a key role in the development of nanofluidics and nanotribology, which sensitively depend on our knowledge of the microscopic structures and phenomena at the solid-liquid interface. The detailed understanding of how a fluid meets a wall is also a theoretical challenge. In particular, the phenomena at repulsive walls are of interest, since they affect many different phenomena, such as water-repellent surfaces or the role of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. Recent x-ray reflectivity studies of various solid-liquid interfaces have disclosed rather intriguiing phenomena, which will be discussed in this lecture: premelting of ice in contact with silica; liquid Pb in contact with Si; water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. These experiments, carried out with high-energy x-ray microbeams, reveal detailed insight into the liquid density profile closest to the wall. A detailed insight into atomistic phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is also a prerequisite in the microscopic control of electrochemical reactions at interfaces. Recent x-ray studies show the enormous future potential of such non-destructive analytical tools for the in situ observation of (electro-)chemical surface reactions. This lecture will review recent x-ray experiments on solid-liquid interfaces.

  16. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  17. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  18. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  19. APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret OCTOBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share X-rays reveal that Picasso's "Old Guitarist," at...

  20. Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridriksson, Joel Karl

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

  1. In Situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Megan E; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the holder shadows the detector, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS for studying chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated for liquids. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in aqueous solution. The potential for using...

  2. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  3. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  4. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  5. X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumpe, M; Corral, A; Schwope, A D; Carrera, F J; Barcons, X; Page, M; Mateos, S; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN coun...

  6. Changes in the Atomic Structure through Glass Transition Observed by X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glass transition involves a minor change in the internal energy, and yet the physical and mechanical properties of a glass change dramatically. In order to determine the evolution of the atomic structure through the glass transition, we employed in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements as a function of temperature on a model material: Zr-Cu-Al metallic glass. We found that the thermal expansion at the atomic level is smaller than the macroscopic thermal expansion, and significantly increases above the glass transition temperature. The observed changes in the pair-distribution function (PDF) are explained in terms of the fluctuations in the local atomic volume and their change through the glass transition.

  7. In situ study of magmatic processes: a new experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is developed mainly to study magmatic processes, as the working pressures and temperatures are appropriate or by in situ spectroscopy (Raman, X-Rays, Infrared...). During the 90's, DACs have been developed to be applied1 In situ study of magmatic processes: a new experimental approach C. GONDÉ1.2 , D. MASSARE1 , H

  8. Evaluation of a 6-wire thermocouple psychrometer for determination of in-situ water potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loskot, C.L.; Rousseau, J.P. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Kurzmack, M.A. [Foothill Engineering Consultants, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A 6-wire, Peltier-type thermocouple psychrometer was designed and evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey for monitoring in-situ water potentials in dry-drilled boreholes in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The psychrometer consists of a wet-bulb, chromel-constantan, sensing junction and a separate dry-bulb, copper-constantan, reference junction. Two additional reference junctions are formed where the chromel and constantan wires of the wet-bulb sensing junction are soldered to separate, paired, copper, lead wires. In contrast, in the standard 3-wire thermocouple psychrometer, both the wet bulb and dry bulb share a common wire. The new design has resulted in a psychrometer that has an expanded range and greater reliability, sensitivity, and accuracy compared to the standard model.

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juett, Adrienne Marie, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first ...

  10. Extending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Jianwei "John"

    , the radiation damage. While the radiation damage problem can be mitigated somewhat by using cryogenic techniques resolution without serious radiation damage to the specimens. Although X-ray crystallography becomesExtending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray Microscopy Without X-ray Optics

  11. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast x-ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Byrd, J.M.; Schoenlein, R.; Zholents, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  12. X-ray holography of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solem, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author reviews the reasons for x-ray imaging of biological specimens and the techniques presently being used for x-ray microscopy. The author points out the advantages of x-ray holography and the difficulties of obtaining the requisite coherence with conventional sources. The author discusses the problems of radiation damage and the remarkable fact that short pulse x-ray sources circumvent these problems and obtain high-resolution images of specimens in the living state. Finally, the author reviews some of the efforts underway to develop high-intensity coherent x-ray sources for the laboratory. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  13. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction study of EuVO4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Alka B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-pressure structural behavior of europium orthovanadate has been studied using in-situ, synchrotron based, high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction technique. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at room temperature up to 34.7 GPa using a diamond-anvil cell, extending the pressure range reported in previous experiments. We confirmed the occurrence of zircon-scheelite phase transition at 6.8 GPa and the coexistence of low- and high-pressure phases up to 10.1 GPa. In addition, clear evidence of a scheelite-fregusonite transition is found at 23.4 GPa. The fergusonite structure remains stable up to 34.7 GPa, the highest pressure reached in the present measurements. A partial decomposition of EuVO4 was also observed from 8.1 to 12.8 GPa, however, this fact did not preclude the identification of the different crystal structures of EuVO4. The crystal structures of the different phases have been Rietveld refined and their equations of state (EOS) have been determined. The results are...

  14. A sample cell to study hydrate formation with x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, Heiko; Lehmkuehler, Felix; Sternemann, Christian; Feroughi, Omid; Tolan, Metin [Fakultaet Physik/DELTA, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, Dortmund D-44221 (Germany); Simonelli, Laura; Huotari, Simo [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Boite Postale 220, Grenoble Cedex 9 F-38043 (France)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new sample cell for measuring nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-water liquid mixture and THF hydrate. The hydrate is formed inside the cell after nucleation seeds have been offered by a special magnetic stirring mechanism. Hydrate formation was verified by wide angle x-ray scattering and nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering spectra at the oxygen K-edge. A broad range of scattering angles can be studied with this cell which is necessary for momentum transfer dependent inelastic x-ray scattering. This cell is ideal to examine other liquid hydrate formers or other liquid samples, which have to be mixed in situ during the measurements.

  15. X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Krumpe; G. Lamer; A. Corral; A. D. Schwope; F. J. Carrera; X. Barcons; M. Page; S. Mateos; J. A. Tedds; M. G. Watson

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN counts, the free fits of the spectrum's slope and absorbing hydrogen column density are reliable. We find only moderate absorption (N_H=(2-10) x 10^22 cm^-2) and no obvious trends with redshift and intrinsic X-ray luminosity. In a few cases a Compton-thick absorber cannot be excluded. Two type II objects with no X-ray absorption were discovered. We find no evidence for an intrinsic separation between type II AGN and high X-ray luminosity type II QSO in terms of absorption. The stacked X-ray spectrum of our 14 type II QSOs shows no iron K-alpha line. In contrast, the stack of the 8 type II AGN reveals a very prominent iron K-alpha line at an energy of ~ 6.6 keV and an EW ~ 2 keV.

  16. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  17. Domain wall motion and electromechanical strain in lead-free piezoelectrics: Insight from the model system (1 ? x)Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}–x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} using in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutuncu, Goknur [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Li, Binzhi [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Bowman, Keith [Illinois Institute of Technology, Armour College of Engineering, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: JacobJones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The piezoelectric compositions (1 ? x)Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}–x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} (BZT-xBCT) span a model lead-free morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between room temperature rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at approximately x?=?0.5. In the present work, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements during electric field application are used to elucidate the origin of electromechanical strain in several compositions spanning the tetragonal compositional range 0.6???x???0.9. As BCT concentration decreases towards the MPB, the tetragonal distortion (given by c/a-1) decreases concomitantly with an increase in 90° domain wall motion. The increase in observed macroscopic strain is predominantly attributed to the increased contribution from 90° domain wall motion. The results demonstrate that domain wall motion is a significant factor in achieving high strain and piezoelectric coefficients in lead-free polycrystalline piezoelectrics.

  18. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronization of ultrafast x-ray pulses produced in theAccurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  19. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  20. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  1. In-situ determination of radionuclide levels in facilities to be decommissioned using the allowable residual contamination level method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, R.J.; Haggard, D.L.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study resulted in verification of a direct and two alternate indirect techniques for making in-situ determinations of {sup 90}Sr and other radionuclide levels in a Hanford facility to be decommissioned that was evaluated using the Allowable Residual Contamination Level (ARCL) method. The ARCL method is used to determine the extent of decontamination that will be required before a facility can be decommissioned. A sump in the 1608F Building was chosen for the feasibility study. Hanford decommissioning personnel had previously taken 79 concrete and surface scale samples from the building to be analyzed by radiochemical analysis. The results of the radiochemical analyses compare favorably with the values derived by the in-situ methods presented in this report. Results obtained using a portable spectrometer and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were both very close to the radiochemistry results. Surface {sup 90}Sr levels detected on the sump floor were 550 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the spectrometer system and 780 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the TLD data. This compares favorably with the levels determined by radiochemical analyses (i.e., 230 to 730 pCi/cm{sup 2}). Surface {sup 90}Sr levels detected on the sump wall ranged between 10 and 80 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the spectrometer system, compared with a conservative 200 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the TLD data. The radiochemical results ranged between 19 and 77 pCi/cm{sup 2} for the four samples taken from the wall at indeterminate locations. 17 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Interferometric phase detection at x-ray energies via Fano resonance control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Heeg; C. Ott; D. Schumacher; H. -C. Wille; R. Röhlsberger; T. Pfeifer; J. Evers

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern x-ray light sources promise access to structure and dynamics of matter in largely unexplored spectral regions. However, the desired information is encoded in the light intensity and phase, whereas detectors register only the intensity. This phase problem is ubiquitous in crystallography and imaging, and impedes the exploration of quantum effects at x-ray energies. Here, we demonstrate phase-sensitive measurements characterizing the quantum state of a nuclear two-level system at hard x-ray energies. The nuclei are initially prepared in a superposition state. Subsequently, the relative phase of this superposition is interferometrically reconstructed from the emitted x-rays. Our results form a first step towards x-ray quantum state tomography, and provide new avenues for structure determination and precision metrology via x-ray Fano interference.

  3. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  4. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  5. 13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    , including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility attenuation. 1 Introduction A patent for in situ bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with gasoline

  6. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Suzaku Reveals Helium-burning Products in the X-ray Emitting Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Murashima; M. Kokubun; K. Makishima; J. Kotoku; H. Murakami; K. Matsushita; K. Hayashida; K. Arnaud; K. Hamaguchi; H. Matsumoto

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    BD+303639, the brightest planetary nebula at X-ray energies, was observed with Suzaku, an X-ray observatory launched on 2005 July 10. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer, the K-lines from C VI, O VII, and O VIII were resolved for the first time, and C/O, N/O, and Ne/O abundance ratios determined. The C/O and Ne/O abundance ratios exceed the solar value by a factor of at least 30 and 5, respectively. These results indicate that the X-rays are emitted mainly by helium shell-burning products.

  8. Suzaku Reveals Helium-burning Products in the X-ray Emitting Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murashima, M; Makishima, K; Kotoku, J; Murakami, H; Matsushita, K; Hayashida, K; Arnaud, K; Hamaguchi, K; Matsumoto, H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BD+303639, the brightest planetary nebula at X-ray energies, was observed with Suzaku, an X-ray observatory launched on 2005 July 10. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer, the K-lines from C VI, O VII, and O VIII were resolved for the first time, and C/O, N/O, and Ne/O abundance ratios determined. The C/O and Ne/O abundance ratios exceed the solar value by a factor of at least 30 and 5, respectively. These results indicate that the X-rays are emitted mainly by helium shell-burning products.

  9. X-ray populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

  10. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  11. Eta Car and Its Surroundings: the X-ray Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; K. Hamaguchi

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray emission from the supermassive star Eta Carinae (\\ec) originates from hot shocked gas produced by current stellar mass loss as well as ejecta from prior eruptive events. Absorption of this emission by cool material allows the determination of the spatial and temporal distribution of this material. Emission from the shocked gas can provide important information about abundances through the study of thermal X-ray line emission. We discuss how studies of the X-ray emission from Eta Car at a variety of temporal, spatial and spectral scales and resolutions have helped refine our knowledge of both the continuous and discrete mass loss from the system, and its interactions with more extended material around the star.

  12. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Thibault, P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Beetz, T. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Elser, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Jacobsen, C. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Kirz, J. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Lima, E. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Miao, H. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Neiman, A. M. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sayre, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  13. Biological Imaging by Soft X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro,D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; et al.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  14. Instantaneous In-Situ Determination of Water-Cement Ratio of Fresh Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancio, Mauricio; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Brooks, Zenzile; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Glaser, Steve D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    method for cement content determination of fresh concrete.Cement and Concrete Research, 1980. 10(1): p. 23-34. Hime,the cement content of plastic concrete. ASTM Bulletin, 1955.

  15. X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, Miriam Ilana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

  16. A fibre optic sensor for the in situ determination of rock physical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinsch, Thomas; Milsch, Harald; Bremer, Kort; Lewis, Elfed; Leen, Gabriel; Lochmann, Steffen; 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2012.06.011

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the behaviour of rocks under changing load or temperature conditions, the determination of physical parameters like pore pressure or temperature within the pore space is essential. Within this study, the implementation of a novel fibre optic point sensor for pressure and temperature determination into a high pressure / high temperature triaxial cell is presented. For the first time, pressure was measured directly within the pore space of a Flechtinger sandstone specimen during a hydrostatic compression test at up to 70 MPa. The sensor used within this study consists of a miniature all-silica fibre optic Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (EFPI) sensor which has an embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) reference sensor element to determine temperature and pressure directly at the point of measurement.

  17. Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gongora, Cesar Augusto

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -situ stress determination in the Travis Peak Formation, (2) the effect of shale has been considered in the correlation model, and (3) the model is easy to use once the lithology of the layer has been identified. This new model can be used to estimate in...

  18. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  19. X-ray source populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensitive, high-resolution X-ray observations allow the study of populations of X-ray sources, in the luminosity range of Galactic X-ray binaries, in galaxies as distant as 20-30 Mpc. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, providing a direct probe of the evolved binary component of different stellar populations. The study of the X-ray populations of E and S0 galaxies has revamped the debate on the formation and evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and on the role of globular clusters in these processes. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar populations, the amount of sources in star forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Short-lived, luminous, high-mass binaries (HMXBs) dominate these young populations. The most luminous sources in these systems are the debated ULXs, which have been suggested to be ~100-1000 Msol black holes, but could alternatively include a number of binaries with stellar mass black holes. Very soft sources have also been discovered in many galaxies and their nature is currently being debated. Observations of the deep X-ray sky, and comparison with deep optical surveys, are providing the first evidence of the X-ray evolution of galaxies.

