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1

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

Evaluation of very long baseline interferometry atmospheric modeling improvements  

SciTech Connect

We determine the improvement in baseline length precision and accuracy using new atmospheric delay mapping functions and MTT by analyzing the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project research and development (R&D) experiments and the International Radio Interferometric Surveying (IRIS) A experiments. These mapping functions reduce baseline length scatter by about 20% below that using the CfA2.2 dry and Chao wet mapping functions. With the newer mapping functions, average station vertical scatter inferred from observed length precision (given by length repeatabilites) is 11.4 mm for the 1987-1990 monthly R&D series of experiments and 5.6 mm for the 3-week-long extended research and development experiment (ERDE) series. The inferred monthly R&D station vertical scatter is reduced by 2 mm or by 7 mm is a root-sum-square (rss) sense. Length repeatabilities are optimum when observations below a 7-8 deg elevation cutoff are removed from the geodetic solution. Analyses of IRIS-A data from 1984 through 1991 and the monthly R&D experiments both yielded a nonatmospheric unmodeled station vertical error or about 8 mm. In addition, analysis of the IRIS-A exeriments revealed systematic effects in the evolution of some baseline length measurements. The length rate of change has an apparent acceleration, and the length evolution has a quasi-annual signature. We show that the origin of these effects is unlikely to be related to atmospheric modeling errors. Rates of change of the transatlantic Westford-Wettzell and Richmond-Wettzell baseline lengths calculated from 1988 through 1991 agree with the NUVEL-1 plate motion model (Argus and Gordon, 1991) to within 1 mm/yr.

Macmillan, D.S.; Ma, C. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

IMPROVING AND EXPANDING PRECISION ORBIT DERIVED ATMOSPHERIC DENSITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the area facing the Earth, were determined so that these areas could be used to estimate the atmospheric drag, the force due to solar radiation pressure, and the force due to Earth radiation pressure (infrared and Earth albedo). This was done for both Terra...

Mysore Krishna, Dhaval

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composites using atmospheric plasma treatment. J. Appl.of polymer surfaces: atmospheric plasma versus vacuum plasmaA. Morgan, The effect of atmospheric plasma treatment on the

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Determination, Control & Improvement of an SKA Radio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SKA core sites were chosen in a sparsely populated part of South Africa, in the Northern Cape ProvinceDetermination, Control & Improvement of an SKA Radio Environment in South Africa Three potential -200 -150 -100 -50 0 Frequency spectrum 150 to 174 MHz Spectralpowerflux-density Agg Signal Kalahari

Ellingson, Steven W.

6

Calibrations of filter radiometers for determination of atmospheric optical depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric optical depths are determined by relating ground-based measurements of direct solar radiation to the extraterrestrial value, I0, that a filter radiometer would read outside the atmosphere. Usually I0 is determined by the Langley extrapolation technique from a high-altitude site, where clear and highly stable atmospheric conditions may be found. Alternatively, I0 can be measured in situ from a stratospheric balloon experiment. We have employed both methods and found agreement to better than 1 %. Filter radiometers tend to change over time, especially when used operationally outdoors. Absolute calibrations in the laboratory are used to monitor the radiometric stability of filter radiometers at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD/WRC, Switzerland). A spectral calibration facility based on a calibrated trap detector from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) is used to relate the filter radiometer to an accurate and long-term traceable standard. An FEL-lamp-based standard, previously used for several years, was compared with the new trap standard via a filter radiometer at four wavelengths between 368 nm and 862 nm and revealed a systematic difference of the order of 5 %. The link between radiometric and I0 calibration is the value of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum at the filter radiometer wavelengths which can be determined from these two calibrations and compared with published values.

Ch Wehrli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Discrete Packet Analysis for Improved Atmospheric Rejection on Modulated Laser Signals  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show discusses how the method of discrete packet analysis improves atmospheric compensation for quasi-CW fluorescence detection methods. This is key to improving remote sensing capabilities.

O'Neill, M., McKenna, I., DiBenedetto, J., Capelle, G., Trainham, R.

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An atmospheric pressure plasma source operating at temperatures below 150°C and fed with 1.0-3.0 volume% oxygen in helium was used to activate the surfaces of… (more)

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Improved Adhesion of Dense Silica Coatings on Polymers by Atmospheric Plasma Pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved Adhesion of Dense Silica Coatings on Polymers by Atmospheric Plasma Pretreatment ... In another study,(7) which compared the treatments of low- and atmospheric-pressure plasmas, the authors reported that the low-pressure plasma treatment increased the adhesion with extended treatment time but prolonged atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment decreased the adhesion to epoxy. ... The authors begin with a brief overview of adhesion theory, and of the physics and chem. of cold plasmas. ...

Linying Cui; Alpana N. Ranade; Marvi A. Matos; Geraud Dubois; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination  

SciTech Connect

As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Improved HCN/HNC linelist, model atmospheres and synthetic spectra for WZ Cas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build an accurate database of 5200 HCN and HNC rotation-vibration energy levels, determined from existing laboratory data. 20~000 energy levels in the Harris et al. (2002) linelist are assigned approximate quantum numbers. These assignments, lab determined energy levels and Harris et al (2002) energy levels are incorporated in to a new energy level list. A new linelist is presented, in which frequencies are computed using the lab determined energy levels where available, and the ab initio energy levels otherwise. The new linelist is then used to compute new model atmospheres and synthetic spectra for the carbon star WZ Cas. This results in better fit to the spectrum of WZ Cas in which the absorption feature at 3.56 micron is reproduced to a higher degree of accuracy than has previously been possible. We improve the reproduction of HCN absorption features by reducing the abundance of Si to [Si/H] = --0.5 dex, however, the strengths of the $\\Delta v=2$ CS band heads are over-predicted.

G. J. Harris; J. Tennyson; B. M. Kaminsky; Ya. V. Pavlenko; H. R. A. Jones

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Domain: Impact of Improved Molecular Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Domain: Impact of Improved Molecular Spectroscopy A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada B. Hwang Intermap Technologies Corp. Calgary, Canada Z. Li University of Maryland and The Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center College Park, Maryland Introduction Atmospheric correction of satellite measurements is a major step in the retrieval of surface reflective properties. It involves removing the effect of gaseous absorption as well as correcting for the effect of an atmospheric molecular and particulate scattering. In the past few years, there has been significant advancement in our knowledge of the absorbing properties of various atmospheric radiatively active

13

On the Cooling and Evaporative Powers of the Atmosphere, as Determined by the Kata-thermometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 April 1919 research-article On the Cooling and Evaporative Powers of the Atmosphere, as Determined by the Kata-thermometer Leonard Hill D. Hargood-Ash The Royal Society is collaborating with...

1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Title Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-45618 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Xiaomin Liu, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-45618 Date Published May 4 Abstract Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential water heater energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a water heater and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers are significant. At the efficiency level examined in this paper, 35% of households with electric water heaters experience LCC savings, with an average savings of $106, while 4% show LCC losses, with an average loss of $40 compared to a pre-standard LCC average of $2,565. The remainder of the population (61%) are largely unaffected.

15

Atmospheric plasma treatment to improve durability of a water and oil repellent finishing for acrylic fabrics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of an atmospheric plasma treatment on the durability of a commercial water and oil repellent finish was tested. Acrylic fabrics were processed with a RF atmospheric pressure plasma generator and afterwards a fluorocarbon finish was applied through a traditional pad-dry-cure method. Two gas mixtures were tested (helium and helium/oxygen) with different plasma treatment times. The ageing of the finishing was simulated through repeated accelerated laundry cycles. The water and oil repellencies were measured through standard test methods. While the initial water and oil repellency did not change, the plasma treatment improved the durability of the finish after artificial ageing. Scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to highlight morphological changes.

Alberto Ceria; Peter J. Hauser

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Determining stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of FGK stars with iSpec  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. An increasing number of high-resolution stellar spectra is available today thanks to many past and ongoing extensive spectroscopic surveys. Consequently, the scientific community needs automatic procedures to derive atmospheric parameters and individual element abundances. Aims. Based on the widely known SPECTRUM code by R. O. Gray, we developed an integrated spectroscopic software framework suitable for the determination of atmospheric parameters (i.e., effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity) and individual chemical abundances. The code, named iSpec and freely distributed, is written mainly in Python and can be used on different platforms. Methods. iSpec can derive atmospheric parameters by using the synthetic spectral fitting technique and the equivalent width method. We validated the performance of both approaches by developing two different pipelines and analyzing the Gaia FGK benchmark stars spectral library. The analysis was complemented with several tests designed to assess other ...

Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Heiter, U; Jofré, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Improvement of Moist and Radiative Processes in Highly Parallel Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Validation and Development  

SciTech Connect

Research on designing an integrated moist process parameterization package was carried. This work began with a study that coupled an ensemble of cloud models to a boundary layer model to examine the feasibility of such a methodology for linking boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes. The approach proved feasible, prompting research to design and evaluate a coupled parameterization package for GCMS. This research contributed to the development of an Integrated Cumulus Ensemble-Turbulence (ICET) parameterization package. This package incorporates a higher-order turbulence boundary layer that feeds information concerning updraft properties and the variances of temperature and water vapor to the cloud parameterizations. The cumulus ensemble model has been developed, and initial sensitivity tests have been performed in the single column model (SCM) version of CCM2. It is currently being coupled to a convective wake/gust front model. The major function of the convective wake/gust front model is to simulate the partitioning of the boundary layer into disturbed and undisturbed regions. A second function of this model is to predict the nonlinear enhancement of surface to air sensible heat and moisture fluxes that occur in convective regimes due to correlations between winds and anomalously cold, dry air from downdrafts in the gust front region. The third function of the convective wake/gust front model is to predict the amount of undisturbed boundary layer air lifted by the leading edge of the wake and the height to which this air is lifted. The development of the wake/gust front model has been completed, and it has done well in initial testing as a stand-alone component. The current task, to be completed by the end of the funding period, is to tie the wake model to a cumulus ensemble model and to install both components into the single column model version of CCM3 for evaluation. Another area of parametrization research has been focused on the representation of cloud radiative properties. An examination of the CCM2 simulation characteristics indicated that many surface temperature and warm land precipitation problems were linked to deficiencies in the specification of cloud optical properties, which allowed too much shortwave radiation to reach the surface. In-cloud liquid water path was statically specified in the CCM2 using a "prescribed, meridionally and height varying, but time independent, cloud liquid water density profile, which was analytically determined from a meridionally specified liquid water scale height. Single-column model integrations were conducted to explore alternative formulations for the cloud liquid water path diagnostic, converging on an approach that employs a similar, but state-dependent technique for determining in-cloud liquid water concentration. The new formulation, results in significant improvements to both the top-of- atmosphere and surface energy budgets. In particular, when this scheme is incorporated in the three-dimensional GCM, simulated July surface temperature biases are substantially reduced, where summer precipitation over the northern hemisphere continents, as well as precipitation rates over most all warm land areas, is more consistent with observations". This improved parameterization has been incorporated in the CCM3.

Frank, William M.; Hack, James J.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Improvements of surface functionality of cotton fibers by atmospheric plasma treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to investigate the viability of atmospheric plasma treatment over raw cotton fabric surfaces as ... , the fabric samples were treated with air plasma and argon atmospheric plasma. Thereafter, the ...

H. A. Karahan; E. Özdo?an

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Experimental determination of the effective structure-function parameter for atmospheric turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective structure-function parameter for scattering by atmospheric turbulentvelocityfluctuations has normally been assumed to be C eff 2 =4C V 2 /c 0 2 where C V 2 is the velocitystructure-function parameter and c 0 the sound speed. However a new derivation by Ostashev [WavesRandom Media4 403–428 (1994)] which takes into account the vectorial nature of the wind velocity field suggests that C eff 2 =22C V 2 /3c 0 2 . An experiment was designed to determine the correct value of the coefficient. Sound-pressure amplitude variances were monitored for several discrete frequencies between 380 and 3800 Hz at distances up to 250 m. Cup and hot-wire anemometers were used to determine C V 2 . A theory for scattering by inertial-subrange turbulence was then used to calculate the C eff 2 coefficient from the amplitude variance and C V 2 . Datasets recorded under different atmospheric conditions yielded different relationships between the coefficients and failed to verify either the 4 or 22/3 value. Some possible explanations for this behavior are discussed including the need for more realistic meteorological modeling.

D. K. Wilson; D. I. Havelock; M. Heyd; M. J. Smith; J. M. Noble; H. J. Auvermann

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Which Hydrogen Balmer Lines Are Most Reliable for Determining White Dwarf Atmospheric Parameters?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our preliminary results from laboratory experiments studying white dwarf (WD) photospheres show a systematic difference between experimental plasma conditions inferred from measured H$\\beta$ absorption line profiles versus those from H$\\gamma$. One hypothesis for this discrepancy is an inaccuracy in the relative theoretical line profiles of these two transitions. This is intriguing because atmospheric parameters inferred from H Balmer lines in observed WD spectra show systematic trends such that inferred surface gravities decrease with increasing principal quantum number, $n$. If conditions inferred from lower-$n$ Balmer lines are indeed more accurate, this suggests that spectroscopically determined DA WD masses may be greater than previously thought and in better agreement with the mean mass determined from gravitational redshifts.

Falcon, Ross E; Bailey, J E; Gomez, T A; Montgomery, M H; Winget, D E; Nagayama, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coupling Terrestrial and Atmospheric Water Dynamics to Improve Prediction in a Changing Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluxes across the land surface directly influence predictions of ecological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and terrestrial hydrology. However, many simplifications are made in numerical models when considering ...

Lyon, Steve W.; Dominguez, Francina; Gochis, David J.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Castro, Christopher; Chow, Fotini K.; Fan, Ying; Fuka, Daniel; Hong, Yang; Kucera, Paul A.; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Salzmann, Nadine; Schmidli, Juerg; Snyder, Peter K.; Teuling, Adriaam J.; Twine, Tracy E.; Levis, Samuel; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Sealy, Andrea M.; Walter, M. Todd

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Plasma treatment of carbon fibres and glass-fibre-reinforced polyesters at atmospheric pressure for adhesion improvement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment is useful for adhesion improvement, because cleaning, roughening and addition of polar functional groups can be expected at the surfaces. Its possible applications in the wind energy industry include plasma treatment of fibres and fibre-reinforced polymer composites before assembling them to build wind turbine blades. In the present work, unsized carbon fibres are continuously treated using a dielectric barrier discharge plasma in helium at atmospheric pressure, and carbon fibre reinforced epoxy composite plates are manufactured for the mechanical test. The plasma treatment improved fracture toughness, indicating that adhesion between the fibres and the epoxy was enhanced by the treatment. In addition, glass-fibre-reinforced polyester plates are treated using a gliding arc and an ultrasound enhanced dielectric barrier discharge, improving the wettability and/or the adhesive strength with a vinylester resin.

Yukihiro Kusano; Tom L. Andersen; Helmuth L. Toftegaard; Frank Leipold; Alexander Bardenshtein; Niels Krebs

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Binary Contamination in the SEGUE Sample: Effects on SSPP Determinations of Stellar Atmospheric Parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the effects that unresolved binaries have on the determination of various stellar atmospheric parameters for targets from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) using numerical modeling, a grid of synthetic spectra, and the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SEGUE survey, a component of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) project focusing on Galactic structure, provides medium resolution spectroscopy for over 200,000 stars of various spectral types over a large area on the sky. To model undetected binaries that may be in this sample, we use a variety of mass distributions for the primary and secondary stars in conjunction with empirically determined relationships for orbital parameters to determine the fraction of G - K dwarf stars, defined by SDSS color cuts as having 0.48 ? (g – r)0 ? 0.75, that will be blended with a secondary companion. We focus on the G-K dwarf sample in SEGUE as it records the history of chemical enrichment in our galaxy. To determine the effect of the secondary on the spectroscopic parameters, specifically effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and [?/Fe], we synthesize a grid of model spectra from 3275 to 7850 K and [Fe/H] = –0.5 to –2.5 from MARCS model atmospheres using TurboSpectrum. These temperature and metallicity ranges roughly correspond to a stellar mass range of 0.1-1.0 M ?. We assume that both stars in the pair have the same metallicity. We analyze both "infinite" signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) models and degraded versions of the spectra, at median S/N of 50, 25, and 10. By running individual and combined spectra (representing the binaries) through the SSPP, we determine that ~10% of the blended G - K dwarf pairs with S/N ? 25 will have their atmospheric parameter determinations, in particular temperature and metallicity, noticeably affected by the presence of an undetected secondary; namely, they will be shifted beyond the expected SSPP uncertainties. Shifts in [Fe/H] largely result from the shifts in temperature caused by a secondary. The additional uncertainty from binarity in targets with S/N ? 25 is ~80 K in temperature and ~0.1 dex in [Fe/H]. The effect on surface gravity and [?/Fe] is even smaller. As the S/N of targets decreases, the uncertainties from undetected secondaries increase. For S/N = 10, 40% of the G-K dwarf sample is shifted beyond expected uncertainties for this S/N in effective temperature and/or metallicity. To account for the additional uncertainty from binary contamination at an S/N ~ 10, the most extreme scenario, uncertainties of ~140 K and ~0.17 dex in [Fe/H] must be added in quadrature to the published uncertainties of the SSPP.

Katharine J. Schlesinger; Jennifer A. Johnson; Young Sun Lee; Thomas Masseron; Brian Yanny; Constance M. Rockosi; B. Scott Gaudi; Timothy C. Beers

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft, and surface data during the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft overcast conditions the aircraft measurements yield an absorptance of 0.32 0.03 for the layer between the aircraft (0.5­13 km), while the GOES 8 albedo versus surface transmittance analysis gives an absorptance

Dong, Xiquan

27

A rapid and precise method for sampling and determining the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002; Accepted 1 March 2002 A quantitative method for cryogenically sampling atmospheric water vapor recovery of a vaporized, known, 18 O water standard to 0.2% precision. Copyright # 2002 John Wiley & Sons differentially affect both the concentration and isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor.5,8,9 Measurements

Ehleringer, Jim

28

Improving the Representation of the Physical Atmosphere in Central California Using Satellite Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constrained by observations. Moisture, Heat Capacity, Solar Radiation from Satellite Observations #12; EGHRImproving the Representation of the Physical Atmosphere in Central California Using Satellite Data/22/2006 8/23/2006 8/24/2006 Date Agreementindex(fraction) AI_cntrl AI_assim W0 #12;Central California

Jacob, Daniel J.

29

DETERMINATION OF LOW-Z ELEMENTS IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY CHARGED-PARTICLE-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the nuclear reaction N14 (p,a)c 11 with low-energy protonsLOW-Z ELEMENTS IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY CHARGED-PARTICLE-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS Mark Steven Clemenson Energy

Clemenson, Mark Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Improved Gas Chromatographic Method for the Determination of Perfluorocarbon Tracers in the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......U.S. Department of Energy, New York, New York...U.S. Department of Energy, New York, New York...quantity, hence the cost, of the tracer required...experiments in the geysers geothermal area. RH. Gudiksen...U. S. Department of Energy, New York, NY(1991......

