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Sample records for determination holy cross

  1. Holy Cross Energy- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross Energy's WE CARE (With Efficiency, Conservation And Renewable Energy) Program offers an incentive for customers who install renewable energy generation for net metering at their premises...

  2. Holy Cross Energy- WE CARE Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross Energy's WE CARE (With Efficiency, Conservation And Renewable Energy) Program offers an incentive for customers who install renewable energy generation for net metering at their premises...

  3. Holy Cross Energy- WE CARE Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross offers a wide variety of prescriptive rebates for energy efficient equipment purchased by its commercial customers. Equipment must be replacing existing working equipment to qualify. The...

  4. Holy Cross Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross Energy, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, has developed a voluntary carbon reduction strategy designed to slow the growth of carbon dioxide emissions created in the generation of...

  5. Holy Cross Energy- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross offers a wide variety of prescriptive rebates for energy efficient equipment purchased by its commercial customers. Equipment must be replacing existing working equipment to qualify. The...

  6. Holy Cross Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HolyCrossEnergy Outage Hotline: 970-945-5491 Outage Map: ebill.holycross.comomsoutage References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861...

  7. Holy Name Central Catholic School Wind Turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Central Catholic School Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Holy Name Central Catholic School Wind Turbine Facility Holy Name Central Catholic School Wind Turbine...

  8. Holy Technology Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Holy Technology Corporation Place: China Product: Supplier of scrap silicon offcuts to silicon recycler and PV wafer manufacturer,...

  9. Questing for the Holy Grail of High Explosives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holy Grail National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Questing for the Holy Grail of High Explosives A molecule invented by Los Alamos scientist David E. Chavez might herald the arrival of a new class of insensitive high explosives. March 22, 2016 Questing for the Holy Grail of High Explosives Explosives chemist David Chavez has developed new explosives molecules that offer high energy with enhanced safety-they cannot be detonated by spark, friction, or

  10. CX-003423: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/17/2010Location(s): New Orleans, LouisianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using the surrogate ratio method

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using the surrogate ratio method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using the surrogate ratio method Authors: Czeszumska, A. ; Angell, C. T. ; Burke, J. T. ; Scielzo, N. D. ; Norman, E. B. ; Austin, R. A. E. ; Boutoux, G. ; Casperson, R. J. ; Chodash, P. ; Hughes, R. O. ; Mattoon, C. M. ; Méot, V. ; Munson, J. ; Phair, L. ; Ressler, J. J. ; Roig, O.

  12. Determination of Thermal Neutron Capture Cross-Sections at Budapest PGAA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revay, Zsolt; Belgya, Tamas; Firestone, Richard B.

    2007-10-26

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) is a powerful nuclear analytical technique to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of materials. The PGAA facility at Budapest, Hungary is one of the leading laboratories of the world, determining spectroscopic data for chemical analysis to be used in other laboratories. These partial gamma-ray production cross-sections and k{sub 0} values, being proportional to the analytical sensitivities of the chemical elements, can be transformed into thermal neutron capture cross-sections, i.e. the probabilities of the (n,{gamma}) reactions, which are of broader interest in different fields of nuclear physics. Some preliminary results on thermal neutron capture cross-sections are presented.

  13. Determination of Importance Evaluation for the ESF Enhanced Charcterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Goodin

    2002-01-09

    The objective of this DIE is to determine whether the ECRB-Cross-Drift-related activities, as identified in Section 6.0, could potentially impact (1) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) testing or (2) the waste isolation capabilities of a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site. Any controls necessary to limit such potential impacts are also identified herein.

  14. CX-003166: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holy Cross Hospital Lighting RetrofitCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1, B6.3Date: 07/23/2010Location(s): Chicago, IllinoisOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vagelatos, Nicholas; Steinman, Donald K.; John, Joseph; Young, Jack C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  16. Chapter 9, Metering Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Metering Cross- Cutting Protocols Dan Mort, ADM Associates, Inc. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 9 - 1 Chapter 9 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 3 2 Metering Application and Considerations

  17. The 209Bi(nth,{gamma})210Bi and 209Bi(nth,{gamma})210m,gBi Cross Sections Determined at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron total capture cross section of 209Bi together with the cross sections to the ground state and the isomeric state were determined at the cold neutron beam PGAA-NIPS facilities at the Budapest Neutron Centre. For the measurements we used a coaxial HPGe detector with Compton suppression. The partial {gamma}-ray production cross sections were deduced relative to the partial capture cross section for the 4055 keV transition following 209Bi(n,{gamma}). This partial cross section was measured with a bismuth nitrate sample with respect to nitrogen as a comparator. The total capture cross section resulting from the primary transitions is lower than the one deduced from the transitions feeding the isomeric and the ground state. Since the multipolarity of the main transition feeding the ground state is not known, the uncertainty on the capture cross section to the ground state is rather large. We also compare the total capture thermal cross section with the value deduced from resonance parameters and discuss the impact of the branching ratio on the analysis of prompt capture cross section measurements using the total energy detection principle.

  18. Chapter 10, Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings Cross-Cutting Protocols Frank Stern, Navigant Consulting Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 10 - 1 Chapter 10 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................2 2 Purpose of Peak Demand and Time-differentiated Energy

  19. Chapter 11, Sample Design Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Sample Design Cross-Cutting Protocols M. Sami Khawaja, Josh Rushton, and Josh Keeling, The Cadmus Group, Inc. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 11 - 1 Chapter 11 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 3 1.1 Chapter Organization

  20. Chapter 12, Survey Design and Implementation Cross-Cutting Protocols for Estimating Gross Savings: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 12: Survey Design and Implementation Cross-Cutting Protocols for Estimating Gross Savings Robert Baumgartner, Tetra Tech Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 12 - 1 Chapter 12 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 2 2 The Total Survey Error Framework

  1. Chapter 13, Assessing Persistence and Other Evaluation Issues Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Assessing Persistence and Other Evaluation Issues Cross- Cutting Protocols Daniel M. Violette, Navigant Consulting Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 13 - 1 Chapter 13 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................2 2 Persistence of Energy Savings

  2. The (3He,tf) as a surrogate reaction to determine (n,f) cross sections in the 10 to 20 MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basunia, M. S.; Clark, R. M.; Goldblum, B. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Phair, L.; Burke, J. T.; Beausang, C. W.; Bleuel, D. L.; Darakchieva, B.; Dietrich, F. S.; Evtimova, M.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Hatarik, R.; Jewett, C. C.; Lesher, S. R.; McMahan, M. A.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Wiedeking, M.

    2009-02-25

    The surrogate reaction 238U(3He,tf) is used to determine the 237Np(n,f) cross section indirectly over an equivalent neutron energy range from 10 to 20 MeV. A self-supporting ~;;761 mu g/cm2 metallic 238U foil was bombarded with a 42 MeV 3He2+ beam from the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Outgoing charged particles and fission fragments were identified using the Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies (STARS), consists of two 140 mu m and one 1000 mu m Micron S2 type silicon detectors. The 237Np(n,f) cross sections, determined indirectly, were compared with the 237Np(n,f) cross section data from direct measurements, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VII.0), and the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL 3.3) and found to closely follow those datasets. Use of the (3He,tf) reaction as a surrogate to extract (n,f) cross section in the 10 to 20 MeV equivalent neutron energy is found to be suitable.

  3. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of a Minimum Soiling Level to Affect Photovoltaic Devices Patrick D. Burton and Bruce H. King Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 USA...

  4. Comparison of IUPAC k0 Values and Neutron Cross Sections to Determine a Self-consistent Set of Data for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B; Revay, Zsolt

    2009-12-01

    Independent databases of nuclear constants for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been independently maintained by the physics and chemistry communities for many year. They contain thermal neturon cross sections s0, standardization values k0, and transition probabilities Pg. Chemistry databases tend to rely upon direct measurements of the nuclear constants k0 and Pg which are often published in chemistry journals while the physics databases typically include evaluated s0 and Pg data from a variety of experiments published mainly in physics journals. The IAEA/LBNL Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) also contains prompt and delayed g-ray cross sections sg from Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) measurements that can also be used to determine k0 and s0 values. As a result several independent databases of fundamental constants for NAA have evolved containing slightly different and sometimes discrepant results. An IAEA CRP for a Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis was established to compare these databases and investigate the possibilitiy of producing a self-consistent set of s0, k0, sg, and Pg values for NAA and other applications. Preliminary results of this IAEA CRP comparison are given in this paper.

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Holy Cross Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Holy Cross Energy, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, has developed a voluntary carbon reduction strategy...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels Holy Cross Energy- Renewable Energy Rebate Program Holy Cross Energy's WE CARE (With Efficiency, Conservation And Renewable Energy) Program offers an incentive for...

  7. Tevatron combination of single-top-quark cross sections and determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $\\bf V_{tb}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σt= 2.25-0.31+0.29 pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs+t= 3.30-0.40+0.52 pb, without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σst. The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vtb|= 1.02-0.05+0.06, corresponding to |Vtb| > 0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  8. Tevatron combination of single-top-quark cross sections and determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $$\\bf V_{tb}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σt= 2.25-0.31+0.29 pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs+t= 3.30-0.40+0.52 pb, without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σs/σt. The resulting valuemore » of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vtb|= 1.02-0.05+0.06, corresponding to |Vtb| > 0.92 at the 95% C.L.« less

  9. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene; /Paris U., VI-VII /Saclay

    2010-06-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb{sup -1} recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  10. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass,more » $$m_t^{pole}$$, or the strong coupling constant, $$\\alpha_S$$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$$ GeV is obtained when constraining $$\\alpha_S$$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $m_Z$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $$m_t^{pole}$$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $$\\alpha_S(m_Z)$$ = 0.1151$$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $$\\alpha_S$$ using events from top-quark production.« less

  11. CrossConnects Bioinformatics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CrossConnects Workshop Series CrossConnects Bioinformatics Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Programs & Workshops » CrossConnects Workshop Series » CrossConnects Bioinformatics Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects

  12. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).

  13. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  14. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  15. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD atmorenext-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).less

  16. Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE (MB) is a e search (B. Fleming, next session) - High rates and good particle ID also allow accurate cross section measurements. - Important for MB and...

  17. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  18. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2008CO03 19F(p, γ): σ Ecm = 200 - 700 keV X4 05/14/2014 1979SU13 19F(p, γ): σ 0.2 - 1.2 X4 05/06/2014 2006COZY 19F(p, γ1): capture yield 200 - 800 keV thin target 12/08/2014 19F(p, γ): capture yield thick target 19F(p, α2γ): capture yield thin target, thick target 2008CO03 19F(p, γ1): reaction cross section Ecm = 200 - 800 keV thin target, thick target

  19. CrossConnects Workshop Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CrossConnects Bioinformatics Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Programs & Workshops » CrossConnects Workshop Series Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series CrossConnects Bioinformatics Operating Innovative

  20. 10Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1970GO04 10Be(p, γ0): σ 0.6 - 6.3 θ = 0°, θ = 90° 06/05/2012 1987ERZY 10Be(p, n): σ 0.9 - 2 X4 05/15/2012 The following references may be related but not included. 1991GOZV Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March 2016

  1. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1992MC03 10B(α, α): σ relative to Rutherford scattering 1 - 3.3 X4 05/02/2012 1969GA01 10B(α, p), (α α'): relative σ at θ = 90° for Eγ = 1.0 - 3.5 0.170 MeV, 3.088 MeV, 3.682 MeV, 3.852 MeV, 0.717 MeV 06/18/2012 1973VA25 10B(α, n): laboratory differential σ 1.0 - 5.0 for n0: θ = 0°, θ = 90°, θ = 160° X4 04/04/2011 for n1: θ = 0°, θ = 90° for n23: θ = 0°, θ = 90° 10B(α, n):

  2. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(α, n): thick-target yield of Eα = 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance 350 - 2400 keV 1 X4 04/04/2011 11B(α, n): for 606-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): for 411-keV resonance after subtraction of the 605-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): S-factor 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thick-target 400 - 500 keV 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thin-target 1 1966MA04, Errata 11B(α, n): excitation curve < 4.5 for

  3. 11C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013SO11 11C(p, γ): deduced astrophysical reaction rates and S-factors X4 12/14/2015 2003LI51 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor low X4 09/12/2011 2003TA02 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor 0 - 0.7 X4 09/12/2011 2003KU36 11C(p, p): elastic scattering σ ~ 0.2 - 3.2 θcm = 180° 09/08/2011 Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March

  4. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 10/28/2014 1993CH02 12C(p, X): σ for η production ≤ 0.9 GeV X4 03/07/2012 1974RO29 12C(p, γ): σ 150 - 3000 keV X4 08/27/2013 1951GO1B 12C(p, p): yield curve of elastic scattering 0.2 - 4.0 θ = 164° 11/05/2014 1976ME22 12C(p, p): absolute σ 0.3 - 2.0 X4 08/07/2013 2008BU19 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors. 354, 390, 460, 463, 565,

  5. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09/12/2011 1994KI02 13C(p, γ): γ-ray yield, calculated S(E) 120 - 950 keV X4 09/12/2011 2008HE11 13C(p, γ): reaction yield at the resonance 448.5-keV for a fresh target and after an integrated charge of 1C 435 - 470 keV σ X4 11/07/2011 1991BR19 13C(p, γ): reaction yield near the resonance 0.44 - 0.6 483.3-keV, 0.55-MeV X4 11/07/2011

  6. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  7. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, γ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05/06/2013 1990WA10 14N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2005CO16, 2006BE50 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors, resonance strength 70 - 228 keV X4 05/08/2013 2006LE13 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors 70 - 228 keV X4 05/30/2013 2005BR04, 2005BR15 14N(p, γ): astrophysical S-factors ~ 0.1 - 2.5 1 08/15/2013 2004FO02,