  20. X-ray standing waves and surface EXAFS studies of electrochemical interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abruna, H.D.; Bommarito, G.M.; Yee, H.S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their penetrative power, X-rays are ideally suited for in-situ studies of interfaces in general and solid/liquid interfaces in particular. The recent advent of powerful X-ray synchrotron sources has made experiments of this type feasible. Synchrotron sources offer a broad spectral range of polarized, highly collimated X-rays with intensities that are 10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} higher than those of conventional sources. Moreover, third-generation synchrotron sources, with their projected increase in brightness on the order of 10{sup 4}, will allow for new types of experiments, including the study of dynamic processes in real time. There are a number of X-ray-based surface-sensitive techniques that can be employed in the study of solid/liquid interfaces, including surface EXAFS, X-ray standing waves (XSW), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), and others. In this Account the authors focus on the use of XSW and surface EXAFS. The authors begin with a brief theoretical description followed by experimental aspects of these techniques. The authors then discuss specific examples with emphasis on the underpotential deposition of copper on platinum in the presence and absence of coadsorbates, the potential dependent distribution of interfacial species, and potential dependent structural changes of a redox-active self-assembling monolayer. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  1. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  2. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  3. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yennawar, Hemant [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Møller, Magda [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gillilan, Richard [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yennawar, Neela, E-mail: nhy1@psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray crystal structure and a small-angle X-ray scattering solution structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase have been determined. The details of the interactions that enable the tetramer scaffold to be the functional biological unit have been analyzed. The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer that superposes well with that seen in hSDH (despite belonging to a different space group) and obeying the 222 crystal symmetry is seen in slSDH. An acetate molecule is bound in the active site, coordinating to the active-site zinc through a water molecule. Glycerol, a substrate of slSDH, also occupies the substrate-binding pocket together with the acetate designed by nature to fit large polyol substrates. The substrate-binding pocket is seen to be in close proximity to the tetramer interface, which explains the need for the structural integrity of the tetramer for enzyme activity. Small-angle X-ray scattering was also used to identify the quaternary structure of the tetramer of slSDH in solution.

  4. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  5. Research and Design of a Sample Heater for Beam Line 6-2c Transmission X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policht, Veronica; /Loyola U., Chicago /SLAC

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a need for environmental control of samples to be imaged by the Transmission X-Ray Microscope (TXM) at the SSRLs Beam Line 6-2c. In order to observe heat-driven chemical or morphological changes that normally occur in situ, microscopes require an additional component that effectively heats a given sample without heating any of the microscope elements. The confinement of the heat and other concerns about the heaters integrity limit which type of heater is appropriate for the TXM. The bulk of this research project entails researching different heating methods used previously in microscopes, but also in other industrial applications, with the goal of determining the best-fitting method, and finally in designing a preliminary sample heater.

  6. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  7. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  8. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  9. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell...

  10. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for...

  11. Manipulating X-rays with Tiny Mirrors | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for controlling X-rays. MEMS, or microelectromechanical systems, allow shrinking the optics to the microscale creating ultrafast devices for reflecting X-rays at precise times...

  12. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperature ambient (plastic windows) 5 Radiography - Monochromatic x-rays - Absorption of x-rays by the fuel - Ensemble averaged (flux limited) - Room temperature ambient...

  13. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by ECN using several different techniques - Silicone molds (Valencia) - X-ray absorption tomography (CAT) - X-Ray phase contrast imaging (Argonne) - Microscopy (Sandia) ...

  14. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity.Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4), a semiconductor(gallium arsenide,GaAs), and a metal (gold,Au), obtained with ?100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  15. Columbia University X-Ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University X-Ray Measurements of the Levitated Dipole Experiment J. L. Ellsworth, J. Kesner MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center D.T. Garnier, A.K. Hansen, M.E. Mauel Columbia University

  16. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  17. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field...

  18. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  19. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  20. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  1. An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Chiang

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the hard X-ray continuum above $\\sim 50$ keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft $\\gamma$-ray telescopes, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  2. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A. (Sungkyunkwan); (UTSMC)

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  3. SUPERLUMINOUS X-RAYS FROM A SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levan, A. J.; Wheatley, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Read, A. M.; Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Metzger, B. D., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, 704 Pupin Hall, MC 5255, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of {approx}100 brighter than normal supernovae (SNe; typically SLSNe have M{sub V} < -21), has shown an unexpected diversity in core-collapse SN properties. Numerous models have been postulated for the nature of these events, including a strong interaction of the shockwave with a dense circumstellar environment, a re-energizing of the outflow via a central engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability SNe). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift, and show that at least one SLSN-I is likely the brightest X-ray SN ever observed, with L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, {approx}150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity three orders of magnitude higher than seen in other X-ray SNe powered via circumstellar interactions. Such high X-ray luminosities are sufficient to ionize the ejecta and markedly reduce the optical depth, making it possible to see deep into the ejecta and any source of emission that resides there. Alternatively, an engine could have powered a moderately relativistic jet external to the ejecta, similar to those seen in gamma-ray bursts. If the detection of X-rays does require an engine it implies that these SNe do create compact objects, and that the stars are not completely destroyed in a pair instability event. Future observations will determine which, if any, of these mechanisms are at play in SLSNe.

  4. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  5. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  6. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  7. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  8. Development of an adaptable coherent x-ray diffraction microscope with the emphasis on imaging hydrated specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Daewoong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaehyun; Shimada, Hiroki; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Gallagher-Jones, Marcus [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a versatile coherent x-ray diffraction microscope capable of imaging biological specimens in solution. The microscope is a flexible platform accommodating various conditions, from low vacuum (10{sup ?2} Pa) to helium gas filled ambient pressure. This flexibility greatly expands the application area, from in situ materials science to biology systems in their native state, by significantly relaxing restrictions to the sample environment. The coherent diffraction microscope has been used successfully to image a yeast cell immersed in buffer solution. We believe that the design of this coherent diffraction microscope can be directly adapted to various platforms such as table top soft x-ray laser, synchrotron x-ray sources, and x-ray free electron laser with minor relevant adjustments.

  9. A New Measurement of Kaonic Hydrogen X rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\bar{K}N$ system at threshold is a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD, especially for the explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Therefore, we have measured the $K$-series x rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and have determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the $1s$ atomic state. As x-ray detectors, we used large-area silicon drift detectors having excellent energy and timing resolution, which were developed especially for the SIDDHARTA experiment. The shift and width were determined to be $\\epsilon_{1s} = -283 \\pm 36 \\pm 6 {(syst)}$ eV and $\\Gamma_{1s} = 541 \\pm 89 {(stat)} \\pm 22 {(syst)}$ eV, respectively. The new values will provide vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  10. Attenuation of high-energy x rays by iron shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo calculations are presented on electron-accelerator x-ray spectra for actual target thicknesses and electron energies of 4-50 MeV. Effective attenuation coefficients have been obtained as well as build-up factors for collimated beams andiron shielding of thickness form 1 to 80 cm. The radiation contrast has been determined as a function of thickness for this energy range.

  11. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, Masami [Institute of Science and Technology, Tokyo Univ. of Science, Yamasaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Dept. of Photo-Science, GUAS, Shonan, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Bando, Hiroko; Ueno, Ei [Dept. of Breast-Thyroid-Endocrine Surgery, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)] (and others)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

  12. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  13. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  14. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  15. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  16. Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

  17. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  18. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    , Chicago, IL 60637, USA 3 Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and School of Applied and EngineeringX-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336­342 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www to establish a breakthrough in high-resolution, simultaneous area mapping of multiple trace elements

  19. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high of these batteries for commercial use. The two primary obstacles are the solubility of long chain lithium

  20. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  1. A NEW CORRELATION BETWEEN GRB X-RAY FLARES AND THE PROMPT EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonbas, E. [Department of Physics, University of Adiyaman, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); MacLachlan, G. A.; Shenoy, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Parke, W. C., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    From a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi and Swift missions, we have extracted the minimum variability timescales for temporal structures in the light curves associated with the prompt emission and X-ray flares. A comparison of this variability timescale with pulse parameters such as rise times, determined via pulse-fitting procedures, and spectral lags, extracted via the cross-correlation function, indicates a tight correlation between these temporal features for both the X-ray flares and the prompt emission. These correlations suggest a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission in GRBs.

  2. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Havrilla, George J. (Los Alamos, NM); Mann, Grace (Hong Kong, HK)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  3. Frontiers in X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Young

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

  4. The X-ray/submillimetre link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Almaini

    2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that most of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) is produced by a vast, hitherto undetected population of obscured AGN. Deep X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM will soon test this hypothesis. Similarly, recent sub-mm surveys with SCUBA have revealed an analogous population of exceptionally luminous, dust-enshrouded {\\em star-forming} galaxies at high redshift. There is now growing evidence for an intimate link between these obscured populations. There are currently large uncertainties in the models, but several independent arguments lead to the conclusion that a significant fraction of the SCUBA sources ($10-30% $) will contain quasars. Recent observational studies of SCUBA survey sources appear to confirm these predictions, although the relative roles of AGN and star-forming activity in heating the dust are unclear. Forthcoming surveys combining X-ray and sub-mm observations will provide a very powerful tool for disentangling these processes.

  5. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  6. Combined microstructure x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas. Special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided.

  8. X-ray enhancement and long-term evolution of swift J1822.3–1606

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benli, Onur; Çal??kan, ?.; Ertan, Ü.; Alpar, M. A. [Sabanc? University, Orhanl?-Tuzla, ?stanbul 34956 (Turkey); Trümper, J. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Geissenbachstrasse, 85740 Garching bei München (Germany); Kylafis, N. D., E-mail: onurbenli@sabanciuniv.edu [Physics Department and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the X-ray enhancement and the long-term evolution of the recently discovered second 'low-B magnetar' Swift J1822.3-1606 in the frame of the fallback disk model. During a soft gamma burst episode, the inner disk matter is pushed back to larger radii, forming a density gradient at the inner disk. Subsequent relaxation of the inner disk could account for the observed X-ray enhancement light curve of Swift J1822.3-1606. We obtain model fits to the X-ray data with basic disk parameters similar to those employed to explain the X-ray outburst light curves of other anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters. The long period (8.4 s) of the neutron star can be reached by the effect of the disk torques in the long-term accretion phase ((1-3) × 10{sup 5} yr). The currently ongoing X-ray enhancement could be due to a transient accretion epoch, or the source could still be in the accretion phase in quiescence. Considering these different possibilities, we determine the model curves that could represent the long-term rotational and the X-ray luminosity evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, which constrain the strength of the magnetic dipole field to the range of (1-2) × 10{sup 12} G on the surface of the neutron star.

  9. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  10. Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

  11. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  12. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray

  13. 2011 X-Ray Science Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Colby, College. Waterville, ME)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Stephenson

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Gordon Research Conference on X-ray Science will feature forefront x-ray-based science enabled by the rapid improvements in synchrotron and x-ray laser sources. Across the world, x-ray sources are playing an increasingly important role in physics, materials, chemistry, and biology, expanding into ever broadening areas of science and engineering. With the first hard x-ray free electron laser source beginning operation and with other advanced x-ray sources operational and planned, it is a very exciting and pivotal time for exchange ideas about the future of x-ray science and applications. The Conference will provide the forum for this interaction. An international cast of speakers will illuminate sessions on ultrafast science, coherence, imaging, in situ studies, extreme conditions, new developments in optics, sources, and detectors, inelastic scattering, nanoscience, life science, and energy sciences. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of these areas, and will provide a venue for young scientists entering a career in x-ray research to present their research in poster format, hold discussions in a friendly setting, and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with ample time for discussion as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to exchange ideas about forefront x-ray techniques and will promote cross-fertilization between the various research areas represented.

  14. Is there any beam yet. Uses of synchrotron radiation in the in situ study of electrochemical interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abruna, H.D.; White, J.H.; Albarelli, M.J.; Bommarito, G.M.; Bedzyk, M.J.; McMillan, M.

    1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The advantages of employing synchrotron radiation for the in situ study of electrochemical interfaces are discussed with emphasis on the techniques of surface EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and X-ray standing waves. The principles behind the techniques are briefly considered followed by a discussion of recent experimental results. Examples include the study of under potentially deposited metallic monolayers, polymer films on electrodes, and in situ measurement of adsorption isotherms. The authors conclude with an assessment of future directions.

  15. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  16. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  17. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying, E-mail: liu.ying.48r@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya [Kyoto Prefectural Technology Center for Small and Medium Enterprises, Chudojiminami machi, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z?>?11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  18. Nucleation and Ordering of an Electrodeposited Two-Dimensional Crystal: Real-Time X-Ray Scattering and Electronic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnefrock, A.C.; Ringland, K.L.; Brock, J.D. [School of Applied Engineering Physics and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [School of Applied Engineering Physics and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Buller, L.J.; Abruna, H.D. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied {ital in situ} the ordering of a two-dimensional Cu-Cl crystal electrodeposited on a Pt(111) surface. We simultaneously measured x-ray scattering and chronoamperometric transients during Cu desorption and subsequent ordering of the Cu-Cl crystal. In all cases, the current transient occurs on a shorter time scale than the development of crystalline order. The ordering time diverges with applied potential, consistent with the nucleation and growth of two-dimensional islands. We see a time-dependent narrowing of the x-ray peak, corresponding to the growing islands. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. X-ray diffraction study of the static strength of tungsten to 69 GPa Duanwei He* and Thomas S. Duffy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    X-ray diffraction study of the static strength of tungsten to 69 GPa Duanwei He* and Thomas S of tungsten was determined under static high pressures to 69 GPa using x-ray diffraction techniques strength of tungsten increases with compression, reaching a value of 5.3 GPa at the highest pressure

  20. Nuclear surface studies with antiprotonic atom X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wycech, S; Jastrzebski, J J; Klos, B; Trzcinska, A; Von Egidy, T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent and older level shifts and widths in pbar atoms are analyzed. The results are fitted by an antiproton-nucleus optical potential with two basic complex strength parameters. These parameters are related to average S and P wave scattering parameters in the subthreshold energy region. A fair consistency of the X-ray data for all Z values, stopping pbar data and the Nbar-N scattering data has been achieved. The determination of neutron density profiles at the nuclear surface is undertaken, and the determination of the neutron R_{rms} radii is attempted. Uncertainties due to the input data and the procedure are discussed.

  1. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Franz A. (Oakland, CA); Moon, Stephen J. (Tracy, CA)

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  2. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  3. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  4. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  5. Internal-conversion process in superintense ultrashort x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kis, Daniel; Kalman, Peter; Keszthelyi, Tamas; Szivos, Janos [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Technics, Department of Nuclear Energy, Muegyetem rkpt. 9, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Budafoki ut 8. F. I. I. 10, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron-nucleus interaction in a super-intense few-cycle x-ray pulse is investigated. The super-intense few-cycle x-ray pulse-induced internal conversion (IC) process is discussed in detail. The x-ray laser-pulse induced IC coefficient is calculated, and in particular, it is derived in the case of a pulse of Gaussian shape and for a bound-free electron transition. The IC coefficient of the IC process induced by a super-intense few-cycle soft-x-ray laser pulse in the case of the {sup 99m}Tc isomer is determined numerically. The results obtained for the IC coefficient show significant carrier angular frequency, carrier-envelope phase, and pulse-length dependencies. The infinite pulse-length limit and experimental aspects are also discussed.