Raymond J. Lagomarsino

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DETERMINATION, CONTROL AND IMPROVEMENT OF AN SKA RADIO ENVIRONMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION, CONTROL AND IMPROVEMENT OF AN SKA RADIO ENVIRONMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA By Neël Smuts1 ABSTRACT South Africa, in its bid to host the SKA2 , has adopted a dual approach to determine, assess Recommendations and Resolutions and South African legal provisions. An overview of this process is provided. Even

Ellingson, Steven W.

32

Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: Improved resin adhesive penetration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Methods Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15 s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6 mA, treatment time 30 s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30 s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5 s, and light-cured for 20 s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-?m spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. Results The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. Conclusion The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and restorative materials.

Ying Zhang; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Simultaneous Gas Chromatographic Determination of Four Toxic Gases Generally Present in Combustion Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......determining these gases in mixtures...dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and...determining these gases in mixtures...dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and...to the solubility of A HCN in water, which was...thevariationin gas con- centrations......

Boyd R. Endecott; Donald C. Sanders; Arvind K. Chaturvedi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/?-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/?-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/?-TCP scaffolds.

Yu-Ri Choi; Jae-Sung Kwon; Doo-Hoon Song; Eun Ha Choi; Yong-Keun Lee; Kyoung-Nam Kim; Kwang-Mahn Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Study of atmospheric pressure weakly ionized plasma as surface compatibilization technique for improved plastic composites loaded with cellulose based fillers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained considerable interest from researchers recently for their unique prospective of engineering surfaces with plasma without the need of vacuum systems.… (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Atmospheric structure and variability in areas of convective storms determined from 3-h rawinsonde data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes in TTI determined from charts in Fig. 58. . 101 60 61 62 Cumulative frequency distributions of changes in TTI in AVE II . . ~ . . . . . ~ Surface analysis at 2100 GMT, 11 May 1974 Satellite and radar composite at 2200 GMT, 11 May 1974 102... change in the probability of convective activity by a factor of 8 or more in 3 h. Between 30% and 60% of the total changes in parameters associated with convective activity over a 12-h period is shown to take place during a 3-h period. These large...

Wilson, Gregory Sims

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Determination of Low Molecular Weight Monocarboxylic Acid Gases in the Atmosphere by Parallel Plate Diffusion Scrubber-Ion Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as a function of the atmospheric mixing ratio, and...mechanism of these acids. Atmospheric concentration data...needed to understand the atmospheric chemistry of these...on-line analysis of water-soluble basic gases...with an EG40 eluent generator (Dionex, Sunnyvale......

Bokyoung Lee; Yown Hwangbo; Dong Soo Lee

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite...Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acid...

Qing Song Yu; H. Li; A. C. Ritts; B. Yang…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Ambient-atmosphere glow discharge for determination of elemental concentration in solutions in a high-throughput or transient fashion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient atmosphere glow discharge spectrometer is disclosed having a capillary, two electrodes and a means for recording the atomic emissions.

Webb, Michael R. (Somerville, MA); Hieftje, Gary M. (Bloomington, IN); Andrade, Francisco (Leeds, GB)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development of a Test Methodology for Determining the Efficacy of One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma Against Airborne Contaminants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A method of analysis is developed for an atmospheric plasma reactor in a ducted air stream with the intent of enabling parametric analysis for the… (more)

Domitrovic, Ronald Edward

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fabrication of ZnO/Cu2O heterojunctions in atmospheric conditions: improved interface quality and solar cell performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zn_1-xMg_xO/Cu_2O heterojunctions were successfully fabricated in open-air at low temperatures via atmospheric atomic layer deposition of Zn_1-xMg_xO on thermally oxidized cuprous oxide. Solar cells employing these heterojunctions demonstrated a...

Ievskaya, Y.; Hoye, R. L. Z.; Sadhanala, A.; Musselman, K.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

An improved thin film approximation to accurately determine the optical conductivity of graphene from infrared transmittance  

SciTech Connect

This work presents an improved thin film approximation to extract the optical conductivity from infrared transmittance in a simple yet accurate way. This approximation takes into account the incoherent reflections from the backside of the substrate. These reflections are shown to have a significant effect on the extracted optical conductivity and hence on derived parameters as carrier mobility and density. By excluding the backside reflections, the error for these parameters for typical chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene on a silicon substrate can be as high as 17% and 45% for the carrier mobility and density, respectively. For the mid- and near-infrared, the approximation can be simplified such that the real part of the optical conductivity is extracted without the need for a parameterization of the optical conductivity. This direct extraction is shown for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmittance measurements of CVD graphene on silicon in the photon energy range of 370–7000?cm{sup ?1}. From the real part of the optical conductivity, the carrier density, mobility, and number of graphene layers are determined but also residue, originating from the graphene transfer, is detected. FTIR transmittance analyzed with the improved thin film approximation is shown to be a non-invasive, easy, and accurate measurement and analysis method for assessing the quality of graphene and can be used for other 2-D materials.

Weber, J. W.; Bol, A. A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sanden, M. C. M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

Venot, Olivia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Determination of Low Molecular Weight Monocarboxylic Acid Gases in the Atmosphere by Parallel Plate Diffusion Scrubber-Ion Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......emission from fuel combustion and in- dustry is...Atmospheric concentration data with temporal and...continuous measurement data will likely help...Gaseous oxygenated hydrocarbons in the remote marine...P.A. McCuen. Heat transfer with laminar...wall temperature and heat flux. Stanford University......

Bokyoung Lee; Yown Hwangbo; Dong Soo Lee

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Lidar determination of altitude profile of the refraction index in electro-optical monitoring of the Earths atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generated data 1. Introduction Control of atmosphere pollution is a complex problem of environmental of the reconstruction of the individual contributions and the overall altitude pro- file of the refraction index of air the pollutants and obtain detailed information about the distri- bution of the substances both in altitude

48

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

49

Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10\\,GeV and 100\\,GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by $\\Delta m^2_{32}=2.72^{+0.19}_{-0.20}\\times 10^{-3}\\,\\mathrm{eV}^2$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23} = 0.53^{+0.09}_{-0.12}$ (normal mass hierarchy assumed). The results are compatible and comparable in precision to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Brunner, J; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Atmospheric Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

51

Improved determination of the astrophysical S(0) factor of the (15)N(p,alpha)(12)C reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 012801(R) (2009) Improved determination of the astrophysical S(0) factor of the 15N( p, ?)12C reaction M. La Cognata,1 V. Z. Goldberg,2 A. M. Mukhamedzhanov,2 C. Spitaleri,1,* and R. E. Tribble2 1DMFCI...

La Cognata, M.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.; Tribble, Robert E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Improved Measurement of the Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MuLan collaboration has measured the lifetime of the positve muon to a precision of 1.0 parts per million. The Fermi constant is determined to a precision of 0.6 parts per million.

P. T. Debevec

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Improvements in Test Protocols for Electric Vehicles to Determine Range and Total Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As electric vehicles have entered the market fairly recently, ... tested the same way as the ICE-driven cars with the exception that determining range is ... However, the current procedures address mainly primary...

Juhani Laurikko; Jukka Nuottimäki…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Improvement in accuracy of protein local structure determination from NMR data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for determining the most probable conformations of amino acid residues from semiquantitatively estimated nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and coupling constants was developed and coded in the FiSiNOE-2 program. This program is a new version of the FiSiNOE program, utilizing NMR data with complementary knowledge-based information on protein structures. In FiSiNOE-2 this information is conformational clusters of the dihedral angles (?, ?, gc1) derived from the Protein Data Bank. The FiSiNOE-2 method determines mathematical expectations and standard deviations for the angles ?, ?, and ?1, and provides direct determination of the local structure of proteins from NMR data before building and refining their spatial structure. The results of the FiSiNOE-2 program in combination with the results of the habas program may be used to provide stereospecific assignments of a pair of ?-methylene protons and to determine precisely allowed ranges of the ?, ?, and ?1 dihedral angles consistent with a given set of NMR data. To do this, a new procedure, combine, was developed. Computational experiments with the NMR data simulated from X-ray coordinates of the BPTI showed that use of the combine procedure, in comparison with results obtained when habas was used alone, increases by more than 30% the number of correct assignments for ?CH2 groups and reduces the total lengths of the combined angular intervals for ?, ?, and ?1 angles to 1.9, 2.4, and 1.8 times, respectively. In contrast to the redundant dihedral angle constraints (REDAC) strategy, that derives REDAC from preliminary calculations of the complete structure, the combine procedure reduces the length of the angular intervals before using the variable target function algorithm to determine spatial structures of proteins. This feature of the combine strategy may be especially beneficial in the cases when there is lack of long-range NOEs.

Simon Sherman; Stanley Sclove; Leonid Kirnarsky; Igor Tomchin; Oleg Shats

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An improved method for the determination of the wellstream gas specific gravity for retrograde gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution of the equation. Th1s term, the additional gas production (AGP), accounts for the gas production from low pressure separators. Second, the vapor-equivalent of the primary separator liquid (VEQ) correlation has been improved. And third, AGP... and VEQ correlations were developed for both two-stage and three-stage separation systems. These correlat1ons were developed using the flash liberation results from 234 laboratory fluid analyses. The models wer e fit to the data using non-11near...

Gold, David Keith

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Method for energy estimation and mass composition determination of primary cosmic rays at Chacaltaya observation level based on atmospheric Cerenkov light technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for energy and mass composition estimation of primary cosmic ray radiation based on atmospheric Cerenkov light flux in extensive air showers (EAS) analysis is proposed. The Cerenkov light flux in EAS initiated by primary protons and iron nuclei is simulated with CORSIKA 5.62 code for Chacaltaya observation level (536 g/cm2) in the energy range 10 TeV - 10 PeV. An adequate model, approximation of lateral distribution of Cerenkov light in showers is obtained. Using the proposed model and solution of overdetermined system of nonlinear equations based on Gauss Newton method with autoregularization, two different array detector arrangements are compared. The detector response for the detector sets is simulated. The accuracies in energy and shower axis determination are studied and the corresponding selection criteria are proposed. An approximation with nonlinear fit is obtained and the energy dependence of the proposed model function parameters is studied. The approximation of model parameters as function of the primary energy is carried out. This permits, taking into account the properties of the proposed method and model, to distinguish proton primaries from iron primaries. The detector response for the detector sets is simulated and the accuracies in energy determination are calculated. Moreover the accuracies in shower axis determination are studied and criteria in shower axis position estimation are proposed.

S. Mavrodiev; A. Mishev; J. Stamenov

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

A High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometric Method for Determination of Risperidone and 9-Hydroxyrisperidone in Human Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Chromatographic-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical...9-Hydroxyrisperidone in Human Plasma David E. Moody...spec- trometry and atmospheric pressure chemical...or polar drugs in plasma. Ther. Drug Monit...their metabolites in plasma by liquid chromatography...spectrometry with atmospheric pres- sure chemical......

David E. Moody; John D. Laycock; Wei Huang; Rodger L. Foltz

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Simultaneous determination of nine trace mono- and di-chlorophenols in water by ion chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel analytical method was proposed for the rapidly simultaneous determination of nine mono-chlorophenols (MCPs) and di-chlorophenols (DCPs) in water samples using eluent generator ion chromatography (IC) coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) in the negative mode. The IC separation was carried out on an IonPac® AS11 analytical column (250 mm × 4.0 mm) using gradient KOH containing 15% acetonitrile as organic modifier at a constant flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The molecular ions m/z [M ? H]? 127 and 161 were selected for the quantification in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode for \\{MCPs\\} and DCPs, respectively. The average recoveries were between 80.6% and 92.6%. Within-day and day-to-day relative standard deviations were less than 12.1% and 13.3%, respectively. The method allowed the nine objective compounds in water samples to be determined at ?g/L levels. It was confirmed that this method could be used in routine analysis.

Micong Jin; Yiwen Yang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)  

SciTech Connect

Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

64

Methodical improvements of standard laboratory tests for determining the sideeffects of agrochemicals on predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the course of the alignment of national registration procedures with general EU guidelines, changes, improvements and validation of current test guidelines are advisable. The following is intended to contri...

Dr. F. Louis; Dr. A. Ufer

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013; Preliminary Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of preliminary determination regarding energy savings for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2013, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on May 8, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

68

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector  

SciTech Connect

The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

71

What we can learn from atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics potential of future measurements of atmospheric neutrinos is explored. Observation of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ driven sub-dominant effects and $\\theta_{13}$ driven large matter effects in atmospheric neutrinos can be used to study the deviation of $\\theta_{23}$ from maximality and its octant. Neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined extremely well due to the large matter effects. New physics can be constrained both in standard atmospheric neutrino experiments as well as in future neutrino telescopes.

Sandhya Choubey

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

72

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

IMPROVED Ti II log(gf) VALUES AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937  

SciTech Connect

Atomic transition probability measurements for 364 lines of Ti II in the UV through near-IR are reported. Branching fractions from data recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and a new echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes to determine these transition probabilities. The new results are in generally good agreement with previously reported FTS measurements. Use of the new echelle spectrometer, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enables a reduction of systematic errors and overall improvement in transition probability accuracy over previous measurements. The new Ti II data are applied to high-resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to derive new, more accurate Ti abundances. Lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential are used to search for non-LTE effects. The Ti abundances derived using Ti II for these two stars match those derived using Ti I and support the relative Ti/Fe abundance ratio versus metallicity seen in previous studies.

Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sneden, C. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cowan, J. J., E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nonequilibrium atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mexico City area are shown...inorganic atmospheric aerosols...2005 ) A large organic aerosol source...photochemical and thermal studies of...Characteristic Group Frequencies—Tables and...particle thermal speed...phase-equilibrium in the atmospheric system: Aerosol...Support, Non-U.S...Determination by plasma-based...implications for atmospheric chemistry...2002) A thermal disso-ciation...

Véronique Perraud; Emily A. Bruns; Michael J. Ezell; Stanley N. Johnson; Yong Yu; M. Lizabeth Alexander; Alla Zelenyuk; Dan Imre; Wayne L. Chang; Donald Dabdub; James F. Pankow; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Radon-222 Daughter Concentrations in Uranium Mine Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... undertaken to measure the concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in uranium mine atmospheres at various radon daughter concentration levels, and to determine the amount of 210Pb in the mine atmosphere ... atmosphere relative to that which would be produced from the decay of the short-lived radon daughters deposited in the lungs. Radium-226 was also measured in air so as ...

RICHARD L. BLANCHARD

1969-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

Crawford, T.V.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

8, 10691088, 2008 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the atmosphere (Molina et al., 1974; Farman et al., 1985) has led to an interna- tional effort to replace

Boyer, Edmond

80

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

83

Improved determination of variation of rate of rotation of oscillation plane of a paraconic pendulum during the solar eclipse in Mexico on July 11, 1991  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An improved value of the variation in the rate of rotation of the oscillation plane of a paraconic pendulum during the solar eclipse in Mexico on July 11, 1991 is obtained....

L. A. Savrov

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Idaho | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 CX-009703: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improve the Access Road System in Miles 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, and 30 of the Lower Granite-Hatwai Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 12/19/2012 Location(s): Washington, Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration December 17, 2012 CX-009790: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Canyon Wind Study CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/17/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office December 15, 2012 CX-009635: Categorical Exclusion Determination INTEC - U-233 Waste Stream Disposition CX(s) Applied: NO CX GIVEN Date: 12/15/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office December 5, 2012 CX-009634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

86

Trace analysis of atmospheric organic bases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of atmospheric organic bases were investigated; the study included (1) the analysis of submarine charcoal filter bed samples for nitrogen bases and (2) the use of metallic tetraphenylporphines (TPP) as specific adsorbents for atmospheric... gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The isolation procedure provided acceptable reproducibi lity in the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen bases in the submarine environment. Several metallic TPP adsorbents were...

Clark, Dwayne C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

88

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

89

CX-005016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16: Categorical Exclusion Determination 16: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005016: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits to Utility CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/13/2011 Location(s): Saint Paul, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office WindLogics, in Saint Paul, Minnesota, is proposing to use federal funding to identify and quantify the benefits of improved National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) foundational weather forecasts when applied to wind energy forecasting. Improved weather forecasts from NOAA would result in more efficient integration of wind energy forecasts on power grid system operations. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

90

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

92

Conference on Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE half-yearly Conference of representatives of local authorities and other organisations co-operating with the Department of Scientific ... of atmospheric pollution was held in the offices of the Department on May 25. The Conference received from Dr. G. M. B. Dobson, chairman of the Atmospheric Pollution ...

1936-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

96

Improved Description of One- and Two-Hole States after Electron Capture in 163 Holmium and the Determination of the Neutrino Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The atomic pair 163 Holmium and 163 Dysprosium$ seems due to the small Q value of about 2.3 to 2.8 keV the best case to determine the neutrino mass by electron capture. The bolometer spectrum measures the full deexcitation energy of Dysprosium by X rays, by Auger electrons and by the recoil of Holmium. The spectrum has an upper energy limit given by the Q value minus the neutrino mass. Till now this spectrum has been calculated allowing in Dysprosium excitations with 3s1/2, 3p1/2, 4s1/2, 4p1/2, 5s1/2, 5p1/2 holes only. Robertson calculated recently also the spectrum with two electron hole excitations in Dy. He took the probability for the excitation for the second electron hole from work of Carlson and Nestor for Z=54 Xenon. He claims, that the bolometer spectrum with two holes is "not well enough understood to permit a sensitive determination of the neutrino mass in this way." The purpose of the present work is to determine the theoretical bolometer spectrum with two hole excitations more reliably. In additi...

Faessler, Amand

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 31, MAY 2014, 559569 Ensemble Retrieval of Atmospheric Temperature Profiles from AIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite-based observations provide great opportunities for improving weather forecasting. Physical in global climate and weather systems. Among all observations, satellite-derived atmospheric temperatureCooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison

Li, Jun

98

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric iron corrosion Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmosphere and an oxidizing... -2 Chromium additions seemed to help improve the corrosion resistance of the ... Source: DuPont, John N. - Department of Materials Science and...

100

Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...has been used by atmospheric modelers as a vertical...Ackerman, in Atmospheric Physics from Spacelab...shut-tle allows recovery of the film, we...dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. To avoid water condensation on the optical...

M. HERSÉ

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

1CAItUS69, 519--531 (1987) Magnetospheric Plasma Sputtering of Io's Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1CAItUS69, 519--531 (1987) Magnetospheric Plasma Sputtering of Io's Atmosphere M. A. Mc be used as knowledge of both the plasma flow and atmospheric composition improve. © 1987Academic Press, ln of material from Io to the plasma torus (Kumar, 1984), although the amount of atmospheric gas required

Johnson, Robert E.

104

Improved aethalometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

Hansen, A.D.

1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle The first step in the...

106

CX-011597: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-011597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Facility Safety and Environmental Improvements under...

107

CX-009656: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-009656: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Facility Safety and Environmental Improvements...