  8. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971CO27 14N(α, γ): thick target yield 0.5 - 1.2 1 08/04/2011 2000GO43 14N(α, γ): resonance yields, deduced astrophysical reaction rates 550 - 1300 keV X4 03/01/2012 1973RO03 14N(α, γ): γ-ray yield 1.0 - 3.2 1 04/30/2012 1980MA26 14N(α, α): σ 1.5, 1.6 X4 03/01/2012 2007CH25 14N(α, γ): deduced resonance parameters 1620 - 1775 keV X4 03/01/2012 1994YE11 14N(α, α): σ(θ)/σ(Rutherford) 2

  9. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, α): σ threshold - 7.7 X4 10/17/2012 1981DY03 16O(p, pα): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 4.44-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 16O(p, p'): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1997MO27 16O(p, p), (p, γ): elastic, capture σ Ecm = 200 - 3750 keV X4 03/28/2013 1973RO34 16O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 3.1 S-Factor X4 05/10/2011 16O(p, γ): differential σ for the DC → ground

  10. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013DA10 4He(α, γ): deduced σ 19 - 29 X4 01/27/2016 1978HI04 4He(α, α): elastic scattering excitation function 32.6 - 35.4 θ = 30.5°, θ = 53.7°, θ = 54.7°, θ = 71.5°, θ = 90.0° 04/24/2012 1995DE18 4He(α, γ): excitation function for the decay to the 3 MeV level 33 - 34.7 θlab = 90.0° 04/24/2012 1975NA12 4He(α, γ): excitation function 33 - 36 1 07/19/2011 1977PA26 4He(α, γ): γ

  11. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, α): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from direct data, S-factors from indirect data 03/20/2012 2004TU06 6Li(p, α): σ, coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low σ, coincidence yields, S-factors from direct data, S-factors from indirect data 03/20/2012 1966GE11 6Li(p, α): S-factor Ec.m. = 0.01 - 1.00 X4 12/15/2015 2005CR05 6Li(p, α): S-factor 20 - 100 keV X4

  12. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  13. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/16/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, γ): total σ, S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 - 80 keV X4 06/12/2014 1994CH23 7Li(pol. p, γ): deduced S-factor ≤ 80 keV X4 06/12/2014 1999SP09 7Li(p, α): deduced S-factor < 0.4 X4 06/12/2014 1974BU16 7Li(p, n): σ < 3.8 X4 03/14/2012 2011PI04 7Li(p, α): analyzed excitation functions Ecm = 0 - 7 X4 06/12/2014 2001LA35 7Li(p, α): deduced S(E)-factor 10 -

  14. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(α, γ): deduced resonance strengths ~ 470 - 770 keV X4 02/13/2012 1978TR05 18O(α, γ): excitation function for the 1.27 MeV secondary γ-ray transition 0.6 - 2.3 θγ = 0° 02/29/2012 1990VO06 18O(α, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.78 X4 02/13/2012 1973BA10 18O(α, n): σ with target thickness 1 - 5 6 keV, 13 keV 06/06/2011 1956BO61 18O(α, n): neutron yields 1.8 - 5.3 0° - 30° X4

  15. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008UG01 19F(α, p): yield curves, σ 792 - 1993 keV X4 09/14/2011 2005UG04 19F(α, p1γ): excitation curve 1238 - 2009 keV 1 11/30/2011 19F(α, p0): excitation curve 1 19F(α, p1): excitation curve 1 1984CS01 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 3.7 X4 09/14/2011 1994CH36 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 4.5 X4 09/14/2011 2000WR01 19F(α, n): neutron yields and σ 2.28 - 3.10 X4 09/14/2011 1977VA10 19F(α, n): differential

  16. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  17. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  18. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, α): deduced S(E) E(cm) = 0 - 0.15 1 11/30/2011 1993AN06 10B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/07/2011 1993AN09 10B(p, α): absolute fusion σ and S(E) E(cm) = 48 - 159 keV X4 11/07/2011 1972SZ02 10B(p, α): total reaction σ and S(E) 60 - 180 keV 1 X4 03/03/2011 1983WI09 10B(p, γ): γ yield, capture σ(E) 0.07 - 2.2 X4 11/07/2011 2003TO21 10B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced

  19. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/17/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, α): deduced σ, S-factor Ecm ~ 0 - 1 X4 11/07/2012 2010LA11 11B(p, α): deduced S-factor E(cm) = 0 - 0.6 1 11/30/2011 2000KE10 11B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor < 100 keV X4 11/07/2012 1993AN06 11B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/29/2012 1979DA03 11B(p, 3α): σ 35.4 - 1500 keV X4 07/30/2014 1992CE02 11B(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012

  20. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(α, γ0): σ 0 - 2.27 X4 05/01/2012 2012OU01 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.3 - 3.5 X4 02/12/2015 1997KU18 12C(α, γ): analyzed S-factor Ecm = 0.9 - 3 X4 05/10/2012 1987RE02 12C(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 0.94 - 2.84 X4 05/09/2012 2001HA31 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.95 - 2.78 E1, E2 06/18/2012 2001KU09 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.95 - 2.8 X4 05/09/2012

  1. 14C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, γ): γ-rays yield for 230 - 690 keV Eγ ≥ 2.8 MeV 08/15/2013 1990GO25 14C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 250 - 740 keV X4 10/28/2014 1968HE12 14C(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.6 - 2.7 γ0 01/06/2015 1991WA02 14C(p, n): σ 1.0 - 1.55 X4 10/28/2014 1968HA27 14C(p, p): σ at θcm = 1.0 - 2.7 39.2°, 54.7°, 90°, 125.3°, 161.4° 08/15/2013 1971KU01 14C(p, γ0): excitation function at θ = 90° 1.3 - 2.6 1

  2. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 15N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1982RE06 15N(p, α): σ 78 - 810 keV X4 09/12/2011 1979ZY02 15N(p, α0): σ, deduced S-factor 93 - 418 keV X4 09/12/2011 2010LE21, 2013DE03 15N(p, γ): σ, S-factors 130 - 1800 keV X4 05/01/2012 & 02/01/2016 2012IM02 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ, S-factors 0.14 - 1.80 X4 02/01/2016 1974RO37 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ 150 - 2500 keV X4 09/12/2011 1968GO07

  3. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N(α γ): σ 461 - 2642 keV X4 09/12/2011 1997WI12 15N(α γ): σ 0.65 - 2.65 X4 09/12/2011 1995WI26 15N(α γ): σ 0.67 - 0.69 X4 09/12/2011 1969AI01 15N(α γ): γ-ray excitation curve for 3.0 ≤ Eγ ≤ 7.0 MeV 2.5 - 3.2 1 11/30/2011 1977DI08 15N(α, γ): γ-ray excitation curve near Eα = 3.15 MeV for transitions to 3146 - 3158 keV five low-lying states, 4.65 MeV (13/2+) state

  4. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6O(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(α, γ): σ 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09/15/2011 1953CA44 16O(α, α): σ 0.94 - 4.0 X4 09/15/2011 1997KU18 16O(α, γ): analyzed S-factor 1 - 3.25 X4 05/10/2012 1980MA27 16O(α, α): σ 1.305 - 1.330; 2.950 - 3.075 X4 02/14/2012 16O(α, γ): σ 1.37, 2.6, 2.9, 3.036 1987HA24 16O(α, γ): σ Ecm = 1.7 - 2.35 X4 02/14/2012 1990LE06 16O(α, α): σ 1.8 - 5 X4 03/12/2011 1985JA17 16O(α, α): σ 2

  5. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010SE11 17O(p, α): nuclear excitation function 0 - 0.7 1 06/22/2011 1973RO03 17O(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.15 - 1.4 1 08/01/2012 2015BU02 17O(p, γ): total S(E)-factors 0.17 - 0.53 X4 03/03/2016 2012SC16, 2014DI01 17O(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.2 - 0.4 X4 03/03/2016 1973RO34 17O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 1.9 S-Factor X4 06/22/2011 17O(p, γ): σ for the γ-ray transition 0.94 → 0 MeV 17O(p, γ):

  6. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013BE11; see also 2012BEZP 17O(α, n), (α, γ): σ, S-factors 0.8 - 2.3 X4 02/12/2015 1973BA10 17O(α, n): neutron yields with target thickness 0.9 - 5.3 ~ 2.5 keV, 6 keV, 13 keV, ~ 35 keV 06/06/2011 1976MC12 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.4 - 2.3 θγ = 50° 04/28/2011 17O(α, n0): yield of neutrons θn = 120° 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.825 - 1.885 θγ = 0° 05/03/2011 17O(α,

  7. 3H Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3H(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001TO07 3H(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.05 - 0.8 X4 01/09/2012 1994BR25 3H(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor Ecm = 50 - 1200 keV X4 01/09/2012 1987SC18 3H(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor Ecm = 79 - 464 keV X4 01/09/2012 1988SA13 3H(α, α): recoil σ 0.5 - 2.5 X4 01/09/2012 1987BU18 3H(α, γ): σ and S-factor 0.7 - 2 X4 01/09/2012 1968IV01 3H(α, α): elastic scattering σ 3 - 11 Table 9 X4

  8. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 107 - 1266 keV X4 01/05/2012 1969NA24 3He(α, γ): σ and S-factor 164 - 245 keV σ, S(E) X4 07/19/2011 1984OS03 3He(α, γ): σ 165 - 1169 keV X4 01/05/2012 1982OS02 3He(α, γ): S-factor 165 - 1170 keV S34(Ecm) X4 07/19/2011 1988HI06 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 195 - 686 keV X4 01/05/2012 2007CO17 3He(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor 220, 250, 400 keV X4 01/05/2012

  9. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1974KR07 4He(p, p): σ 0.5 - 3 X4 10/23/2014 2004PU02 4He(p, p): σ(θ = 128.7°) 1.2 - 5.2 X4 10/23/2014 1997NU02 4He(p, p): σ 1.4 - 6 X4 10/23/2014 1976BR17 4He(p, p): σ(168.8°)/σ(104.4°) 2.24 - 5.90 X4 10/23/2014 1977DO01 4He(p, p): σ 11 - 14 X4 10/23/2014 1969GA12 4He(p, p): σ 12.04, 14.23, 17.45 X4 10/23/2014 1974SO06 4He(p, X): total reaction σ 18 - 48 1 03/08/2011 1976SO01 4He(p, X),

  10. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, α), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01/23/2013 1973SI27 9Be(p, α), (p, d): σ 30 - 700 keV X4 01/24/2013 1992CE02 9Be(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012 1995ZA04 9Be(p, γ): deduced σ 75 - 1800 keV X4 01/23/2013 1994LI51 9Be(p, p): σ at θ = 170° 0.15- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1973SZ07 9Be(p, γ): σ 200 - 750 keV X4 01/09/2013 1972RE07 9Be(p, γ): σ 0.20 - 0.85 X4

  11. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8O(p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, α): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0 - 1.5 θα = 46° 12/03/2012 1990CH32 18O(p, α): σ < 2 X4 10/04/2012 1990VO06 18O(p, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.22 X4 02/13/2012 2008LA13 18O(p, α): deduced σ 0 - 250 keV X4 10/20/2014 1973BA31 18O(p, n): total neutron-production σ < 5 1 X4 05/10/2011 1990WA10 18O(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1979LO01 18O(p, α): σ 72 - 935 keV X4

  12. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  13. Nucleon-nucleon cross sections in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, H.; Schnell, A.; Roepke, G.; Lombardo, U.

    1997-06-01

    We provide a microscopic calculation of neutron-proton and neutron-neutron cross sections in symmetric nuclear matter at various densities, using the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation scheme with the Paris potential. We investigate separately the medium effects on the effective mass and on the scattering amplitude. We determine average cross sections suitable for application in the dynamical simulation of heavy ion collisions, including a parametrization of their energy and density dependence. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Alliance green|spaces Holy Cross Energy ... & revenue, data & evaluation, business partners, ... If a community met its energy retrofit goal, its library ...

  15. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  16. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N u F a c t 0 9 11th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, Superbeams and Beta Beams July 20-25, 2009 - Illinois Institute of Technology - Chicago David Schmitz, Fermilab Outline  Quick Audience Survey  Introduction  Relevant Energies and Targets  Current Cross-Section Experiments  Recent Results and Mysteries  Future Cross-Section Experiments NuFact09 - IIT, Chicago - 07/24/2009 D. Schmitz, Fermilab White Sox Survey D. Schmitz, Fermilab NuFact09 - IIT, Chicago -

  17. Elastic scattering and total cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses concepts of elastic scattering and cross sections of proton-proton interactions. (LSP)

  18. Tevatron Combination of Single-Top-Quark Cross Sections and Determination of the Magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element Vtb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Borysova, M.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D’Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gogota, O.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savitskyi, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σt=2.25+0.29-0.31 pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs+t=3.30+0.52-0.40 pb , without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σs/σt. Moreover, the resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vtb|=1.02+0.06-0.05, corresponding to |Vtb|>0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  19. Experience With the SCALE Criticality Safety Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, S.M.

    2000-08-21

    This report provides detailed information on the SCALE criticality safety cross-section libraries. Areas covered include the origins of the libraries, the data on which they are based, how they were generated, past experience and validations, and performance comparisons with measured critical experiments and numerical benchmarks. The performance of the SCALE criticality safety cross-section libraries on various types of fissile systems are examined in detail. Most of the performance areas are demonstrated by examining the performance of the libraries vs critical experiments to show general trends and weaknesses. In areas where directly applicable critical experiments do not exist, performance is examined based on the general knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the cross sections. In this case, the experience in the use of the cross sections and comparisons with the results of other libraries on the same systems are relied on for establishing acceptability of application of a particular SCALE library to a particular fissile system. This report should aid in establishing when a SCALE cross-section library would be expected to perform acceptably and where there are known or suspected deficiencies that would cause the calculations to be less reliable. To determine the acceptability of a library for a particular application, the calculational bias of the library should be established by directly applicable critical experiments.