  6. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; et al

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  7. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  8. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  9. Relating Aerosol Absorption due to Soot, Organic Carbon, and Dust to Emission Sources Determined from In-situ Chemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazorla, Alberto; Bahadur, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cahill, John F.; Chand, Duli; Schmid, Beat; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies, and using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such an estimation. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) are used to develop a new methodology for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns are combined in order to validate the methodology for the estimation of aerosol composition using spectral optical properties. Results indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear. On the other hand, the knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  10. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  11. Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J; Paul, A C

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of the injector would lead to an accurate value of the emittance. If the emittance was approximately half of the measured value, the beam envelope is slightly space charge dominated, but envelope measurements would set reasonable bounds on the emittance value. For an emittance much less than 100 cm-mr, the envelope measurements would be insensitive to emittance. The outcome of this envelope experiment determines if a redesigned diode is needed or if more sophisticated emittance measurements should be pursued.

  12. Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray, aiming to understand their sciences for applying a new material. In particular, soft x-ray capabilities have been used to obtain microscopic-level understanding of the...

  13. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  14. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  15. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  16. Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the soft x-ray range and down to 15 nm in the multi keV range. For use at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, diffractive optics must be capable of withstanding extreme...

  17. In situ determination of /sup 241/Am on Enewetak Atoll. Date of survey: July 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.; Fritzsche, A.E.; Jaffe, R.J.; Villaire, A.E.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ gamma ray spectrometer system was operated at Enewetak Atoll from July 1977 to December 1979 in support of the Enewetak Cleanup Project. The system employed a high purity germanium planar detector suspended at a height of 7.4 m above ground. Conversion factors were established to relate measured photopeak count rate data to source concentration in the soil. Data obtained for /sup 241/Am, together with plutonium-to-americium ratios obtained from soil sample analyses, were used to establish area-averaged surface (0 to 3 cm) transuranic concentration values. In areas which exceeded cleanup criteria, measurements were made in an iterative fashion to guide soil removal until levels were reduced below the cleanup criteria. Final measurements made after soil removal had been completed were used to document remaining surface transuranic concentration values and to establish external exposure rate levels due to /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co.

  18. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and X-ray emission studies on iron-bearing silicate perovskite under high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Speciale, Sergio; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Dera, Przemek; Lavina, Babara; Watson, Heather C. (NIU); (UC); (Texas); (GFZ)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-bearing silicate perovskite is believed to be the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle. Recent studies have shown that Fe{sup 2+} exists predominantly in the intermediate-spin state with a total spin number of 1 in silicate perovskite in the lower part of the lower mantle. Here we have measured the spin states of iron and the pressure-volume relation in silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}] at pressure conditions relevant to the lowermost mantle using in situ X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction in a diamond cell. Our results showed that the intermediate-spin Fe{sup 2+} is stable in the silicate perovskite up to {approx} 125 GPa but starts to transition to the low-spin state at approximately 135 GPa. Concurrent X-ray diffraction measurements showed a decrease of approximately 1% in the unit cell volume in the silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}], which is attributed to the intermediate-spin to the low-spin transition. The transition pressure coincides with the pressure conditions of the lowermost mantle, raising the possibility of the existence of the silicate perovskite phase with the low-spin Fe{sup 2+} across the transition from the post-perovskite to the perovskite phases in the bottom of the D{double_prime} layer.

  19. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G; Sidky, Emil; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in-situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3d computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3d-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)$^3$ field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  20. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasios G Athanassiadis; Patrick J. La Rivière; Emil Sidky; Charles Pelizzari; Xiaochuan Pan; Heinrich M. Jaeger

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in-situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3d computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3d-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)$^3$ field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  1. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G. [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pan, Xiaochuan [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Pelizzari, Charles [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Jaeger, Heinrich M., E-mail: h-jaeger@uchicago.edu [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52?mm resolution in a (60 mm){sup 3} field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  2. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  3. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  4. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  5. X-rays from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

  6. Kaonic hydrogen X-ray measurement in SIDDHARTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaonic hydrogen atoms provide a unique laboratory to probe the kaon-nucleon strong interaction at the energy threshold, allowing an investigation of the interplay between spontaneous and explicit chiral symmetry breaking in low-energy QCD. The SIDDHARTA Collaboration has measured the $K$-series X rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and has determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction induced shift and width of the $1s$ atomic energy level. This result provides vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  7. Radial distribution function in x-ray-absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, E.A.; Ma, Y.; Hanske-Petitpierre, O. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Bouldin, C.E. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been argued that, in systems that have disorder too large to be described by a Gaussian, x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy alone cannot define the radial distribution function (RDF) because of the lack of low-{ital k} data. We show that the low-{ital k} data can, under certain conditions, be reconstructed using cumulant expansions, which give the correct functional form. This allows XAFS to determine unbiased single-shell RDF's in cases of moderate disorder, without assuming a particular model for the RDF. Some examples are given to illustrate the technique and its limitations.

  8. An X-ray source population study of the Andromeda galaxy M 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Pietsch

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XMM-Newton EPIC observations reveal the population of X-ray sources of the bright Local Group spiral galaxy M 31, a low-star-formation-rate galaxy like the Milky Way, down to a 0.2-4.5 keV luminosity of 4.4E34 erg/s. With the help of X-ray hardness ratios and optical and radio information different source classes can be distinguished. The survey detected 856 sources in an area of 1.24 square degrees. Sources within M 31 are 44 supernova remnants (SNR) and candidates, 18 super-soft sources (SSS), 16 X-ray binaries (XRBs) and candidates, as well as 37 globular cluster sources (GlC) and candidates, i.e. most likely low mass XRBs within the GlC. 567 hard sources may either be XRBs or Crab-like SNRs in M 31 or background AGN. 22 sources are new SNR candidates in M 31 based on X-ray selection criteria. Time variability information can be used to improve the source classification. Two GlC sources show type I X-ray bursts as known from Galactic neutron star low mass XRBs. Many of the M 31 SSS detected with XMM-Newton, Chandra and ROSAT, could be identified with optical novae. Soft X-ray light curves can be determined in M 31 center observations for several novae at a time opening a new area of nova research.

  9. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tugay, A V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  10. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    .A. & Svergun D.I. (1987). Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering. NY: Plenum PressSmall Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences o - Use of small angle X-ray scattering instrumentation o - Programs that you will use SAXS (BRUKER AXS) PRIMUS (Konarev, Volkov, Koch

  11. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  12. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence analysis for non-destructive determination of In and Ga depth profiles in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streeck, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Brunken, S.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Weber, A.; Schock, H.-W.; Mainz, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gerlach, M.; Hönicke, P.; Lubeck, J.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Herzog, C.; Kanngießer, B. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of highly efficient thin film solar cells involves band gap engineering by tuning their elemental composition with depth. Here we show that grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and well-characterized instrumentation is suitable for a non-destructive and reference-free analysis of compositional depth profiles in thin films. Variation of the incidence angle provides quantitative access to the in-depth distribution of the elements, which are retrieved from measured fluorescence intensities by modeling parameterized gradients and fitting calculated to measured fluorescence intensities. Our results show that double Ga gradients in Cu(In{sub 1?x},Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} can be resolved by GIXRF.

  13. Demonstration of Successful X-ray Thomson Scattering Using Picosecond K-(alpha) X-ray Sources for the Characterization of Dense Heated Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R; Glenzer, S; Morse, E C

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the first successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering experiment from solid density plasmas for use as a diagnostic in determining the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter with picosecond resolution. The development of this source as a diagnostic and stringent requirements for successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering are addressed. Data for the experimental techniques described in this paper [1] suggest the capability of single shot characterization of warm dense matter and the ability to use this scattering source at future Free Electron Lasers (FEL) where comparable scattering signal levels are predicted.

  14. Determining the effect of seawater on the interfacial strength of an interlayer E-glass-graphite/epoxy composite using observations of transverse cracking made in-situ in an environmental SEM 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Catherine Ann

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINING THE EFFECT OF SEAWATER ON THE INTERFACIAL STRENGTH OF AN INTERLAYER K-GLASS-GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE USING OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSVERSE CRACKING MADE IN-SITU IN AN ENVIRONMENTAL SEM A Thesis by CATHERINE ANN WOOD Submitted... OF AN INTERLAYER E-GLASS-GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE USING OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSVERSE CRACKING MADE IN-SITU IN AN ENVIRONMENTAL SEM A Thesis by CATHERINE ANN WOOD Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  16. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  17. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of electrochemically deposited thin oxide films.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasubramanian, M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have utilized ''in situ'' X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy to investigate the structure and composition of thin oxide films of nickel and iron that have been prepared by electrodeposition on a graphite substrate from aqueous solutions. The films are generally disordered. Structural information has been obtained from the analysis of the data. We also present initial findings on the local structure of heavy metal ions, e.g. Sr and Ce, incorporated into the electrodeposited nickel oxide films. Our results are of importance in a number of technological applications, among them, batteries, fuel cells, electrochromic and ferroelectric materials, corrosion protection, as well as environmental speciation and remediation.

  19. Novel Approaches to Soft X-ray Spectroscopy: Scanning TransmissionX-ray Microscopy and Ambient Pressure X-Ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Gilles, Mary K.; Mun, Simon B.; Tyliszczak, Tolek

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop focused on novel spectroscopies at Beamlines 11.0.2, 5.3.2 and 9.3.2 at the ALS. The workshop brought together users from a wide range of fields to highlight recent experimental and technical developments both in scanning transmission X-ray spectroscopy (STXM) and ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES). The morning session featured talks on experiments involving new developments at the STXM, while the afternoon session was devoted to those using APXPS. In the morning session, Tolek Tyliszczak discussed the improved detector developments at the STXM, such as an avalanche photodiode detector and fluorescence and electron detection, as well as the continued development of in situ cells for heating, gas flow, and electrochemical cells. Of these, only the avalanche photodiode in combination with a novel multichannel photon-counting system is in routine use in time-resolved studies. Bartel Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University) presented results of magnetic imaging with a time resolution of 70-100 ps combined with a lateral resolution of 20-40 nm performed with the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). As a complement to the time-domain ''pump-and-probe'' measurements, they developed a frequency-domain ''sine-excitation'' technique in order to study specific eigenmodes of these ferromagnetic patterns with high spatial resolution. This new approach was used to study the gyrotropic vortex motions in micron-sized ferromagnetic patterns. Adam Hitchcock (McMaster University) presented the development, in collaboration with Daniel Guay (INRS, Varennes) and Sherry Zhang, of the apparatus and techniques for applying STXM to in-situ studies of electrochemistry, in particular electrochromism in polyaniline. In addition, substantial progress was reported on a joint project to develop substrates and methods for chemically selective lithography of multilayer polymer systems. Selective patterns, such as that displayed in the figure, can now be written efficiently with the bend magnet STXM on Beamline 5.3.2. Yves Acremann (SSRL) discussed time and spatially resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments on spin transfer devices at the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). These elegant experiments explore time resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics within a 100 x 150 nm sample influenced by a spin-polarized current. This experiment shows that the magnetization in these magnetic nanostructures are not uniform, as they are influenced by the Oersted field of the charge current needed to generate the spin current. The implementation of a novel multichannel photon counting system in combination with an avalanche photon detector decreased the data-acquisition time by a factor of 10, owing to its ability to resolve the structure of multi bunch mode. Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University and SSRL) described ''Applications of STXM to Microbial Bioweathering and Biomineralization''. In the interaction of bacteria with ferrihydrite nanoparticles, microenvironments that were very different than the bulk material were observed, showing that bulk thermodynamics may not be useful for predicting micro phases. Gordon also presented work showing that iron nanoparticles are attracted to the negatively charged bacteria and form a coating that reduces iron oxide minerals. The afternoon session started with presentations by Simon Mun and Hendrik Bluhm, who discussed the current status and the future plans for the two APPES end-stations at the ALS, which are located at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2, respectively. In both end-stations, samples can be measured in gaseous environments at pressures of up to several Torr, which makes possible the investigation of numerous phenomena, in particular in the fields of atmospheric and environmental science as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Specific examples of the application of APPES were shown in the following presentations. John Hemminger (University of California, Irvine) reported on APPES investigations at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 of the interaction of alkali halide surfaces with water. The m

  20. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  1. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore »deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  2. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  3. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  4. TW Hya: SPECTRAL VARIABILITY, X-RAYS, AND ACCRETION DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Luna, G. J. M.; Schneider, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bessell, M. S. [Australian National Observatory, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bonanos, A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Athens (Greece); Crause, L. A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Lawson, W. A. [School of Physical, Environmental, and Math Sciences, University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Mallik, S. V. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Schuler, S. C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nearest accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya was intensively and continuously observed over {approx}17 days with spectroscopic and photometric measurements from four continents simultaneous with a long segmented exposure using the Chandra satellite. Contemporaneous optical photometry from WASP-S indicates a 4.74 day period was present during this time. The absence of a similar periodicity in the H{alpha} flux and the total X-ray flux which are dominated by accretion processes and the stellar corona, respectively, points to a different source of photometric variations. The H{alpha} emission line appears intrinsically broad and symmetric, and both the profile and its variability suggest an origin in the post-shock cooling region. An accretion event, signaled by soft X-rays, is traced spectroscopically for the first time through the optical emission line profiles. After the accretion event, downflowing turbulent material observed in the H{alpha} and H{beta} lines is followed by He I ({lambda}5876) broadening near the photosphere. Optical veiling resulting from the heated photosphere increases with a delay of {approx}2 hr after the X-ray accretion event. The response of the stellar coronal emission to an increase in the veiling follows {approx}2.4 hr later, giving direct evidence that the stellar corona is heated in part by accretion. Subsequently, the stellar wind becomes re-established. We suggest a model that incorporates the dynamics of this sequential series of events: an accretion shock, a cooling downflow in a supersonically turbulent region, followed by photospheric and later, coronal heating. This model naturally explains the presence of broad optical and ultraviolet lines, and affects the mass accretion rates determined from emission line profiles.

  5. X-ray server : an outline resource for simulations of x-ray diffraction and scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Server is a public project operational at the APS since 1997 with the goals to explore novel network technologies for providing wide scientific community with access to personal research results, establishing scientific collaborations, and refining scientific software. The Server provides Web-based access to a number of programs developed by the author in the field of X-ray diffraction and scattering. The software code operates directly on the Server available for use without downloading. Currently seven programs are accessible that have been used more than 85,000 times. This report discusses the Server philosophy, provides an overview of the physical models and algorithms beneath the codes and demonstrates some applications of the programs. It is shown with examples and statistics how the Server goals are achieved. The plans for further X-ray Server development are outlined.