108

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

109

CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01: Categorical Exclusion Determination 01: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft, and In-Ocean Observations CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1, B3.2 Date: 02/22/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE is proposing to provide federal funding to State University of New York (SUNY) to develop, research, model, and collect data of environmental factors that influence wind turbine structures along the Atlantic coast. This study would include information gathering, data analysis and modeling, mapping, and reporting. CX-007901.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009575: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009130: Categorical Exclusion Determination

110

Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group  

SciTech Connect

The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very large scale water Cerenkov detector, or a magnetized detector with flavor and antiflavor sensitivity. Additional priorities are nuclear physics measurements which will reduce the uncertainties in the predictions of the Standard Solar Model, and similar supporting measurements for atmospheric neutrinos (cosmic ray fluxes, magnetic fields, etc.). We note as well that the detectors for both solar and atmospheric neutrino measurements can serve as multipurpose detectors, with capabilities of discovering dark matter, relic supernova neutrinos, proton decay, or as targets for long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments.

Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Formation of atmospheric particles from organic acids produced by forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Ljungstrom, E. Atmospheric fate of carbonyl oxidation products originating from ?-pinene and ?3-carene: Determination of rate of reaction with OH and NO3radicals, UV absorption cross sections, ...

Ilias G. Kavouras; Nikolaos Mihalopoulos; Euripides G. Stephanou

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Atmospheric chemistry of gaseous diethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of diethyl sulfate (DES) has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants (in cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DES with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by FTIR spectroscopy and are <3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and {le}2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}23}, respectively. The reactivity of DES toward OH radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from {ge}1 day with respect to reaction with water to >12 years with respect to ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DES within an urban air parcel is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmospheric species studied. No evidence has been found for the formation of DES or related compounds during the ozonolysis of olefins in the presence of SO{sub 2} and ethanol.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

114

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

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moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

115

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

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Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

116

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

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pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

117

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

118

Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition  

SciTech Connect

A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

Brown, T.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

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121

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

122

Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

Read, Peter L.

123

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

124

On plasma parameters of a self-organized plasma jet at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Electron temperature and electron concentration in the active zone of a miniaturized radio frequency (RF) non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in argon have been determined using... ...

J. Schäfer; F. Sigeneger; R. Foest; D. Loffhagen…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric surface layer Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

determining albedo and opacity Clouds Snow and ice Aerosols Time... Horizontal transport in the atmosphere Dry and moist static energy Eddy ... Source: Sherwood, Steven -...

126

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2012 22, 2012 CX-007925: Categorical Exclusion Determination Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/22/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 22, 2012 CX-007924: Categorical Exclusion Determination Developing Next Generation High Power Batteries CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/22/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 22, 2012 CX-007824: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory- MRTC Office Building CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 02/22/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program February 22, 2012 CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and

127

The Atmospheric Monitoring Strategy for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT) is unusual in astronomy as the atmosphere actually forms an intrinsic part of the detector system, with telescopes indirectly detecting very high energy particles by the generation and transport of Cherenkov photons deep within the atmosphere. This means that accurate measurement, characterisation and monitoring of the atmosphere is at the very heart of successfully operating an IACT system. The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next generation IACT observatory with an ambitious aim to improve the sensitivity of an order of magnitude over current facilities, along with corresponding improvements in angular and energy resolution and extended energy coverage, through an array of Large (23m), Medium (12m) and Small (4m) sized telescopes spread over an area of order ~km$^2$. Whole sky coverage will be achieved by operating at two sites: one in the northern hemisphere and one in the southern hemisphere. This proceedings will cover the characterisation of...

Daniel, M K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

ATMOSPHERIC ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud hydrometeors (water drops, ice particles, and, particularlyATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259 Simulations of drop fall turbulence. The model permits us to generate different realizations of the random velocity field component

Mark, Pinsky

130

Keratinocyte and Hepatocyte Growth Proliferation and Adhesion to Helium and Helium/Oxygen Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treated Polyethylene Terephthalate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To improve the surface properties of biomaterials, the effects of changes in surface chemistry and morphology of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films treated with atmospheric pressure… (more)

Christie, Megan Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

132

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

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Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

136

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared using (a) the IPA wipe (control), (b) sanding, (c)of aluminum alloy 2024: a) IPA wiped, b) sanded with 180bond primer with a) the IPA wipe (control), b) sanding, c)

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

138

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos ... In the positive ion mode, protonated water hydrates (H3O+(H2O)n) generated by the corona discharge in the chamber diluent air were responsible for the protonation of analytes, and the ions that were mass analyzed were mainly protonated molecules ([M + H]+) and their protonated homo- and heterodimers. ... Methyl nitrite, 2-propyl nitrite and N2O5 were prepared and stored as described previously,(8, 10) and O3 in O2 diluent was generated using a Welsbach T-408 ozone generator. ...

Sara M. Aschmann; Ernesto C. Tuazon; William D. Long; Roger Atkinson

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

FIRST-PRINCIPLES APPROACHES TO THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF ATMOSPHERICALLY RELEVANT AQUESOUS INTERFACES  

SciTech Connect

The field of atmospheric science is very rich in problems ranging from the molecular to the regional and global scale. These problems are often extremely complex, and although the statement of a particular atmospheric science question may be clear, finding a single, concise computational approach to address this question can be daunting. As a result, the broad scope of scientific problems that lie within the umbrella of atmospheric science require a multi-discipline approach. Of particular interest to atmospheric chemists is the role that heterogeneous chemistry plays in the important processes that take place throughout the atmosphere. The definition of heterogeneous is: consisting of dissimilar elements or parts. The chemical environment induced by the presence of the interface can be dramatically different than the corresponding gas- or condensed phase homogeneous environment and can give rise to novel chemistry. Although the importance of heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere has been known for decades, a challenge to both experimentalists and theorists in provide simplified models and experiments that can yield insight into the field measurements of the atmospheric process. The use of molecular modeling has been widely used to provide a particle-based picture of atmospherically relevant interfaces to deduce the novel chemistry that is taking place. Unfortunately, even with the most computationally efficient particle-based approach, it is still impossible to model the full ice-crystal in the stratosphere or the sea-salt aerosol in the troposphere. Figure 1 depicts a caricature of the actual system of interest, and highlights the region where efficient molecular modeling can be employed. Although there is seemingly a large disconnect between reality and the model, we hope to convince the reader that there is still much insight to be gained from a particle-based picture. There is a myriad of different approaches to molecular modeling that have been successfully applied to studying the complex problems put forth by atmospheric chemists. To date, the majority of the molecular models of atmospherically relevant interfaces have been comprised of two genres of molecular models. The first is based on empirical interaction potentials. The use of an empirical interaction potential suffers from at least two shortcomings. First, empirical potentials are usually fit to reproduce bulk thermodynamic states, or gas phase spectroscopic data. Thus, without the explicit inclusion of charge transfer, it is not at all obvious that empirical potentials can faithfully reproduce the structure at a solid-vapor, or liquid-vapor interface where charge rearrangement is known to occur (see section 5). One solution is the empirical inclusion of polarization effects. These models are certainly an improvement, but still cannot offer insight into charge transfer processes and are usually difficult to parameterize. The other shortcoming of empirical models is that, in general, they cannot describe bond-making/breaking events, i.e. chemistry. In order to address chemistry one has to consider an ab initio (to be referred to as first-principles throughout the remaining text) approach to molecular modeling that explicitly treats the electronic degrees of freedom. First-principles modeling also give a direct link to spectroscopic data and chemistry, but at a large computational cost. The bottle-neck associated with first-principles modeling is usually determined by the level of electronic structure theory that one chooses to study a particular problem. High-level first-principles approaches, such as MP2, provide accurate representation of the electronic degrees of freedom but are only computationally tractable when applied to small system sizes (i.e. 10s of atoms). Nevertheless, this type of modeling has been extremely useful in deducing reaction mechanisms of atmospherically relevant chemistry that will be discussed in this review (see section 4). However, to solve problems relating to heterogeneous chemistry at interfaces where the interfacial syste

Mundy, C; Kuo, I W

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

ARM - Evolution of the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides clues as to the composition of the early atmosphere. Volcanic emissions include nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and trace gases such as argon. Although oxygen,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

142

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

143

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Treatment of Polyethylene Surfaces for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Treatment of Polyethylene Surfaces for Adhesion Improvement Uwe studied the activation mechanism of polyethylene (PE) for a pretreatment with a commercial APPJ system jet system from Plasmatreat GmbH (Steinhagen, Germany) was used for the Full Paper Polyethylene (PE

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

144

CX-010405: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010405: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idalia Substation Grounding and Drainage Improvements CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 05222013...

145

CX-000698: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000698: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut - State Building Energy Improvements: 79 Elm Street CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.4,...

146

CX-002679: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-002679: Categorical Exclusion Determination Eastern Avenue Branch Library Improvements CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06032010 Location(s): Davenport, Iowa...

147

CX-010020: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010020: Categorical Exclusion Determination F-08 Industrial Wastewater Outfall Flow Measurement Improvements CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 01282013...

148

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

149

Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

Bean, Keri Marie

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment of Fused Silica, Related Surface and Near-Surface Effects and Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment of fused silica and its related surface and near-surface effects. Such treatment was performed in order to improve laser ... process gas was used. By th...

Christoph Gerhard; Tobias Weihs; Daniel Tasche…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Experimental Study on Ash-Returned Reactor of CFB Atmospheric Air Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an attempt to improve the gasification efficiency and decrease the carbon content in fly ash of atmospheric air CFB gasifiers, an innovatory equipment by name ash-returned ... ash, and hence the coal conversio...

Zhang Shihong; Tian Luning; Zhou Xianrong…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Representing Grass– and Shrub–Snow–Atmosphere Interactions in Climate System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vegetation-protruding-above-snow parameterization for earth system models was developed to improve energy budget calculations of interactions among vegetation, snow, and the atmosphere in nonforested areas. These areas include shrublands, ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CX-100004: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Leveraging a Fundamental Understanding of Fracture Flow, Dynamic Permeability Enhancement, and Induced Seismicity to Improve Geothermal...

154

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

155

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Review article reached the International Reviews in Physical Chemistry most read list NULL...

156

Refractory Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Improvement Refractory Improvement NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 2 Project Description Industry would like gasifier on-line availability of 85-95% for utility applications and 95% for applications such as chemical production. Gasification facilities' are currently unable to meet these requirements, which have created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of gasification technologies. Refractory liners and syngas coolers are among key components of the gasification process previously identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities in the gasifier's carbon feedstock is the root cause of many problems impacting gasifier RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability). At the high temperatures of gasification, ash changes to liquid, gas, and solid phases which wear down refractory materials and can cause fouling, either of which can lead to unplanned shutdowns for system repair, replacement, or cleaning.

157

Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... preliminary work. The absence of levels of a higher order suggests that the contribution of radon from this source does not represent a significant addition to the total atmospheric level. ... Domestic 0.70

W. ANDERSON; R. C. TURNER

1956-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Doubling of atmospheric methane supported  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric methane over the past 27,000 years was measured by analyzing air trapped in glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica. Atmospheric concentrations were stable over that period until about 200 years b.p. In the last 200 years they have more than doubled. This change in concentration is correlated with the increase in human population; the implications for climate modification are discussed. 1 figure, 3 references.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surveillance Guides - Continous Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are effectively managing environment, safety, and health issues in a manner that fosters continuous improvement. The activities included in this surveillance help the Facility Representative determine whether safety issues identified through internal contractor, and external DOE or Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board evaluation programs are resolved consistent with the level of safety importance. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE O 414.1, Quality Assurance 2.2 DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information 2.3 DOE-STD-1045-93, Guide to Good Practices for Notifications and Investigations of Abnormal Events 2.4 48 CFR 1970.5204, Department of Energy Acquisition

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The role of H3+in planetary atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...constituent of this atmospheric region a quarter...determining the thermal structure of the...consisting of plasma, physically coexist...Jupiter to the plasma sheet; this is...was in `quasi-thermal equilibrium...explain are the non-auroral temperatures...the equatorial plasma sheet. But rst...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Paleopressure of Mars' atmosphere from small ancient1 craters2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements18 are required45 #12; 3 to determine the history of Mars' atmosphere. Wind erosion rivers to flow early in Mars history,12 which was affected by P via direct and indirect greenhouse can remove >90% of the kinetic energy of >240 kg30 impactors7 ; Titan's paucity of small craters

Kite, Edwin

163

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

164

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

165

Emulation to simulate low resolution atmospheric data  

SciTech Connect

Climate simulations require significant compute power, they are complex and therefore it is time consuming to simulate them. We have developed an emulator to simulate unknown climate datasets. The emulator uses stochastic collocation and multi-dimensional in- terpolation to simulate the datasets. We have used the emulator to determine various physical quantities such as temperature, short and long wave cloud forcing, zonal winds etc. The emulation gives results which are very close to those obtained by simulations. The emulator was tested on 2 degree atmospheric datasets. The work evaluates the pros and cons of evaluating the mean first and inter- polating and vice versa. To determine the physical quantities, we have assumed them to be a function of time, longitude, latitude and a random parameter. We have looked at parameters that govern high stable clouds, low stable clouds, timescale for convection etc. The emulator is especially useful as it requires negligible compute times when compared to the simulation itself.

Hebbur Venkata Subba Rao, Vishwas [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Lithium in cool stellar atmospheres: Big bang nucleosynthesis and extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium in cool stellar atmospheres: Big bang nucleosynthesis and extrasolar planets Matthias Steffen and Elisabetta Caffau Sternphysik In metal-poor stellar atmospheres, the Lithium line at 6707 Ã?-NLTE, respectively. The accurate spectroscopic determination of the Lithium abundance and in particular the 6Li/7Li

167

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert (VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington); Bretherton, Christopher (GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington); Huebert, Barry (SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii); Mechoso, Roberto C. (VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA); Weller, Robert (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

168

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine

169

The Chemistry of Methane Remediation by a Non?thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The destruction of methane by a non?thermal plasma in atmospheric pressure gas streams of nitrogen with variable ... determined by on?line FTIR spectroscopy and the plasma chemistry is interpreted using kinetic m...

Kirsty J. Pringle; J. Christopher Whitehead…

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effects of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena on precipitation and flooding in the Manafwa River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to determine the relationship between certain oceanic and atmospheric phenomena and the precipitation patterns in the Manafwa River Basin of eastern Uganda. Such phenomena are the El Niño ...

Finney, William W., III (William Warner)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Understanding El Niño in Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Models: Progress and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining how El Niño and its impacts may change over the next 10 to 100 years remains a difficult scientific challenge. Ocean–atmosphere coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) are routinely used both to analyze El Niño mechanisms and ...

Eric Guilyardi; Andrew Wittenberg; Alexey Fedorov; Mat Collins; Chunzai Wang; Antonietta Capotondi; Geert Jan van Oldenborgh; Tim Stockdale

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.  

SciTech Connect

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and greenhouse gas studies. These instruments will provide more accurate, detailed global observations of weather and atmospheric parameters that will, in turn, improve the accuracy and quality of weather forecasts. A satellite-based instrument is cost-effective because it can provide continuous global measurements, eliminating isolated yet costly weather balloon releases. Aqua, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (Figure 2), carries six state-of-the-art instruments that measure various water vapor parameters: (1) AIRS, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity, land and sea surface temperatures, cloud properties, and radiative energy flux; (2) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity during both cloudy and cloud-free periods; (3) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation rates, land surface wetness, sea ice, snow cover, sea surface temperature, and wind fields; (4) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, which measures radiative energy flux; (5) Humidity Sounder for Brazil, which measures atmospheric humidity by using a passive scanning microwave radiometer; and (6) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, aerosol properties, land cover and land use change, vegetation dynamics, land surface temperature, fire occurrence, volcanic effects, sea surface temperature, ocean color, snow cover, atmospheric temperature and humidity, and sea ice. The data-gathering capabilities of the Aqua instruments will provide an unprecedented view of atmosphere-land interactions (Figure 3). The availability of more frequent, more accurate global measurements of important atmospheric parameters will both improve our capabilities for short-term weather forecasting and lead to a better understanding of climate variability and climate change. Simultaneous measurements of many parameters will allow scientists to study complicated forcings and feedbacks of the atmosphere, which can be

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

174

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

175

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

176

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

177

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

178

Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

179

Expression of Interest: The Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron tagging in Gadolinium-doped water may play a significant role in reducing backgrounds from atmospheric neutrinos in next generation proton-decay searches using megaton-scale Water Cherenkov detectors. Similar techniques might also be useful in the detection of supernova neutrinos. Accurate determination of neutron tagging efficiencies will require a detailed understanding of the number of neutrons produced by neutrino interactions in water as a function of momentum transferred. We propose the Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE), designed to measure the neutron yield of atmospheric neutrino interactions in gadolinium-doped water. An innovative aspect of the ANNIE design is the use of precision timing to localize interaction vertices in the small fiducial volume of the detector. We propose to achieve this by using early production of LAPPDs (Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors). This experiment will be a first application of these devices demonstrating their feasibility for Wate...

Anghel, I; Bergevin, M; Davies, G; Di Lodovico, F; Elagin, A; Frisch, H; Hill, R; Jocher, G; Katori, T; Learned, J; Northrop, R; Pilcher, C; Ramberg, E; Sanchez, M C; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Svoboda, R; Usman, S; Vagins, M; Varner, G; Wagner, R; Wetstein, M; Winslow, L; Yeh, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

Sawyer, Patrick

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Expression of Interest: The Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron tagging in Gadolinium-doped water may play a significant role in reducing backgrounds from atmospheric neutrinos in next generation proton-decay searches using megaton-scale Water Cherenkov detectors. Similar techniques might also be useful in the detection of supernova neutrinos. Accurate determination of neutron tagging efficiencies will require a detailed understanding of the number of neutrons produced by neutrino interactions in water as a function of momentum transferred. We propose the Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE), designed to measure the neutron yield of atmospheric neutrino interactions in gadolinium-doped water. An innovative aspect of the ANNIE design is the use of precision timing to localize interaction vertices in the small fiducial volume of the detector. We propose to achieve this by using early production of LAPPDs (Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors). This experiment will be a first application of these devices demonstrating their feasibility for Water Cherenkov neutrino detectors.

I. Anghel; J. F. Beacom; M. Bergevin; G. Davies; F. Di Lodovico; A. Elagin; H. Frisch; R. Hill; G. Jocher; T. Katori; J. Learned; R. Northrop; C. Pilcher; E. Ramberg; M. C. Sanchez; M. Smy; H. Sobel; R. Svoboda; S. Usman; M. Vagins; G. Varner; R. Wagner; M. Wetstein; L. Winslow; M. Yeh

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17431758 Impact of urban heat island on regional atmospheric pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and spatial distribution of atmospheric pollutants over the Paris region. One anticyclonic episode from Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Regional atmospheric pollution; Urban area micrometeorology are large sources of atmospheric pollutants. Their spatial distribution and their temporal evolution can

Ribes, Aurélien

183

Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid- Atlantic Bight Wind Energy Symposium Sienkiewicz , Chris Hughes 26 February 2013 #12;Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Interaction Tower ­ 23 m NOAA Buzzard's Bay Tower ­ 25 m Cape Wind Tower (60 m from 2003-2011; just platform

Firestone, Jeremy

184

Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKS, B.B., A SIMULATION OF THE EDDY ACCUMULATION...CLOSURES IN 2ND-ORDER MODELING, JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC...Their advantag-es are rapid response, linear output...the measurement and modeling of surface fluxes are...the appli-cation of automated conditional sampling...