  20. Cross section standards for neutron-induced gamma-ray production in the MeV energy range.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R. O. (Ronald O.); Fotiadis, N. (Nikolaos); Devlin, M. J. (Matthew J.); Becker, J. A. (John A.); Garrett, P. E. (Paul E.); Younes, W. (Walid)

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray cross section standards for neutron-induced reactions are important in enabling the accurate determination of absolute cross sections from relative measurements of gamma-ray production. In our work we observed a need for improvement in these standards. In particular there are large discrepancies between evaluations of the {sup nat}Fe(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) cross section for the 847-keV gamma ray. We have performed (1) absolute cross section measurements, (2) measurements relative to the {sup nat}Cr(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) 1434-keV gamma ray, and (3) comparisons using measured total and elastic scattering cross sections to refine our knowledge of the Fe cross section and the closely linked inelastic channel cross section for Fe. Calculation of integral tests of the cross section libraries may indicate that adjustment of the angular distributions of the neutron elastic and inelastic scattering may be needed.

  1. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  2. U-073: Bugzilla Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in Bugzilla. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  3. Laser stimulated emission cross sections of Nd glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, A.W.; Birnbaum, M.; Fincher, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-comparison method was used to determine the emission cross sections at 1060 nm of Nd glasses used in laser fusion systems. The values obtained for two phosphate glasses (LHG-8) and (Q-88) were 4.0 +- 0.8 x 10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/ and 1.7 +- 0.5 x 10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/ for a silicate glass (LG-650).

  4. Crossing contours in the interacting boson approximation (IBA) symmetry triangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.

    2006-11-15

    Constant contours of basic observables are discussed in the context of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) symmetry triangle. Contours that exhibit orthogonal crossing within the triangle are presented as a method for determining a set of parameter values for a particular nucleus and trajectories for isotopic chains. A set of contours that highlights a class of nuclei that are outside the two-parameter IBA-1 Hamitonian space is also presented.

  5. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  6. Reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes incident on a proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-03-15

    We systematically study total reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes with N=6-16 on a proton target for wide range of incident energies. An emphasis is put on the difference from the case of a carbon target. The calculations include the reaction cross sections of {sup 19,20,22}C at 40A MeV, the data of which have recently been measured at RIKEN. The Glauber theory is used to calculate the reaction cross sections. To describe the intrinsic structure of the carbon isotopes, we use a Slater determinant generated from a phenomenological mean-field potential, and construct the density distributions. To go beyond the simple mean-field model, we adopt two types of dynamical models: One is a core+n model for odd-neutron nuclei, and the other is a core+n+n model for {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C. We propose empirical formulas which are useful in predicting unknown cross sections.

  7. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  8. V-084: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain Access,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clickjacking, and File Upload Attacks | Department of Energy 84: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain Access, Clickjacking, and File Upload Attacks V-084: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain Access, Clickjacking, and File Upload Attacks February 5, 2013 - 12:01am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain Access, Clickjacking, and File Upload Attacks PLATFORM: RSA Archer SmartSuite Framework version 4.x RSA Archer

  9. Bayou pipeline crossing requires helical pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a routine inspection by Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. which revealed the approximately 100 ft of its 30-in gas pipeline in St. Landry Parish, La., had become suspended. The situation occurred in the West Atchafalaya Floodway after periods of heavy rain produced strong currents that scoured the soil from around and below the pipeline. To protect the pipeline from possible damage from overstressing, Transco awarded a lump-sum contract to Energy Structures Inc., Houston, to design and install pipeline supports. The pipeline supports engineered by ESI used helical-screw pilings instead of conventional driven pilings. The helical piles were manufactured by A.B. Chance Co., Centralia, Mo. Typically, helical pilings consist of steel pipe ranging from 3.5- to 8-in. diameter pipe with one or more helixes welded onto the pipe. Selection of the proper piling cross-section was based on design loads and soil conditions at the project locations. length was determined by the amount of pipeline suspension and on-site soil conditions.

  10. QER- Comment of Peter Cross

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern: We live in Orange, MA, which is one of the towns through which a natural gas pipeline (Kinder Morgan Co.) is proposed to go on its way to Dracut, MA. We are aware that these 30-inch pipelines have on average one leak every 8 miles or so, and we know there will be more than 8 miles of the line in our town if it is approved. Although we are not abutting property owners, we are opposed to the fracking techniques used to extract the gas that will be in this pipeline, primarily because of danger to water supplies. Additionally, we feel as though we're enabling and supporting these techniques by not speaking out about transporting the products of this process. And, just in case you think we are "not in my backyard "people, we SUPPORT both wind and solar power installations - we have both rather close to us! Thanks for taking our opinions into consideration. Peter and Candace Cross, Orange, MA

  11. Recirculating cross-correlation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, W.H. Jr.; Roberts, M.J.

    1985-01-18

    A digital cross-correlation detector is provided in which two time-varying signals are correlated by repetitively comparing data samples stored in digital form to detect correlation between the two signals. The signals are sampled at a selected rate converted to digital form, and stored in separate locations in separate memories. When the memories are filled, the data samples from each memory are first fed word-by-word through a multiplier and summing circuit and each result is compared to the last in a peak memory circuit and if larger than the last is retained in the peak memory. Then the address line to leading signal memory is offset by one byte to affect one sample period delay of a known amount in that memory and the data in the two memories are then multiplied word-by-word once again and summed. If a new result is larger than a former sum, it is saved in the peak memory together with the time delay. The recirculating process continues with the address of the one memory being offset one additional byte each cycle until the address is shifted through the length of the memory. The correlation between the two signals is indicated by the peak signal stored in the peak memory together with the delay time at which the peak occurred. The circuit is faster and considerably less expensive than comparable accuracy correlation detectors.

  12. U-206: WordPress Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Site...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WordPress Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Site Request Forgery, and Information Disclosure Attacks PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 3.4.1 ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities...

  13. PROBLEM DEPENDENT DOPPLER BROADENING OF CONTINUOUS ENERGY CROSS SECTIONS IN THE KENO MONTE CARLO COMPUTER CODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, S. W. D.; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Celik, Cihangir; Leal, Luiz C

    2014-01-01

    For many Monte Carlo codes cross sections are generally only created at a set of predetermined temperatures. This causes an increase in error as one moves further and further away from these temperatures in the Monte Carlo model. This paper discusses recent progress in the Scale Monte Carlo module KENO to create problem dependent, Doppler broadened, cross sections. Currently only broadening the 1D cross sections and probability tables is addressed. The approach uses a finite difference method to calculate the temperature dependent cross-sections for the 1D data, and a simple linear-logarithmic interpolation in the square root of temperature for the probability tables. Work is also ongoing to address broadening theS (alpha , beta) tables. With the current approach the temperature dependent cross sections are Doppler broadened before transport starts, and, for all but a few isotopes, the impact on cross section loading is negligible. Results can be compared with those obtained by using multigroup libraries, as KENO currently does interpolation on the multigroup cross sections to determine temperature dependent cross-sections. Current results compare favorably with these expected results.

  14. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P.; Apen, Paul G.; Mitchell, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  15. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P.; Apen, Paul G.; Mitchell, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  16. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  17. Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment http:web.archive.orgweb20000902074635www.er.doe.govproductionbesYuanLeeExp.html (1 of 4)472006 2:46:13 PM Yuan T. ...

  18. Relativistic electron beam crossed-field device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bekefi, George; Orzechowski, Thaddeus J.

    1980-01-01

    An intense relativistic crossed field device in a nested configuration wherein a field emission cathode is nested within a segmented annular anode with an annular gap separating the two.

  19. Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 Adam Bratis, Ph.D. NREL Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Cross-cutting Technology Areas: Feedstock Supply and Logistics  growth, harvesting, delivery Analysis  economic, life-cycle, resource assessment Catalysis  design, characterization, testing Separations  contaminant removal, product recovery Dr. Adam Bratis Biomass Program Manager National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  20. QuickSite Cross Section Processing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-27

    This AGEM-developed system produces cross sections by inputting data in both standard and custom file formats and outputting a graphic file that can be printed or further modified in a commercial graphic program. The system has evolved over several years in order to combine and visualize a changing set of field data more rapidly than was possible with commercially available cross section software packages. It uses some commercial packages to produce the input and tomore » modify the output files. Flexibility is provided by a dynamic set of programs that are customized to accept varying input and accomodate varying output requirements. There are two basic types of routines: conversion routines and cross section generation routines. The conversion routines convery various data files to logger file format which is compatible with a standard file format for LogPlot 98, a commonly used commercial log plotting program. The cross section routines generate cross sections and apply topography to these cross sections. All of the generation routines produce a standard graphic DXF file, which is the format used in AutoCAD and can then be modified in a number of available graphics programs.« less

  1. Category:Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log page? For detailed information on Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log,...

  2. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  3. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  4. Cross correlations from back reaction on stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2013-02-01

    The induction equation induces non trivial correlations between the primordial curvature mode and the magnetic mode which is a non linear effect. Assuming a stochastic, gaussian magnetic field the resulting power spectra determining the two point cross correlation functions between the primordial curvature perturbation and the magnetic energy density contrast as well as the magnetic anisotropic stress are calculated approximately. The corresponding numerical solutions are used to calculate the angular power spectra determining the temperature anisotropies and polarization of the cosmic microwave background, C{sub l}. It is found that the resulting C{sub l} are sub-leading in comparison to those generated by the compensated mode for a magnetic field which only redshifts with the expansion of the universe. The main focus are scalar modes, however, vector modes will also be briefly discussed.

  5. U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September...

  6. High PID Resistant Cross-Linked Encapsulnt Based on Polyolefin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PID Resistant Cross-Linked Encapsulnt Based on Polyolefin SOLAR ASCE High PID Resistant Cross-Linked Encapsulnt Based on Polyolefin SOLAR ASCE Presented at the PV Module ...

  7. Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology to Market Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 Four projects are working ...

  8. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section ...

  9. MHK Technologies/Uppsala Cross flow Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cross flow Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uppsala Cross flow Turbine.gif Technology Profile Primary Organization...

  10. Cross County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Cross County, Arkansas Cherry Valley, Arkansas Hickory Ridge, Arkansas Parkin, Arkansas Wynne, Arkansas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCross...

  11. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron You are accessing ...

  12. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron An overview of the ...

  13. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions This analysis provides first-ever assessment ...

  14. Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and Attends National Day of Prayer and Remembrance Service with Governor Riley Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and Attends ...

  15. La Crosse County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    INOV8 International Inc Energy Generation Facilities in La Crosse County, Wisconsin French Island Biomass Facility Places in La Crosse County, Wisconsin Bangor, Wisconsin Barre,...

  16. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of nuclear reaction cross ...

  17. Indirect ( n , γ ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Indirect ( n , ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using the surrogate method Title: Indirect ( n , ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using the surrogate method ...

  18. All of Russia's Border Crossings to be Outfitted with Proliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    All of Russia's Border Crossings to be Outfitted with Proliferation Prevention Equipmen June 01, 2007 All of Russia's Border Crossings to be Outfitted with Proliferation Prevention ...

  19. Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of...

  20. Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and ...

  1. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  2. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures More accurate fission cross section calculations in presence of underlying intermediate ...

  3. V-084: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    V-084: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain Access, Clickjacking, ... The vendor has issued a fix (5.2SP1, 5.3). Addthis Related Articles V-151: RSA Archer eGRC ...

  4. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  5. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  6. On the morphology of avoided crossings in the spectrum of irregular quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiazhou; Burgdoerfer, J.; Eschenazi, E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The deformation of the energy level spectra of quantum systems as a function of a control parameter governing the strength of a non- integrable perturbation can be determined by standard molecular dynamics techniques. This method is used to analyze the distribution and morphology of avoided crossings for a system of coupled Morse oscillators. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  7. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sections Group e-mail: BOONE-CROSSSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles, Conferences, Useful Links Last updated on 07/19/07

  8. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Apen, P.G.; Mitchell, M.A.

    1998-01-20

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes. 1 fig.

  9. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 1HP ; Mucha, Peter J.; Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  10. Mixed Legendre moments and discrete scattering cross sections for anisotropy representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J. F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with the resolution of the integro-differential form of the Boltzmann transport equation for neutron transport in nuclear reactors. In multigroup theory, deterministic codes use transfer cross sections which are expanded on Legendre polynomials. This modelling leads to negative values of the transfer cross section for certain scattering angles, and hence, the multigroup scattering source term is wrongly computed. The first part compares the convergence of 'Legendre-expanded' cross sections with respect to the order used with the method of characteristics (MOC) for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) type cells. Furthermore, the cross section is developed using piecewise-constant functions, which better models the multigroup transfer cross section and prevents the occurrence of any negative value for it. The second part focuses on the method of solving the transport equation with the above-mentioned piecewise-constant cross sections for lattice calculations for PWR cells. This expansion thereby constitutes a 'reference' method to compare the conventional Legendre expansion to, and to determine its pertinence when applied to reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  11. Averaging cross section data so we can fit it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.

    2014-10-23

    The 56Fe cross section we are interested in have a lot of fluctuations. We would like to fit the average of the cross section with cross sections calculated within EMPIRE. EMPIRE is a Hauser-Feshbach theory based nuclear reaction code, requires cross sections to be smoothed using a Lorentzian profile. The plan is to fit EMPIRE to these cross sections in the fast region (say above 500 keV).