  6. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  7. HgMn Stars as apparent X-ray emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Mathys, G

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ROSAT all-sky survey 11 HgMn stars were detected as soft X-ray emitters (Berghoefer, Schmitt & Cassinelli 1996). Prior to ROSAT, X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory had suggested that stars in the spectral range B5-A7 are devoid of X-ray emission. Since there is no X-ray emitting mechanism available for these stars (also not for HgMn stars), the usual argument in the case of an X-ray detected star of this spectral type is the existence of an unseen low-mass companion which is responsible for the X-ray emission. The purpose of the present work is to use all available data for our sample of X-ray detected HgMn stars and conclude on the nature of possible companions.

  8. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

  9. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-ID-B intermediate-energy scanning X-ray microscope at theW. D. , Morrison, G. R. et al. Scanning transmission X-rayX-ray spectromicroscopy with the scanning transmission X-ray

  10. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of these sys- tems are illustrated in Figure 2(b) also outlines the principle mode of operation. Here, sealed in an inexpensive and eas- ily fabricated evacuated glass or ceramic envelope, the elec- trons are liberated from a metallic filament, often made... - ment of CNT-based FE sources is provided in [152]. Here we provide a condensed review of the progress, as it pertains to X-ray sources, since then. CNTs have some of the highest attainable aspect ratios, high thermal conductivity, low chemical...

  11. The BMW X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Moretti; Luigi Guzzo; Sergio Campana; Stefano Covino; Davide Lazzati; Marcella Longhetti; Emilio Molinari; Maria Rosa Panzera; Gianpiero Tagliaferri; Ian Dell'Antonio

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  12. The BMW X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moretti, A; Campana, S; Covino, S; Lazzati, D; Longhetti, M; Molinari, E; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Dell'Antonio, I P; Moretti, Alberto; Guzzo, Luigi; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Lazzati, Davide; Longhetti, Marcella; Molinari, Emilio; Panzera, Maria Rosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Antonio, Ian Dell'

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  13. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray Imaging in

  14. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray Imaging

  15. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray

  16. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearningLensless ImagingLensless X-Ray

  17. Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidumAngle X-ray Scattering

  18. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorption Spectroscopy X-ray

  19. Dissociation of the benzene molecule by UV and soft X-rays in circumstellar environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Boechat-Roberty; R. Neves; S. Pilling; A. F. Lago; G. G. B. de Souza

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene molecules, present in the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618, are ionized and dissociated by UV and X-ray photons originated from the hot central star and by its fast wind. Ionic species and free radicals produced by these processes can lead to the formation of new organic molecules. The aim of this work is to study the photoionization and photodissociation processes of the benzene molecule, using synchrotron radiation and time of flight mass spectrometry. Mass spectra were recorded at different energies corresponding to the vacuum ultraviolet (21.21 eV) and soft X-ray (282-310 eV) spectral regions. The production of ions from the benzene dissociative photoionization is here quantified, indicating that C6H6 is more efficiently fragmented by soft X-ray than UV radiation, where 50% of the ionized benzene molecules survive to UV dissociation while only about 4% resist to X-rays. Partial ion yields of H+ and small hydrocarbons such as C2H2+, C3H3+ and C4H2+ are determined as a function of photon energy. Absolute photoionization and dissociative photoionization cross sections have also been determined. From these values, half-life of benzene molecule due to UV and X-ray photon fluxes in CRL 618 were obtained.

  20. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Halbig, James K. (Los Alamos, NM); Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Klosterbuer, Shirley F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  1. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  2. X-ray emission from Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, J U; Wolk, S J; Dennerl, K; Burwitz, V

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first unambiguous detection of X-ray emission originating from Saturn with a Chandra observation, duration 65.5 ksec with ACIS-S3. Beyond the pure detection we analyze the spatial distribution of X-rays on the planetary surface, the light curve, and some spectral properties. The detection is based on 162 cts extracted from the ACIS-S3 chip within the optical disk of Saturn. We found no evidence for smaller or larger angular extent. The expected background level is 56 cts, i.e., the count rate is (1.6 +- 0.2) 10^-3 cts/s. The extracted photons are rather concentrated towards the equator of the apparent disk, while both polar caps have a relative photon deficit. The inclination angle of Saturn during the observation was -27 degrees, so that the northern hemisphere was not visible during the complete observation. In addition, it was occulted by the ring system. We found a small but significant photon excess at one edge of the ring system. The light curve shows a small dip twice at identical phases,...

  3. PHERMEX: Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, R.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHERMEX facility used to provide flash radiographs of explosives and explosive-driven metal systems is described. With this facility, precision radiographs of large objects containing materials with high atomic number and high density are attainable. PHERMEX encompasses the high-current, three-cavity, 30-MeV linear electron accelerator; the 50-MHz-radiofrequency power source to drive the cavities; timing, firing, and signal detection system; and a data-acquisition system. Some unique features of PHERMEX are reliability; very intensive submicrosecond bremsstrahlung source rich in 4- to 8-MeV x rays; less than 1.0-mm-diam spot size; precision determination of edges, discontinuities, and areal-mass distribution; and flash radiographs of large explosive systems close to the x-ray target. Some aspects of the PHERMEX-upgrading program are discussed. The program will result (1) in an increased electron-beam energy to about 50 MeV, (2) the use of an electron-gun pulser that is capable of producing three time-adjustable pulses for obtaining three radiographic pictures of a single explosive event, (3) an increased electron injection energy of 1.25 MeV, (4) the capability for recording high-speed signals, and (5) the use of computers to assist the monitoring and control of the data-acquisition system and the PHERMEX accelerator.

  4. X-ray and synchrotron studies of porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivkov, V. N., E-mail: svn@dm.komisc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Lomov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical-Technological Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical-Technological Institute (Russian Federation); Vasil'ev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Nekipelov, S. V. [Komi State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Komi State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation); Petrova, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of comprehensive studies of layers of porous silicon of different conductivity types, grown by anodizing standard Si(111) substrates in an electrolyte based on fluoric acid and ethanol with the addition of 5% of iodine and kept in air for a long time, are discussed. Measurements are performed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and ultrasoft X-ray spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The structural parameters of the layers (thickness, strain, and porosity) and atomic and chemical composition of the porous-silicon surface are determined. It is found that an oxide layer 1.5-2.3-nm thick is formed on the surface of the silicon skeleton. The near-edge fine structure of the Si 2p absorption spectrum of this layer corresponds to the fine structure of the 2p spectrum of well coordinated SiO{sub 2}. In this case, the fine structure in the Si 2p-edge absorption region of the silicon skeleton is identical to that of the 2p absorption spectrum of crystalline silicon.

  5. The variability properties of X-ray steep and X-ray flat quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio Fiore; Ari Laor; Martin Elvis; Fabrizio Nicastro; Emanuele Giallongo

    1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the variability of 6 low redshift, radio quiet `PG' quasars on three timescales (days, weeks, and months) using the ROSAT HRI. The quasars were chosen to lie at the two extreme ends of the ROSAT PSPC spectral index distribution and hence of the H$\\beta$ FWHM distribution. The observation strategy has been carefully designed to provide even sampling on these three basic timescales and to provide a uniform sampling among the quasars We have found clear evidence that the X-ray steep, narrow H_beta, quasars systematically show larger amplitude variations than the X-ray flat broad H_beta quasars on timescales from 2 days to 20 days. On longer timescales we do not find significant differences between steep and flat quasars, although the statistics are poorer. We suggest that the above correlation between variability properties and spectral steepness can be explained in a scenario in which the X-ray steep, narrow line objects are in a higher L/L_Edd state with respect to the X-ray flat, broad line objects. We evaluated the power spectrum of PG1440+356 (the brigthest quasar in our sample) between 2E-7 and 1E-3 Hz, where it goes into the noise. The power spectrum is roughly consistent with a 1/f law between 1E-3 and 2E-6 Hz. Below this frequency it flattens significantly.

  6. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ?10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup ?1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (?40??s) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  7. X-ray reflectivity studies of the metal/solution interphase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, H.; Nagy, Z.; Melendres, C.A.; Zurawski, D.J.; Chiarello, R.P.; Yonco, R.M.; Kim, H.K.; Maroni, V.A.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed an electrochemical cell that permits x-ray scattering studies in a transmission geometry under in-situ electrochemical control and have performed x-ray specular reflectivity studies of several metal/solution interphases as a function of electrochemical potential. For the copper/solution interphase, we found that the reflectivity changes upon oxidation and reduction, indicating a phase transition between copper and copper oxide at the interphase. We also found that the thickness of the pure copper and the roughness of the interfaces exhibited electrochemical irreversibility that is consistent with the potentials for the oxidation waves in the anodic sweep and the reduction waves in the cathodic sweep of the voltammogram. A standard Fresnel expression for the x-ray specular reflectivity was applied in the data analysis, and a smoothly varying Lorentzian interface profile was used for the individual rough interfaces. Furthermore, an incoherent average was used to include the effect of correlated roughness between a pair of interfaces. Preliminary results are also presented for the silver/solution and platinum/solution interphases. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Initial Evaluation of Engine Combustion Network Injectors with X-Ray Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastengren, A.; Powell, C.F.; Tilocco, F.Z.; Fezzaa, K.

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant hurdle in the understanding of diesel sprays is the sensitivity of such sprays to the detailed geometry of the spray nozzle. This sensitivity hampers the comparison of results from spray measurements by different research groups, even if the groups measure nozzles with the same nominal geometry. Moreover, these differences make the comparison and validation of different diagnostic techniques problematic. To remove this source of uncertainty from diesel spray measurements, a collaboration of several research groups has formed to measure a common set of injectors under identical conditions under the auspices of Sandia National Laboratorys Engine Combustion Network. The current work describes the initial measurement of these injectors and the sprays created by these injectors using the x-ray diagnostics available at the Advanced Photon Source. X-ray phase-enhanced imaging is used to perform time-resolved, in situ measurements of injector pintle motion. In addition to these measurements, x-ray radiography measurements of the sprays from these injectors will be performed to better understand the near-nozzle fuel mass distribution in these sprays.

  9. Investigation of near-infrared spectroscopy for periodic in situ cell culture media determination of glucose and lactate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Christopher Bryan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , biosensors must be developed that are capable of monitoring the cell culture processes non-invasively and continuously. Non-invasive determinations of glucose and lactate in cell culture media were investigated via near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) across...

  10. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  11. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  12. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

    1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

  13. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  14. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  15. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  16. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  17. Sum rules for polarization-dependent x-ray absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankudinov, A.; Rehr, J.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of sum rules is obtained for polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray circular magnetic dichroism (CMD), analogous to those for CMD derived by Thole [ital et] [ital al]. These sum rules relate x-ray-absorption coefficients to the ground-state expectation values of various operators. Problems with applying these sum rules are discussed.

  18. In situ nanotomography and operando transmission X-ray microscopy of micron-sized Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    with transformation into a Li15Ge4-like phase. The high penetration power and large eld of view of nanometer graphite anodes. Yet large volume changes during operation severely limit their lifetime. To understand. Moreover, we show that the density changes due to lithiation are consistent with partial transformation

  19. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi-chun

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state ...

  20. Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corrosion under ambient atmosphere, this includes in particular the alkaline metal based systems, such as lithium

  1. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c) Inverse pole figure during heating. Pressure is 27.8 GPa.2006): Double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT for in-taken during a 5 minute heating period. Pressure is 27.8

  2. In Situ Electrochemical X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis with High Oxygen Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    to the widespread application of fuel cells and air-cathode batteries in automotive and stationary power a progressive evolution of the electronic structure of the metal clusters that is both potential) and the large overpotential (300 mV) in fuel cell cathodes necessitate the use of high loadings of precious-metal

  3. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: Your link to newsInInIn

  5. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: Your link to newsInInInIn

  6. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: Your link to newsInInInInIn

  7. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: Your link to

  8. In situ Nanotomography and Operando Transmission X-ray Microscopy of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: Your linkInNo

  9. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Studies for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruary 9, 2012December

  10. ON THE COOLING TAILS OF THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS: THE IGR J17480-2446 LINK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Van der Klis, M. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam and Center for High-Energy Astrophysics, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, recently discovered in the globular cluster Terzan 5, showed unprecedented bursting activity during its 2010 October-November outburst. We analyzed all X-ray bursts detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and find strong evidence that they all have a thermonuclear origin, despite the fact that many do not show the canonical spectral softening along the decay imprinted on type I X-ray bursts by the cooling of the neutron star photosphere. We show that the persistent-to-burst power ratio is fully consistent with the accretion-to-thermonuclear efficiency ratio along the whole outburst, as is typical for type I X-ray bursts. The burst energy, peak luminosity, and daily-averaged spectral profiles all evolve smoothly throughout the outburst, in parallel with the persistent (non-burst) luminosity. We also find that the peak-burst to persistent luminosity ratio determines whether or not cooling is present in the bursts from IGR J17480-2446, and argue that the apparent lack of cooling is due to the 'non-cooling' bursts having both a lower peak temperature and a higher non-burst (persistent) emission. We conclude that the detection of cooling along the decay is a sufficient, but not a necessary condition to identify an X-ray burst as thermonuclear. Finally, we compare these findings with X-ray bursts from other rapidly accreting neutron stars.

  11. Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare...

  12. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short coherent X-ray radiation by controlling the fraction of the beam that can be properly unchirped using a few-cycle laser

  13. The Daguerreotype and the X-ray: A Deep Look

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - likely will play a crucial role in future scientific breakthroughs. Last week, hers was the first daguerreotype to undergo powerful x-ray analysis in a collaboration...

  14. Development of all-solid-state flash x-ray generator with photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xun, Ma; Jianjun, Deng; Hongwei, Liu; Jianqiang, Yuan; Jinfeng, Liu; Bing, Wei; Yanling, Qing; Wenhui, Han; Lingyun, Wang; Pin, Jiang; Hongtao, Li [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, low-jitter, and high repetitive rate all-solid-state flash x-ray generator making use of photo conductive semiconductor switches was developed recently for the diagnostic purpose of some hydrokinetical experiments. The generator consisted of twelve stages of Blumlein pulse forming networks, and an industrial cold cathode diode was used to generate intense x-ray radiations with photon energy up to 220 keV. Test experiments showed that the generator could produce >1 kA electron beam currents and x-ray pulses with ?40 ns duration under 100 Hz repetitive rates at least (limited by the triggering laser on hand), also found was that the delay time of the cathode explosive emission is crucial to the energy transfer efficiency of the whole system. In addition, factors affecting the diode impedance, how the switching synchronization and diode impedance determining the allowable operation voltage were discussed.