W. F. Dabberdt; D. H. Lenschow; T. W. Horst; P. R. Zimmerman; S. P. Oncley; A. C. Delany

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook followed a Code of Honor, which is stated in this very simple verse: An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal that knowledge for the benefit of society. Our most fundamental mission is to help students at all levels, from

186

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect

The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

189

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

190

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

191

Lifetimes and time scales in atmospheric chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as for years with extensive forest fires. Moving beyond atmospheric chemistry, extension of this approach to Earth system models could yield surprises. The coupling across different components of the chemistry-climate system, such as atmospheric...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

Paul H. Wine

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Model Atmospheres for Low Field Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute model atmospheres and emergent spectra for low field (Bsolar abundance and iron atmospheres. We compare our results to high field magnetic atmospheres, available only for hydrogen. An application to apparently thermal flux from the low field millisecond pulsar PSR J0437--4715 shows that H atmospheres fit substantially better than Fe models. We comment on extension to high fields and the implication of these results for neutron star luminosities and radii.

Mohan Rajagopal; Roger Romani

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

On the energy content of the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of the content of sensible heat, potential energy, and latent heat in the atmosphere between...

Stefan L. Hastenrath

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 13, 2012 December 13, 2012 CX-009588: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sologen Geothermal Co-Production Field Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.31, B3.1, B4.12, B5.5, B5.12, B5.15 Date: 12/13/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Assessment of Wind Resource on Tribal Land CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009575: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft and In-Ocean Observations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.2 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009750: Categorical Exclusion Determination

199

Radar Measurement of the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Upper Atmosphere James C. G...two decades large radars have...of the upper atmosphere. These radars...ionospheric plasma, all as functions...ionospheric plasma by detection...is wasted. Atmospheric radar scientists...305 m and an area of 73,000...frequency of 430 MHz. The radar...

James C. G. Walker

1979-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RADIATIVE-TRANSFER DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC WATER-VAPOR - GLOBAL...giving rise to atmospheric mo-tions that...heat release by condensation as moist air...and because the atmospheric motions that...to thE1tfrof water in a leaky bucket...

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Instrumental Requirements for Global Atmospheric Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC CH2O, O3, AND NO2...AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC OH, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL...HYDROGEN-CHLORIDE AND WATER AT ANTARCTIC STRATOSPHERIC...TOON, O.B., CONDENSATION OF HNO3 AND HCL IN...requirements for global atmospheric chemistry. | The field...

D. L. Albritton; F. C. Fehsenfeld; A. F. Tuck

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

Space plasma influences on the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 129 0.2 0.6 1.0...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 131 the size and the...satellites probing the space-plasma and atmospheric environments, they provide...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...1978012175 air atmosphere biosphere carbon...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth, which...synchronization rate of 16 khz and the picture...the interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

205

Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than red light. #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45% 100% solar radiation #12;Blue Sky, Red;Energy Pathways #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Atmosphere or performing any work. #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Transmission

Pan, Feifei

206

Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

Smith, Arthur P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

208

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

209

Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 5- (DRAFT) Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants Guy Landrieu INERIS Institut, Stuttgart : Germany (1995)" #12;INERIS: Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants (DRAFT may 1995) Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants Summary 1 Introduction 2 Background 3 Harmfulness

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Atmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmospheric chemistry/air quality, boundary layer and air pollution meteorology, regional/global climatology MODELING OF MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS AT URBAN AND REGIONAL SCALES Our atmosphere is a complex systemAtmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) (http

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

211

CX-006127: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) - Wautoma Kwik Trip CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06232011 Location(s): Wautoma,...

212

CX-006183: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) - Neenah Kwik Trip CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s): Neenah,...

213

CX-006264: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) - Marshall Kwik Trip CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07112011 Location(s): Marshall,...

214

CX-006126: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) - Waupaca Kwik Trip CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06232011 Location(s): Waupaca,...

215

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

216

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

217

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

218

ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY ESTIMATION USING SATELLITE PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current atmospheric density models are not capable enough to accurately model the atmospheric density, which varies continuously in the upper atmosphere mainly due to the changes in solar and geomagnetic activity. Inaccurate atmospheric modeling...

Arudra, Anoop Kumar

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

220

Heating in the tropical atmosphere: what level of detail is critical for accurate MJO simulations in GCMs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating in the tropical atmosphere: what level of detail is critical for accurate MJO simulations processes that affect heating in some facet. In this study, we examine various heating adjustments in Community Atmospheric Model version 4 (CAM4) to determine what the vertical and horizontal heating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Determination of dilution factors in a nuclear facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location was found to be 909. From the results of this study it was determined that the described method can be used to determine dilu- tion factors in any facility effectively. ACKNOWLEDGENENTS I wish to express my sincere appreciation to Dr. R. D... and diverse studies. Atmospheric dispersion of particles and gases from the atomic energy field is constantly being studied. Emperical dispersion calculations for aerosol releases into the atmosphere are well known ' . In addition, (1, 2) studies...

Sandel, Philip Sidney

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Expect the unexpected: non-equilibrium processes in brown dwarf atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Dwarf atmosphere are a chemically extremely rich, one example being the formation of clouds driven by the phase-non-equilibrium of the atmospheric gas. Cloud formation modelling is an integral part of any atmosphere simulation used to interpret spectral observations of ultra-cool objects and to determine fundamental parameters like log(g) and Teff. This proceeding to the workshop 'GAIA and the Unseen: The Brown Dwarf Question' first summarizes what a model atmosphere simulation is, and then advocates two ideas: A) The use of a multitude of model families to determine fundamental parameters with realistic confidence interval. B) To keep an eye on the unexpected, like for example, ionisation signatures resulting plasma processes

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Chemical composition of the atmosphere of the K giant approx. Ser  

SciTech Connect

Spectrograms with a reciprocal dispersion of 6 A/mm have been used to study the atmosphere of the K III star approx. Ser. The chemical composition has been determined by the method of model atmospheres. The majority of elements have the solar abundance or exceed it by 0.2-0.4 dex. Reliable excesses are found for sodium Na I (0.8 dex), vanadium VI, and chromium Cr (0.5 dex).

Boyarchuk, M.E.; Orlov, M.Ya.; Shavrina, A.V.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

A {gamma}-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250 C at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region there between. A jet of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, G.S.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

225

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2012 2, 2012 CX-009577: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rochester Regional, Optics, Photonics & Imaging Accelerator CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York, New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009575: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft and In-Ocean Observations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.2 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009566: Categorical Exclusion Determination Loan Loss Reserve CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B1.35, B2.1, B2.2, B5.1, B5.14, B5.16, B5.17, B5.18, B5.19 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012

226

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

227

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Retardation of C2C12 myoblast cell proliferation by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the first step in evaluating the possibility of low-temperature atmospheric plasma for clinical applications in the treatment of ... (RMS), we determined the effects of plasma exposure on C2C12 myoblasts. The ...

Naoya Nakai; Ryo Fujita; Fuminori Kawano…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Institute on Climate and Planets http://icp.giss.nasa.gov/ The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse Effect in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://icp.giss.nasa.gov/ The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse Effect in Determining the Surface. This process is the natural greenhouse effect. The earths surface receives solar energy and energy reradiated

230

Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols R. A. Ferrare and K. D. Evans (a) Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland S. H. Melfi and D. N. Whiteman NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland The principal objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs) which are used to study climate change. Meeting this objective requires detailed measurements of both water vapor and aerosols since these atmospheric constituents affect the radiation balance directly, through scattering and absorption of solar and

231

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineer, improved upon the steam engine then patented theBoulton and Watt steam engine in 1775 [6]. Since then thean atmospheric heat engine that used steam) was developed by

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calibrated laser pulse propagating through the atmosphere produces a flash of Rayleigh scattered light with an intensity that can be calculated very accurately when atmospheric conditions are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper we present the absolute calibration system being constructed and tested for the VERITAS project.

N. Shepherd; J. H. Buckley; O. Celik; J. Holder; S. LeBohec; H. Manseri; F. Pizlo; M. Roberts

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

234

Atmospheric Pressure Discharges: Traveling Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave sustained, atmospheric pressure plasmas are finding an increasing number of applications ... interest in the developing and investigating of appropriate plasma sources [1, 2].

Z. Zakrzewski; M. Moisan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

236

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Atmosphere to Electrons Program Overview Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation provides an introduction to the Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) initiative, including objectives, program areas, and a general timeline of activities.

239

Hot Explosions in the Cool Atmosphere of the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar atmosphere was traditionally represented with a simple one-dimensional model. Over the past few decades, this paradigm shifted for the chromosphere and corona that constitute the outer atmosphere, which is now considered a dynamic structured envelope. Recent observations by IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) reveal that it is difficult to determine what is up and down even in the cool 6000-K photosphere just above the solar surface: this region hosts pockets of hot plasma transiently heated to almost 100,000 K. The energy to heat and accelerate the plasma requires a considerable fraction of the energy from flares, the largest solar disruptions. These IRIS observations not only confirm that the photosphere is more complex than conventionally thought, but also provide insight into the energy conversion in the process of magnetic reconnection.

Peter, H; Curdt, W; Schmit, D; Innes, D; De Pontieu, B; Lemen, J; Title, A; Boerner, P; Hurlburt, N; Tarbell, T D; Wuelser, J P; Martínez-Sykora, J; Kleint, L; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Reeves, K K; Saar, S; Testa, P; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Impact of Atmospheric Chromatic Effects on Weak Lensing Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We use analytic and computational techniques to study the impact on shape measurements of two atmospheric chromatic effects for ground-based surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST): (i) atmospheric differential chromatic refraction (DCR) and (ii) wavelength dependence of seeing. We investigate the effects of using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shape of a galaxy that has a different spectral energy distribution (SED) than the stars. For (i), we extend a study by Plazas & Bernstein based on analytic calculations that show that DCR leads to significant biases in galaxy shape measurements for future surveys, if not corrected. For (ii), we find that the wavelength dependence of seeing leads to significant bia...

Meyers, Joshua E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric models hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation multicore cluster evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric models usually demand high processing power and generate large amounts of data. As the degree of parallelism grows, the I/O operations may become the major impacting factor of their performance. This work shows that a hybrid MPI/OpenMP implementation can improve the performance of the atmospheric model ocean-land-atmosphere model (OLAM) on a multicore cluster environment. We show that the hybrid MPI/OpenMP version of OLAM decreases the number of output files, resulting in better performance for I/O operations. We have evaluated OLAM on the parallel file system PVFS and shown that storing the files on PVFS results in lower performance than using the local disks of the cluster nodes due as a consequence of file creation and network concurrency. We have also shown that further parallel optimisations should be included in the hybrid version in order to improve the parallel execution time of OLAM.

Carla Osthoff; Francieli Zanon Boito; Rodrigo Virote Kassick; Laércio Lima Pilla; Philippe O.A. Navaux; Claudio Schepke; Jairo Panetta; Pablo Javier Grunmann; Nicolas Maillard; Pedro L. Silva Dias; Ro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

Zhuang, Qianlai

243

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate June 2013. [1] Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21

246

Atmospheric Science The Earth's atmosphere, a layered sphere of gas extending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

division study the composition, structure, chemical, and physical processes of the Earth's atmosphere. The division's four interrelated groups focus on satellite, airborne, and ground-based observations processes such as atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and radiation on Earth and other planets. Our atmospheric

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

247

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Radio Frequency Signals in Jupiter's Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IMAGE OF A LARGE UPWARD ELECTRICAL-DISCHARGE...RINNERT K , HDB ATMOSPHERIC ELEC 27 ( 1995...MEASUREMENTS OF THE RF CHARACTERISTICS...JUPITER PLASMA-WAVE OBSERVATIONS...OBSERVATIONS OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC OPTICAL FLASHES...Solar and thermal radiation...relatively large at the beginning...and about non-radiative...sensitive area of 6...

L. J. Lanzerotti; K. Rinnert; G. Dehmel; F. O. Gliem; E. P. Krider; M. A. Uman; J. Bach

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth...interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies of 500 Mhz, this amounts...chang-ing the atmospheric carbon dioxide...in the polar areas. Although...The shaded area indicates the...per-missible atmospheric CO2 level might...emission rates are largest between 2000...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 8629EEC7C72DEEE5.1256/qj.05.87 Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation By S. POLAVARAPU1,2, T. G. SHEPHERD2 Data assimilation is employed at operational weather forecast centres to combine measurements and model

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

252

Atmospheric muon background in the ANTARES detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evaluation of the background due to atmospheric muons in the ANTARES high energy neutrino telescope is presented. Two different codes for atmospheric shower simulation have been used. Results from comparisons between these codes at sea level and detector level are presented. The first results on the capability of ANTARES to reject this class of background are given.

S. Cecchini; E. Korolkova; A. Margiotta; L. Thompson

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... MEASUREMENTS of the radon content of the atmosphere were made so long ago as 1905 by Eve1-2 in ... whole seemed to support the original suggestion of Elster and Geitel6 in 1903 that the radon in the atmosphere arises mainly from the soil. These workers noted that the highest ...

W. ANDERSON; W. V. MAYNEORD; R. C. TURNER

1954-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

Standiford, Richard B.

255

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland Research Applications Laboratory National Center for Atmospheric Research 2007-08 Program on Risk Analysis, Extreme Events and Decision Theory, opening workshop 16-19 September, North Carolina #12;Extremes · Interest in making inferences about large, rare, extreme phenomena

Gilleland, Eric

256

A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

Hoerst, S. M. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, M. E., E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Physical Properties of the Atmosphere in the New Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1). Part I: Model Description and Global Climatology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The atmospheric component of the new Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1) is described and an assessment of its mean climatology presented. HadGEM1 includes substantially improved representations of physical processes, increased ...

G. M. Martin; M. A. Ringer; V. D. Pope; A. Jones; C. Dearden; T. J. Hinton

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione Discovery could mean ingredients for life are abundant on icy space bodies. March 5, 2012 Curiosity rover bears three LANL technologies Inside Titan: This artist's concept shows a possible scenario for the internal structure of Titan, as suggested by data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Scientists have been trying to determine what is under Titan's organic-rich atmosphere and icy crust. Data from the radio science experiment make the strongest case yet for a global subsurface ocean, sitting above a subsurface layer of high-pressure ice and a water-infused silicate core. Image credit: A. Tavani Get Expertise

259

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861 and Arrhenius 1896 and is still supported in global climatology essentially describes a fictitious mechanism in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, ...

Gerlich, Gerhard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Experimental studies on atmospheric Stirling engine NAS-2  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric hot air Stirling engine NAS-1 and 2 have a simple flat rubber sheet diaphragm as their power piston, and they have been experimentally studied at Nihon University for several years continuously, with the target of to get more than 100 watts shaft power by atmospheric air with simple construction and cheap material. The first NAS-1 was intended to be a solar heated engine using television glass and wood for cheap cost, but it failed by thermal break of glass, so the improved NAS-2 is changed to be heated by gas burner, using metallic materials in all parts except rubber power piston. Other than this rubber sheet diaphragm, NAS-2 has many features as using James Watt crank mechanism, high finny copper tube for conventional commercial heat exchanger, and two kinds of hot gas heaters, etc. About the rubber sheet for the power piston, the thickness of the sheet was changed from 2 mm to 6 mm gradually to known what thickness is best, and it is found that about 5 mm is best for this engine. After trying many improvements on this engine, NAS-2 has produced about 130 watt shaft power with indicated power of 350 watt at 1994. In this paper detail of many features, history, results and experiments of these NAS engines are reported.

Watanabe, Hiroichi [Nihon Univ., Koriyama (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Isshiki, Naotsugu [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Ohtomo, Michihiro [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Sendai (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSIASHRAEIES Standard 90.1-2013; Preliminary Determination 2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSIASHRAE...

262

Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling  

SciTech Connect

Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Improving the Scalability of Reduct Determination in Rough Sets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rough Set Data Analysis (RSDA) is a non-invasive data analysis approach that solely relies on the data to find patterns and decision rules. Despite its… (more)

Mahmood, Shahid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Towards improved methods for determining porous media multiphase flow functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase property. Three synthetic experiments are used to show the erroneous estimation of flow functions associated with the homogeneity assumption. A proposal approach is used to predict the relative permeability of wetting phase using NMR relaxation... . . . . . 25 a. Total Flow Rate Specified at the Boundary . . . . 33 b. Pressure Specified at the Boundary . . . . . . . . 36 D. Two-Dimensional Comparison Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 E. Synthetic Experiments and Estimations . . . . . . . . . . . 46 1...

Xue, Song

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Experimental Investigation Of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges  

SciTech Connect

Microwave atmospheric pressure discharge in neon sustained by surface waves in a dielectric tube is considered. The plasma column length was measured versus absorbed microwave power for different discharge conditions. This gives a view on the wave propagation characteristics. The predicted dependence of discharge length on the total flux of wave power based on the modified model of non-equilibrium plasma is compared with experimental values. Moreover, we present results of spectroscopic investigations of the electron density. The electron density was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{beta} spectral line. The spectroscopic results we shall use developing of a model of propagation of surface wave.

Czylkowski, D.; Jasinski, M.; Nowakowska, H.; Zakrzewski, Z. [The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. Hydrocarbon Processing 6cycle gas turbines with an electric efficiency of 32%. 5.The efficiency of the steam turbine is determined by the

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Improve Motor Operation at Off-Design Voltages | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selection and Application Guide - A Handbook for Industry Improving Motor and Drive System Performance - A Sourcebook for Industry Determining Electric Motor Load and Efficiency...

268

Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres V. A. Sreckovic 1 Lj...applicable for the helium plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres described in Koester...study of DB white dwarf atmosphere plasma properties, helium plasmas......

V. A. Sreckovic; Lj. M. Ignjatovic; A. A. Mihajlov; M. S. Dimitrijevic

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

Shapira, Yoram

270

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 3210 Mathematical: atmospheric pollution, tropospheric ozone, urban pollution peaks, adjoint modeling, sensitivity Citation

Menut, Laurent

271

Radon in atmospheric studies: a review  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

Wilkening, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Isotopes and Ratios » 13C and 18O Oxygen Isotopes and Ratios » 13C and 18O Ratios, Atmospheric CO2, Cape Grim In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1014 data Data Investigators Francey R. J. and C. E. Allison Description Since 1982, a continuous program of sampling atmospheric CO2 to determine stable isotope ratios has been maintained at the Australian Baseline Air Pollution Station, Cape Grim, Tasmania (40°, 40'56"S, 144°, 41'18"E). The process of in situ extraction of CO2 from air, the preponderance of samples collected in conditions of strong wind from the marine boundary layer of the Southern Ocean, and the determination of all isotope ratios relative to a common high purity CO2 reference gas with isotopic δ13C close to

273

Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmosphere Model Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model CCSM-sprabhat.png Global warming will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. In this...

274

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

275

Intense and Highly Energetic Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis documents the efforts taken to produce highly ionized and concentrated atmospheric pressure plasma using an arrayed atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system. The… (more)

Furmanski, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

277

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

278

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national economies; Recognizing that significant interrelated, atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial global, terrestrial and atmospheric ecosystem studies should focus on the structure and processes of the environment

279

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of...