  12. Research on Fast-Doppler-Broadening of neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A Fast-Doppler-Broadening method is developed in this work to broaden Continuous Energy neutron cross-sections for Monte Carlo calculations. Gauss integration algorithm and parallel computing are implemented in this method, which is unprecedented in the history of cross section processing. Compared to the traditional code (NJOY, SIGMA1, etc.), the new Fast-Doppler-Broadening method shows a remarkable speedup with keeping accuracy. The purpose of using Gauss integration is to avoid complex derivation of traditional broadening formula and heavy load of computing complementary error function that slows down the Doppler broadening process. The OpenMP environment is utilized in parallel computing which can take full advantage of modern multi-processor computers. Combination of the two can reduce processing time of main actinides (such as {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U) to an order of magnitude of 1{approx}2 seconds. This new method is fast enough to be applied to Online Doppler broadening. It can be combined or coupled with Monte Carlo transport code to solve temperature dependent problems and neutronics-thermal hydraulics coupled scheme which is a big challenge for the conventional NJOY-MCNP system. Examples are shown to determine the efficiency and relative errors compared with the NJOY results. A Godiva Benchmark is also used in order to test the ACE libraries produced by the new method. (authors)

  13. Final Report - Nucelar Astrophysics & Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Robert F

    2009-12-01

    This enduring research program of 28 years has taken advantage of the excellent research facility of ORELA at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The fruitful collaborations include a number of scientists from ORNL and some from LASL. This program which has ranged from nuclear structure determinations to astrophysical applications has resulted in the identification and/or the refinement of the nuclear properties of more than 5,000 nuclear energy levels or compound energy states. The nuclei range from 30Si to 250Cf, the probes range from thermal to 50 MeV neutrons, and the studies range from capture gamma ray spectra to total and differential scattering and absorption cross sections. Specific target nuclei studied include the following: 120Sn 124Sn 125Sn 113Sn 115Sn 117Sn 119Sn 249Cf 33S 34S 249Bk 186Os 187Os 188Os 30Si 32S 40Ca 48Ca 60Ni 54Fe 86Kr 88Sr 40Ar 122Sn 90Zr 122Sn(n,?) 208Pb 204Pb 52Cr 54Cr 50Cr 53Cr As can be seen, we have studied, on average, more than one isotope per year of grant funding and have focused on exploiting those elements having multiple isotopes in order to investigate systematic trends in nuclear properties, for the purpose of providing more stringent tests of the nuclear spherical optical model with a surface imaginary potential. We have investigated an l-dependence of the real-well depth of the spherical optical model; we have used these measurements to deduce the existence of doorway states in the compound nucleus; and in the total cross section measurements we have, in addition to resonance energies and widths, obtained values for the level density and neutron strength function. Due to the high neutron energy resolution of the ORELA and in some cases the addition of differential scattering cross section data, we have been able to disaggregate the spin states and provide level spacing and strength function for each partial wave in the neutron-nucleus interaction, in some cases up to d5/2. In the following we will summarize the most recent analyses of neutron total cross section measurements, some of which have not been previously reported.

  14. 102Pd(n, {gamma}) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatarik, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A. M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 {mu}m thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine the scattering background. The 102Pd(n, {gamma}) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis.

  15. Background-free balanced optical cross correlator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nejadmalayeri, Amir Hossein; Kaertner, Franz X

    2014-12-23

    A balanced optical cross correlator includes an optical waveguide, a first photodiode including a first n-type semiconductor and a first p-type semiconductor positioned about the optical waveguide on a first side of the optical waveguide's point of symmetry, and a second photodiode including a second n-type semiconductor and a second p-type semiconductor positioned about the optical waveguide on a second side of the optical waveguide's point of symmetry. A balanced receiver including first and second inputs is configured to produce an output current or voltage that reflects a difference in currents or voltages, originating from the first and the second photodiodes of the balanced cross correlator and fed to the first input and to the second input of the balanced receiver.

  16. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  17. HolyName Housing Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems...

  18. Background: Energy's holy grail. [The quest for controlled fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-22

    This article presents a brief history of the pursuit and development of fusion as a power source. Starting with the 1950s through the present, the research efforts of the US and other countries is highlighted, including a chronology of hey developments. Other topics discussed include cold fusion and magnetic versus inertial fusion issues.

  19. Measurements of neutron capture cross section for {sup 207,208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segawa, M.; Toh, Y.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Fukahori, T.; Iwamoto, N.; Iwamoto, O.; Oshima, M.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Igashira, M.; Kamada, S.; Tajika, M.

    2014-05-02

    The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb have been measured in the neutron energy region from 10 to 110 keV. The ?-rays cascaded from a capture state to the ground state or low-lying states of {sup 208,209}Pb were observed for the first time, using an anti-Compton Nal(Tl) spectrometer and a TOF method. The observed discrete ?-ray energy spectra enabled us to determine neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb with small systematic errors, since we could distinguish ?-ray of {sup 207,208}Pb(n,?) reactions from background ?-ray with use of the ?-ray spectra. The obtained cross sections include both contributions of resonance and direct capture components different from the previous TOF measurements.

  20. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Wania Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Tavares, Andre C.

    2014-02-14

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  1. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of {sup 15}N J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MeiBner, N.J.; Schatz, H.; Herndl, H.; Wiescher, M.

    1995-10-01

    Neutron capture reactions on fight nuclei may be of considerable importance for the s-process nucleosynthesis in red giant stars as well as in inhomogeneous big bang scenarios and high entropy supernovae neutrino bubbles. To determine the reaction rates for such different temperature conditions, the cross sections need to be known for a wide energy range. The reaction {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}) represents an important link in the reaction seququences for the production of heavier isotopes in such scenarios. At high temperature conditions, the cross section is not only influenced by a non resonant a-wave contribution but also by a non resonant p-wave contribution and higher energy resonances. The (n,{gamma}) cross section has been measured at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for different neutron energies using a fast cyclic neutron activation technique. The technique and the results will be presented.

  2. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maljkovic, J. B.; Milosavljevic, A. R.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Blanco, F.

    2009-05-15

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) are presented for incident energies from 50 to 300 eV. The measurements were performed using a cross beam technique, for scattering angles from 20 deg. to 110 deg. The relative DCSs were measured as a function of both the angle and incident energy and the absolute DCSs were determined using the relative flow method. The calculations of electron interaction cross sections are based on a corrected form of the independent-atom method, known as the screen corrected additivity rule procedure and using an improved quasifree absorption model. Calculated results agree very well with the experiment.

  3. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chen (Chen Yang) - Departments of Chemistry & Physics, Purdue University Yang, De-Ping (De-Ping Yang) - Department of Physics, College of the Holy Cross Yang, In-Sang (In-Sang ...

  4. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks July 5, 2013 -...

  5. U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 10,...

  6. CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to fund off right-of-way (ROW) vegetation restoration treatments immediately adjacent to Western's Curecanti-Poncha 230-kilovolt Transmission Line (CCI-PON) in

  7. CX-013625: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Cross Fee Title Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 04/30/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. T-693: Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks .

  9. Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance Site Presentation Visualization REC Data Viewer Power Flow Data More Documents & Publications Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions 2015 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States

  10. DOERS Records Schedule Cross Index to DOE Administrative Records

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposition Schedules | Department of Energy DOERS Records Schedule Cross Index to DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules DOERS Records Schedule Cross Index to DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Crosswalk between DOERS and Admin Schedules PDF icon DOERS Records Schedule Cross Index to DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules More Documents & Publications DOE Records Disposition Schedule Changes ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL

  11. Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More Documents & Publications Quality Assurance Requirements USA RS Basic Contract - Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description

  12. Precise Relative Earthquake Magnitudes from Cross Correlation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cleveland, K. Michael; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-04-21

    We present a method to estimate precise relative magnitudes using cross correlation of seismic waveforms. Our method incorporates the intercorrelation of all events in a group of earthquakes, as opposed to individual event pairings relative to a reference event. This method works well when a reliable reference event does not exist. We illustrate the method using vertical strike-slip earthquakes located in the northeast Pacific and Panama fracture zone regions. Our results are generally consistent with the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog, which we use to establish a baseline for the relative event sizes.

  13. Cross Sections for Nuclei A = 3 - 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections with Proton and Alpha Induced Reactions for Nuclei A = 3 - 20 I. Introduction: We have scanned the NSR from 1910-present for various articles with proton and alpha induced reactions. We have used the program Plot Digitizer 2.5.0 to extract the excitation functions from figures in the articles. In some cases the uncertainties are provided in the figures, we have noted this in comments, but we have made no attempt to extract the uncertainties. In cases where the data are given in

  14. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The NSA machine received its upgrade and was successfully returned to service following ... We have determined that the new components appear to operate correctly, and the signals to ...

  15. U-206: WordPress Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Site Request Forgery, and Information Disclosure Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in WordPress. A remote authenticated user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. A remote user can conduct cross-site request forgery attacks. A remote authenticated user can obtain potentially sensitive information.

  16. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  17. Experimental Cross Section Data Selection by a SAMMY Parameterization:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9Be({alpha}, n) Cross Section Evaluation up to 4 MeV (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Experimental Cross Section Data Selection by a SAMMY Parameterization: 9Be({alpha}, n) Cross Section Evaluation up to 4 MeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental Cross Section Data Selection by a SAMMY Parameterization: 9Be({alpha}, n) Cross Section Evaluation up to 4 MeV This paper reports an evaluation work on the resolved resonance parameters of the {alpha} + 9Be reaction from 0 to 4

  18. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G.; Gurary, Alexander I.; Boguslavskiy, Vadim

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  19. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  20. Absolute photoneutron cross sections of Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Filipescu, D.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Renstrom, T.; Tesileanu, O.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2015-02-24

    Photoneutron cross sections for seven samarium isotopes, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 148}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 154}Sm, have been investigated near neutron emission threshold using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ-rays produced at the synchrotron radiation facility NewSUBARU. The results are important for nuclear astrophysics calculations and also for probing γ-ray strength functions in the vicinity of neutron threshold. Here we describe the neutron detection system and we discuss the related data analysis and the necessary method improvements for adapting the current experimental method to the working parameters of the future Gamma Beam System of Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility.

  1. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... et al., April 2009, DOESC-ARMP-09-012 3 3. References Clothiaux, EE, P Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of ...

  2. Optimization of multi-group cross sections for fast reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, M. R.; Manalo, K. L.; Edgar, C. A.; Paul, J. N.; Molinar, M. P.; Redd, E. M.; Yi, C.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    The selection of the number of broad energy groups, collapsed broad energy group boundaries, and their associated evaluation into collapsed macroscopic cross sections from a general 238-group ENDF/B-VII library dramatically impacted the k eigenvalue for fast reactor analysis. An analysis was undertaken to assess the minimum number of energy groups that would preserve problem physics; this involved studies using the 3D deterministic transport parallel code PENTRAN, the 2D deterministic transport code SCALE6.1, the Monte Carlo based MCNP5 code, and the YGROUP cross section collapsing tool on a spatially discretized MOX fuel pin comprised of 21% PUO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} with sodium coolant. The various cases resulted in a few hundred pcm difference between cross section libraries that included the 238 multi-group reference, and cross sections rendered using various reaction and adjoint weighted cross sections rendered by the YGROUP tool, and a reference continuous energy MCNP case. Particular emphasis was placed on the higher energies characteristic of fission neutrons in a fast spectrum; adjoint computations were performed to determine the average per-group adjoint fission importance for the MOX fuel pin. This study concluded that at least 10 energy groups for neutron transport calculations are required to accurately predict the eigenvalue for a fast reactor system to within 250 pcm of the 238 group case. In addition, the cross section collapsing/weighting schemes within YGROUP that provided a collapsed library rendering eigenvalues closest to the reference were the contribution collapsed, reaction rate weighted scheme. A brief analysis on homogenization of the MOX fuel pin is also provided, although more work is in progress in this area. (authors)

  3. NEPA Determination Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has determined that this proposed project is a major Federal action that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment. To comply with the National Environmental Policy Act ...

  4. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  5. Generalized crossing states in the interacting case: The uniform gravitational field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villanueva, Anthony D.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2010-11-15

    We reconsider Baute et al.'s free crossing states [Phys. Rev. A 61, 022118 (2000)] and show that if we require a generalization in the interacting case that goes in complete parallel with the free-particle case, then this generalized crossing state cannot be arbitrary but is determined by the null space of the particle's quantum time-of-arrival operator. Nonetheless, the free crossing states appear as the leading term in the asymptotic expansion of our generalized crossing state in the limit of large momentum. We then examine the quantum time-of-arrival problem of a spinless particle in a uniform gravitational field. Mass-dependent time-of-arrival probability distributions emerge, signifying quantum departures from the weak equivalence principle. However, in the classical limit of large mass and vanishing uncertainty in position, the mass dependence of the quantum time-of-arrival distribution becomes exponentially small and the mean quantum time of arrival reduces to the classical time of arrival.

  6. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structures (Conference) | SciTech Connect modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures More accurate fission cross section calculations in presence of underlying intermediate structure are strongly desired. This paper recalls the common approximations used below the fission threshold and quantifies their impact. In particular, an exact expanded R-matrix

  7. Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. The authors discuss the possibilities and limitations of the use of theory as a tool in the evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross-sections. They consider especially the target {sup 235}U as an example. They emphasize the roles of intermediate structure in the fission

  8. MiniBooNE QE Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross section", arXiv:1002:2680 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D81, 092005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2010 CCQE cross section paper is made available to the public: νμ CCQE cross sections: MiniBooNE flux table of predicted MiniBooNE muon neutrino flux (Table V) flux-integrated double differential cross section (Figure 13) 1D array of bin boundaries partitioning the muon kinetic energy (top) and the cosine of the muon

  9. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE Martin Tzanov University of Colorado PANIC 2008, 9-14 November, Eilat, ISRAEL Martin Tzanov, PANIC 2008 Neutrino Cross Sections Today * Precise knowledge needed for precise oscillation measurements. * Cross section well measured above 20 GeV. * Few measurements below 20 GeV. * 20-30 years old bubble chamber experiments (mostly H 2 , D 2 ). * Neutral current cross sections are even less understood. ν CC world data CC world data ν T2K, BooNE K2K,

  10. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 18. Cross-Reference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications 2010 Annual Merit Review Results Cross Reference of PIs and Organizations DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - PI and Project ...