  15. High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

  16. Optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Burenin; I. F. Bikmaev; M. G. Revnivtsev; J. A. Tomsick; S. Yu. Sazonov; M. N. Pavlinskiy; R. A. Sunyaev

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707 trough the spectroscopic observations of its optical counterpart with RTT150 telescope. Accurate position of the X-ray source, determined using Chandra observations, allowed us to associate this source with the faint optical object (m_R=~20.4), which shows broad H_\\alpha emission line in its optical spectrum. Therefore we conclude that the source IGRJ18257-0707 is a type 1 Seyfert galaxy at redshift z=0.037.

  17. Dynamical x-ray diffraction from an icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kycia, S.

    1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary extinction effects in diffraction from single grains of Al-Pd- Mn, and presumably many other FCI alloys, may be significant and should be corrected for prior to use of diffraction data in structural determinations. Probes based on dynamical diffraction effects, such as x-ray standing wave fluorescence, multiple beam interference, and x-ray transmission topographs, may now be used to study the bulk and surface structure of some quasicrystals. The observation of dynamical diffraction from icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn is a striking confirmation of the fact that quasicrystals can present a degree of structural perfection comparable to that found in the best periodic intermetallic crystals.

  18. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  19. Hexakis(4-phormylphenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene: X-ray and DFT-calculated structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albayrak, Cigdem, E-mail: calbayrak@sinop.edu.tr; Kosar, Basak [Sinop University, Faculty of Education (Turkey); Odabasoglu, Mustafa [Pamukkale University, Chemical Technology Program (Turkey); Bueyuekguengoer, Orhan [Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure of hexakis(4-phormylphenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene is determined by using X-ray diffraction and then the molecular structure is investigated with density functional theory (DFT). X-Ray study shows that the title compound has C-H-{pi} interaction with phosphazene ring. The molecules in the unit cell are packed with Van der Waals and dipole-dipole interactions and the molecules are packed in zigzag shaped. Optimized molecular geometry is calculated with DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. The results from both experimental and theoretical calculations are compared in this study.

  20. Using synchrotron X-ray scattering to study the diffusion of water in a weakly-hydrated clay sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Meheust; B. Sandnes; G. Lovoll; K. J. Maloy; J. O. Fossum; G. J. da Silva; M. S. P. Mundim; R. Droppa; D. d. Miranda Fonseca

    2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the diffusion of water in weakly-hydrated samples of the smectite clay Na-fluorohectorite. The quasi one-dimensional samples are dry compounds of nano-layered particles consisting of ~ 80 silicate platelets. Water diffuses into a sample through the mesoporosity in between the particles, and can subsequently intercalate into the adjacent particles. The samples are placed under controlled temperature. They are initially under low humidity conditions, with all particles in a 1WL intercalation state. We then impose a high humidity at one sample end, triggering water penetration along the sample length. We monitor the progression of the humidity front by monitoring the intercalation state of the particles in space and time. This is done by determining the characteristic spacing of the nano-layered particles in situ, from synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements. The spatial width of the intercalation front is observed to be smaller than 2mm, while its velocity decreases with time, as expected from a diffusion process.

  1. Quantitative X-Ray Imaging of Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Aortas of ApoE-/-/LDL-/- Double Knockout Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langheinrich,A.; Michniewicz, A.; Sedding, D.; Lai, B.; Jorgensen, S.; Bohle, R.; Ritman, E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: To determine if hemorrhage into an arterial wall can be detected in CT images by virtue of the iron content. Materials and Methods: Aortas from male apoE-/-/LDL-/- mice (n = 31) were infused in situ with contrast agent, for micro-CT scanning and histology. Roentgen-opacities within the aortic walls were identified by histology and micro-x-ray fluorescence to be iron or calcium. Dual-energy scanning was performed at 2 energy levels using synchrotron-based micro-CT [(2 {mu}m)3 voxels, 16 and 20 keV] and 64-slice CT (0.4 x 0.4 x 0.6 mm voxels, 80 and 120 kVp). Results: Opacities were identified as hemorrhage-related clusters of multiple punctate deposits, containing both Fe (0.48 x 10-12 g/voxel) and Ca (3.18 x 10-2 g/voxel), or as isolated confluent accumulations of exclusively calcium. Subtraction of the dual-energy CT scans discriminated iron from calcium deposits. Conclusion: Detection and quantification of iron deposits in hemorrhaged atherosclerotic lesions is feasible by dual-energy CT imaging.

  2. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Angeli-Greaves, M. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 90373 Caracas 1083A (Venezuela)

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  3. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field applicability. In: Bioremediation Field Experience, (Art. In: Applied Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons. (C. D. 1993. In situ bioremediation: basis and practices. In:

  4. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Strauss, Moshe (Omer, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  5. Constraints on jet X-ray emission in low/hard state X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the combination of the similarities between the X-ray properties of low luminosity accreting black holes and accreting neutron stars, combined with the differences in their radio properties argues that the X-rays from these systems are unlikely to be formed in the relativistic jets. Specifically, the spectra of extreme island state neutron stars and low/hard state black holes are known to be indistinguishable, while the power spectra from these systems are known to show only minor differences beyond what would be expected from scaling the characteristic variability frequencies by the mass of the compact object. The spectral and temporal similarities thus imply a common emission mechanism that has only minor deviations from having all key parameters scaling linearly with the mass of the compact object, while we show that this is inconsistent with the observations that the radio powers of neutron stars are typically about 30 times lower than those of black holes at the same X-ray luminosity. We also show that an abrupt luminosity change would be expected when a system makes a spectral state transition from a radiatively inefficient jet dominated accretion flow to a thin disk dominated flow, but that such a change is not seen.

  6. Isotropic star in low-mass X-ray binaries and X-ray pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehedi Kalam; Sk. Monowar Hossein; Sajahan Molla

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for compact stars in the low mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) and X-ray pulsars using a metric given by John J. Matese and Patrick G. Whitman \\citep{Matese and Whitman1980}. Here the field equations are reduced to a system of two algebraic equations considering the isotropic pressure. Compact star candidates 4U 1820-30(radius=10km) in LMXBs, and Her X-1(radius=7.7km), SAX J 1808.4-3658(SS1)(radius=7.07km) and SAX J 1808.4-3658(SS2)(radius=6.35km) in X-ray pulsars satisfy all the energy conditions, TOV-equation and stability condition. From our model, we have derived mass($M$), central density($\\rho_{0}$), suface density($\\rho_{b}$), central pressure($p_{0}$), surface pressure($p_{b}$) and surface red-shift($Z_{s}$) of the above mentioned stars, which are very much consistant with the observed/reported datas\\citep{N. K. Glendenning1997,Gondek2000}. We have also observe the adiabatic index($\\gamma$>4/3) of the above steller objects.

  7. ON THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THEORETICAL AND X-RAY CONCENTRATION-MASS RELATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasia, E. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Borgani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Trieste, Sezione di Astronomia, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Ettori, S.; Meneghetti, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Mazzotta, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133, Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past 15 years, the concentration-mass relation has been investigated diffusely in theoretical studies. On the other hand, only recently has this relation been derived from X-ray observations. When that happened, the results caused a certain level of concern: the X-ray normalizations and slopes were found significantly dissimilar from those predicted by theory. We analyzed 52 galaxy clusters and groups, simulated with different descriptions of the physical processes that affect the baryonic component, with the purpose of determining whether these discrepancies are real or induced by biases in the computation of the concentration parameter or in the determination of the selection function of the cluster sample for which the analysis is carried out. In particular, we investigate how the simulated concentration-mass relation depends (1) on the radial range used to derive the concentration; (2) on the presence of baryons in the simulations, and on the effect of star formation and feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Finally, we evaluate (3) how the results differ when adopting an X-ray approach for the analysis and (4) how the selection function based on X-ray luminosity can impact the results. All effects studied go in the direction of alleviating the discrepancy between observations and simulations, although with different significance: while the choice of the radial range to fit the profiles and the inclusion of the baryonic component play only a minor role, the X-ray approach to reconstruct the mass profiles and the selection of the cluster sample have a strong impact on the resulting concentration-mass relation. Extending the fit to the most central regions or reducing the fitting radius from the virial boundary to the typical X-ray external radius causes an increase of the normalization in radiative simulations by 5%-10%. In the second case, we measure a slope that is up to twice steeper than that derived by using the typical theoretical radial range. Radiative simulations including only supernova feedback produce 30% higher concentrations than the dark matter case. Such a difference is largely reduced when including the effect of AGN feedback. The concentration-mass relation derived from the X-ray synthetic catalog is significantly steeper due to the combination of several different effects, such as environment, dynamical state and dynamical history of the clusters, bias in mass and temperature measurements, and their dependence on the radius and on the mass of the system. Finally, selecting clusters according to their X-ray luminosity produces a net increase in both normalization and slope of the relation, since at fixed mass, the most luminous clusters are also the most concentrated.

  8. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.6.2. Synchrotron Diffraction.........................................................................9 II. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN X-RAY DIFFRACTION.....................................12 2.1. X-ray Source... radiations ...................................................................16 Table 2.2 Structure factors and reflection conditions ...................................................20 Table 4.1 Chemical composition of SS316...

  9. Ultrafast x-rays: radiographing magnetism Project overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    , head of the ultrafast magnetism group. Stanford PULSE is a worldwide renowned centre for ultrafast1 Ultrafast x-rays: radiographing magnetism Project overview The main purpose of the proposed, it is now possible to achieve x-ray pulses that are a few femtoseconds long and that are focused within

  10. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -rays..............................................................................................16 2.4. Bragg's Law ..........................................................................................................18 2.5. Diffractometer Geometry... Figure 2.2 Schematic showing the basic components of a modern x-ray tube. Beryllium window is highly transparent to x-rays...............................15 Figure 2.3 Coherent scattering from an electron to a point P...

  11. Shad-o-Snap X-Ray Camera Hardware Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -o-Snap x-ray camera is a complete, stand-alone x-ray imaging device featuring "smart" microprocessor-controlled camera electronics and a convenient USB interface. The plug- and-play interface allows easy control by the silicon photodiodes. The Shad-o-Snap camera also includes electronics to digitize the video signal

  12. Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, K.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  14. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  15. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  16. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  17. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  18. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  19. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  20. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  1. Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    , Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

  2. Chandra X-ray Analysis of Galaxy Cluster A168

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanbin Yang; Zhiying Huo; Xu Zhou; Suijian Xue; Shude Mao; Jun Ma; Jiansheng Chen

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of galaxy cluster A168 (z=0.045). Two X-ray peaks with a projected distance of 676 kpc are found to be located close to two dominant galaxies, respectively. Both peaks are significantly offset from the peak of the number density distribution of galaxies. This suggests that A168 consists of two subclusters, a northern subcluster (A168N) and a southern subcluster (A168S). Further X-ray imaging analysis reveals that (1) the X-ray isophotes surrounding the two X-ray peaks are heavily distorted, (2) an elongated and ontinuous filament connects the two X-ray peaks. These suggest that strong interactions have occurred between the two subclusters. Spectral analysis shows that A168 has a mean temperature of 2.53 +/- 0.09 keV and a mean metallicity of 0.31 +/- 0.04 Z_{solar}. The metallicity is roughly a constant across the cluster but the temperature shows some systematic variations. Most X-ray, optical and radio properties of A168 are consistent with it being an off-axis merger several Gyrs after a core passage, although detailed numerical simulations are required to see whether the observed properties, in particular the significant offset between the optical and X-ray centers, can be reproduced in such a scenario.

  3. Millisecond oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muno, Michael Patrick, 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I analyze 68 oscillation trains detected in a search of 159 thermonuclear bursts from eight neutron star X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. I use all data that were public as of September 2001. ...

  4. POWDER DIFFRACTION BEAMLINE FOR IN SITU STUDIES OF STRUCTURAL AND CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS (IXD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    , the availability of techniques for the real time characterization of catalytic systems as they evolve in time community, such as the user groups conducting studies on batteries, fuel cells, catalysis, high growth and the evolution of stress. In Situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Studies on Li-ion Battery Materials

  5. Investigations of laser-induced damages in fused silica optics using x-ray laser interferometric microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margarone, D.; Rus, B.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Homer, P.; Polan, J.; Stupka, M. [Department of X-ray Lasers/PALS Centre, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Lagron, J. C.; Ros, D. [LIXAM, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Danson, C.; Hawkes, S. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel x-ray laser (XRL) application, aimed at understanding the microscopic effects involved in formation of laser-induced damage in optical materials exposed to high-power sub-ns laser pulses, is presented. Standard fused silica substrates with permanent damage threshold below 20 J/cm{sup 2}, when irradiated by 438 nm laser pulses, were probed in situ by a neonlike zinc XRL at 21.2 nm. The probing beamline employed a double Lloyd's mirror x-ray interferometer, used in conjunction with an imaging mirror to achieve magnification of {approx}8. In conjunction with an array of in situ optical diagnostics, the main question addressed is whether the damage on the rear surface of the beamsplitter is transient or permanent. The second issue, examined by both the x-ray interferometric microscopy and the optical diagnostics, is whether a local rear-surface modification is associated with nonlinear effects such as self-focusing or filamentation of the damaging laser beam in the bulk.

  6. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  7. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H. (Berkeley, CA); Legros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norm W. (Livermore, CA); Goulding, Fred (Lafayette, CA); Landis, Don (Pinole, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  9. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippo Frontera

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observational status of the X-ray afterglow emission, its mean properties (detection rate, continuum spectra, line features, and light curves), and the X-ray constraints on theoretical models of gamma-ray bursters and their progenitors. I also discuss the early onset afterglow emission, the remaining questions, and the role of future X-ray afterglow observations.

  10. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY PULSATION FROM THE GEMINGA-LIKE PULSAR PSR J2021+4026

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, L. C. C. [General Education Center, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hu, C. P.; Chou, Y. [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Wu, J. H. K.; Huang, R. H. H. [Institute of Astronomy, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Trepl, L. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitaets-Sternwarte, Universitaet Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Takata, J.; Wang, Y.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of an X-ray periodicity of {approx}265.3 ms from a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-quiet {gamma}-ray pulsar, PSR J2021+4026, located at the edge of the supernova remnant G78.2+2.1 ({gamma}-Cygni). The detected frequency is consistent with the {gamma}-ray pulsation determined by the observation of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope at the same epoch. The X-ray pulse profile resembles the modulation of a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. The phase-averaged spectral analysis also suggests that the majority of the observed X-rays have thermal origins. This is the third member in the class of radio-quiet pulsars with significant pulsations detected from both X-ray and {gamma}-ray regimes.