280

Improving Interpersonal Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By improving interpersonal communication skills, we can improve our relationships with others. Better communication comes from understanding one's self, understanding other people, learning to empathize, being a good listener and practicing...

Warren, Judith L.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An improved method for measuring muon energy using the truncated mean of dE/dx  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The measurement of muon energy is critical for many analyses in large Cherenkov detectors, particularly those that involve separating extraterrestrial neutrinos from the atmospheric neutrino background. Muon energy has traditionally been determined by measuring the specific energy loss (dE/dx) along the muon's path and relating the dE/dx to the muon energy. Because high-energy muons ( E ? > 1 TeV ) lose energy randomly, the spread in dE/dx values is quite large, leading to a typical energy resolution of 0.29 in log 10 ( E ? ) for a muon observed over a 1 km path length in the IceCube detector. In this paper, we present an improved method that uses a truncated mean and other techniques to determine the muon energy. The muon track is divided into separate segments with individual dE/dx values. The elimination of segments with the highest dE/dx results in an overall dE/dx that is more closely correlated to the muon energy. This method results in an energy resolution of 0.22 in log 10 ( E ? ) , which gives a 26% improvement. This technique is applicable to any large water or ice detector and potentially to large scintillator or liquid argon detectors.

R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J.A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S.W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J.J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K.-H. Becker; M. Bell; M.L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D.Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D.J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A.M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D.F. Cowen; A.H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J.C. Davis; C. De Clercq; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J.C. Díaz-Vélez; J. Dreyer; J.P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; J. Eisch; R.W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P.A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A.R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T.K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J.A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G.C. Hill; K.D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P.O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G.S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Kläs; S.R. Klein; J.-H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D.J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M.J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H.S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; S.M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S.C. Nowicki; D.R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J.A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P.B. Price; G.T. Przybylski; L. Rädel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J.P. Rodrigues; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S.M. Saba; T. Salameh; H.-G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; L. Schönherr; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S.H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; M.W.E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G.M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R.G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E.A. Strahler; R. Ström; G.W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P.A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C.H. Wiebusch; D.R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T.R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D.L. Xu; X.W. Xu; J.P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

283

Airborne Particles in Outdoor Air: Atmospheric Dust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For industrial products, in addition to the harmful effect like usual particles, the particular harmful effect of atmospheric dust especially metal particles is very large. For example, the light metal element...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) represents an innovative approach...2, and dust cycles together with the energy and momentum budgets. The mission concept is based on a constellation of satel...

E. R. Kursinski; W. Folkner; C. Zuffada…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Uraninite and Fullerene in Atmospheric Particulates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incineration, uranium mining, and atmospheric testing of nuclearweapons-burning power plants typically contain very small amounts of uranium ( concentrations, the form of the uranium has been unknown. Using a variety of advanced electron microscopy

Utsunomiya, Satoshi

286

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens ... (22) Plasma II is more effective than Plasma I with the ability to develop homogeneous plasmas and eliminate boundary-layer air effects. ...

Sudheer Jinka; Uday Turaga; Vinitkumar Singh; Rachel L. Behrens; Cenk Gumeci; Carol Korzeniewski; Todd Anderson; Rory Wolf; Seshadri Ramkumar

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landing accuracy requirements for a manned space vehicle make it necessary to ?y a controlled entry trajectory rather than a more robust ballistic entry trajectory used for some robotic missions. The large variations in Mars atmospheric properties make a...

Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Balanced Atmospheric Response to Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a Squall line propagates through the atmosphere, it not only excite transient gravity–inertia wave motion but also produces more permanent modifications to the large-scale balanced flow. Here we calculate this balanced response using the is ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott R. Fulton; Rolf F. A. Herttenstein

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

Honrath, Richard E.

292

Synopsis of Atmospheric Research under MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold regions present a challenge to atmospheric and hydrologic research. Their low temperatures test the endurance of field workers and their instruments; their distance from large urban centers raises the cos...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

294

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

Radioactive contamination of atmospheric dust over southeastern New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosol particle samples were collected at three sites located near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a deep underground nuclear waste-storage facility, and they were analyzed to investigate the spatial and temporal variations in the concentrations of selected radionuclides and inorganic substances. The activities of 238Pu, 239,240Pu,241Pu and 241Am were determined by alpha spectrometry following a series of chemical separations, and the concentrations of Al, U and Th were determined in a separate set of samples by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. There was no evidence for impacts of the WIPP on radionuclide activity concentrations. Rather, the activities of both naturally-occurring (U and Th) and man-made (241Am and 239,240Pu) radionuclides in the aerosols peaked in spring and tracked the loadings of Al, an indicator of mineral dust. More than half of the variability in the 239,240Pu at the sampling site closest to the WIPP could be explained by the seasonal cycles of atmospheric dust. For U and Th, the predictive value of Al was even higher: 66% to over 90% of the variance in these nuclides could be explained by their relationship to dust. Extrapolation of the data to a global scale suggests that ?0.02% of the total 239,240Pu from nuclear weapons’ fallout currently recirculates between the earth and atmosphere each year. In terms of monitoring releases from nuclear facilities, the results presented here demonstrate that elemental data provide information directly relevant to understanding causes for variability in the activities of atmospheric radionuclides.

Richard Arimoto; Joel L. Webb; Marsha Conley

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

297

Observations and simulations of synoptic, regional, and local variations in atmospheric CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations and simulations of synoptic, regional, and local variations in atmospheric CO2 Jih] Synoptic events may play an important role in determining the CO2 spatial distribution and temporal 2001, which had the most significant CO2 concentration variation in our case pool. The CO2

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

298

Atmospheric emissions from the Deepwater Horizon spill constrain airwater partitioning, hydrocarbon fate, and leak rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

releases of gas and oil mixtures is initially determined by solubility and volatility of individual bioavailability of different fractions of the gasoil mixture, and to develop a comprehensive picture of the fate of leaked hydrocarbons in the marine environ- ment. Analysis of airborne atmospheric data shows massive

Toohey, Darin W.

299

Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

1963-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

300

Limitations of the FPD and ECD in Atmospheric Analysis: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Natusch, J.R. Sewell, and R.L. Tanner, Anal. Chem. 46 410 (1974). 108. 67. W.L. Bamesberger and D.F. Adams, Tappi 52 1302 (1969). 6&. D.F. Adams, "Determination of Sulfur-Containing Compounds in the Atmosphere," presented at......

S.O. Farwell; R.A. Rasmussen

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Abstract The present study uses increased atmospheric pressure as an ethanol antagonist to test the hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract The present study uses increased atmospheric pressure as an ethanol antagonist to test for ethanol. This was accomplished using behavioral and in vitro mea- sures to determine the effects of pressure on ethanol and other GABAergic drugs in C57BL/6 and LS mice. Be- haviorally, exposure to 12 times

Brinton, Roberta Diaz

302

Refines Efficiency Improvement  

SciTech Connect

Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

WRI

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

304

CX-005588: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04112011 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota...

305

CX-009581: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009581: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Improvement Program for the Oil and Gas Industry Supply Chain CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 12142012...

306

Improving Lives. Improving Texas. Agency Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Williams Administration Building 7101 TAMU September 2009 College Station, TX 77843-7101 Phone: 979. In the context of this broad mission, the priorities for Extension education are: Ensure a sustainable and management. Build local capacity for economic development in Texas communities. Improve the health

307

Atmospheric chemistry impacts and feedbacks on the global carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prediction. Issues to be addressed include the quantification of the impact of the atmospheric oxidation and the oxidative state of the atmosphere. The end goal is to create a model that can quantitatively predict is required to: Predict 3-D atmospheric CO2 production as a function of the CCSM3 atmospheric chemistry module

308

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Upper-Ocean Currents How the atmosphere-ocean-land system/Salinity/Mass/Momentum Conservations #12; How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? It is the sun that sustains all living beings on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

309

Advanced atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion design - spouted bed  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Spouted-Fluidized Bed Boiler that is an advanced atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (FBC). The objective of this system design study is to develop an advanced AFBC with improved performance and reduced capital and operating costs compared to a conventional AFBC and an oil-fired system. The Spouted-Fluidized Bed (SFB) system is a special type of FBC with a distinctive jet of air in the bed to establish an identifiable solids circulation pattern. This feature is expected to provide: reduced NO/sub x/ emissions because of the fuel rich spout zone; high calcium utilization, calcium-to-sulfur ratio of 1.5, because of the spout attrition and mixing; high fuel utilization because of the solids circulation and spout attrition; improved thermal efficiency because of reduced solids heat loss; and improved fuel flexibility because of the spout phenomena. The SFB was compared to a conventional AFBC and an oil-fired package boiler for 15,000 pound per hour system. The evaluation showed that the operating cost advantages of the SFB resulted from savings in fuel, limestone, and waste disposal. The relative levelized cost for steam from the three systems in constant 1985 dollars is: SFB - $10 per thousand pounds; AFBC - $11 per thousand pounds; oil-fired - $14 per thousand pounds. 18 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

Shirley, F.W.; Litt, R.D.

1985-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands  

SciTech Connect

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; /LPSC, Grenoble; Blondin, Stephane; /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Gorecki, Alexia; /LPSC, Grenoble; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the mass of Jupiter and R its radius. Assuming this is all converted to thermal energy, give a crudePhysics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES PLA.1 for discounting the less popular of these? Show that the energy liberated during the collapse of a sphere of mass

Read, Peter L.

312

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

313

HUD Home Improvements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Provides a collection of information, resources, and updates related to home improvements and insurance for manufactured housing. Author: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

314

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Fundamental & Computational  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Global Change Science and Global Change Our researchers are transforming the nation's ability to predict climate change and its impacts. PNNL's research is expanding knowledge of fundamental atmospheric processes, developing state-of-the-art modeling capabilities, and improving understanding of how climate, energy, water, and land systems interact. Working across disciplines, we integrate theory, measurements, and modeling at molecular to global scales. Read more... aerial irrigation green circles Plugging Water's Effects in an Earth System Model In two studies led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers simulated how irrigation from both surface water and groundwater affects the Earth's water and energy budget. The two studies highlight the challenges for Earth system models to include a more complete

315

Subcycled dynamics in the Spectral Community Atmosphere Model, version 4  

SciTech Connect

To gain computational efficiency, a split explicit time integration scheme has been implemented in the CAM spectral Eulerian dynamical core. In this scheme, already present in other dynamical core options within the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM), the fluid dynamics portion of the model is subcycled to allow a longer time step for the parameterization schemes. The physics parameterization of CAM is not subject to the stability restrictions of the fluid dynamics, and thus finer spatial resolutions of the model do not require the physics time step to be reduced. A brief outline of the subcycling algorithm implementation and resulting model efficiency improvement is presented. A discussion regarding the effect of the climate statistics derived from short model runs is provided.

Taylor, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Evans, Katherine J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL] [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field.

Robert F. Hicks; Gary S. Selwyn

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission  

SciTech Connect

Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte [University of Texas at Austin, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 210 East 24. Street W. R. Woolrich Laboratories 1 University Station, C0600 Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 229 Hammond, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Continuous Collection of Soluble Atmospheric Particles with a Wetted Hydrophilic Filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous Collection of Soluble Atmospheric Particles with a Wetted Hydrophilic Filter ... aerodynamic diameter range were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG, model 3450, TSI Inc.) using 0.5 mg/L fluorescein solution in ultrapure water as the feed without and with 0.2, 2, 5, and 10 mM NaCl added to the feed. ... The performance of a gas and aerosol monitoring system (GAMS) for the determination of acidic water soluble organic and inorganic gases and ammonia as well as related particles from the atmosphere ...

Masaki Takeuchi; S. M. Rahmat Ullah; Purnendu K. Dasgupta; Donald R. Collins; Allen Williams

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS  

SciTech Connect

Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

Hashemi, M. M. [Physics Department, Doctorate Technical Center of PNU, P.O. Box 19536-33511, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir; Moosakhani, A. [Physics Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A. [Physics Department, Imam Khomeini International University, P.O. Box 34149-16818, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Majdabadi, A. [Laser and Optics Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 11155-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abachi, S. [Physics Department, University of California, Irvin, CA 92697 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The eco-friendly surface modification of textiles for deep digital textile printing by in-line atmospheric non-thermal plasma treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluated the potential application of an atmospheric plasma (AP) treatment as a pre-treatment for digital textile printing (DTP) of polyester (PET) fabrics and cotton, in order to determine its via...

Youngmi Park; Kang Koo

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Analysis of Spurious Surface Temperature at the Atmosphere–Land Interface and a New Method to Solve the Surface Energy Balance Equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solving the surface energy balance equation is the most important task when combining an atmospheric model and a land surface model. However, while the surface energy balance equation determines the interface temperature between the models, this ...

Hirofumi Tomita

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

White dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$?$ opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of NGC 6397  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the importance of pure hydrogen white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ far red wing opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397. Our recently improved atmosphere models account for the previously missing opacity from the Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ hydrogen line broadened by collisions of the absorbing hydrogen atoms with molecular and atomic hydrogen. These models are the first that well reproduce the UV colors and spectral energy distributions of cool white dwarfs with $T_{\\rm eff}white dwarf cooling sequence using atmosphere models that do not include the correct Ly-$\\alpha$ opacity is underestimated by $\\sim 0.5$ Gyr. Our analysis shows that it is essential to use white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ opacity for precise dating of old stellar populations from white dwarf cooling sequences.

Piotr M. Kowalski

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

325

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

326

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

327

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

328

Detection of an Extrasolar Planet Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high precision spectrophotometric observations of four planetary transits of HD 209458, in the region of the sodium resonance doublet at 589.3 nm. We find that the photometric dimming during transit in a bandpass centered on the sodium feature is deeper by (2.32 +/- 0.57) x 10^{-4} relative to simultaneous observations of the transit in adjacent bands. We interpret this additional dimming as absorption from sodium in the planetary atmosphere, as recently predicted from several theoretical modeling efforts. Our model for a cloudless planetary atmosphere with a solar abundance of sodium in atomic form predicts more sodium absorption than we observe. There are several possibilities that may account for this reduced amplitude, including reaction of atomic sodium into molecular gases and/or condensates, photoionization of sodium by the stellar flux, a low primordial abundance of sodium, or the presence of clouds high in the atmosphere.

David Charbonneau; Timothy M. Brown; Robert W. Noyes; Ronald L. Gilliland

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

Spatially Resolved STIS Spectroscopy of Betelgeuse's Outer Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present spatially resolved spectra observed with HST-STIS of the upper chromosphere and dust envelope of Alpha Orionis (M2 Iab). In the fall of 2002 a set of five high-resolution near-UV spectra was obtained by scanning at intensity peak-up position and four off-limb target positions up to one arcsecond, using a small aperture, to investigate the thermal conditions and flow dynamics in the outer atmosphere of this important nearby cool supergiant star. Based on Mg II h & k, Fe II 2716 A, C II 2327 A, and Al II ] 2669 A emission lines we provide the first evidence for the presence of warm chromospheric plasma at least 1 arcsecond away from the star at ~40 R* (1 R*~700 Rsun). The STIS spectra reveal that Betelgeuse's upper chromosphere extends far beyond the circumstellar H alpha envelope of ~5 R*, determined from previous ground-based imaging. The flux in the broad and self-absorbed resonance lines of Mg II decreases by a factor of ~700 compared to the flux at chromospheric disk center. We observe strong asymmetry changes in the Mg II h and Si I resonance line profiles when scanning off-limb, signaling the outward acceleration of gas outflow in the upper chromosphere. From the radial intensity distributions of Fe I and Fe II emission lines we determine the radial non-LTE iron ionization balance. We compute that the local kinetic gas temperatures of the warm chromospheric gas component in the outer atmosphere exceed 2600 K, when assuming local gas densities of the cool gas component we determine from radiative transfer models that fit the 9.7 um silicate dust emission feature. The spatially resolved STIS spectra directly demonstrate that warm chromospheric plasma co-exisists with cool gas in Betelgeuse's circumstellar dust envelope.

A. Lobel; J. Aufdenberg; A. K. Dupree; R. L. Kurucz; R. P. Stefanik; G. Torres

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

330

Improved wire chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

Atac, M.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

Improved solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 6 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process Document Number: P-006 Rev 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): P-008 Corrective-Preventive Action Process, P-004 Business System Management Review and REG-003 Records Register P-006 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0416 Changed verbiage in Step 6 to, "CAR/PAR/IO using P-008, Corrective-Preventive Action & Improvement Opportunity"

333

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues surrounding this process. We concluded that the MP process could be improved for most users by tuning the system configuration. With the approval of both the STRIPES Executive Steering Committee and the STRIPES Project Office, we launched the MP Process Improvement Initiative. After many meetings with members of the STRIPES Team and Working Group, we are ready to "go-live" with this initiative. On October 1 st , 2012 the new MP process will be implemented for use by most field offices.

334

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

335

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

336

A sun glint heliostat for atmospheric spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple arrangement based upon sun glint the brilliant image of the sun behind a convex reflecting surface is used to produce a nearly stationary image of the sun. Using a telescopemirror this image is directed into a spectrometer and is spectrally analyzed for the purpose of remote sensing of trace species in our atmosphere. Typical data using a reflecting sphere are reported and discussed qualitatively in relation to the atmospheric absorbers between the sun and detector. The over?all uses of the system are described and some cautions concerning its limitations are discussed. Alternate geometries and possible variations of the system are described.

A. E. S. Green; R. A. Sutherland; G. Ganguli

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Headspace profiles of modified atmosphere packaged fresh red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) by gas liquid chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activity. Typical components found in the headspace were, butanal, ethanol, hexanal, dimethylamine and trimethylamine. During storage at 4 C, the microbial population within the packages containing C02 tended to shift from an initial gram negative... dioxide (CO2) enriched atmospheres and vacuum packaging have become important new technologies that will improve the quality and shelf-life of fresh seafood products. This type of packaging not only extends the shelf-life of seafoods, it also makes...