  11. Radar cross section of triangular trihedral reflector with extended...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; OPTICAL RADAR; PERFORMANCE TESTING; CROSS SECTIONS; PLATES; ...

  12. Positive Scattering Cross Sections using Constrained Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, J.A.; Ganapol, B.D.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-09-27

    A method which creates a positive Legendre expansion from truncated Legendre cross section libraries is presented. The cross section moments of order two and greater are modified by a constrained least squares algorithm, subject to the constraints that the zeroth and first moments remain constant, and that the standard discrete ordinate scattering matrix is positive. A method using the maximum entropy representation of the cross section which reduces the error of these modified moments is also presented. These methods are implemented in PARTISN, and numerical results from a transport calculation using highly anisotropic scattering cross sections with the exponential discontinuous spatial scheme is presented.

  13. Compact Cross-Dipole Sonic (CXD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sonic (CXD) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Compact Cross-Dipole Sonic (CXD) Author Weatherford Published Publisher Not...

  14. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energyspin-flip density functional theory approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  15. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Uranium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Actinides at LANSCE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Uranium Isotopes and Other Actinides at LANSCE A well ...

  16. Application of nuclear models to neutron nuclear cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear theory is used increasingly to supplement and extend the nuclear data base that is available for applied studies. Areas where theoretical calculations are most important include the determination of neutron cross sections for unstable fission products and transactinide nuclei in fission reactor or nuclear waste calculations and for meeting the extensive dosimetry, activation, and neutronic data needs associated with fusion reactor development, especially for neutron energies above 14 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the use of nuclear models for data evaluation and, particularly, in the methods used to derive physically meaningful parameters for model calculations. Theoretical studies frequently involve use of spherical and deformed optical models, Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, preequilibrium theory, direct-reaction theory, and often make use of gamma-ray strength function models and phenomenological (or microscopic) level density prescriptions. The development, application, and limitations of nuclear models for data evaluation are discussed, with emphasis on the 0.1 to 50 MeV energy range. (91 references).

  17. CX-005674: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portland General Electric Overhead Line Crossing of Keeler-Oregon CityCX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 04/15/2011Location(s): Willamette Meridian, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-005008: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Energy System for Hawaii Red Cross Headquarters BuildingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 01/12/2011Location(s): Diamond Head, HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  19. CX-003923: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mining Equipment Transmission Line CrossingCX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 09/16/2010Location(s): Haskell County, OklahomaOffice(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  20. CX-009516: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tualatin River Pipeline Crossing Site- Monitoring Well Redevelopment CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 11/08/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-008677: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia and Willamette River Crossings Liquefaction Hazard Assessment CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-006300: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Murray Hill Recreation Association Permission to Cross Keeler-Oregon City Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 07/21/2011Location(s): Washington County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-004830: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irmo Charling Cross Sidewalk ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 12/21/2010Location(s): Irmo, South CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  4. CX-002992: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration Cleaning and FoulingCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/16/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consolidated Business Service Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management Consolidated Business Service Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued ...

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Minnesota | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Minnesota Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Minnesota Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Minnesota. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December ...

  7. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  8. Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels NREL report-out presentation at the CTAB webinar on crosscutting technologies for advanced biofuels. PDF icon ctab_webinar_crosscutting.pdf More Documents & Publications Innovative Topics for Advanced Biofuels Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Production Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Upgrading

  9. Interim Action Determination

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national security needs of the United States. Although the Deputy Secretary of Energy approved Critical

  10. NEPA Determination Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    LA NEPA COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION FORM PRID - 09P-0059 V2 Page 1 of 8 Project/Activity Title: TA-3 Substation Replacement Project PRID: 09P-0059 V2 Date: February 16, 2016 Purpose: The proposed demolition and replacement of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-3 electrical power substation is needed to provide reliable and efficient electrical distribution systems with sufficient electrical capacity to support the national security missions. The electrical distribution

  11. Award Fee Determination Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Final Fee Determination for Base funded Performance Measures Basis of Evaluation: Completion of Performance Measures contained in Section J, Attachment J.4, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan, according to the identified completion criteria. Evaluation Results: FY 2012 Base Period Fee Available Fee allocated to FY 2012* Performance Measures $10,399,033.60 Incremental Fee $4,490,000.00 Provisional Fee

  12. Award Fee Determination Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Final Fee Determination for Base funded and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery) funded Performance Measures Basis of Evaluation: Completion of Performance Measures contained in Section J, AttachmentJ.4, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan, according to the identified completion criteria. Evaluation Results: Fiscal Year 2011 (Oct 1, 2010 - Sept 30, 2011) Base Funded Fee Recovery Funded Fee Available

  13. Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

    1986-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

  14. Cs/sup +/ + Cs/sup +/ charge-transfer and ionization cross-section measurements by a plasma-target technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stalder, K.R.

    1982-05-01

    A Q machine plasma target using cesium was constructed to serve as a target for a beam of Cs/sup +/ ions. The sum of charge transfer and ionization cross sections was determined by measuring the growth of the Cs/sup + +/ component of the beam as a function of the plasma radial line density. The measured cross section varies approximately linearly with energy between 50 and 110 keV. This loss cross section is 0.47 +- .11 x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ at 110 keV. These results have been compared to the cross section determined by a crossed-beam technique. The agreement between the results of the experiments is good at energies above 75 keV. A discrepancy between the results at lower energies indicated a systematic error in one of the techniques. Theoretical estimates of the cross section recently have begun to agree with the magnitude of the cross section but have not fully explained the energy dependence.

  15. Integral cross section measurement of the U 235 ( n , n ' ) U 235 m reaction in a pulsed reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bélier, G.; Bond, E. M.; Vieira, D. J.; Authier, N.; Becker, J. A.; Hyneck, D.; Jacquet, X.; Jansen, Y.; Legendre, J.; Macri, R.; et al

    2015-04-08

    The integral measurement of the neutron inelastic cross section leading to the 26-minute half-life 235mU isomer in a fission-like neutron spectrum is presented. The experiment has been performed at a pulsed reactor, where the internal conversion decay of the isomer was measured using a dedicated electron detector after activation. The sample preparation, efficiency measurement, irradiation, radiochemistry purification, and isomer decay measurement will be presented. We determined the integral cross section for the ²³⁵U(n,n')235mU reaction to be 1.00±0.13b. This result supports an evaluation performed with TALYS-1.4 code with respect to the isomer excitation as well as the total neutron inelastic scatteringmore » cross section.« less

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: California | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... February 25, 2016 CX-100493 Categorical Exclusion Determination Integrated Glass Coating ... February 25, 2016 CX-100514 Categorical Exclusion Determination Crop Protection Utilizing ...

  17. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Connecticut | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 11, 2014 CX-100033: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Smart" Matrix Development ... May 22, 2014 CX-012145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut Clean Cities ...

  18. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Louisiana | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    March 4, 2016 CX-100533 Categorical Exclusion Determination Pump Station Improvements ... February 18, 2015 CX-100185 Categorical Exclusion Determination Pump Station Improvements ...

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Mississippi | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 30, 2015 CX-013741: Categorical Exclusion Determination Statistical Analysis of ... March 30, 2015 CX-013758: Categorical Exclusion Determination Statistical Analysis of ...

  20. Scaling properties of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy; Kohama, Akihisa

    2010-05-15

    We study the scaling properties of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei and propose an approximate expression in proportion to Z{sup 2/3}sigma{sub pp}{sup total}+N{sup 2/3}sigma{sub pn}{sup total}. Based on this expression, we can derive a relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any stable nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the empirical value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus.

  1. Measurement of the inclusive B sup * cross section above the. Upsilon. (4 S )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Stroynowski, R.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Morrison, R.; Schmidt, D.; Procario, M.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; A

    1991-09-23

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have determined the inclusive {ital B}{sup *} cross section above the {Upsilon}(4{ital S}) resonance in the energy range from 10.61 to 10.70 GeV. We also report a new measurement of the energy of the {ital B}{sup *}{r arrow}{ital B}{gamma} transition photon of 46.2{plus minus}0.3{plus minus}0.8 MeV.

  2. Sensitivity of silicon 1-MeV damage function to cross-section evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Danjaji, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    The electronics radiation hardness-testing community uses the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E722-93 Standard Practice to define the energy dependence of the nonionizing neutron damage to silicon semiconductors. This neutron displacement damage response function is defined to be equal to the silicon displacement kerma. An Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) {sup 28}Si cross-section evaluation and the NJOY code are used to define the standard response function to be used in reporting 1-MeV (silicon) neutron damage and in determining neutron damage equivalence between test facilities. This paper provides information for the precision and bias section of the E722 standard.

  3. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure formore » the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.« less

  4. Studies of combustion reactions at the state-resolved differential cross section level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, P.L.; Suits, A.G.; Bontuyan, L.S.; Whitaker, B.J.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved differential reaction cross sections provide perhaps the most detailed information about the mechanism of a chemical reaction, but heretofore they have been extremely difficult to measure. This program explores a new technique for obtaining differential cross sections with product state resolution. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of state-selected reaction products is determined by ionizing the appropriate product, waiting for a delay while it recoils along the trajectory imparted by the reaction, and finally projecting the spatial distribution of ions onto a two dimensional screen using a pulsed electric field. Knowledge of the arrival time allows the ion position to be converted to a velocity, and the density of velocity projections can be inverted mathematically to provide the three-dimensional velocity distribution for the selected product. The main apparatus has been constructed and tested using photodissociations. The authors report here the first test results using crossed beams to investigate collisions between Ar and NO. Future research will both develop further the new technique and employ it to investigate methyl radical, formyl radical, and hydrogen atom reactions which are important in combustion processes. The authors intend specifically to characterize the reactions of CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO; of HCO with O{sub 2}; and of H with CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}.

  5. Smart Grid Conceptual Actors/Data Flow Diagram- Cross Domain...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Smart Grid Conceptual ActorsData Flow Diagram- Cross Domain Network Focued- Open SGSG-Network TF More Documents & Publications Report to NIST on the Smart Grid ...

  6. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrts13 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the top quark...

  7. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plujko, V.A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O.M.

    2011-09-15

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010. - Highlights: {yields} Experimental {sigma} ({gamma}, abs) or a sum of partial cross sections are taken as input to the fitting. {yields} Data include contributions from photoproton reactions. {yields} Standard (SLO) or modified (SMLO) Lorentzian approaches are used for formulating GDR models. {yields} Spherical or axially deformed nuclear shapes are used in GDR least-squares fit. {yields} Values and uncertainties of the SLO and SMLO GDR model parameters are tabulated.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Cross-Scale Land-Atmosphere Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cross-Scale Land-Atmosphere Experiment 2016.09.01 - 2019.05.31 Lead Scientist :...

  9. Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 11, 2009, DOE announced the first round of Photovoltaic (PV) Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies awardees. The funded projects target manufacturing and product cost reduction with...

  10. Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island, New York www.nrel.gov Baker and Belding installed a 10-kW Bergey Excel wind turbine in August 2011. Photo from ...

  11. Avoided level crossings in very highly charged ions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Avoided level crossings in very highly charged ions Authors: Beiersdorfer, P. ; Scofield, J. H. ; Brown, G. V. ; Chen, M. H. ; Hell, N. ; Osterheld, A. L. ; Vogel, D. A. ; ...

  12. Preliminary Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the Casa Diablo...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Cross Sections of the Casa Diablo Geothermal Area, Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map:...

  13. CX-100354 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Module Level Exposure and Evaluation Test for Real-world and Lab-based PV Modules: Common Data and Analytics for Quantitative Cross-correlation and Validation Award Number: DE-EE0007140 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 09/02/2015 Location(s): OH Office(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-011202: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    COLORA - Cross-Arm Replacement, Structure Numbers 12-3, 12-6 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/23/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-008793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gore Pass to Muddy Pass: Single Pole and Multiple Cross Arm Replacements Grand County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B4.6 Date: 09/16/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. CX-001708: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irma Charing Cross Sidewalk Project American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block GrantCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/16/2010Location(s): Irmo, South CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-002047: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irma Charing Cross Sidewalk Project American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block GrantCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/20/2010Location(s): Irmo, South CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. CX-010675: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parker Dam to Gila 161-kilovolt Transmission Line, Cross Arm Replacement at Structure 0/7 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-010410: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oracle to Tucson 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Cross Arm Replacements at Structure 2/5 and 7/3 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/02/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. Competency Management and Cross-Cutting Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Operations » Project Management Coordination Office » Competency Management and Cross-Cutting Activities Competency Management and Cross-Cutting Activities PMCO works with the Workforce Management Office to provide project and risk management training and certification support. Goals and Priorities Provide project and risk management training and certification as well as knowledge sharing. Blog News Mission Leadership Budget EERE Offices Business Operations Budget Workforce Management

  1. Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical Model

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical Model Authors: Kawano, Toshihiko [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-06-03 OSTI Identifier: 1082234 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-24025 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Working Party

  2. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CELL WALLS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the

  3. Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross Reference Matrix Introduction This cross-reference matrix is intended to provide NRC reviewers with an aid to show where Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP) (NUREG-1804) acceptance criteria as well as 10 CFR Part 63 regulations are addressed within the Yucca Mountain Repository License Application. This matrix does not assert compliance with 10 CFR Part 63 or the YMRP; it is provided as an aid to reviewers. The information contained in this matrix is generally repeated in tables at the

  4. A Comparison of Cross-Sector Cyber Security Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a review and comparison (commonality and differences) of three cross-sector cyber security standards and an internationally recognized information technology standard. The comparison identifies the security areas covered by each standard and reveals where the standards differ in emphasis. By identifying differences in the standards, the user can evaluate which standard best meets their needs. For this report, only cross-sector standards were reviewed.