  11. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Peter D. (Santa Fe, NM); Claytor, Thomas N. (White Rock, NM); Berry, Phillip C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Charles R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  12. CX-009554: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-situ X-ray Nanocharacterization of Defect Kinetics in Chalcogenide Solar Cell CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/04/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. In situ investigation of explosive crystallization in a-Ge: Experimental determination of the interface response function using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolova, Liliya; MacLeod, Jennifer M.; Ibrahim, Heide [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stern, Mark J.; Siwick, Bradley J., E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Center for the Physics of Materials, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; LaGrange, Thomas, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Rosei, Federico, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Centre for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization of amorphous semiconductors is a strongly exothermic process. Once initiated the release of latent heat can be sufficient to drive a self-sustaining crystallization front through the material in a manner that has been described as explosive. Here, we perform a quantitative in situ study of explosive crystallization in amorphous germanium using dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Direct observations of the speed of the explosive crystallization front as it evolves along a laser-imprinted temperature gradient are used to experimentally determine the complete interface response function (i.e., the temperature-dependent front propagation speed) for this process, which reaches a peak of 16?m/s. Fitting to the Frenkel-Wilson kinetic law demonstrates that the diffusivity of the material locally/immediately in advance of the explosive crystallization front is inconsistent with those of a liquid phase. This result suggests a modification to the liquid-mediated mechanism commonly used to describe this process that replaces the phase change at the leading amorphous-liquid interface with a change in bonding character (from covalent to metallic) occurring in the hot amorphous material.

  14. Deep x-ray lithography for micromechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guckel, H. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensions of the German LIGA process have brought about fabrication capability suitable for cost effective production of precision engineered components. The process attributes allow fabrication of mechanical components which are not capable of being made via conventional subtractive machining methods. Two process improvements have been responsible for this extended capability which involve the areas of thick photoresist application and planarization via precision lapping. Application of low-stress x-ray photoresist has been achieved using room temperature solvent bonding of a preformed photoresist sheet. Precision diamond lapping and polishing has provided a flexible process for the planarization of a wide variety of electroplated metals in the presence of photoresist. Exposure results from the 2.5 GeV National Synchrotron Light Source storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that structural heights of several millimeter and above are possible. The process capabilities are also well suited for microactuator fabrication. Linear and rotational magnetic microactuators have been constructed which use coil winding technology with LIGA fabricated coil forms. Actuator output forces of 1 milliNewton have been obtained with power dissipation on the order of milliWatts. A rotational microdynamometer system which is capable of measuring torque-speed data is also discussed.

  15. X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen/s)Velocity (km/s) #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;The

  16. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. I. APPARENT RADII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guever, Tolga; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses and radii of low-magnetic field neutron stars can be measured by combining different observable quantities obtained from their X-ray spectra during thermonuclear X-ray bursts. One of these quantities is the apparent radius of each neutron star as inferred from the X-ray flux and spectral temperature measured during the cooling tails of bursts, when the thermonuclear flash is believed to have engulfed the entire star. In this paper, we analyze 13,095 X-ray spectra of 446 X-ray bursts observed from 12 sources in order to assess possible systematic effects in the measurements of the apparent radii of neutron stars. We first show that the vast majority of the observed X-ray spectra are consistent with blackbody functions to within a few percent. We find that most X-ray bursts follow a very well determined correlation between X-ray flux and temperature, which is consistent with the whole neutron-star surface emitting uniformly during the cooling tails. We develop a Bayesian Gaussian mixture algorithm to measure the apparent radii of the neutron stars in these sources, while detecting and excluding a small number of X-ray bursts that show irregular cooling behavior. This algorithm also provides us with a quantitative measure of the systematic uncertainties in the measurements. We find that those errors in the spectroscopic determination of neutron-star radii that are introduced by systematic effects in the cooling tails of X-ray bursts are in the range {approx_equal} 3%-8%. Such small errors are adequate to distinguish between different equations of state provided that uncertainties in the distance to each source and the absolute calibration of X-ray detectors do not dominate the error budget.

  17. Protein crystallography: From X-ray diffraction spots to a three dimensional image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Berendzen, J.

    1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Proteins are remarkable molecular machines that are essential for life. They can do many things ranging from the precise control of blood clotting to synthesizing complex organic compounds. Pictures of protein molecules are in high demand in biotechnology because they are important for applications such as drug discovery and for engineering enzymes for commercial use. X-ray crystallography is the most common method for determining the three-dimensional structures of protein molecules. When a crystal of a protein is placed in an X-ray beam, scattering of X-rays off the ordered molecules produces a diffraction pattern that can be measured on a position-sensitive CCD or image-plate detector. Protein crystals typically contain thousands of atoms and the diffraction data are generally measured to relatively low resolution. Consequently the direct methods approaches generally cannot be applied. Instead, if the crystal is modified by adding metal atoms at specific sites or by tuning the wavelength of the X-rays to cross an absorption edge of a metal atom in the crystal, then the information from these additional measurements is sufficient to first identify the /locations of the metal atoms. This information is then used along with the diffraction data to make a three-dimensional picture of electron densities. This picture can be used to determine the position of most or all of the atoms in the protein.

  18. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenphysik, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraus, D. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.4–10?keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-? x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/?E = 220 at 9.8 keV.

  19. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

    1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

  20. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Charles K. (Chicago, IL); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Solem, Johndale C. (Los Alamos, NM); Haddad, Waleed S. (Chicago, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

  1. Swift J2218.4+1925: a new hard X-ray selected Polar observed with XMM-Newton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardini, Federico; Mukai, Koji; Falanga, Maurizio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Swift J2218.4+1925, a hard X-ray source detected by Swift BAT, has been proposed as a candidate magnetic cataclysmic variable of the polar type from optical spectroscopy. Using XMM-Newton we perform detailed timing and spectral analysis with simultaneous X-ray ($0.3-10$ keV) and optical B band data. We complement the spectral study with archival hard X-ray (14-70 keV) spectra collected by Swift BAT as well as with optical, near and mid-infrared photometry from $SDSS$, $2MASS$ and $WISE$ archive, respectively. A strong periodic X-ray signal at 2.16 h, consistent with the recently determined spectroscopic orbital period, adds Swift J2218.4+1925 to the small group of hard X-ray polars and locates it at the low edge of the orbital period gap. The X-ray pulse profile shows the typical bright and faint phases seen in polars ($\\sim 70%$ and $\\sim 30%$ of the orbit, respectively). A pronounced dip centred on the bright phase is also detected. It is stronger at lower energies and is mainly produced by photoelectric ab...

  2. Measuring the mean and scatter of the X-ray luminosity -- optical richness relation for maxBCG galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Rykoff; T. A. McKay; M. R. Becker; A. Evrard; D. E. Johnston; B. P. Koester; E. Rozo; E. S. Sheldon; R. H. Wechsler

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the scaling relations between galaxy cluster observables requires large samples of uniformly observed clusters. We measure the mean X-ray luminosity--optical richness (L_X--N_200) relation for an approximately volume-limited sample of more than 17,000 optically-selected clusters from the maxBCG catalog spanning the redshift range 0.1X-ray emission from many clusters using ROSAT All-Sky Survey data, we are able to measure mean X-ray luminosities to ~10% (including systematic errors) for clusters in nine independent optical richness bins. In addition, we are able to crudely measure individual X-ray emission from ~800 of the richest clusters. Assuming a log-normal form for the scatter in the L_X--N_200 relation, we measure \\sigma_\\ln{L}=0.86+/-0.03 at fixed N_200. This scatter is large enough to significantly bias the mean stacked relation. The corrected median relation can be parameterized by L_X = (e^\\alpha)(N_200/40)^\\beta 10^42 h^-2 ergs/s, where \\alpha = 3.57+/-0.08 and \\beta = 1.82+/-0.05. We find that X-ray selected clusters are significantly brighter than optically-selected clusters at a given optical richness. This selection bias explains the apparently X-ray underluminous nature of optically-selected cluster catalogs.

  3. X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Measurements of the Gas Mass Fraction in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaRoque, S J; Carlstrom, J; Dawson, K; Joy, M; Nagai, D; Reese, E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present gas mass fractions of 38 massive galaxy clusters spanning redshifts from 0.14 to 0.89, derived from Chandra X-ray data and OVRO/BIMA interferometric Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect measurements. We use three models for the gas distribution: (1) an isothermal beta-model fit jointly to the X-ray data at radii beyond 100 kpc and to all of the SZE data,(2) a non-isothermal double beta-model fit jointly to all of the X-ray and SZE data, and (3) an isothermal beta-model fit only to the SZE spatial data. We show that the simple isothermal model well characterizes the intracluster medium (ICM) outside of the cluster core in clusters with a wide range of morphological properties. The X-ray and SZE determinations of mean gas mass fractions for the 100 kpc-cut isothermal beta-model are fgas(X-ray)=0.110 +0.003-0.003 +0.006-0.018 and fgas(SZE)=0.116 +0.005-0.005 +0.009-0.026, where uncertainties are statistical followed by systematic at 68% confidence. For the non-isothermal double beta-model, fgas(X-ray)=0.119 +0.0...

  4. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A., E-mail: a-physics2001@yahoo.com; Tibai, Z. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary)] [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary) [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Szentagothai Research Centre, University of Pecs, Pecs-7624 (Hungary); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  5. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  6. Gated x-ray detector for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, John A.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Tom; Barnes, Cris; Casper, Larry; Fatherley, Valerie; Heinrichs, Todd; King, Robert; Landers, Doug; Lopez, Frank; Sanchez, Phillip; Sandoval, George; Schrank, Lou; Walsh, Peter; Bell, Perry; Brown, Matt; Costa, Robert; Holder, Joe; Montelongo, Sam; Pederson, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); VI Control Systems Ltd., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed, and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These gated x-Ray detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significantly different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due, in part, to an innovative impedance matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring, and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution, and no detectable impedance reflections.

  7. X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tavani

    1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

  8. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  9. X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-RayX-ray

  10. SU-E-I-01: A Fast, Analytical Pencil Beam Based Method for First Order X-Ray Scatter Estimation of Kilovoltage Cone Beam X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J; Bourland, J [Wake Forest University, Winston-salem, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analytically estimate first-order x-ray scatter for kV cone beam x-ray imaging with high computational efficiency. Methods: In calculating first-order scatter using the Klein-Nishina formula, we found that by integrating the point-to-point scatter along an interaction line, a “pencil-beam” scatter kernel (BSK) can be approximated to a quartic expression when the imaging field is small. This BSK model for monoenergetic, 100keV x-rays has been verified on homogeneous cube and cylinder water phantoms by comparing with the exact implementation of KN formula. For heterogeneous medium, the water-equivalent length of a BSK was acquired with an improved Siddon's ray-tracing algorithm, which was also used in calculating pre- and post- scattering attenuation. To include the electron binding effect for scattering of low-kV photons, the mean corresponding scattering angle is determined from the effective point of scattered photons of a BSK. The behavior of polyenergetic x-rays was also investigated for 120kV x-rays incident to a sandwiched infinite heterogeneous slab phantom, with the electron binding effect incorporated. Exact computation and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for comparisons, using the EGSnrc code package. Results: By reducing the 3D volumetric target (o(n{sup 3})) to 2D pencil-beams (o(n{sup 2})), the computation expense can be generally lowered by n times, which our experience verifies. The scatter distribution on a flat detector shows high agreement between the analytic BSK model and exact calculations. The pixel-to-pixel differences are within (-2%, 2%) for the homogeneous cube and cylinder phantoms and within (0, 6%) for the heterogeneous slab phantom. However, the Monte Carlo simulation shows increased deviation of the BSK model toward detector periphery. Conclusion: The proposed BSK model, accommodating polyenergetic x-rays and electron binding effect at low kV, shows great potential in efficiently estimating the first-order scatter from small imaging fields. We are investigating more thoroughly to improve performance and explore applications.

  11. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  12. X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumental drifts, and systematic errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumentalUSA Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Nationaland reflecting x-ray optics suitable for micro- and nano-

  13. atf compton x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D; Fritzsche, S 2014-01-01 14 Photospheres, Comptonization and X-ray Lines in Gamma Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Steep X-ray spectral slopes, X-ray excesses and...

  14. adc x-ray binary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems. Sudip Bhattacharyya 2010-02-24 17 X-ray Transients from X-ray Binaries to Gamma Ray Bursts CERN Preprints Summary: We discuss three classes of x-ray transients to...

  15. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nonradiologists in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometrymorphometry studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

  16. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells with Soft X-Rays Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Wednesday, 26 May 2010 00:00 A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction...

  17. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

  18. Performance Characteristics Of An Intensity Modulated Advanced X-Ray Source (IMAXS) For Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Brown, Craig; Condron, Cathie; Ingle, Mike [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Christensen, Phil A.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D. [HESCO/PTSE Inc., 2501 Monarch St., Alameda, CA 94501 (United States); Hernandez, Michael; Schonberg, Russell G. [XScell Corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Ross, Randy [Stangenes Industries, Inc., 1052 East Meadow Circle, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband must address stringent, competitive performance requirements. High x-ray intensity is needed to penetrate dense cargo, while low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint, i.e. the size of the controlled area, required shielding and the dose to personnel. In a collaborative effort between HESCO/PTSE Inc., XScell Corp., Stangenes Industries, Inc. and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., an Intensity Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) was designed and produced. Cargo inspection systems utilizing such a source have been projected to achieve up to 2 inches steel-equivalent greater penetration capability, while on average producing the same or smaller radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the design can be used to obtain the same penetration capability as with conventional sources, but reducing the radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to anticipate the needed intensity for each x-ray pulse by evaluating signal strength in the cargo inspection system detector array for the previous pulse. The IMAXS is therefore capable of changing intensity from one pulse to the next by an electronic signal provided by electronics inside the cargo inspection system detector array, which determine the required source intensity for the next pulse. We report on the completion of a 9 MV S-band (2998 MHz) IMAXS source and comment on its performance.

  19. Interpreting the X-ray state transitions of Cygnus X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?echura, Jan; Hadrava, Petr

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel method for interpreting observations of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) based on a combination of spectroscopic data and numerical results from a radiation hydrodynamic model of stellar winds. We calculate synthetic Doppler tomograms of predicted emission in low/hard and high/soft X-ray states and compare them with Doppler tomograms produced using spectra of Cygnus X-1, a prototype of HMXBs. Emission from HMXBs is determined by local conditions within the circumstellar medium, namely density, temperature, and ionization state. These quantities depend strongly on the X-ray state of the systems. By increasing intensity of an X-ray emission produced by the compact companion in the HMXB model, we achieved a complete redistribution of the circumstellar medium in the vicinity of the modelled system. These changes (which simulate the transitions between two major spectral states) are also apparent in the synthetic Doppler tomograms which are in good agreement with the observations.