Scorah, Craig Darrell Allen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operates at non-permanent sites selected by the ARM Program. Sometimes these sites can become permanent ARM sites, as was the case with Graciosa Island in the Azores. It is now known as the Eastern North Atlantic permanent site. In January 2006 the AMF deployed to Niamey, Niger, West Africa, at the Niger Meteorological Office at Niamey International Airport. This deployment was timed to coincide with the field phases and Special Observing Periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The ARM Program participated in this international effort as a field campaign called "Radiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST).The primary purpose of the Niger deployment was to combine an extended series of measurements from the AMF with those from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) Instrument on the Meteosat operational geostationary satellite in order to provide the first well-sampled, direct estimates of the divergence of solar and thermal radiation across the atmosphere. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Niamey are available via a link from ARM's Niamey, Niger site information page. Other data can be found at the related websites mentioned above and in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

340

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in permafrost regions September 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint One of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century lies in predicting the impacts of anthropogenic activities on Earth's carbon cycle. Soil is a significant component of the carbon cycle, because it contains at least two-thirds of the world's terrestrial carbon and more than twice as much carbon as the atmosphere. Although soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks were built over millennial time scales, they are susceptible to a far more rapid release back to the atmosphere due to climatic and land use change. If environmental perturbations negatively impact the processes regulating the storage of SOC, significant amounts of this carbon could be decomposed

342

Atmospheric histories and growth trends Diane J. Ivy, Tim Arnold, Christina M. Harth, L. Paul Steele, Jens Mhle,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric histories and growth trends of C4 F10 , C5 F12 , C6 F14 , C7 F16 and C8 F18 * Diane J to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

343

Surface modification of polymeric materials by cold atmospheric plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work we report the surface modification of different engineering polymers, such as, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). It was operated with Ar gas using 10 kV, 37 kHz, sine wave as an excitation source. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal treatment conditions and also to compare the polymer surface modification induced by plasma jet with the one obtained by another atmospheric pressure plasma source – the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The samples were exposed to the plasma jet effluent using a scanning procedure, which allowed achieving a uniform surface modification. The wettability assessments of all polymers reveal that the treatment leads to reduction of more than 40° in the water contact angle (WCA). Changes in surface composition and chemical bonding were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that both detected incorporation of oxygen-related functional groups. Surface morphology of polymer samples was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and an increase of polymer roughness after the APPJ treatment was found. The plasma-treated polymers exhibited hydrophobic recovery expressed in reduction of the O-content of the surface upon rinsing with water. This process was caused by the dissolution of low molecular weight oxidized materials (LMWOMs) formed on the surface as a result of the plasma exposure.

K.G. Kostov; T.M.C. Nishime; A.H.R. Castro; A. Toth; L.R.O. Hein

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model  

SciTech Connect

This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the O{sub x}, HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

Moraes, F.P. Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improving Bulk Microphysics Parameterizations in Simulations of Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect

To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) in regional and global climate models, a double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified and the results are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). Rather than using prescribed aerosols as in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR), a prognostic doublemoment aerosol representation is introduced to predict both the aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated. Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes, maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (SC) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds (DCC) in the southeast of China from the Department of Energy/ARM Mobile Facility (DOE/AMF) - China field campaign. The results from Bulk-2M exhibit a much better agreement in the cloud number concentration and effective droplet radius in both the SC and DCC cases with those from SBM and field measurements than those from Bulk-OR. In the SC case particularly, Bulk-2M reproduces the observed drizzle precipitation, which is largely inhibited in Bulk-OR. Bulk-2M predicts enhanced precipitation and invigorated convection with increased aerosol loading in the DCC case, consistent with the SBM simulation, while Bulk-OR predicts the opposite behaviors. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm 2 stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 ?m is determined as a more realistic setting in the autoconversion parameterization. The saturation adjustment employed in calculating condensation/evaporation in the bulk scheme is identified as the main factor responsible for the large discrepancies in predicting cloud water in the SC case, suggesting that an explicit calculation of diffusion growth with predicted supersaturation is necessary for further improvements of the bulk microphysics scheme. Lastly, a larger rain evaporation rate below cloud is found in the bulk scheme in comparison to the SBM simulation, which could contribute to a lower surface precipitation in the bulk scheme.

Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Franklin, Charmaine N.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;2 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Contents 3 Heavy Snowfall regulations designed to elimi- nate human-caused haze in Big Bend and 155 other National Parks), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), among others. In support of BRAVO, NPS and CIRA scientists

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

348

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas Alexander Fridman · Microdischarge Interaction and Structuring in Dielectric Barrier Discharges · Kinetics of Blood Coagulation in Plasma · Surface Wound wire Area of DBD plasma region: ~104cm2 #12;7 Microdischarge Patterning (2D) R22 R23 R24 R26 R27 R28

Kaganovich, Igor

349

Sputtering and heating of Titan's upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Although, the plasma energy deposition...viable, but the plasma heating is inadequate...be true: another non-thermal process must be active...composition of the ambient plasma near Titan's orbit...used to test the atmospheric loss rate. Prior...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of solar composition studies. The first column labeled "radial" describes the overall structure of the workTHE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN Sterrekundig Instituut, Postbus 80 000, NL­3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low

Rutten, Rob

351

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is no10 isotopic fractionation between the liquid phase and the generated moist "air". The water11., A microdrop generator for the calibration of.... 1. Introduction1 2 Water vapor is a key element in the globalAMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 May 1971 research-article Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer...semi-empirical laws for the variation of mean wind speed with height and for the statistical...provide some useful ordering of the mean wind profile characteristics in relation to...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

TETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, starting with the Greek and Roman cultures3'4.The cumulative deposition from anthropogenicsourcesin preTETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric lead contamination detected in Swedish lake sediments for pre-industrial atmospherictrace-metalcontaminationt''it is commonlyassumed that air pollution

Short, Daniel

354

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professor; Recipient, Teaching Innovation Prize; Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year Allison Mission to Comet 67P / Churyumov- Gerasimenko · Solar and Heliospheric Physics Group · STEREO Mission,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann

Eustice, Ryan

355

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Research areas Atmospheric Science/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved

Eustice, Ryan

356

1 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1 atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and mL/L; and in terms of Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(L atm); mg real gas/(L mmHg); and mg real gas/(L kPa) for 0–40°C and freshwater conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390 ?atm) and for 2030 (440 ?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentrations of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Conversion factors are presented to convert these concentrations to other commonly used units. Equations and tabular information are provided to compute air saturation concentration for moist air at local barometric pressure for the four atmospheric gases. Because of the importance of dissolved oxygen in biological processes, the air solubility concentration is also presented as a function of elevation for both metric and English elevations. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, freshwater, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

358

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

359

Nonlinear waves in the solar atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the intended application to solar physics deserves great effort...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Figure 1 A typical...distance from the base of the solar atmosphere. The quantity is...The (a), (b) and (c) panels correspond to z=0, z=z...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

White Dwarf Spectra and Atmosphere Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the spectral classification of white dwarfs and some of the physical processes important for their understanding. In the major part of this paper we discuss the input physics and computational methods for one of the most widely used stellar atmosphere codes for white dwarfs.

Detlev Koester

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ch.6 Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference in air pressure. #12;Measure Air Pressure-- Mercury Barometer ·Seal the glass tube at one end of latitude. Meridional flows Zonal flows #12;Learning Objective Two: Air Pressure #12;Air Pressure Atmospheric pressure is the force per unit area exerted against a surface by the weight of air above

Pan, Feifei

362

Stereographic displays of atmospheric model data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system has been developed to display color stereographic time-lapsed sequences of outputs of three-dimensional atmospheric models. Contour lines and wind vectors derived from a model can be overlaid on a geostationary satellite image or displayed with ... Keywords: Computer graphics, Meteorology, Modeling display, Stereography

Mary desJardins; A. Frederick Hasler

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Magnetic Field in the Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication provides an overview of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with the focus lying on the corona. The solar magnetic field couples the solar interior with the visible surface of the Sun and with its atmosphere. It is also responsible for all solar activity in its numerous manifestations. Thus, dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and flares are magnetically driven. In addition, the field also plays a crucial role in heating the solar chromosphere and corona as well as in accelerating the solar wind. Our main emphasis is the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere so that photospheric and chromospheric magnetic structures are mainly discussed where relevant for higher solar layers. Also, the discussion of the solar atmosphere and activity is limited to those topics of direct relevance to the magnetic field. After giving a brief overview about the solar magnetic field in general and its global structure, we discuss in more detail the magnetic field in active regions, the quie...

Wiegelmann, Thomas; Solanki, Sami K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The solar photospheric abundance of phosphorus: results from co5bold 3D model atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aims: We determine the solar abundance of phosphorus using co5bold 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres. method: High resolution, high signal-to-noise solar spectra of the PI lines of Multiplet 1 at 1051-1068 nm are compared to line formation computations performed on a co5bold solar model atmosphere. results: We find A(P)=5.46+- 0.04, in good agreement with previous analysis based on 1D model atmospheres, due to the fact that the PI lines of Mult. 1 are little affected by 3D effects. We cannot confirm an earlier claim by other authors of a downward revision of the solar P abundance by 0.1 dex employing a 3D model atmosphere. Concerning other stars, we found modest (<0.1 dex) 3D abundance corrections for P among four F dwarf model atmospheres of different metallicity, being largest at lowest metallicity. conclusions: We conclude that 3D abundance corrections are generally rather small for the PI lines studied in this work. They are marginally relevant for metal-poor stars, but may be neglected in the Sun.

Elisabetta Caffau; Matthias Steffen; Luca Sbordone; Hans-G. Ludwig; Piercarlo Bonifacio

2007-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

1987-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

366

Targeting Atmospheric Simulation Algorithms for Large Distributed Memory GPU Accelerated Computers  

SciTech Connect

Computing platforms are increasingly moving to accelerated architectures, and here we deal particularly with GPUs. In [15], a method was developed for atmospheric simulation to improve efficiency on large distributed memory machines by reducing communication demand and increasing the time step. Here, we improve upon this method to further target GPU accelerated platforms by reducing GPU memory accesses, removing a synchronization point, and better clustering computations. The modification ran over two times faster in some cases even though more computations were required, demonstrating the merit of improving memory handling on the GPU. Furthermore, we discover that the modification also has a near 100% hit rate in fast on-chip L1 cache and discuss the reasons for this. In concluding, we remark on further potential improvements to GPU efficiency.

Norman, Matthew R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Prioritizing Data for Improving the Multi-decadal Predictive Capability of Atmospheric Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prioritization accorded to observation types currently being considered for a space-based climate observing system is extended from a previous study. Hind-cast averages and trends from 1970 through 2005 of longitude-latitude maps of 200-hPa ...

Stephen S. Leroy; Gianluca Redaelli; Barbara Grassi

368

A system for improved radiotelegraphy reception in the presence of atmospherics and interference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the cathode ray tube (to select the desired signal), would visually separate signals on the same frequency but of different directions of arrival. The signal chosen could be transformed to an audible one by phototube pickup controlling an audio oscillator... sensitivity and selectivity at higher frequencies, the amplifiers in Fig. 1 are usually replaced by superheterodyne receivers with comsfon local and beat frequency oscillators (Fig. S) ~ ~rre eeoc of ~Reer ttoe The frequency region used for this study...

Anderson, Warren Leslie

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

Link, Percy Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Improved Dragline Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cause of energy conservation can be served by increasing the efficiency of large draglines used in surface coal mining. The topic is the application of a training simulator, computer instrumentation and computer simulation to improve dragline...

Keller, K. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Improving Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On December 19, 2014, the Energy Department released its "Improving Project Management" report, a roadmap to transformation in funding, culture, project ownership, independent oversight and front-end planning from experienced project management leaders.

372

Software Quality Assurance Improvment Plan: ALOHA Gap Analysis, Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final-ALOHA Final-ALOHA Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.3: Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan: ALOHA Gap Analysis Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 May 2004 ALOHA Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii ALOHA Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report FOREWORD This report documents the outcome of an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) attributes of the chemical source term and atmospheric dispersion computer code, ALOHA 5.2.3, relative to established

373

What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Indoor atmospheric corrosion of conventional weathering steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One year indoor atmospheric corrosion examinations have been carried out on two conventional weathering steels for a year, at two test sites, Tocumen and Sherman Breakwater in Panama. They are environmentally cla...

Juan A. Jaén; Josefina Iglesias; Olga Adames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Representing El Niño in Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere GCMs: The Dominant Role of the Atmospheric Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic modular approach to investigate the respective roles of the ocean and atmosphere in setting El Niño characteristics in coupled general circulation models is presented. Several state-of-the-art coupled models sharing either the same ...

E. Guilyardi; S. Gualdi; J. Slingo; A. Navarra; P. Delecluse; J. Cole; G. Madec; M. Roberts; M. Latif; L. Terray

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

377

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a limited data sampling. This is especially important for establishing the optimal sampling and temporal interpolation schemes employed in satellite radiation budget missions, such as Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB), and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System

378

A method of estimating time scales of atmospheric piston and its application at DomeC (Antarctica)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston are critical for interferometers as they determine their sensitivity. We characterize an instrumental set-up, termed the piston scope, that aims at measuring the atmospheric time constant, tau0, through the image motion in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer. High-resolution piston scope measurements have been obtained at the observatory of Paranal, Chile, in April 2006. The derived atmospheric parameters are shown to be consistent with data from the astronomical site monitor, provided that the atmospheric turbulence is displaced along a single direction. Piston scope measurements, of lower temporal and spatial resolution, were for the first time recorded in February 2005 at the Antarctic site of DomeC. Their re-analysis in terms of the new data calibration sharpens the conclusions of a first qualitative examination.

A. Kellerer; M. Sarazin; T. Butterley; R. Wilson

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

CX-005498: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

498: Categorical Exclusion Determination 498: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005498: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operation of Argon Atmosphere Furnace in C-118 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A commercial, argon atmosphere furnace in 773-A, Lab C-118, will be used for metallic sample fabrication. Building water will be used for cooling and disposed of via a clear water drain. Argon will be emitted from the furnace during operation. Total water and argon emissions over the course of a year of operation are estimated at 4000 gallons, and 4000 cubic feet, respectively. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005498.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002551: Categorical Exclusion Determination

380

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H?-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface ...

Seager, Sara

382

Faculty-Led Study Abroad in Atmospheric Science Education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For several years the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee's Atmospheric Science group has offered the faculty-led study abroad program Mexico: Air Pollution and Ancient Cultures. In this course, open to both atmospheric science majors and nonmajors as well ...

Jonathan D. W. Kahl; Julia G. Cerón

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

Ivy, Diane Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Muon diagnostics of the Earth’s atmosphere and magnetosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of distant monitoring of the Earth’s magnetosphere and atmosphere is described, which is based on the close correlation between the modulations in the flux of atmospheric muons detected at the Earth’s su...

N. S. Barbashina; V. V. Borog…

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvénic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

386

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

389

Surface Nanostructuring of Polysulfone Membranes by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization (APPIGP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large substrates. Various atmospheric plasma sources arePolymerization The atmospheric plasma source used in thisby Remote Atmospheric- Pressure Plasma. Ieee Transactions on

Kim, Soo Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sensitive multi-photon nonlinear laser spectroscopic methods for isotope analysis in atmospheric and environmental applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements in atmospheric pressure plasma. However, nonean atmospheric radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma (atmospheric atomizer. Also, the inductively coupled plasma

Lyons, Wendy Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric physics Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: atmospheric physics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:cpac.pku.edu.cn Summary: Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:...

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol size Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for about ten percent of all aerosols in the atmosphere. We... , can actually absorb solar energy and warm the atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosols are very important... by...

393

Dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma has been derived. The result can be...

S. S. De; Bithika Ghosh; Manasi Mal; B. Ghosh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from a global 3D land.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since

Selin, Noelle Eckley

395

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from global modeling Noelle Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since industrialization Major anthropogenic

Selin, Noelle Eckley

396

The nature of moss and lower atmospheric seismology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TR (i.e. thermal interface between...perform lower atmospheric seismology...chromospheric plasma upwards at...despite the atmospheric seeing deformations...EUV-emitting plasma in its vicinity...tunnel some non-propagating...examples of lower atmospheric seismology...in the solar plasma. Figure 1...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

New consideration of atmospheric refraction in laser ranging data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......atmosphere near the Earth. Atmospheric refraction increases...function based on the generator function method proposed...incorporated with the generator function theory and...which P is the total atmospheric pressure in millibars...partial pressure of water vapour in millibars......

Haojian Yan; Guangli Wang

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Refined correlations between atmospheric and rapid polar motion excitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......experiments, the atmospheric or geodetic excitation...a random number generator, and is regenerated...1990. Global water storage and polar...C.R., 1993. Atmospheric excitation computations...polar motion by atmospheric angular momentum...Global surface water-induced Rosen......

T. C. Stieglitz; S. R. Dickman

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER management decisions? II--WATERWATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere,Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems resource issues. #12;I-WATER: Vision and Goals ¤ I-WATER will provide a new generation of Ph.D. students

400

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7 Be concentrations Ilya G. Usoskin,1; published 21 March 2009. [1] Variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in the global atmosphere the variations in the 7 Be concentration in the atmosphere for the period from 1 January to 28 February 2005

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Numerical Analysis of Flow Characteristics of An Atmospheric Plasma Torch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Analysis of Flow Characteristics of An Atmospheric Plasma Torch You-Jae Kim, J.-G. HanCheon-dong, Suwon 440-746, KOREA Abstract The atmospheric plasma is regarded as an effective method for surface mathematical models used for simulating plasma characteristics inside an atmospheric plasma torch is carried

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

402

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University 104 CEOAS Admin Bldg Announcement College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Posting 0012926 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, Earth Systems History The College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) at Oregon State University

403

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3 Contents Abstract 2 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Problem background

Learned, John

404

Singular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are presented for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001. The singular valuesSingular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models Wenyuan Liao and Adrian Sandu for atmospheric chemical transport models. The distinguishing feature of these models is the presence of stiff

Sandu, Adrian

405

AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley-Interscience, 2006AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols Tuesdays 9-9:50 AM, 212B ACRC Wednesdays, Lab, 1-4 PM, ACB 10 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 19 491

406

Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

Sandu, Adrian

407

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

408

European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to the Eastern Mediterranean during of European pollution are observed in the atmosphere (74 ( 13%). On the other hand, when the Persian Trough). This study demonstrates that atmospheric pollution over the East Mediterranean region during the summer

Einat, Aharonov

409

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA NOAA About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder houses the Earth System Research Lab, which supports a "reforecasting" project. The initiative involves running several decades of historical

410

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

411

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Velocity June 5-6, 2012 Jeremy Rishel Bruce Napier Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses: GENII Today's Presentation.... Will provide a high-level overview of the GENII codes. Will cover basic aspects of GENII's acute atmospheric transport model. Will review the GENII deposition model that is used to estimate the deposition velocity used in plume depletion. 2 GENII Development History 1988 - GENII V1 released ICRP-26/30/48 dosimetry 1990 - GENII V1.485 stabilized Current DOE Toolbox Version 1992 - GENII-S stochastic version 2004 - GENII V2 ICRP-72 age-dependent dosimetry Federal Guidance Report 13 risk factors

412

Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models  

SciTech Connect

Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

Rotman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Improving steam turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the condition of a significant number of fossil steam turbines operating in the United States and the maintenance practices used to improve their performance. Through the use of steam path audits conducted by the authors` company and by several utilities, a large data base of information on turbine heat rate, casing efficiency, and maintenance practices is available to help the power generation industry understand how different maintenance practices and steam path damage impact turbine performance. The data base reveals that turbine cycle heat rate is typically 5.23% poorer than design just prior to major outages. The degraded condition of steam turbines presents an opportunity for utilities to improve heat rate and reduce emissions without increasing fuel costs. The paper describes what losses typically contribute to the 5.23% heat rate degradation and how utilities can recover steam turbine performance through maintenance actions aimed at improving steam path efficiency.

Cioffi, D.H.; Mitchell, D.R.; Whitecar, S.C. [Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

OIT geothermal system improvements  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon Institute of Technology campus has been heated by the direct use of geothermal fluids since 1964. The 11 building campus uses geothermal energy for space heating/cooling, domestic water heating, the swimming pool and sidewalk snow melt. The hydronic system was designed to use the geothermal fluids directly in heating units. In the 1970s, problems were experienced with the design and operation of the well pumps, buried piping and heating equipment. Beginning in the early 1980`s, many improvements were made to the system due to equipment performance problems and resource management requirements. This paper discusses those improvements that included the distribution system, cooling, well pumps, cascading of geothermal fluids, installation of isolation plate heat exchangers in each building and drilling of two injection wells. Plans for future improvements include better controls to manage energy use and data monitoring systems for individual buildings, and instrumentation to monitor well pump performance.