  5. OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SNe Ia AND ESTIMATING THEIR REDSHIFTS (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING SNe Ia AND ESTIMATING THEIR REDSHIFTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING SNe Ia AND ESTIMATING THEIR REDSHIFTS Large photometric surveys of transient phenomena, such as Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, will

  6. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structures (Conference) | SciTech Connect modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in

  7. Axion inflation with cross-correlated axion isocurvature perturbations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect inflation with cross-correlated axion isocurvature perturbations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Axion inflation with cross-correlated axion isocurvature perturbations We study the inflation scenarios, in the framework of superstring theory, where the inflaton is an axion producing the adiabatic curvature perturbations while there exists another light axion producing the isocurvature perturbations. We discuss how the non-trivial couplings among

  8. Sulfolane-Cross-Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Jennifer S.; Long, Gregory S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2006-02-14

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by reacting polybenzimidazole (PBI) with the sulfone-containing crosslinking agent 3,4-dichloro-tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1-dioxide. The cross-linked reaction product exhibits enhanced gas permeability to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and methane as compared to the unmodified analog, without significant loss of selectivity, at temperatures from about 20 degrees Celsius to about 400 degrees Celsius.

  9. Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science

  10. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  11. New approach to analyzing and evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.

    2012-11-15

    The presence of substantial systematic discrepancies between the results of different experiments devoted to determining cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions-first of all, ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n), and ({gamma}, 3n) reactions-is a strong motivation for studying the reliability and authenticity of these data and for developing methods for taking into account and removing the discrepancies in question. In order to solve the first problem, we introduce objective absolute criteria involving transitional photoneutron-multiplicity functions F{sub 1}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 3}, Horizontal-Ellipsis ; by definition, their values cannot exceed 1.0, 0.5, 0.33, Horizontal-Ellipsis , respectively. With the aim of solving the second problem, we propose a new experimental-theoretical approach. In this approach, reaction cross sections are evaluated by simultaneously employing experimental data on the cross section for the total photoneutron yield, {sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, xn) = {sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, n) + 2{sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, 2n) + 3{sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, 3n) + Horizontal-Ellipsis , which are free from drawbacks plaguing experimental methods for sorting neutrons in multiplicity, and the results obtained by calculating the functions F{sub theor}{sup 1}, F{sub theor}{sup 2}, F{sub theor}{sup 3}, Horizontal-Ellipsis on the basis of the modern model of photonuclear reactions. The reliability and authenticity of data on the cross sections for ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n), and ({gamma}, 3n) partial reactions-{sigma}{sup eval}({gamma}, in) = F{sub i}{sup theor}{sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, xn)-were evaluated for the {sup 90}Zr, {sup 115}In, {sup 112,114,116,117,118,119,120,122,124}Sn, {sup 159}Tb, and {sup 197}Au nuclei.

  12. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Cross-Wind RHI Scan...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cross-Wind RHI Scan Title: ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Cross-Wind RHI Scan X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Cross-Wind RHI Scan Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph ...

  13. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section with an in situ Calibration of $b$-jet Identification Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    A measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.12 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. Decays of top-quark pairs into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets are selected, and the cross section and the b-jet identification efficiency are determined using a new measurement technique which requires that the measured cross sections with exactly one and multiple identified b-quarks from the top-quark decays agree. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of 8.5 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) pb is measured.

  14. Measurement of charged and neutral current {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital p} deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high {ital Q}{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O`Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-08-07

    Deep inelastic {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital p} scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared {ital Q}{sup 2} above 400GeV{sup 2} using the ZEUS detector at the HERA {ital ep} collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections {ital d}{sigma}/{ital dQ}{sup 2} are presented. From the {ital Q}{sup 2} dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be {ital M}{sub {ital W}}=76{plus_minus}16{plus_minus}13 GeV.

  15. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  16. 2010 Annual Merit Review Results Cross Reference of PIs and Organizati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects, and Organizations DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - PI and Project Cross Reference 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Cross-Reference of ...

  17. V-146: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Information Disclosure Attacks V-146: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Information Disclosure...

  18. V-028: Splunk Multiple Cross-Site Scripting and Denial of Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    28: Splunk Multiple Cross-Site Scripting and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities V-028: Splunk Multiple Cross-Site Scripting and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities November 20, 2012 -...

  19. V-230: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities V-230: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities August 29, ...

  20. Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique:...

  1. Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details...

  2. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  3. Dosimetry and cross section measurements at RTNS II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Kneff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous measurements have been conducted at TRNS-II in order to map the neutron field for materials irradiations, to measure activation cross sections, and to measure helium production cross sections. Experiments of up to two weeks duration irradiated large numbers of activation dosimetry and helium samples both close to the source and throughout the target room. Many other samples have been irradiated in piggy-back positions over periods lasting many months. All of these experiments fall into four main classes, namely, fluence-mapping, activation dosimetry, the production of long-lived isotopes, and helium generation measurements. Radiometric dosimetry and activation cross section measurements were performed at Argonne National Laboratory; helium production was measured at Rockwell International Corporation. This paper briefly summarizes the principal results of our measurements at RTNS-II; references are given for more detailed publications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  4. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: cross correlation with Planck maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, Thibaut; Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Joanna; Næss, Sigurd; Addison, Graeme E.; Hincks, Adam D.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hlozek, Renée; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dünner, Rolando; Infante, Leopoldo; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Huffenberger, Kevin; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; and others

    2014-07-01

    We present the temperature power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background obtained by cross-correlating maps from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and 218 GHz with maps from the Planck satellite at 143 and 217 GHz, in two overlapping regions covering 592 square degrees. We find excellent agreement between the two datasets at both frequencies, quantified using the variance of the residuals between the ACT power spectra and the ACT × Planck cross-spectra. We use these cross-correlations to measure the calibration of the ACT data at 148 and 218 GHz relative to Planck, to 0.7% and 2% precision respectively. We find no evidence for anisotropy in the calibration parameter. We compare the Planck 353 GHz power spectrum with the measured amplitudes of dust and cosmic infrared background (CIB) of ACT data at 148 and 218 GHz. We also compare planet and point source measurements from the two experiments.

  5. Cross-Sectional Transport Imaging in a Multijunction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi-Wen; Taha, Hesham; Guthrey, Harvey; Fetzer, C. M.; King, Richard

    2015-06-14

    Combining highly localized electron-beam excitation at a point with the spatial resolution capability of optical near-field imaging, we have imaged carrier transport in a cross-sectioned multijunction (GaInP/GaInAs/Ge) solar cell. We image energy transport associated with carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell and luminescent coupling from point excitation in the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting cathodoluminescence and near-field photoluminescence measurements demonstrate excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of cross-sectional measurements.

  6. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand how cross-state transactions have been used to meet RPS compliance. Data on regional renewable energy flow use generator-specific information primarily sourced from EIA, SNL Energy, and FERC Form 1 filings. The renewable energy examined through this method may or may not have actually been used to meet RPS compliance.

  7. Cross Section Generation Guidelines for TRACE-PARCS (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Technical Report: Cross Section Generation Guidelines for TRACE-PARCS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cross Section Generation Guidelines for TRACE-PARCS Authors: Wang, Dean [1] ; Ade, Brian J [1] ; Ward, Andrew [2] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL University of Michigan Publication Date: 2013-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1128957 Report Number(s): ORNL/TM-2012/518 401001060 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Oak Ridge

  8. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  9. American Red Cross Blood Drive Hanford Health and Safety Exposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Red Cross Blood Drive Hanford Health and Safety Exposition 6600 Burden Blvd. - TRAC Center Tuesday,May13,2014 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM To schedule your appointment go online to www.redcrossblood.org/make- donation, enter EXPO for sponsor code and follow further instructions. redcrossblood.org I 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800 - 733-2767) [!] ........ Use your smartphone to scan the OR code at left, or go to redcrossblood .org/social to follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Identif ication is requ ired to don ate.

  10. Neutron capture cross section standards for BNL 325, Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    This report evaluates the experimental data and recommends values for the thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the neutron capture reactions: /sup 55/Mn(n,..gamma..), /sup 59/Co(n,..gamma..) and /sup 197/Au(n,..gamma..). The failure of lithium and boron as standards due to the natural variation of the absorption cross sections of these elements is discussed. The Westcott convention, which describes the neutron spectrum as a thermal Maxwellian distribution with an epithermal component, is also discussed.

  11. Method and apparatus for controlling cross contamination of microfluid channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2006-02-07

    A method for controlling fluid flow at junctions in microchannel systems. Control of fluid flow is accomplished generally by providing increased resistance to electric-field and pressure-driven flow in the form of regions of reduced effective cross-sectional area within the microchannels and proximate a channel junction. By controlling these flows in the region of a microchannel junction it is possible to eliminate sample dispersion and cross contamination and inject well-defined volumes of fluid from one channel to another.

  12. BlueCross BlueShield International Claim Form | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BlueCross BlueShield International Claim Form PDF icon BCBSIL International Claim Form 2015

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    230-kV Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power ... replacement of high-efficiency particulate air filters; ...

  14. Determination of Thermoelectric Module Efficiency A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; McCarty, Robin; Salvador, James R.; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Konig, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The development of thermoelectrics (TE) for energy conversion is in the transition phase from laboratory research to device development. There is an increasing demand to accurately determine the module efficiency, especially for the power generation mode. For many thermoelectrics, the figure of merit, ZT, of the material sometimes cannot be fully realized at the device level. Reliable efficiency testing of thermoelectric modules is important to assess the device ZT and provide the end-users with realistic values on how much power can be generated under specific conditions. We conducted a general survey of efficiency testing devices and their performance. The results indicated the lack of industry standards and test procedures. This study included a commercial test system and several laboratory systems. Most systems are based on the heat flow meter method and some are based on the Harman method. They are usually reproducible in evaluating thermoelectric modules. However, cross-checking among different systems often showed large errors that are likely caused by unaccounted heat loss and thermal resistance. Efficiency testing is an important area for the thermoelectric community to focus on. A follow-up international standardization effort is planned.

  15. Determining Supersymmetric Parameters With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, we explore the ability of direct and indirect dark matter experiments to not only detect neutralino dark matter, but to constrain and measure the parameters of supersymmetry. In particular, we explore the relationship between the phenomenological quantities relevant to dark matter experiments, such as the neutralino annihilation and elastic scattering cross sections, and the underlying characteristics of the supersymmetric model, such as the values of {mu} (and the composition of the lightest neutralino), m{sub A} and tan {beta}. We explore a broad range of supersymmetric models and then focus on a smaller set of benchmark models. We find that by combining astrophysical observations with collider measurements, {mu} can often be constrained far more tightly than it can be from LHC data alone. In models in the A-funnel region of parameter space, we find that dark matter experiments can potentially determine m{sub A} to roughly {+-}100 GeV, even when heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H{sub 1}) cannot be observed at the LHC. The information provided by astrophysical experiments is often highly complementary to the information most easily ascertained at colliders.

  16. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial ?-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the ? rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of ?-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thickness until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.

  17. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thicknessmore » until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.« less

  18. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

  19. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw

    2014-04-28

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.214.67?nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.27.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07??0.11 TPa and 0.180.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  20. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  1. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Henderson, D.; et al

    2015-06-02

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  2. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Tennessee | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    February 26, 2016 CX-100506 Categorical Exclusion Determination Biofuel Micro-Refineries ... Low-Viscosity Oils for Automotive Engine and Rear Axle Lubrication for 4% Improved ...

  3. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  4. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... September 13, 2011 CX-006990: Categorical Exclusion Determination Synthesis and Characterization of Coatings by Chemical Solution Deposition Methods CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09...

  6. Measurement of the cross section of charmed hadrons and the nuclear dependence alpha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco-Covarrubias, E.Alejandro; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2009-12-01

    With data from the SELEX experiment we study charm hadro-production. We report the differential production cross sections as function of the longitudinal and transverse momentum, as well as for two different target materials, of 14 charmed hadron and/or their decay modes. This is the most extensive study to date. SELEX is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab with high forward acceptance; it took data during 1996-1997 with 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and {pi}{sup -}, and 540 GeV/c proton and {pi}{sup +} beams. It used 5 target foils (two copper and three diamond). We use the results to determine {alpha}, used in parametrizing the production cross section as {infinity} A{sup {alpha}}, where A is the mass number of the target nuclei. We found within our statistics that {alpha} is independent of the longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} in the interval 0.1 < x{sub F} < 1.0, with {alpha} = 0.778 {+-} 0.014. The average value of {alpha} for charm production by pion beams is {alpha}{sub meson} = 0.850 {+-} 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average {alpha}{sub baryon} = 0.755 {+-} 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ({Sigma}{sup -} and protons).

  7. Cross-correlation spin noise spectroscopy of heterogeneous interacting spin systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roy, Dibyendu; Yang, Luyi; Crooker, Scott A.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-04-30

    Interacting multi-component spin systems are ubiquitous in nature and in the laboratory. As such, investigations of inter-species spin interactions are of vital importance. Traditionally, they are studied by experimental methods that are necessarily perturbative: e.g., by intentionally polarizing or depolarizing one spin species while detecting the response of the other(s). Here, we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on multi-probe spin noise spectroscopy, which can reveal inter-species spin interactions - under conditions of strict thermal equilibrium - by detecting and cross-correlating the stochastic fluctuation signals exhibited by each of the constituent spin species. Specifically, we consider a two-component spinmore » ensemble that interacts via exchange coupling, and we determine cross-correlations between their intrinsic spin fluctuations. The model is experimentally confirmed using “two-color” optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs vapors. Noise correlations directly reveal the presence of inter-species spin exchange, without ever perturbing the system away from thermal equilibrium. These non-invasive and noise-based techniques should be generally applicable to any heterogeneous spin system in which the fluctuations of the constituent components are detectable.« less

  8. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  9. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)--the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  10. ENERGETIC PARTICLE CROSS-FIELD PROPAGATION EARLY IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laitinen, T.; Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.