  20. Availability Performance and Considerations for LCLS X-Ray FEL at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, W.B.; Brachmann, A.; Colocho, W.; Stanek, M.; Warren, J.; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS has been in operation since spring 2009, and it has completed its 3rd user run. LCLS is the first in its class of X-ray FEL user facilities, and presents different availability challenges compared to storage ring light sources. This paper presents recent availability performance of the FEL as well as factors to consider when defining the operational availability figure of merit for user runs. During LCLS [1] user runs, an availability of 95% has been set as a goal. In run III, LCLS photon and electron beam systems achieved availabilities of 94.8% and 96.7%, respectively. The total availability goal can be distributed among subsystems to track performance and identify areas that need attention in order to maintain and improve hardware reliability and operational availability. Careful beam time accounting is needed to understand the distribution of down time. The LCLS complex includes multiple experimental hutches for X-ray science, and each user program has different requirements of a set of parameters that the FEL can be configured to deliver. Since each user may have different criteria for what is considered 'acceptable beam', the quality of the beam must be considered to determine the X-ray beam availability.

  1. In-Situ Decommissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination.  The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both...

  2. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2000; 29: 178186

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    (micro-PIXE) were obtained for different chemical elements for natural and synthetic emeralds. Eighty crystal. These (a) demonstrated the power of micro-PIXE in reveal- ing inclusions in emeralds, which the power of micro-PIXE in the in situ study of minerals. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  3. How Can X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Aide Solar Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are from optimized on structural, energetic and dynamic parameters. Intense X-ray pulses from synchrotrons and X-ray free electrons lasers coupled with ultrafast lasers...

  4. X-rays only when you want them: Report on Pseudo-single-bunch...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speaker: David Robin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Program Description Laser pump - x-ray probe experiments require control over the x-ray pulse pattern and timing. Such...

  5. Scanning X-ray Microscopy Investigations into the Electron Beam Exposure Mechanism of Hydrogen Silsesquioxane Resists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olynick, Deirdre L.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Salmassi, Farhad; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning X-ray Microscopy Investigations into the Electronchemistry is investigated by Scanning Transmission X-raythe area exposed. 15 Recently, scanning transmission x-ray

  6. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular...

  7. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Obsidian Artifacts from Shoofly Ruin, Central Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, M. Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-RAY FLUORESCENCE (XRF) ANALYSIS OF OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS FROM62:426-437. SOUTHWEST XRF PAPER Table 1. X-ray fluorescence

  8. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  9. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  10. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as well as important L-edges of the 3d transition metals important in magnetic and oxide systems. Measurements of soft x-ray absorption spectra are inherently surface sensitive,...

  11. Staff at sector 30, inelastic x-ray scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 30 Staff Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button...

  12. Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Yoshiharu Sakurai (Japan Synchrotron...

  13. The Identification Problem for the attenuated X-ray transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray transform has been solved in [27], see also [15]. The main result in .... For any compact set K ? T2, we define Hs(K) to be the closed subspace of Hs(T2) of

  14. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  15. Epoxy replication for Wolter x-ray microscope fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priedhorsky, W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An epoxy replica of a test piece designed to simulate a Wolter x-ray microscope geometry showed no loss of x-ray reflectivity or resolution, compared to the original. The test piece was a diamond-turned cone with 1.5/sup 0/ half angle. A flat was fly-cut on one side, then super- and conventionally polished. The replica was separated at the 1.5/sup 0/-draft angle, simulating a shallow angle Wolter microscope geometry. A test with 8.34 A x rays at 0.9/sup 0/ grazing angle showed a reflectivity of 67% for the replica flat surface, and 70% for the original. No spread of the reflected beam was observed with a 20-arc second wide test beam. This test verifies the epoxy replication technique for production of Wolter x-ray microscopes.

  16. X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advance required the high brightness of the APS as an X-ray source and points the way to advances that can be expected as it is planned to be increased a hundredfold in the...

  17. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  18. Performance enhancement approaches for a dual energy x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evans, J.P.O. , “Stereoscopic dual energy imaging for targetCrawford, C.R. , “Dual Energy Volumetric X-ray Tomographicimages in 4–10 MeV Dual- energy customs system for material

  19. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 033904 (2011). Web: http:prl.aps.orgpdfPRLv107i3e033904...

  20. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron...

  1. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be used instead of HC FEL. In the following illustra-UM is now tuned for resonant FEL interaction with the 32-nmAttosecond X-Ray Pulses from the FEL Alexander A. Zholents,

  2. X-ray micromodulated luminescence tomography in dual-cone ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 16, 2014 ... ing the intensity of x-ray energy at the vertex point of a double- cone beam. ... such focusing element, but it is of low efficiency and restricted.

  3. X-ray mask and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an x-ray mask tool which is a contact lithographic mask which can provide an x-ray exposure dose which is adjustable from point-to-point. The tool is useful in the preparation of LIGA plating molds made from PMMA, or similar materials. In particular the tool is useful for providing an ability to apply a graded, or "stepped" x-ray exposure dose across a photosensitive substrate. By controlling the x-ray radiation dose from point-to-point, it is possible to control the development process for removing exposed portions of the substrate; adjusting it such that each of these portions develops at a more or less uniformly rate regardless of feature size or feature density distribution.

  4. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  5. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury.

  6. Real-time x-ray studies of gallium nitride nanodot formation by droplet heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yiyi; Oezcan, Ahmet S.; Sanborn, Christopher; Ludwig, Karl F.; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Zhou Lin; Smith, David J. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA and School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-organized gallium nitride nanodots have been fabricated using droplet heteroepitaxy on c-plane sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy at different substrate temperatures and Ga fluxes. Nanoscale Ga droplets were initially formed on the sapphire substrate at high temperatures by Ga deposition from an effusion cell in an ultrahigh vacuum growth chamber. Subsequently, the droplets were converted into GaN nanodots using a nitrogen plasma source. The process was monitored and controlled using real-time grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The samples were examined postgrowth by in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction, which confirmed the epitaxial relationship between the GaN nanodots and the sapphire surface. X-ray diffraction indicated that the wurtzite phase was dominant at higher substrate temperature (710 deg. C), but a mixture of wurtzite and zinc blende phases was present at a substrate temperature of 620 deg. C. Ex situ atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that the dot size distribution was bimodal. A thin GaN continuous layer of {approx} three monolayers thick was observed by transmission electron microscopy on the sample grown at a substrate temperature of 620 deg. C, but no such layer was observed for the substrate temperature of 710 deg. C. This suggests that there is little mobility of Ga atoms in contact with the sapphire substrate at the lower temperature so that they cannot easily diffuse to nearby droplets and instead form a thin layer covering the surface.

  7. Real-Time X-ray Studies of Gallium Nitride Nanodot Formation by Droplet Heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang,Y.; Ozcan, A.; Sanborn, C.; Ludwig, K.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T.; Zhou, L.; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-organized gallium nitride nanodots have been fabricated using droplet heteroepitaxy on c-plane sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy at different substrate temperatures and Ga fluxes. Nanoscale Ga droplets were initially formed on the sapphire substrate at high temperatures by Ga deposition from an effusion cell in an ultrahigh vacuum growth chamber. Subsequently, the droplets were converted into GaN nanodots using a nitrogen plasma source. The process was monitored and controlled using real-time grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The samples were examined postgrowth by in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction, which confirmed the epitaxial relationship between the GaN nanodots and the sapphire surface. X-ray diffraction indicated that the wurtzite phase was dominant at higher substrate temperature (710? C), but a mixture of wurtzite and zinc blende phases was present at a substrate temperature of 620? C. Ex situ atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that the dot size distribution was bimodal. A thin GaN continuous layer of ? three monolayers thick was observed by transmission electron microscopy on the sample grown at a substrate temperature of 620? C, but no such layer was observed for the substrate temperature of 710? C. This suggests that there is little mobility of Ga atoms in contact with the sapphire substrate at the lower temperature so that they cannot easily diffuse to nearby droplets and instead form a thin layer covering the surface.

  8. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. II. EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of thermonuclear bursts observed from low-mass X-ray binaries offer a unique tool to measure neutron-star masses and radii. In this paper, we continue our systematic analysis of all the X-ray bursts observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from X-ray binaries. We determine the events that show clear evidence for photospheric radius expansion and measure the Eddington limits for these accreting neutron stars using the bolometric fluxes attained at the touchdown moments of each X-ray burst. We employ a Bayesian technique to investigate the degree to which the Eddington limit for each source remains constant between bursts. We find that for sources with a large number of radius expansion bursts, systematic uncertainties are at a 5%-10% level. Moreover, in six sources with only pairs of Eddington-limited bursts, the distribution of fluxes is consistent with a {approx}10% fractional dispersion. This indicates that the spectroscopic measurements of neutron-star masses and radii using thermonuclear X-ray bursts can reach the level of accuracy required to distinguish between different neutron-star equations of state, provided that uncertainties related to the overall flux calibration of X-ray detectors are of comparable magnitude.

  9. Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, I. Matias; Combe, Gaeel; Foray, Pierre; Flin, Frederic; Lesaffre, Bernard [Universite de Grenoble, 3SR Lab, UMR 5521 Grenoble-INP, UJF-Grenoble 1, CNRS, Grenoble, France CEN, CNRM-GAME UMR 3589, Meteo France - CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Pile foundations of offshore platforms, wind and water turbines are typically subjected to a variety of cyclic loading paths due to their complex environment. While many studies focus on global pile behaviour, the soil-pile interface is explored here by a micromechanical study of the soil layer in contact with the pile surface. This work is devoted to the analysis of frozen post-mortem silica sand samples recovered at the pile interface following installation and cyclic loading tests in a calibration chamber using x-ray tomography. An experimental procedure developed for three dimensional (3D) snow imaging was adapted for the recovery of the in-situ sand samples to preserve their structure during tomography scans. 3D images at a pixel size of 7 {mu}m were then obtained using a cryogenic cell. Results confirm the presence of a shear band at the pile surface as well as void ratios changes in the direction of the pile's radius.

  10. Wavelet-based local region-of-interest reconstruction for synchrotron radiation x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Lingqi; Toda, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Toshiro; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyougo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation x-ray microtomography is becoming a uniquely powerful method to nondestructively access three-dimensional internal microstructure in biological and engineering materials, with a resolution of 1 {mu}m or less. The tiny field of view of the detector, however, requires that the sample has to be strictly small, which would limit the practical applications of the method such as in situ experiments. In this paper, a wavelet-based local tomography algorithm is proposed to recover a small region of interest inside a large object only using the local projections, which is motivated by the localization property of wavelet transform. Local tomography experiment for an Al-Cu alloy is carried out at SPring-8, the third-generation synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. The proposed method readily enables the high-resolution observation for a large specimen, by which the applicability of the current microtomography would be promoted to a large extent.

  11. Speciation of Uranium in Sediments Before and After in Situ Biostimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Phillips, Debra H [Queen's University, Belfast; Watson, David B [ORNL; Wu, Weimin [Stanford University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of sequestration-based remediation strategies will depend on detailed information, including the predominant U species present as sources before biostimulation and the products produced during and after in situ biostimulation. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the valence state and chemical speciation of U in sediment samples collected at a variety of depths through the contaminant plume at the Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN, before and after approximately 400 days of in situ biostimulation, as well as in duplicate bioreduced sediments after 363 days of resting conditions. The results indicate that U(VI) in subsurface sediments was partially reduced to 10-40% U(IV) during biostimulation. After biostimulation, U was no longer bound to carbon ligands and was adsorbed to Fe/Mn minerals. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) continued in sediment samples stored under anaerobic condition at <4 C for 12 months, with the fraction of U(IV) in sediments more than doubling and U concentrations in the aqueous phase decreasing from 0.5-0.74 to <0.1 {micro}M. A shift of uranyl species from uranyl bound to phosphorus ligands to uranyl bound to carbon ligands and the formation of nanoparticulate uraninite occurred in the sediment samples during storage.

  12. Speciation of uranium in sediments before and after in situ biostimulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Carley, J.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P. M.; Marsh, T. L.; Phillips, D.; Watson, D.; Wu, W.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Stanford Univ.; Michigan State Univ.; Queen's Univ. of Belfast

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of sequestration-based remediation strategies will depend on detailed information, including the predominant U species present as sources before biostimulation and the products produced during and after in situ biostimulation. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the valence state and chemical speciation of U in sediment samples collected at a variety of depths through the contaminant plume at the Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN, before and after approximately 400 days of in situ biostimulation, as well as in duplicate bioreduced sediments after 363 days of resting conditions. The results indicate that U(VI) in subsurface sediments was partially reduced to 10-40% U(IV) during biostimulation. After biostimulation, U was no longer bound to carbon ligands and was adsorbed to Fe/Mn minerals. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) continued in sediment samples stored under anaerobic condition at <4 C for 12 months, with the fraction of U(IV) in sediments more than doubling and U concentrations in the aqueous phase decreasing from 0.5-0.74 to <0.1 {micro}M. A shift of uranyl species from uranyl bound to phosphorus ligands to uranyl bound to carbon ligands and the formation of nanoparticulate uraninite occurred in the sediment samples during storage.

  13. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W. (Albuquerque, NM); Turman, Bobby N. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaye, Ronald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  14. Quantum coherence phenomena in x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisimov, Petr Mikhailovich

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN X-RAY OPTICS A Dissertation by PETR MIKHAILOVICH ANISIMOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December... 2008 Major Subject: Physics QUANTUM COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN X-RAY OPTICS A Dissertation by PETR MIKHAILOVICH ANISIMOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  15. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roger Falcone

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  16. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Vulcanized Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toki,S.; Hsiao, B.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Tosaka, A.; Tsou, A.; Datta, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique has revealed strain-induced crystallization and molecular orientation in vulcanized rubbers and thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) during deformation in real time. The stress-strain curves and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns in vulcanized rubbers and TPE were measured simultaneously. In-situ WAXD patterns were taken not only at different strains during uniaxial deformation but also at different temperatures at a constant strain. Results lead to several new insights. (i) Strain-induced crystallization is a common phenomenon in vulcanized rubbers, except SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber), and in TPE (with crystalline hard segments). (ii) Strain-induced crystallization decreases the stress and increases the elongation in the strained rubber. (iii) The hybrid structure of chemical networks and strain-induced crystallites is responsible to the tensile strength and elongation at break for both systems. (iiii) Some original crystal fraction (hard segment domain) in TPE is destroyed. During deformation, strain-induced crystallization increases with strain. Upon retraction even to stress zero, the majority of oriented strain-induced crystallites remains in tack with preferred orientation.