Lienau, P.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Coastal Atmospheric Circulation around an Idealized Cape during Wind-Driven Upwelling Studied from a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study analyzes atmospheric circulation around an idealized coastal cape during summertime upwelling-favorable wind conditions simulated by a mesoscale coupled ocean–atmosphere model. The domain resembles an eastern ocean boundary with a ...

Natalie Perlin; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Response of a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled ocean–atmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mt. Cimone Mt. Cimone Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone graphics Graphics data Data Investigators Tiziano Colombo and Riccardo Santaguida Italian Meteorological Service, Via delle Ville, 100-41029 Sestola (MO), Italy Period of Record 1979-1997 Methods Continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements have been carried out at Mt. Cimone since 1979. Since December 1988, air samples have also been collected approximately once per week in a pair of 2-L, electropolished, stainless steel cylindrical flasks. From 1979 until December 1988, a Hartmann and Braun URAS-2T NDIR gas analyzer was used for CO2 determinations. Currently, CO2 determinations are made through the use of a Siemens Ultramat-5E NDIR gas analyzer. Water vapor is eliminated by passing the air through a U-tube

419

ETEM observation of Pt/C electrode catalysts in a moisturized cathode atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There have been reports of challenges in designing platinum carbon (Pt/C) electrode catalysts for PEMFC. Pt/C electrode catalysts deactivate much faster on the cathode (in moisturized O2) than on the anode (in H2). To understand influences of moisture and oxygen on the deactivation of the Pt/C catalysts in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), spherical-aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy (AC-ETEM) was applied with a high-speed CCD camera. Structural changes of the Pt/C electrode catalysts were dynamically recorded in moisturized nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen. The mass spectrometry confirmed the moisture content (between 5 to 30 %) of nitrogen driving gas through a humidifier. Coalescence of platinum nanoparticles (D = 3.24 nm) was carefully evaluated in pure N2 and moisturized N2 atmosphere. The Pt/C showed considerable structural weakness in a moisturized N2 atmosphere. Comparable results obtained by AC-ETEM in different gas atmospheres also suggested ways to improve the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this paper, the deactivation process due to moisture (hydroxylation) of carbon supports is discussed using for comparison the movement of platinum nanoparticles measured in moisturized nitrogen and pure nitrogen atmospheres.

K Yoshida; X Zhang; N Tanaka; E D Boyes; P L Gai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Atmosphere to Electrons Initiative Takes Shape  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since DOE launched its Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative last July, the A2e executive committee has been developing a comprehensive approach for working with multiple stakeholders (industry, national laboratories, international experts, and universities) over the next 5- to 7 years. In February, they held an external merit review to lay the groundwork for an A2e multi-year strategic research plan.

422

Thomson scattering measurements in atmospheric plasma jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron temperature and electron density in a dc plasma jet at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using Thomson laser scattering. Measurements performed at various scattering angles have revealed effects that are not accounted for by the standard scattering theory. Differences between the predicted and experimental results suggest that higher order corrections to the theory may be required, and that corrections to the form of the spectral density function may play an important role.

G. Gregori; J. Schein; P. Schwendinger; U. Kortshagen; J. Heberlein; E. Pfender

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT #12;Accelerated.quality.wisc.edu O F F I C E O F Q U A L I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T Accelerated Improvement This guide to improving resources. You will find helpful information needed to conduct an Accelerated Improvement project

Shapiro, Vadim

424

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the laboratory? *Detailed experiments on long lived free floating *Detailed experiments on long-lived free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas C i f l b b ll l i h "b ll *Comparison of laboratory ball plasmas with "ball lightning" *Summary U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA

425

Atmospheric and combustion chemistry of dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that dimethyl ether (DME) is an ideal diesel fuel alternative. DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, combines good fuel properties with low exhaust emissions and low combustion noise. Large scale production of this fuel can take place using a single step catalytic process converting CH{sub 4} to DME. The fate of DME in the atmosphere has previously been studied. The atmospheric degradation is initiated by the reaction with hydroxyl radicals, which is also a common feature of combustion processes. Spectrokinetic investigations and product analysis were used to demonstrate that the intermediate oxy radical, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}O, exhibits a novel reaction pathway of hydrogen atom ejection. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to chemi-ions based on supersonic molecular beam sampling has recently been demonstrated. The highly reactive ionic intermediates are sampled directly from the flame and identified by collision activation mass spectrometry and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrum reflects the distribution of the intermediates in the flame. The atmospheric degradation of DME as well as the unique fuel properties of a oxygen containing compound will be discussed.

Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Sehested, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

The atmospheric reactivity of. alpha. -methyltetrahydrofuran  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-derived {alpha}-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) has been proposed as an automotive fuel additive. Since MTHF is a volatile organic compound, the environmental impact of evaporation to the atmosphere needs to be considered. The major loss process of MTHF in the atmosphere is expected to occur via reaction with hydroxyl radical; hence we have conducted a study of the kinetics of the reaction OH + MTHF {yields} products using both absolute (flash photolysis resonance fluorescence) and relative rate techniques. The absolute rate experiments were performed over the temperature range 240-400 K at total pressures of 35 Torr (4.7 kPa) argon; the relative rate experiments were conducted at 295 K in 740 Torr (99 kPa) synthetic air. The results from both techniques were in good agreement and yield k{sub 1} = (2.52 {plus minus} 0.74) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp-((650 {plus minus} 80)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, with k{sub 1} (298 K) = 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}. The implications of these results for the atmospheric chemistry of MTHF are discussed.

Wallington, T.J.; Siegl, W.O. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA)); Liu, Renzhang; Zhang, Zhengyu; Huie, R.E.; Kurylo, M.J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

Price, C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

IONIZATION OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANET ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Many extrasolar planets orbit close in and are subject to intense ionizing radiation from their host stars. Therefore, we expect them to have strong, and extended, ionospheres. Ionospheres are important because they modulate escape in the upper atmosphere and can modify circulation, as well as leave their signatures, in the lower atmosphere. In this paper, we evaluate the vertical location Z{sub I} and extent D{sub I} of the EUV ionization peak layer. We find that Z{sub I{approx}}1-10 nbar-for a wide range of orbital distances (a = 0.047-1 AU) from the host star-and D{sub I}/H{sub p{approx}}>15, where H{sub p} is the pressure scale height. At Z{sub I}, the plasma frequency is {approx}80-450 MHz, depending on a. We also study global ion transport, and its dependence on a, using a three-dimensional thermosphere-ionosphere model. On tidally synchronized planets with weak intrinsic magnetic fields, our model shows only a small, but discernible, difference in electron density from the dayside to the nightside ({approx}9 x 10{sup 13} m{sup -3} to {approx}2 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3}, respectively) at Z{sub I}. On asynchronous planets, the distribution is essentially uniform. These results have consequences for hydrodynamic modeling of the atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets.

Koskinen, Tommi T. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ (United States); Cho, James Y-K. [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Achilleos, Nicholas; Aylward, Alan D., E-mail: tommi@lpl.arizona.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

What determines cell size?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Marshall WF, et al. : What determines cell size? BMC7007/10/101 FORUM Open Access What determines cell size?biologists have been wondering what determines the size of

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Atmosphere to Electrons | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PropagationReduction in aeroacoustics emissions (both from the plant and individual wind turbines) can lead to improved wind plant performance. It will be important to account for...

433

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of precipitation. These data will be combined with coincident radar, aircraft, and satellite data to improve how clouds and precipitation in low-mountain regions are...

434

Atmospheric chemistry of diethyl ether and ethyl tert-butyl ether  

SciTech Connect

The mechanisms for the Cl-initiated and OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation of diethyl ether and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) have been determined. For diethyl ether the products are ethyl formate and formaldehyde and its atmospheric oxidation can be represented by C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC{sub 2}H{sub 5} + OH + 2NO {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(O)H + HCHO + 2NO{sub 2} + HO{sub 2}. The mechanism for the atmospheric oxidation of ETBE is more complex, with 80% of the reaction being accounted for in terms of tert-butyl formate and formaldehyde. The remaining 20% the authors ascribe to 2-ethoxy-2-methylpropanal. The atmospheric oxidation of ETBE can be represented by ETBE + OH + 1.8NO {yields} 0.8HCOOC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} + 0.2C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CHO + HO{sub 2} + 0.8HCHO + 1.8NO{sub 2}. THe subsequent atmospheric chemistry of 2-ethoxy-2-methylpropanal the authors estimate to be represented by C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CHO + OH + 3NO {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}CO + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(O)CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2} + 3NO{sub 2}. These results are discussed in terms of the reactivity of these compounds in urban atmospheres.

Wallington, T.J.; Japar, S.M. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres III: Photochemistry and Thermochemistry in Thick Atmospheres on Super Earths and Mini Neptunes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H2-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes, applicable for both H2-dominated atmospheres and non-H2-dominated atmospheres. Using this model to study thick atmospheres for wide ranges of temperatures and elemental abundances, we classify them into hydrogen-rich atmospheres, water-rich atmospheres, oxygen-rich atmospheres, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres. We find that carbon has to be in the form of CO2 rather than CH4 or CO in a H2-depleted water-dominated thick atmosphere, and that the preferred loss of light elements from an oxygen-poor carbon-rich atmosphere leads to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (C2H2 and C2H4). We apply our self-consistent atmosphere models to compute spectra and diagnostic features for known transiting low-mass exoplanets GJ 1214 b, HD 97658 b, and 55 Cnc e. For GJ 1...

Hu, Renyu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 201420  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CIP) 2014­20? The Campus Improvement Program (CIP) is a concept proposal for the delivery of new-Darlington campus to 2020 through land uses and building envelopes. The CIP is not a proposal for the detailed design and construction of new buildings. See point 9. 2. What are the objectives of the CIP? The CIP

Viglas, Anastasios

438

MODELLING THE OVERLAND TRANSPORT OF LEAD DEPOSITED FROM THE ATMOSPHERE IN THE ELBE CATCHMENT OVER FOUR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unknown. Despite decreasing atmospheric pollution, soil and freshwater systems still indicate high lead on minimizing atmospheric emissions, but also on minimizing soil erosion. Keywords: atmospheric pollution, direct atmospheric deposition, direct runoff, Elbe catchment, erosion, soil pollution, lead, long

Costa-Cabral, Mariza

439

ORISE: Peer Review Process Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Improvement Two men discuss ways to improve peer review processes After finding academic reviewers and conducting peer reviews, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and...

440

Dependence of offshore wind turbine fatigue loads on atmospheric stratification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stratification of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is classified in terms of the M-O length and subsequently used to determine the relationship between ABL stability and the fatigue loads of a wind turbine located inside an offshore wind farm. Recorded equivalent fatigue loads, representing blade-bending and tower bottom bending, are combined with the operational statistics from the instrumented wind turbine as well as with meteorological statistics defining the inflow conditions. Only a part of all possible inflow conditions are covered through the approximately 8200 hours of combined measurements. The fatigue polar has been determined for an (almost) complete 360° inflow sector for both load sensors, representing mean wind speeds below and above rated wind speed, respectively, with the inflow conditions classified into three different stratification regimes: unstable, neutral and stable conditions. In general, impact of ABL stratification is clearly seen on wake affected inflow cases for both blade and tower fatigue loads. However, the character of this dependence varies significantly with the type of inflow conditions – e.g. single wake inflow or multiple wake inflow.

K S Hansen; G C Larsen; S Ott

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Pre/post-strike atmospheric assessment system (PAAS)  

SciTech Connect

The Pre/Post-Strike Atmospheric Assessment System was proposed to show the importance of local meteorological conditions in the vicinity of a site suspected of storing or producing toxic agents and demonstrate a technology to measure these conditions, specifically wind fields. The ability to predict the collateral effects resulting from an attack on a facility containing hazardous materials is crucial to conducting effective military operations. Our study approach utilized a combination of field measurements with dispersion modeling to better understand which variables in terrain and weather were most important to collateral damage predictions. To develop the PAAS wind-sensing technology, we utilized a combination of emergent and available technology from micro-Doppler and highly coherent laser systems. The method used for wind sensing is to probe the atmosphere with a highly coherent laser beam. As the beam probes, light is back-scattered from particles entrained in the air to the lidar transceiver and detected by the instrument. Any motion of the aerosols with a component along the beam axis leads to a Doppler shift of the received light. Scanning in a conical fashion about the zenith results in a more accurate and two-dimensional measurement of the wind velocity. The major milestones in the benchtop system development were to verify the design by demonstrating the technique in the laboratory, then scale the design down to a size consistent with a demonstrator unit which could be built to take data in the field. The micro-Doppler heterodyne system we developed determines absolute motion by optically mixing a reference beam with the return signal and has shown motion sensitivity to better than 1 cm/s. This report describes the rationale, technical approach and laboratory testing undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a system to provide local meteorological data and predict atmospheric particulate motion. The work described herein was funded by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office as a part of the 1996 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Peglow, S. G., LLNL; Molitoris, J. D., LLNL

1997-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

442

The recovery of glow-plasma structure in atmospheric radio frequency microplasmas at very small gaps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In atmospheric radio frequency discharges at 13.56 MHz with the electrode gap reduced the sheath region eventually occupies a main portion of the electrode spacing and the bulk plasma region is significantly compressed. The computational results in this letter based on a one-dimensional fluid model show that by increasing the excitation frequency over 13.56 MHz the traditional glow-plasma structure could gradually recover even at very small sizes with a well defined quasineutral plasma region and the electron density is improved but the electric fields in sheath region are reduced. This study indicates that the excitation frequency can be used to modulate the discharge structure and then tailor the plasma-surface interaction in atmospheric microplasmas.

Yuan-Tao Zhang; Wan-Li Shang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The recovery of glow-plasma structure in atmospheric radio frequency microplasmas at very small gaps  

SciTech Connect

In atmospheric radio frequency discharges at 13.56 MHz, with the electrode gap reduced, the sheath region eventually occupies a main portion of the electrode spacing and the bulk plasma region is significantly compressed. The computational results in this letter based on a one-dimensional fluid model show that by increasing the excitation frequency over 13.56 MHz, the traditional glow-plasma structure could gradually recover even at very small sizes with a well defined quasineutral plasma region, and the electron density is improved but the electric fields in sheath region are reduced. This study indicates that the excitation frequency can be used to modulate the discharge structure and then tailor the plasma-surface interaction in atmospheric microplasmas.

Zhang Yuantao [Shandong Provincial Key Lab of UHV Technology and Gas Discharge Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, Shandong Province (China); Shang Wanli [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan Province (China)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Role of Atmospheric Conditions in Determining Intensity of Crepuscular and Anticrepuscular Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the summer of 2006, daily observations of crepuscular and anticrepuscular rays were made around sunset from central Oklahoma. A relative scale of ray intensity was developed and used to relate the rays to concurrent meteorological ...

Matthew S. Van Den Broeke; William H. Beasley; Michael B. Richman

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Determination of Aromatic Acids and Nitrophenols in Atmospheric Aerosols by Capillary Electrophoresis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......one day containing 25 sample runs had an RSD of 2.6%), these...wavelength cell capillary Straight capillary Compound (nm...range of compounds in a single run. However, the advantages of...Seinfeld. Aromatics, reformulated gasoline, and atmo- spheric organic......

Jochen Rudolph; Jacek Stupak

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents: Preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

A method for the determination of radiation doses resulting from a hypothetical crticality accident is presented. The method is an improvement over the slide-rule method cuurently used. The improved method calculates doses for low eneriched uranium as well as highly enriched solutions.

Wilkinson, A.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Dunn, M.; Plaster, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hopper, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 2012 25, 2012 CX-008305: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Retail Biofuel Infrastructure Supporting I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.22 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.23 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008302: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement

448

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2011 28, 2011 CX-006119: Categorical Exclusion Determination Autonomous Inspection of Subsea Facilities (Phase II) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Port Fourchon, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 28, 2011 CX-006117: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flooring Improvements CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.5 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 23, 2011 CX-006129: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optical Sensors Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 23, 2011 CX-006127: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) -

449

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 20, 2010 July 20, 2010 CX-003668: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subsurface Soils Exploration for Potential Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project Sandfilter Footprint CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 7, 2010 CX-003670: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improvements to L Area Sidewalks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 7, 2010 CX-002984: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improvements to L Area Sidewalks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 25, 2010 CX-003671: Categorical Exclusion Determination

450

Improving Floating Point Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Improving Floating Point Compression through Binary Masks Leonardo A. Bautista Gomez Argonne National Laboratory Franck Cappello Argonne National Laboratory Abstract-Modern scientific technology such as particle accel- erators, telescopes and supercomputers are producing extremely large amounts of data. That scientific data needs to be processed using systems with high computational capabilities such as supercomputers. Given that the scientific data is increasing in size at an exponential rate, storing and accessing the data is becoming expensive in both, time and space. Most of this scientific data is stored using floating point representation. Scientific applications executed in supercomputers spend a large amount of CPU cycles reading and writing floating point values, making data compression techniques an interesting way to increase computing efficiency.

451

CX-009790: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90: Categorical Exclusion Determination 90: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009790: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Canyon Wind Study CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/17/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Valley Wind Study would be conducted under the umbrella of the NOAA/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Meteorological Research Partnership Memorandum of Agreement between NOAA and the Idaho Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-ID). The project would use a location near the northeast corner of the Test Area North (TAN) perimeter fence just north of the old TAN parking lot adjacent to the road to the Initial Engine Test (IET) facility

452

CX-004163: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Categorical Exclusion Determination 63: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004163: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mobile Meteorological Equipment CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/02/2010 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to provide mobile meteorological instrumentation on an as-needed or as-required basis. SNL/NM owns and operates a suite of mobile meteorological instruments including, trailer-mounted meteorological towers, trailer-mounted sound detection and ranging systems (SODAR), and a Digicora System that can be used to tether an instrumented balloon, or send a free balloon into the atmosphere to measure atmospheric-state parameters through the troposphere. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004163.pdf

453

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

454

Low energy atmospheric muon neutrinos in MACRO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flux of low energy neutrinos (~ 4 GeV) has been studied with the MACRO detector at Gran Sasso via the detection of muon neutrinos interactions inside the apparatus, and of upward-going stopping muons. Data collected in ~3 y with the full apparatus were analyzed. The results are compatible with a deficit of the flux of atmospheric muon neutrinos from below, and no reduction from above, with respect to Monte Carlo predictions. The deficit and the angular distributions are interpreted in terms of neutrino oscillations, and compared with the MACRO results on the upward throughgoing muons (~ 100 GeV).

M. Spurio; for the MACRO Collaboration

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sampling procedure for atmospheric geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamic and chemical changes can alter the characteristics of geothermal brine samples significantly. A procedure which minimizes these changes has been developed for sampling atmospheric geothermal brines. The method is fast with minimal cooling and yields representative samples which have been stabilized to preserve their integrity. The procedure provides reliable suspended solids data and both the solid and liquid samples are suitable for elemental analysis. The procedure is also a valuable tool to aid in monitoring a geothermal brine conditioning system. Data are included from a flow test at an MCR Geothermal well in the Imperial Valley area of California to illustrate the utility of the sampling procedure.