    2013-08-20

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been observed to easily spread across heliographic longitudes, and the mechanisms responsible for this behavior remain unclear. We use full-orbit simulations of a 10 MeV proton beam in a turbulent magnetic field to study to what extent the spread across the mean field can be described as diffusion early in a particle event. We compare the full-orbit code results to solutions of a Fokker-Planck equation including spatial and pitch angle diffusion, and of one including also propagation of the particles along random-walking magnetic field lines. We find that propagation of the particles along meandering field lines is the key process determining their cross-field spread at 1 AU at the beginning of the simulated event. The mean square displacement of the particles an hour after injection is an order of magnitude larger than that given by the diffusion model, indicating that models employing spatial cross-field diffusion cannot be used to describe early evolution of an SEP event. On the other hand, the diffusion of the particles from their initial field lines is negligible during the first 5 hr, which is consistent with the observations of SEP intensity dropouts. We conclude that modeling SEP events must take into account the particle propagation along meandering field lines for the first 20 hr of the event.

  11. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  12. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  13. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  14. Apparatus And Method For Reconstructing Data Using Cross-Parity Stripes On Storage Media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, James Prescott

    2003-06-17

    An apparatus and method for reconstructing missing data using cross-parity stripes on a storage medium is provided. The apparatus and method may operate on data symbols having sizes greater than a data bit. The apparatus and method makes use of a plurality of parity stripes for reconstructing missing data stripes. The parity symbol values in the parity stripes are used as a basis for determining the value of the missing data symbol in a data stripe. A correction matrix is shifted along the data stripes, correcting missing data symbols as it is shifted. The correction is performed from the outside data stripes towards the inner data stripes to thereby use previously reconstructed data symbols to reconstruct other missing data symbols.

  15. Accurate Development of Thermal Neutron Scattering Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawari, Ayman; Dunn, Michael

    2014-06-10

    The objective of this project is to develop a holistic (fundamental and accurate) approach for generating thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries for a collection of important enutron moderators and reflectors. The primary components of this approach are the physcial accuracy and completeness of the generated data libraries. Consequently, for the first time, thermal neutron scattering cross section data libraries will be generated that are based on accurate theoretical models, that are carefully benchmarked against experimental and computational data, and that contain complete covariance information that can be used in propagating the data uncertainties through the various components of the nuclear design and execution process. To achieve this objective, computational and experimental investigations will be performed on a carefully selected subset of materials that play a key role in all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  16. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  17. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  18. XOA: Web-Enabled Cross-Ontological Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riensche, Roderick M.; Baddeley, Bob; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu

    2007-07-09

    The paper being submitted (as an "extended abstract" prior to conference acceptance) provides a technical description of our proof-of-concept prototype for the XOA method. Abstract: To address meaningful questions, scientists need to relate information across diverse classification schemes such as ontologies, terminologies and thesauri. These resources typically address a single knowledge domain at a time and are not cross-indexed. Information that is germane to the same object may therefore remain unlinked with consequent loss of knowledge discovery across disciplines and even sub-domains of the same discipline. We propose to address these problems by fostering semantic interoperability through the development of ontology alignment web services capable of enabling cross-scale knowledge discovery, and demonstrate a specific application of such an approach to the biomedical domain.

  19. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, K.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  20. Overview of recent U235 neutron cross section evaluation work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubitz, C. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This report is an overview (through 1997) of the U235 neutron cross section evaluation work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), AEA Technology (Harwell) and Lockheed Martin Corp.-Schenectady (LMS), which has influenced, or appeared in, ENDF/B-VI through Release 5. The discussion is restricted to the thermal and resolved resonance regions, apart from some questions about the unresolved region which still need investigation. The important role which benchmark testing has played will be touched on.

  1. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments David Schmitz, Fermilab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Schmitz, Fermilab WIN '0 9 22nd International Workshop on Weak Interactions and Neutrinos September 13-19, 2009 - Perugia, Italy Outline !! Introduction (motivation and context) !! The relevant neutrino energies and nuclear targets !! Summary of recent results and open questions !! Status and prospects of neutrino cross-section experiments on the horizon 2 WIN 09 - Perugia, Italy - September 14-19, 2009 D. Schmitz, Fermilab Introduction D. Schmitz, Fermilab 3 !! There has been a recent

  2. The 2mrad Crossing Angle Interaction Region and Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, R.; U., Manchester; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Dadoun, O.; Bambade, P.; Parker, B.; Keller, L.; Moffeit, K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Carter, J.; Royal Holloway, U.of London; Napoly, O.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-12

    A complete optics design for the 2mrad crossing angle interaction region and extraction line was presented at Snowmass 2005. Since this time, the design task force has been working on developing and improving the performance of the extraction line. The work has focused on optimizing the final doublet parameters and on reducing the power losses resulting from the disrupted beam transport. In this paper, the most recent status of the 2mrad layout and the corresponding performance are presented.

  3. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  4. Inclusive jet cross-section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2007-05-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  5. Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Structural Materials at ORELA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guber, Klaus H; Koehler, Paul; Wiarda, Dorothea; Harvey, John A

    2011-01-01

    Neutron capture experiments, using isotopically enriched and natural samples of chromium and titanium, were performed on flight paths 6 and 7 at the 40 m flight station of ORELA. The experimental data were acquired using a pair of deuterated benzene detectors employing the now well-established pulse-height-weighting technique. These data were complemented by new total cross-section measurements where no useful previous data were available.

  6. T-680:Samba SWAT 'user' Field Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It was found that the 'Change Password' page / screen of the Samba Web Administration Tool did not properly sanitize content of the user-provided "user" field, prior printing it back to the page content. A remote attacker could provide a specially-crafted URL, which once visited by an authenticated Samba SWAT user could allow the attacker to conduct cross-site scripting attacks (execute arbitrary HTML or script code).

  7. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Pennsylvania | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 3, 2015 CX-100321 Categorical Exclusion Determination VOLTTRON Compatible Whole Building root-Fault Detection and Diagnosis Award Number: DE-EE0007135 CX(s) Applied: A9, ...

  8. CX-100604 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Determination of Coverage for Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products RIN 1904-AC66 CX(s) Applied: A6 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 05/04/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-000768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determining the Variability of Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury LevelsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/07/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-008905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  12. CX-010493: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determining Distribution Coefficients by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wisconsin | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... March 4, 2015 CX-100191 Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost-Optimized Modular Helical Rotors Turbine-Generator System for Small Hydro Power Plants Award Number: DE-EE0006927 ...

  14. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Nationwide | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 25, 2016 CX-100584 Categorical Exclusion Determination Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Sales of Five Lamp Types RIN NA CX(s) Applied: A6 EERE-Buildings ...

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Massachusetts | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 3, 2015 CX-100413 Categorical Exclusion Determination The French Modular Impoundment Award Number: DE-FOA-0007244 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Wind and Water Power Technologies ...

  16. CX-012121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notice of Preliminary Determination of Energy Savings for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 CX(s) Applied: A6 Date: 04/25/2014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-004264: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phase II, Determination of Uranium in GroundwaterCX(s) Applied: B3.8Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Richland, WashingtonOffice(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  18. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  19. From ZZ to ZH : How Low Can These Cross Sections Go or Everybody, Let's Cross Section Limbo!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Emanuel Alexandre; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-08-01

    We report on two searches performed at the D0 detector at the Fermi National Laboratory. The first is a search for Z di-boson production with a theoretical cross section of 1.4 pb. The search was performed on 2.6 fb{sup -1} of data and contributed to the first observation of ZZ production at a hadron collider. The second is a search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs in 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The Higgs boson is produced in association with a Z boson where the Higgs decays hadronically and the Z decays to two leptons. The ZZ search was performed in both the di-electron and di-muon channels. For the ZH search, we will focus on the muonic decays where we expanded the traditional coverage by considering events in which one of the two muons fails the selection requirement, and is instead reconstructed as an isolated track. We consider Higgs masses between 100 and 150 GeV, with theoretical cross sections ranging from 0.17 to 0.042 pb, and set upper limits on the ZH production cross-section at 95% confidence level.

  20. Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at the LANSCE Lujan Center Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross ...

  1. V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks May 31, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis...

  2. V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 2, 2013 - 1:13am Addthis...

  3. File:03HIFPermitToCrossOrEnterTheStateEnergyCorridor.pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HIFPermitToCrossOrEnterTheStateEnergyCorridor.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03HIFPermitToCrossOrEnterTheStateEnergyCorridor.pdf Size of...

  4. Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment ...

  5. V-221: WordPress A Forms Plugin Cross-Site Request Forgery and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Forms Plugin Cross-Site Request Forgery and Form Field Script Insertion Vulnerabilities V-221: WordPress A Forms Plugin Cross-Site Request Forgery and Form Field Script Insertion...

  6. V-112: Microsoft SharePoint Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Denial of Service Attacks V-112: Microsoft SharePoint Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Denial...

  7. S3TEC Cross Cutting Meeting | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Cutting Meeting Meeting Friday May 6, 2016 12:00pm Location: 1-390 Event Contact: sborisk@mit.edu Monthly S3TEC cross cutting meeting

  8. S3TEC Cross Cutting Meeting | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S3TEC Cross Cutting Meeting Meeting Friday Apr 1, 2016 12:00pm Location: 1-390 Event Contact: sborisk@mit.edu Monthly S3TEC cross-cutting meeting

  9. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross ...

  10. U-020: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerabilit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability U-020: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability October 26, 2011 - 9:00am Addthis ...

  11. V-048: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery Vulnerability V-048: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery Vulnerability December 17, 2012 - 1:00am ...

  12. Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cross section at the LANSCE Lujan Center Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at the LANSCE Lujan Center A new ...

  13. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  14. Cross-linked comb-shaped anion exchange membranes with high base stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, NW; Wang, LZ; Hickner, M

    2014-01-01

    A unique one-step cross-linking strategy that connects quaternary ammonium centers using Grubbs II-catalyzed olefin metathesis was developed. The cross-linked anion exchange membranes showed swelling ratios of less than 10% and hydroxide conductivities of 18 to 40 mS cm(- 1). Cross-linking improved the membranes' stability to hydroxide degradation compared to their non-cross-linked analogues.

  15. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois PPO Claim Form | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois PPO Claim Form PDF icon BCBSIL PPO Claim Form

  16. U-149: Apache OFBiz Cross-Site Scripting and Code Execution Vulnerabilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Server Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability | Department of Energy 11: Cisco Security Response: Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability U-011: Cisco Security Response: Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability October 14, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco Security Response: Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): VCS prior to 7.0 ABSTRACT: A

  17. T-546: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft MHTML. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  18. T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  19. A measurement of the neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, David Christopher; /Indiana U.

    2008-02-01

    The neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic interaction {nu} N {yields} {nu} N is a fundamental process of the weak interaction ideally suited for characterizing the structure of the nucleon neutral weak current. This process comprises {approx}18% of neutrino events in the neutrino oscillation experiment, MiniBooNE, ranking it as the experiment's third largest process. Using {approx}10% of MiniBooNE's available neutrino data, a sample of these events were identified and analyzed to determine the differential cross section as a function of the momentum transfer of the interaction, Q{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of a differential cross section with MiniBooNE data. From this analysis, a value for the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} was extracted to be 1.34 {+-} 0.25 GeV consistent with previous measurements. The integrated cross section for the Q{sup 2} range 0.189 {yields} 1.13 GeV{sup 2} was calculated to be (8.8 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.2(syst)) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}.

  20. CX-003600: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Program will enlist a broad cross-section of resources to advance a self-sustaining effort to promote residential energy efficiency through home energy audits and efficiency ...

  1. MOX Cross-Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2003-07-01

    The use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial nuclear power reactors operated in Europe has expanded rapidly over the past decade. The predicted characteristics of MOX fuel such as the nuclide inventories, thermal power from decay heat, and radiation sources are required for design and safety evaluations, and can provide valuable information for non-destructive safeguards verification activities. This report describes the development of computational methods and cross-section libraries suitable for the analysis of irradiated MOX fuel with the widely-used and recognized ORIGEN-ARP isotope generation and depletion code of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system. The MOX libraries are designed to be used with the Automatic Rapid Processing (ARP) module of SCALE that interpolates appropriate values of the cross sections from a database of parameterized cross-section libraries to create a problem-dependent library for the burnup analysis. The methods in ORIGEN-ARP, originally designed for uranium-based fuels only, have been significantly upgraded to handle the larger number of interpolation parameters associated with MOX fuels. The new methods have been incorporated in a new version of the ARP code that can generate libraries for low-enriched uranium (LEU) and MOX fuel types. The MOX data libraries and interpolation algorithms in ORIGEN-ARP have been verified using a database of declared isotopic concentrations for 1042 European MOX fuel assemblies. The methods and data are validated using a numerical MOX fuel benchmark established by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Working Group on burnup credit and nuclide assay measurements for irradiated MOX fuel performed as part of the Belgonucleaire ARIANE International Program.