  18. Using Synchrotron X-Ray Nano-CT to Characterize SOFC Electrode Microstructures in Three-Dimensions at Operating Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearing, P.R.; Bradley, R.S.; Gelb, J.; Lee, S.N.; Atkinson, A.; Withers, P.J.; Brandon, N.P. (Manchester); (Xradia); (ICL)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, developments in tomography tools have provided unprecedented insight into the microstructure of electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells, enabling researchers to establish direct links between electrode microstructure and electrochemical performance. Here we present results of high resolution, synchrotron X-ray nano computed tomography experiments, which have enabled microstructural characterisation of a mixed ionic electronic conducting lanthanum strontium cobalt iron oxide (LSCF) cathode with sub-50nm resolution at operating temperature. Using the uniquely non-destructive nano-CT platform, it is possible to characterise microstructural evolution processes associated with heating and operation in-situ.

  19. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  20. Quiet Sun X-rays as Signature for New Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zioutas; K. Dennerl; L. DiLella; D. H. H. Hoffmann; J. Jacoby; Th. Papaevangelou

    2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied published data from the Yohkoh solar X-ray mission, with the purpose of searching for signals from radiative decays of new, as yet undiscovered massive neutral particles. This search is based on the prediction that solar axions of the Kaluza-Klein type should result in the emission of X-rays from the Sun direction beyond the limb with a characteristic radial distribution. These X-rays should be observed more easily during periods of quiet Sun. An additional signature is the observed emission of hard X-rays by SMM, NEAR and RHESSI. The recent observation made by RHESSI of a continuous emission from the non-flaring Sun of X-rays in the 3 to ~15 keV range fits the generic axion scenario. This work also suggests new analyses of existing data, in order to exclude instrumental effects; it provides the rationale for targeted observations with present and upcoming (solar) X-ray telescopes, which can provide the final answer on the nature of the signals considered here. Such measurements become more promising during the forthcoming solar cycle minimum with an increased number of quiet Sun periods.

  1. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  2. Hydrostatic low-range pressure applications of the Paris-Edinburgh cell utilising polymer gaskets for diffuse x-ray scattering measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Kurtz, C.; Locke, D.; Parise, J. B.; Hriljac, J. A.; Stony Brook Univ.; Univ. of Birmingham

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a polymeric Torlon (polyamide-imide) gasket material in a Paris-Edinburgh pressure cell for in situ high-pressure X-ray scattering measurements is demonstrated. The relatively low bulk modulus of the gasket allows for fine control of the sample pressure over the range 0.01-0.42 GPa. The quality of the data obtained in this way is suitable for Bragg and pair distribution function analysis.

  3. Optimization for Single-Spike X-Ray FELs at LCLS with a Low Charge Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron radiation sources. At the low charge operation mode (20 pC), the x-ray pulse length can be <10 fs. In this paper we report our numerical optimization and simulations to produce even shorter x-ray pulses by optimizing the machine and undulator setup at 20 pC charge. In the soft x-ray regime, with combination of slotted-foil or undulator taper, a single spike x-ray pulse is achievable with peak FEL power of a few 10s GW. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray Free electron laser (FEL), has started operation since 2009. With nominal operation charge of 250 pC, the generated x-ray pulse length is from 70 fs to a few hundred fs. This marks the beginning of a new era of ultrashort x-ray sciences. In addition, a low charge (20pC) operation mode has also been established. Since the collective effects are reduced at the low charge mode, we can increase the compression factor and still achieve a few kA peak current. The expected electron beam and x-ray pulses are less than 10 fs. There are growing interests in even shorter x-ray pulses, such as fs to sub-fs regime. One of the simple solutions is going to even lower charge. As discussed, single-spike x-ray pulses can be generated using 1 pC charge. However, this charge level is out of the present LCLS diagnostic range. 20 pC is a reasonable operation charge at LCLS, based on the present diagnostic system. At 20 pC in the soft x-ray wavelength regime, we have experimentally demonstrated that FEL can work at undercompression or over-compression mode, such as 1 degree off the full-compression; at full-compression, however, there is almost no lasing. In hard x-ray wavelength regime, we observed that there are reasonable photons generated even at full-compression mode, although the photon number is less than that from under-compression or over-compression mode. Since we cannot measure the x-ray pulse length at this time scale, the machine is typically optimized for generating maximum photons, not minimum pulse length. In this paper, we study the methods of producing femtosecond (or single-spike) x-ray pulses at LCLS with 20 pC charge, based on start-to-end simulations. Figure 1 shows a layout of LCLS. The compression in the second bunch compressor (BC2) determines the final e-beam bunch length. However, the laser heater, dog-leg after the main linac (DL2) and collective effects also affect the final bunch length. To adjust BC2 compression, we can either change the L2 phase or BC2 R{sub 56}. In this paper we only tune L2 phase while keep BC2 R{sub 56} fixed. For the start-to-end simulations, we used IMPACT-T and ELEGANT tracking from the photocathode to the entrance of the undulator, after that the FEL radiation was simulated with GENESIS. IMPACT-T tracks about 10{sup 6} particles in the injector part until 135 MeV, including 3D space charge force. The output particles from IMPACT-T are smoothed and increased to 12 x 10{sup 6} to reduce high-frequency numerical noise for subsequent ELEGANT simulations, which include linear and nonlinear transport effects, a 1D transient model of CSR, and longitudinal space charge effects, as well as geometric and resistive wake fields in the accelerator. In GENESIS part, the longitudinal wake field from undulator chamber and longitudinal space field are also included.

  4. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F,more »in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.« less

  5. FULL FIELD X-RAY IMAGING (FXI) Group Leader: Wah-Keat Lee2 Proposal Team: G. Amatucci1, L. Berman2, L. Butler3, W. Chiu4, Y. Chu2, P. Crane5, D. Dunand6,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    -operando studies of energy storage devices · X-ray imaging for biofuels to evaluate biomass breakdown · In situ · Nanostructure of biological armor · Micro and nano physiological networks Micro/nano fluidic devices. K dynamics of freeze-casting for biomaterials · Micro and nanofluidic devices from biomimetics

  6. 54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed

  7. IN-SITU XRD OF OPERATING LSFC CATHODES: DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) research capability has been developed that facilitates measuring the electrochemical performance of an operating SOFC while simultaneously performing x-ray diffraction on its cathode. The evolution of this research tool’s development is discussed together with a description of the instrumentation used for in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of operating SOFC cathodes. The challenges that were overcome in the process of developing this capability, which included seals and cathode current collectors, are described together with the solutions that are presently being applied to mitigate them.

  8. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating the shortest wavelength laboratory x-ray laser, below 4.5 nm and operating in the water window, by using the high-energy capability of the Titan laser.

  9. A high pressure cell for supercritical CO{sub 2} on-line chemical reactions studied with x-ray techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Portale, Giuseppe; Bras, Wim, E-mail: Wim.Bras@esrf.eu, E-mail: Steve.Howdle@nottingham.ac.uk [DUBBLE@ESRF, Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (N.W.O.), CS40220, 38043, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Fields, Peter; Wilson, Richard; Bassett, Simon P.; Jennings, James; Dellar, Martin; Howdle, Steven M., E-mail: Wim.Bras@esrf.eu, E-mail: Steve.Howdle@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Gommes, Cedric [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Liège B6A, allée du 6 Août 3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Vrolijk, Benno C. M. [Element Six BV, P.O. Box 119, 5430 AC Cuijk (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A versatile high pressure X-ray sample cell has been developed for conducting in situ time-resolved X-ray scattering experiments in the pressure and temperature regime required (pressures up to 210 bars and temperatures up to 120 °C) for chemical reactions in supercritical fluids. The large exit opening angle of the cell allows simultaneous performance of SAXS-WAXS experiments. Diamond windows are used in order to benefit from the combination of maximum strength, minimal X-ray absorption and chemical inertia. The sample cell can also be utilised for X-ray spectroscopy experiments over a wide range of photon energies. Results of the online synthesis of a block copolymer, poly(methyl methacrylate-block-poly(benzyl methacrylate), by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) in a supercritical CO{sub 2} dispersion polymerisation will be discussed. The contribution of the density fluctuations, as function of temperature, to the X-ray scattering signal has been quantified in order to allow appropriate background subtractions.

  10. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many â?? you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability weâ??d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDDâ??s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detectorâ??s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

  11. Calibration of a gated flat field spectrometer as a function of x-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jiyan, E-mail: zhangjiyanzjy@sina.com; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin; Wei, Minxi; Qing, Bo; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental determination of the response of a gated flat-field spectrometer at the Shenguang-II laser facility. X-rays were emitted from a target that was heated by laser beams and then were divided into different intensities with a step aluminum filter and collected by a spectrometer. The transmission of the filter was calibrated using the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The response characteristics of the spectrometer were determined by comparing the counts recorded by the spectrometer with the relative intensities of the x-rays transmitted through the step aluminum filter. The response characteristics were used to correct the transmission from two shots of an opacity experiment using the same samples. The transmissions from the two shots are consistent with corrections, but discrepant without corrections.

  12. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oliva, E [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Lu, L [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Nejdl, J [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Proux, C [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique] [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique; Le, T. T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Dunn, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ros, D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Zeitoun, Philippe [École Polytechnique] [École Polytechnique; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  13. Characterization of Nano and Mesoscale Deformation Structures with Intense X-ray Synchrotron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.E.; Barabash, R.I.; Walker, F.J. (ORNL)

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced polychromatic microdiffraction is sensitive to the organization of dislocations and other defects that rotate the lattice planes. Using ultra-brilliant third-generation synchrotron sources and non-dispersive X-ray focusing optics, it is now possible to analyze individual dislocation cells and walls at a submicron scale that cannot be probed by traditional methods. The method is applied to an Ir weld sample to illustrate how microdiffraction can be used to determine the locally active dislocation system.

  14. Synchrotron X-ray Investigations of Mineral-Microbe-Metal Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between microbes and minerals can play an important role in metal transformations (i.e. changes to an element's valence state, coordination chemistry, or both), which can ultimately affect that element's mobility. Mineralogy affects microbial metabolism and ecology in a system; microbes, in turn, can affect the system's mineralogy. Increasingly, synchrotron-based X-ray experiments are in routine use for determining an element's valence state and coordination chemistry, as well as for examining the role of microbes in metal transformations.

  15. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A., E-mail: cswenson@astro.psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ?1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ?50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of ?t/t ? 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  16. Understanding the performance of x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacture of x-ray mirrors is a rather specialized branch of the optical fabrication industry. As those who have had to deal with the procurement of these components well know, there are only a handful of optical companies who supply most of the grazing incidence optics in use at the synchrotron light source facilities in this country. There is relatively little information available of practical use to guide the user through any of the above steps. We have been ''forced'' to develop our own foundation for assessing the performance of various vendors and determining the quality of the components produced by them. Our approach has been to concentrate on the area of metrology of grazing incidence optics and to develop instruments and techniques that can be used to improve the quality of components delivered to us. The major problem hindering the production of grazing incidence optics is the lack of specialized metrology instrumentation that can be used by the small manufacturing shop to assess the quality of the component under production. We have been engaged over the past several years in developing the theoretical framework and practical measurement techniques to link the metrology to actual performance, providing much-needed feedback to the manufacture and also educating users and manufacturers in the proper understanding of the language of surface figure and finish metrology.

  17. In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni ({approx}25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

  18. Design and fabrication of a multi-purpose soft x-ray array diagnostic system for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Chai, Kil Byoung; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Won-Ha; Kim, Junghee; Seo, Dongcheol; Lee, Jongha [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, Jin-Soo [FAR-TECH, Inc., 10350 Science Center Drive, Building 14, Suite 150, San Diego, California 92121-1136 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-purpose soft x-ray array diagnostic system was developed for measuring two-dimensional x-ray emissivity profile, electron temperature, Ar impurity transport, and total radiation power. A remotely controlled filter wheel was designed with three different choices of filters. The electron temperature profile can be determined from the ratio of two channels having different thickness of Be layer, and the Ar impurity concentration transport can be determined from a pair of Ar Ross filters (CaF{sub 2} and NaCl thin films). Without any filters, this diagnostic system can also be used as a bolometer.

  19. Water destruction by X-rays in young stellar objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Stauber; J. K. Jorgensen; E. F. van Dishoeck; S. D. Doty; A. O. Benz

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the H2O chemistry in star-forming environments under the influence of a central X-ray source and a central far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. The gas-phase water chemistry is modeled as a function of time, hydrogen density and X-ray flux. To cover a wide range of physical environments, densities between n_H = 10^4-10^9 cm^-3 and temperatures between T = 10-1000 K are studied. Three different regimes are found: For T water abundance is of order 10^-7-10^-6 and can be somewhat enhanced or reduced due to X-rays, depending on time and density. For 100 K 10^-3 ergs s-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^4 yrs) and for F_X > 10^-4 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^5 yrs). At higher temperatures (T > 250 K) and hydrogen densities, water can persist with x(H2O) ~ 10^-4 even for high X-ray fluxes. The X-ray and FUV models are applied to envelopes around low-mass Class 0 and I young stellar objects (YSOs). Water is destroyed in both Class 0 and I envelopes on relatively short timescales (t ~ 5000 yrs) for realistic X-ray fluxes, although the effect is less prominent in Class 0 envelopes due to the higher X-ray absorbing densities there. FUV photons from the central source are not effective in destroying water. The average water abundance in Class I sources for L_X > 10^27 ergs s^-1 is predicted to be x(H2O) < 10^-6.

  20. Chandra Multiwavelength Project X-ray Point Source Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsun Kim; Dong-Woo Kim; Belinda J. Wilkes; Paul J. Green; Eunhyeuk Kim; Craig S. Anderson; Wayne A. Barkhouse; Nancy R. Evans; Zeljko Ivezic; Margarita Karovska; Vinay L. Kashyap; Myung Gyoon Lee; Peter Maksym; Amy E. Mossman; John D. Silverman; Harvey D. Tananbaum

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) X-ray point source catalog with ~6,800 X-ray sources detected in 149 Chandra observations covering \\~10 deg^2. The full ChaMP catalog sample is seven times larger than the initial published ChaMP catalog. The exposure time of the fields in our sample ranges from 0.9 to 124 ksec, corresponding to a deepest X-ray flux limit of f_{0.5-8.0} = 9 x 10^{-16} erg/cm2/sec. The ChaMP X-ray data have been uniformly reduced and analyzed with ChaMP-specific pipelines, and then carefully validated by visual inspection. The ChaMP catalog includes X-ray photometric data in 8 different energy bands as well as X-ray spectral hardness ratios and colors. To best utilize the ChaMP catalog, we also present the source reliability, detection probability and positional uncertainty. To quantitatively assess those parameters, we performed extensive simulations. In particular, we present a set of empirical equations: the flux limit as a function of effective exposure time, and the positional uncertainty as a function of source counts and off axis angle. The false source detection rate is ~1% of all detected ChaMP sources, while the detection probability is better than ~95% for sources with counts >30 and off axis angle <5 arcmin. The typical positional offset between ChaMP X-ray source and their SDSS optical counterparts is 0.7+-0.4 arcsec, derived from ~900 matched sources.