Kochelek, J.T.; Zienty, D.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions related to the the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 28, 2010 CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program (Summary Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 06/28/2010 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 25, 2010 CX-003086: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improvement of Access Roads on the Cougar-Thurston Number 1 115-Kilovolt and the Thurston-McKenzie Number 1 115-Kilovolt Transmission Lines

457

Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of DOE/METC's AFBC activities is to establish an engineering technology base by 1990, from which the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors can build and operate coal-fired AFBC systems. These systems will be capable of economically generating process steam, direct and indirect heat, and onsite electric power from coals of all ranks and sulfur contents in an environmentally acceptable manner. First-generation atmospheric fluidized-bed technology is considered commercial; a number of US boiler manufacturers are offering commercial units. However, many of these first units are products of empirical design and offer marginal gains in economics, performance, and reliability over conventional systems. In order to resolve the remaining technical issues and to broaden the market, DOE is pursuing advanced concepts. Development of this second-generation AFBC technology is directed toward small industrial, commercial, and residential applications. Penetration of these potential markets will require: (1) a 20 to 30% reduction in capital and operating costs over first-generation technology; (2) significant improvements in performance and reliability; and (3) compliance with existing and proposed New Source Performance Standards for environmental emissions. Current AFBC activities address: industrial operations, advanced concepts, and technology development. Four AFBC demonstration projects were active in FY 1984. The development of AFBC technology is directly supported by the evaluation of five advanced concepts by the M.W. Kellogg Company (circulating-bed FBC), Battelle Columbus Laboratories (spouted-bed FBC), Aerojet Energy Conversion Company (moving-bed FBC), Howard University (staged cascade FBC), and Arthur D. Little, Inc. (pulsed-bed FBC). These concepts may improve the economics and performance. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe Improving modeling platforms with statistical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe ­ Improving modeling platforms. For regional air quality, seven regional modeling teams combine state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling the ensemble or a unique model. Keywords: Air quality, modeling system, ensemble approach, validation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

459

An analytical inversion method for determining regional and global emissions of greenhouse gases: Sensitivity studies and application to halocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new analytical inversion method has been developed to determine the regional and global emissions of long-lived atmospheric trace gases. It exploits in situ measurement data from three global networks and builds on ...

Stohl, A.

460

Experimental evidence of chaotic behavior in atmospheric pressure arc discharge  

SciTech Connect

Thermal plasma technology is already playing an important role in the production of new materials, in the destruction of toxic wastes, and in the development of safer and more efficient manufacturing and material processing applications. In free burning as well as in stabilized arc columns, the inherent movement of arc root results in fluctuation in arc voltage. A full knowledge and control over the arc root dynamics can effectively lengthen the life time, drastically improve performance and reliability in arc plasma devices. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigate the fluctuating voltage signals generated from an atmospheric pressure arc discharge produced in a hollow electrode plasma torch. For the first time, analysis of these signals reveal them to exhibit chaotic behavior. The present analysis is supported with real time behavior, phase portraits, power spectra and Lyapunov exponents. Dependence of system behavior on various control parameters is also investigated. This approach is interesting in the sense that it can lead to better understanding of physics for future researches on arc plasma jets and related devices.

Ghorui, S.; Sahasrabudhe, S.N.; Murthy, P.S.S.; Das, A.K.; Venkatramani, N.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and to improve air quality (13...global climate and air-quality models...21). POA from fossil fuel combustion and...substantial particulate pollution, including intense...dilution of the air mass. Biomass...quasi-ideal solution according to standard...

J. L. Jimenez; M. R. Canagaratna; N. M. Donahue; A. S. H. Prevot; Q. Zhang; J. H. Kroll; P. F. DeCarlo; J. D. Allan; H. Coe; N. L. Ng; A. C. Aiken; K. S. Docherty; I. M. Ulbrich; A. P. Grieshop; A. L. Robinson; J. Duplissy; J. D. Smith; K. R. Wilson; V. A. Lanz; C. Hueglin; Y. L. Sun; J. Tian; A. Laaksonen; T. Raatikainen; J. Rautiainen; P. Vaattovaara; M. Ehn; M. Kulmala; J. M. Tomlinson; D. R. Collins; M. J. Cubison; E.; J. Dunlea; J. A. Huffman; T. B. Onasch; M. R. Alfarra; P. I. Williams; K. Bower; Y. Kondo; J. Schneider; F. Drewnick; S. Borrmann; S. Weimer; K. Demerjian; D. Salcedo; L. Cottrell; R. Griffin; A. Takami; T. Miyoshi; S. Hatakeyama; A. Shimono; J. Y Sun; Y. M. Zhang; K. Dzepina; J. R. Kimmel; D. Sueper; J. T. Jayne; S. C. Herndon; A. M. Trimborn; L. R. Williams; E. C. Wood; A. M. Middlebrook; C. E. Kolb; U. Baltensperger; D. R. Worsnop

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1970s.6) In order to explain this weakening *1 Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto Univer- sity, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan (e-mail: tsuda processes of atmospheric gravity waves was proposed.7),8) In the 1980s a notable advance was made

Takada, Shoji

463

Hydrodynamics of Embedded Planets' First Atmospheres. II. A Rapid Recycling of Atmospheric Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following Paper I we investigate the properties of atmospheres that form around small protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc by conducting hydrodynamical simulations. These are now extended to three dimensions, employing a spherical grid centred on the planet. Compression of gas is shown to reduce rotational motions. Contrasting the 2D case, no clear boundary demarcates bound atmospheric gas from disc material; instead, we find an open system where gas enters the Bondi sphere at high latitudes and leaves through the midplane regions, or, vice versa, when the disc gas rotates sub-Keplerian. The simulations do not converge to a time-independent solution; instead, the atmosphere is characterized by a time-varying velocity field. Of particular interest is the timescale to replenish the atmosphere by nebular gas, $t_\\mathrm{replenish}$. It is shown that the replenishment rate, $M_\\mathrm{atm}/t_\\mathrm{replenish}$, can be understood in terms of a modified Bondi accretion rate, $\\sim$$R_\\mathrm{Bondi}^2\\rho...

Ormel, Chris W; Kuiper, Rolf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Spectrophotometric Resolution of Stellar Atmospheres with Microlensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microlensing is a powerful tool for studying stellar atmospheres because as the source crosses regions of formally infinite magnification (caustics) the surfaceof the star is resolved, thereby allowing one to measure the radial intensity profile, both photometrically and spectroscopically. However, caustic crossing events are relatively rare, and monitoring them requires intensive application of telescope resources. It is therefore essential that the observational parameters needed to accurately measure the intensity profile are quantified. We calculate the expected errors in the recovered radial intensity profile as a function of the unlensed flux, source radius, spatial resolution the recovered intensity profile, and caustic crossing time for the two principle types of caustics: point-mass and binary lenses. We demonstrate that for both cases there exist simple scaling relations between these parameters and the resultant errors. We find that the error as a function of the spatial resolution of the recovered profile, parameterized by the number of radial bins, increases as $N_R^{3/2}$, considerably faster than the naive $N_R^{1/2}$ expectation. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of binary caustic-crossing events and point-lens events. Binary events are more common, easier to plan for, and provide more homogeneous information about the stellar atmosphere. However, a sub-class of point-mass events with low impact parameters can provide dramatically more information provided that they can be recognized in time to initiate observations.

B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

465

Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)] [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Atmospheric model intercomparison project: Monsoon simulations  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of monsoons, in particular the Indian summer monsoon, has proven to be a critical test of a general circulation model`s ability to simulate tropical climate and variability. The Monsoon Numerical Experimentation Group has begun to address questions regarding the predictability of monsoon extremes, in particular conditions associated with El Nino and La Nina conditions that tend to be associated with drought and flood conditions over the Indian subcontinent, through a series of seasonal integrations using analyzed initial conditions from successive days in 1987 and 1988. In this paper the authors present an analysis of simulations associated with the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP), a coordinated effort to simulate the 1979--1988 decade using standardized boundary conditions with approximately 30 atmospheric general circulation models. The 13 models analyzed to date are listed. Using monthly mean data from these simulations they have calculated indices of precipitation and wind shear in an effort to access the performance of the models over the course of the AMIP decade.

Sperber, K.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Palmer, T.N. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading (United Kingdom)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Improved cycling cryopump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is designed to achieve continuous high efficiency cryopumping of a vacuum vessel by improving upon and combining in a novel way the cryopumping in a novel way the cryopumping methods. The invention consists of a continuous operation cryopump, with movable louvres, with a high efficiency pumping apparatus. The pumping apparatus includes three cryogenic tubes. They are constructed of a substance of high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum and their exterior surfaces are cryogenic condensing surfaces. Through their interior liquid or gaseous helium from two reservoirs can be made to flow, alternately promoting extreme cooling or allowing some warming.

Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

468

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

469

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

470

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

471

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii The graphs on this page are generated from data taken from "Trends in Carbon Dioxide" page on the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website. The NOAA website presents monthly and weekly atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. It offers weekly and monthly data, additional graphs, analysis, descriptions of how the data are collected, and an animation of historical changes in atmospheric CO2. Mauna Loa constitutes the longest record of direct measurements of CO2 in the atmosphere. The measurents were started by C. David Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in March of 1958. Recent Monthly Average CO2

472

CX-000262: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Categorical Exclusion Determination 62: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000262: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio City Columbus CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 12/21/2009 Location(s): Columbus, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for: Downtown Bike Infrastructure Improvements, Cultural Arts Center Lighting Efficiency Improvements, Central Safety Building Energy Retrofit, Fire Stations High Efficiency Lighting Retrofit, Business Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program, Pedestrian Signal Upgrade to LED (light-emitting diode) Technology, Center for Science and Industry Energy Efficiency Improvements, Home Energy Efficiency Baseload Reduction Program, Project Oversight. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

473

SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES  

SciTech Connect

Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nonlocality improves Deutsch algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, [{arXiv:0810.3134}] is accepted and published. We show that the Bell inequalities lead to a new type of linear-optical Deutsch algorithms. We have considered a use of entangled photon pairs to determine simultaneously and probabilistically two unknown functions. The usual Deutsch algorithm determines one unknown function and exhibits a two to one speed up in a certain computation on a quantum computer rather than on a classical computer. We found that the violation of Bell locality in the Hilbert space formalism of quantum theory predicts that the proposed {\\it probabilistic} Deutsch algorithm for computing two unknown functions exhibits at least a $2\\sqrt{2}(\\simeq 2.83)$ to one speed up.

Koji Nagata; Sangkyung Lee; Jaewook Ahn

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

10 ns pulsed atmospheric air plasma for uniform treatment of polymeric surfaces  

SciTech Connect

This letter reports an experimental study of a 10 ns pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air, excited with a train of 65 ns voltage pulses at a repetition frequency of 5 kHz. It is shown that these ultrashort pulses produce a homogenous discharge with very high electron density in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and low gas temperature, which are particularly desirable for uniform treatment of thermally sensitive polymer films. Their treatment of polypropylene films is found to introduce microscale surface patterns as well as various carbon-oxygen bonds, both useful for improving the hydrophilic properties of polymeric materials.

Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

476

Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Consequence Management > National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center

478

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

479

Hierardlicsl Diagnosis V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Optics Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Systematic observations of the earth's ozone layer over the last ten years indicate a...

480

Enhancing Electrostatic Properties and Hydroentangling Efficiency via Atmospheric Plasma Treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT MALSHE, PRIYADARSHINI PRAKASH. Enhancing Electrostatic Properties and Hydroentangling Efficiency via Atmospheric Plasma Treatment. (Under the guidance of Professors Marian G. McCord and Mohamed A.… (more)

Malshe, Priyadarshini Prakash

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination improving atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Novel Applications of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Textile Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on… (more)

Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Dissociation of carbon dioxide in atmospheric pressure microchannel plasma devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plasma discharge of carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure was successfully demonstrated in microchannel plasma devices at breakdown voltages lower than 1 kVRMS. Optical emissions of… (more)

Oh, Taegon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Stain Repellent-Antimicrobial Textiles via Atmospheric Plasma Finishes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research was aimed to impart antimicrobial and stain repellent finishes to polyester fabrics using atmospheric pressure plasma-aided graft copolymerization of active monomers. The process… (more)

McLean, Robert II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Technical Sessions M. C. MacCracken Atmospheric amj Geophysical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system, including treatment of the deep ocean and horizontal transport by ocean currents 4 Separate, uncoupled, and limited treatment of atmospheric composition,...

485

Technical Sessions D. A. Randall K. Xu Department of Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. A. Randall K. Xu Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 simulating observations collected during ARM, and to suggest...

486

atmospheric control systems: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

487

atmospheres psychiatric knowledge: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

488

atmospheric parameters uncertainlty: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

489

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evidence to suggest that particle aggregation is particularly successful in removing glass shards with high surface areasmass ratios. The primary atmospheric hazard of...

490

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

491

Single-Column Modeling C. J. Walcek Atmospheric Sciences Research Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. J. Walcek C. J. Walcek Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction intense mid latitude cyclone developed and traversed this domain, allowing one to investigate cloud cover under a wide variety of meteorological environments. Large-scale numerical models of the atmosphere approximate the heterogeneous or subgrid-scale nature of cloudiness by assuming that a fraction of each grid area is occupied by clouds. This cloud cover fraction is used to apportion cloud effects into a "grid-averaged" forcing within areas that contain a mixture of clear and cloudy regions. Most models of tropospheric dynamics assume that the fractional cloud coverage is determined by the grid- averaged relative humidity, stability, or resolvable-scale

492

Laboratory studies of atmospheric sulfur chemistry using tunable diode laser probes  

SciTech Connect

Tunable lead-salt diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) provides a sensitive and versatile probe for the study of the kinetics and mechanisms of atmospheric reactions. In the laboratory, the combination of laser flash photolysis with TDLAS detection of reactant and/or product species has proven useful in several studies of the gas phase oxidation of the atmospheric sulfur compound dimethylsulfide (DMS), a process which may play an important role in global climate modification/regulation. Typically a radical species is produced by UV laser photolysis of a stable precursor in a slowly flowing mixture of reactant and buffer gases. The concentration of this radical or a selected reaction product is then followed by TDLAS on a time scale of microseconds to milliseconds. This method allows direct determination of reaction rates and product branching ratios over a range of temperature, pressure and reactant concentrations in complete isolation from reactor surfaces.

Stickel, R.E.; Urbanski, S.P.; Zhao, Z.; Wine, P.H. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

Surface atmospheric pressure excitation of the translational mode of the inner core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using hourly atmospheric surface pressure field from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) models, we show that atmospheric pressure fluctuations excite the translational oscillation of the inner core, the so-called Slichter mode, to the sub-nanogal level at the Earth surface. The computation is performed using a normal-mode formalism for a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model. We determine the statistical response in the form of power spectral densities of the degree-one spherical harmonic components of the observed pressure field. Both hypotheses of inverted and non-inverted barometer for the ocean response to pressure forcing are considered. Based on previously computed noise levels, we show that the surface excitation amplitude is below the limit of detection of the superconducting gravimeters, making the Slichter mode detection a challenging instrumental task...

Rosat, Séverine; Rogister, Yves

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Particle acceleration and transport in reconnecting twisted loops in a stratified atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Twisted coronal loops should be ubiquitous in the solar corona. Twisted magnetic fields contain excess magnetic energy, which can be released during magnetic reconnection, causing solar flares. The aim of this work is to investigate magnetic reconnection, and particle acceleration and transport in kink-unstable twisted coronal loops, with a focus on the effects of resistivity, loop geometry and atmospheric stratification. Another aim is to perform forward-modelling of bremsstrahlung emission and determine the structure of hard X-ray sources. We use a combination of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle methods. First, the evolution of the kinking coronal loop is considered using resistive MHD model, incorporating atmospheric stratification and loop curvature. Then, the obtained electric and magnetic fields and density distributions are used to calculate electron and proton trajectories using a guiding-centre approximation, taking into account Coulomb collisions. It is shown that electric fields in twist...

Gordovskyy, Mykola; Kontar, Eduard; Bian, Nicolas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The solar photospheric abundance of europium. Results from CO5BOLD 3-D hydrodynamical model atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Europium is an almost pure r-process element, which may be useful as a reference in nucleocosmochronology. Aims. To determine the photospheric solar abundance using CO5BOLD 3-D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. Methods. Disc-centre and integrated-flux observed solar spectra are used. The europium abundance is derived from the equivalent width measurements. As a reference 1D model atmospheres have been used, in addition. Results. The europium photospheric solar abundance is 0.52 +- 0.02 in agreement with previous determinations. We also determine the photospheric isotopic fraction of Eu(151) to be 49 % +- 2.3 % from the intensity spectra and 50% +-2.3 from the flux spectra. This compares well to the the meteoritic isotopic fraction 47.8%. We explore the 3D corrections also for dwarfs and sub-giants in the temperature range ~5000 K to ~6500 K and solar and 1/10--solar metallicities and find them to be negligible for all the models investigated. Conclusions. Our photospheric Eu abundance is in good agreement with previous determinations based on 1D models. This is in line with our conclusion that 3D effects for this element are negligible in the case of the Sun.

A. Mucciarelli; E. Caffau; B. Freytag; H. -G. Ludwig; P. Bonifacio

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

496

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2, 2009 November 2, 2009 CX-000008: Categorical Exclusion Determination Raver-Paul #1 Access Road Improvement and Bridge Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/02/2009 Location(s): Pierce County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 27, 2009 CX-000007: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spirit Tap to Colville-Boundary #1 Landings and Access Roads Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 10/27/2009 Location(s): Stevens County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 8, 2009 CX-000004: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lane-Wendson #1 Structure 10/5 Access Road Improvement and Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/08/2009 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 8, 2009

497

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 16, 2010 March 16, 2010 CX-001179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lancaster-Noxon Number 1 Mile 46-50 Access Road Improvement and Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/16/2010 Location(s): Bonner County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 15, 2010 CX-001180: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monroe-Custer Number 1 and 2 500-Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure 16/2 Access Road Improvement and Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/15/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 12, 2010 CX-001181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Santiam Substation Renovation CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Linn County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

498

Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume  

SciTech Connect

The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Atmospheric considerations for the CTA site search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next high-energy gamma-ray observatory. Selection of the sites, one in each hemisphere, is not obvious since several factors have to be taken into account. Among them, and probably the most crucial, are the atmospheric conditions. Since July 2012, the site working group has deployed automatic ground based instrumentation (ATMOSCOPE) on all the candidate sites. Due to the limited time span available from ground based data, long term weather forecast models become necessary tools for site characterization. It is then of prime importance to validate the models by comparing it to the ATMOSCOPE measurements. We will describe the sources of data (ATMOSCOPE, weather forecasting model and satellite data) for the site evaluation and how they will be used and combined.

Vincent, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Wave Heating of the Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding on coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding on the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation, and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us understanding and quantifying magnetic wave heating of the sola...

Arregui, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z