  2. Detailed photonuclear cross-section calculations and astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1989-06-15

    We have investigated the role of an isomeric state and its coupling to the ground state (g.s.) via photons and neutron inelastic scattering in a stellar environment by making detailed photonuclear and neutron cross-section calculations for /sup 176/Lu and /sup 210/Bi. In the case of /sup 176/Lu, the g.s. would function as an excellent galactic slow- (s-) process chronometer were it not for the 3.7-h isomer at 123 keV. Our calculations predicted much larger photon cross sections for production of the isomer, as well as a lower threshold, than had been assumed based on earlier measurements. These two factors combine to indicate that an enormous correction, a factor of 10/sup 7/, must be applied to shorten the current estimate of the half-life against photoexcitation of /sup 176/Lu as a function of temperature. This severely limits the use of /sup 176/Lu as a stellar chronometer and indicates a significantly lower temperature at which the two states reach thermal equilibrium. For /sup 210/Bi, our preliminary calculations of the production and destruction of the 3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ y isomeric state by neutrons and photons suggest that the /sup 210/Bi isomer may not be destroyed by photons as rapidly as assumed in certain stellar environments. This leads to an alternate production path of /sup 207/Pb and significantly affects presently interpreted lead isotopic abundances. We have been able to make such detailed nuclear cross-section calculations using: modern statistical-model codes of the Hauser-Feshbach type, with complete conservation of angular momentum and parity; reliable systematics of the input parameters required by these codes, including knowledge of the absolute gamma-ray strength-functions for E1, M1, and E2 transitions; and codes developed to compute large, discrete, nuclear level sets, their associated gamma-ray branchings, and the presence and location of isomeric states. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Models to interpret bedform geometries from cross-bed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthi, S.M. (Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (USA)); Banavar, J.R. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA)); Bayer, U. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01

    Semi-elliptical and sinusoidal bedform crestlines were modeled with curvature and sinuosity as parameters. Both bedform crestlines are propagated at various angles of migration over a finite area of deposition. Two computational approaches are used, a statistical random sampling (Monte Carlo) technique over the area of the deposit, and an analytical method based on topology and differential geometry. The resulting foreset azimuth distributions provide a catalogue for a variety of situations. The resulting thickness distributions have a simple shape and can be combined with the azimuth distributions to constrain further the cross-strata geometry. Paleocurrent directions obtained by these models can differ substantially from other methods, especially for obliquely migrating low-curvature bedforms. Interpretation of foreset azimuth data from outcrops and wells can be done either by visual comparison with the catalogued distributions, or by iterative computational fits. Studied examples include eolian cross-strata from the Permian Rotliegendes in the North Sea, fluvial dunes from the Devonian in the Catskills (New York State), the Triassic Schilfsandstein (West Germany) and the Paleozoic-Jurassic of the Western Desert (Egypt), as well as recent tidal dunes from the German coast of the North Sea and tidal cross-strata from the Devonian Koblentquartzit (West Germany). In all cases the semi-elliptical bedform model gave a good fit to the data, suggesting that it may be applicable over a wide range of bedforms. The data from the Western Desert could only be explained by data scatter due to channel sinuosity combining with the scatter attributed to the ellipticity of the bedform crestlines. These models, therefore, may also allow simulations of some hierarchically structured bedforms.

  4. Method and apparatus for affecting a recirculation zone in a cross flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bathina, Mahesh (Andhra Pradesh, IN); Singh, Ramanand (Uttar Pradesh, IN)

    2012-07-17

    Disclosed is a cross flow apparatus including a surface and at least one outlet located at the surface. The cross flow apparatus further includes at least one guide at the surface configured to direct an intersecting flow flowing across the surface and increase a velocity of a cross flow being expelled from the at least one outlet downstream from the at least one outlet.

  5. Regularization scheme independence and unitarity in QCD cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catani, S.; Seymour, M.H.; Trocsanyi, Z.

    1997-06-01

    When calculating next-to-leading order QCD cross sections, divergences in intermediate steps of the calculation must be regularized. The final result is independent of the regularization scheme used, provided that it is unitary. In this paper we explore the relationship between regularization scheme independence and unitarity. We show how the regularization scheme dependence can be isolated in simple universal components, and how unitarity can be guaranteed for any regularization prescription that can consistently be introduced in one-loop amplitudes. Finally, we show how to derive transition rules between different schemes without having to do any loop calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore »extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  7. Crab Crossing Schemes and Studies for Electron Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, Y. Derbenev, V. Morozov, A. Castilla, G.A. Krafft, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang, J.R. Delayen

    2011-09-01

    This report shows our progress in crab crossing consideration for future electron-ion collider envisioned at JLab. In this design phase, we are evaluating two crabbing schemes viz., the deflecting and dispersive. The mathematical formulations and lattice design for these schemes are discussed in this paper. Numerical simulations involving particle tracking through a realistic deflecting RF cavity and optics illustrate the desired crab tilt of 25 mrad for 1.35 MV. Evolution of beam propagation are shown which provides the physical insight of the crabbing phenomenon.

  8. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore » extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  9. Crossed-field divertor for a plasma device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerst, Donald W. (Madison, WI); Strait, Edward J. (Madison, WI)

    1981-01-01

    A divertor for removal of unwanted materials from the interior of a magnetic plasma confinement device includes the division of the wall of the device into segments insulated from each other in order to apply an electric field having a component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. The resulting crossed-field drift causes electrically charged particles to be removed from the outer part of the confinement chamber to a pumping chamber. This method moves the particles quickly past the saddle point in the poloidal magnetic field where they would otherwise tend to stall, and provides external control over the rate of removal by controlling the magnitude of the electric field.

  10. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  11. OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    color data used for subsequent distance determinations which reduce selection or interpretation bias, and because it makes use of the spectral features its reliability is greater. ...

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Health, Safety, and Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety, and Security Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Health, Safety, and Security Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Health, Safety, and Security. ...

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Civilian Radioactive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Civilian ...

  14. CX-100267 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100267 Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Logistics Systems for Delivering Optimal Biomass Feedstocks to Biorefining Industries in...

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Strategic ...

  16. CX-100144 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100144 Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar and Distributed Generation as Key Elements in Meeting Vermont's Comprehensive Energy Plan...

  17. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Electricity Delivery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued ...

  18. CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine Algae Industrialization Consortium (MAGIC): Combining biofuel and high-value bioproducts to...

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Natural Gas Regulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Regulation Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Natural Gas Regulation Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Natural Gas Regulation. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR ...

  20. Adjudicative Guidelines for Determining Eligibility for Access...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adjudicative Guidelines for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Information Adjudicative Guidelines for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Information ...

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Carlsbad Field Office ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlsbad Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Carlsbad Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Carlsbad Field Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR ...

  2. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Energy Technology Engineering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Technology Engineering Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Energy Technology Engineering Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Energy Technology ...

  3. Plasma digital density determining device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien C.; Lovell, Thomas W.; Holly, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

  4. CX-002602: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Minneapolis, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-002600: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Minneapolis, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-002599: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Berkeley, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-002598: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Morris, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-002601: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Fridley, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-011193: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination for Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B3.6, B3.10, B3.12, B3.15, B5.1, B5.15 Date: 08/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  10. CX-008738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determination of Microstructure and Chemical State Changes in Ion-Irradiated Fuels and Structural Components with a High Kinetic Energy Electron Detector – Illinois Institute of Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  11. CX-013440: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Record of Categorical Exclusion Determination to Replace Piping Header at Bryan Mound RWIS and RWIP (BM-MM-1027) CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/18/2015 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  12. CX-000373: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measurements of 222 Radon, 220 Radon, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Natural Carbon Dioxide Fields in Wyoming: Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock IntegrityCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, B3.8Date: 11/20/2009Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-100312 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Withdrawal of Proposed Determination Regarding Energy Conservation Program: Natural Draft Commercial Boilers RIN: 1904-AD01 CX(s) Applied: A5 EERE- Buildings Technology Program Date: 07/20/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-012693: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experimental Determination and Mechanistic Modeling of Used Fuel Drying by Vacuum and Gas Circulation for Dry Cask Storage University of South Carolina CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41869 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  15. CX-100019: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Rare Earths in Geothermal Brines and Evaluation of Potential Extraction Techniques CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 08/18/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Geothermal Technologies Award Number: DE-EE0006750

  16. CX-100558 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Determination of Coverage for Portable Air Conditioners (1904-AD02) RIN 1904-AD02 CX(s) Applied: A6 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 03/03/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  17. Technical Cross-Cutting Issues for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Blanc, P.; Burr, T.; Evans, L. G.; Favalli, A.; Fensin, M. L.; Freeman, C. R.; Galloway, J.; Gerhart, J.; Rajasingam, A.; Rauch, E.; Sandoval, N. P.; Trellue, H.; Ulrich, T. J.; Conlin, J. L.; Croft, S.; Hendricks, John; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Eigenbrodt, J. M.; Koehler, W. E.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, T. H.; Lafleur, A. M.; Schear, M. A.; Humphrey, M. A.; Smith, Leon E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Shaver, Mark W.; Misner, Alex C.; Amber, S. D.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Quiter, B.; Solodov, Alexander; Charlton, W.; Stafford, A.; Romano, C.; Cheatham, J.; Ehinger, Michael; Thompson, S. J.; Chichester, David; Sterbentz, James; Hu, Jianwei; Hunt, A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Richard, J. G.

    2012-03-01

    Ever since there has been spent fuel (SF), researchers have made nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of that fuel to learn about its content. In general these measurements have focused on the simplest signatures (passive photon and total neutron emission) and the analysis has often focused on diversion detection and on determining properties such as burnup (BU) and cooling time (CT). Because of shortcomings in current analysis methods, inspectorates and policy makers are interested in improving the state-of-the-art in SF NDA. For this reason the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), targeted the determination of elemental Pu mass in SF as a technical goal. As part of this research effort, 14 nondestructive assay techniques were studied . This wide range of techniques was selected to allow flexibility for the various needs of the safeguards inspectorates and to prepare for the likely integration of one or more techniques having complementary features. In the course of researching this broad range of NDA techniques, several cross-cutting issues were. This paper will describe some common issues and insights. In particular we will describe the following: (1) the role of neutron absorbers with emphasis on how these absorbers vary in SF as a function of initial enrichment, BU and CT; (2) the need to partition the measured signal among different isotopic sources; and (3) the importance of the “first generation” concept which indicates the spatial location from which the signal originates as well as the isotopic origins.

  18. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  19. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  20. PR-PR: Cross-Platform Laboratory Automation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linshiz, G; Stawski, N; Goyal, G; Bi, CH; Poust, S; Sharma, M; Mutalik, V; Keasling, JD; Hillson, NJ

    2014-08-01

    To enable protocol standardization, sharing, and efficient implementation across laboratory automation platforms, we have further developed the PR-PR open-source high-level biology-friendly robot programming language as a cross-platform laboratory automation system. Beyond liquid-handling robotics, PR-PR now supports microfluidic and microscopy platforms, as well as protocol translation into human languages, such as English. While the same set of basic PR-PR commands and features are available for each supported platform, the underlying optimization and translation modules vary from platform to platform. Here, we describe these further developments to PR-PR, and demonstrate the experimental implementation and validation of PR-PR protocols for combinatorial modified Golden Gate DNA assembly across liquid-handling robotic, microfluidic, and manual platforms. To further test PR-PR cross-platform performance, we then implement and assess PR-PR protocols for Kunkel DNA mutagenesis and hierarchical Gibson DNA assembly for microfluidic and manual platforms.

  1. Effect of strongly coupled plasma on photoionization cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Madhusmita

    2014-01-15

    The effect of strongly coupled plasma on the ground state photoionization cross section is studied. In the non relativistic dipole approximation, cross section is evaluated from bound-free transition matrix element. The bound and free state wave functions are obtained by solving the radial Schrodinger equation with appropriate plasma potential. We have used ion sphere potential (ISP) to incorporate the plasma effects in atomic structure calculation. This potential includes the effect of static plasma screening on nuclear charge as well as the effect of confinement due to the neighbouring ions. With ISP, the radial equation is solved using Shooting method approach for hydrogen like ions (Li{sup +2}, C{sup +5}, Al{sup +12}) and lithium like ions (C{sup +3}, O{sup +5}). The effect of strong screening and confinement is manifested as confinement resonances near the ionization threshold for both kinds of ions. The confinement resonances are very much dependent on the edge of the confining potential and die out as the plasma density is increased. Plasma effect also results in appearance of Cooper minimum in lithium like ions, which was not present in case of free lithium like ions. With increasing density the position of Cooper minimum shifts towards higher photoelectron energy. The same behaviour is also true for weakly coupled plasma where plasma effect is modelled by Debye-Huckel potential.

  2. Neutron cross section standards and instrumentation. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasson, O.A.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction measurements for the US Department of Energy nuclear programs which include waste disposal, fusion, safeguards, defense, fission, and personnel protection. These measurements are also useful to other energy programs which indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. The work includes the measurement of reference cross sections and related neutron data employing unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; the preservation of standard reference deposits and the development of improved neutron detectors and measurement methods. A related and essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology contains a summary of the accomplishments of the Neutron Cross Section Standards and Instrumentation Project during the third year of this three-year interagency agreement. The proposed program and required budget for the following three years are also presented. The program continues the shifts in priority instituted in order to broaden the program base.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  5. RECONSTRUCTING REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS: TESTS AND AN OPTIMIZED RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A., E-mail: djm70@pitt.ed, E-mail: janewman@pitt.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-09-20

    Many of the cosmological tests to be performed by planned dark energy experiments will require extremely well-characterized photometric redshift measurements. Current estimates for cosmic shear are that the true mean redshift of the objects in each photo-z bin must be known to better than 0.002(1 + z), and the width of the bin must be known to {approx}0.003(1 + z) if errors in cosmological measurements are not to be degraded significantly. A conventional approach is to calibrate these photometric redshifts with large sets of spectroscopic redshifts. However, at the depths probed by Stage III surveys (such as DES), let alone Stage IV (LSST, JDEM, and Euclid), existing large redshift samples have all been highly (25%-60%) incomplete, with a strong dependence of success rate on both redshift and galaxy properties. A powerful alternative approach is to exploit the clustering of galaxies to perform photometric redshift calibrations. Measuring the two-point angular cross-correlation between objects in some photometric redshift bin and objects with known spectroscopic redshift, as a function of the spectroscopic z, allows the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample to be reconstructed in detail, even if it includes objects too faint for spectroscopy or if spectroscopic samples are highly incomplete. We test this technique using mock DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift survey light cones constructed from the Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs. From this realistic test, which incorporates the effects of galaxy bias evolution and cosmic variance, we find that the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample can, in fact, be determined accurately with cross-correlation techniques. We also compare the empirical error in the reconstruction of redshift distributions to previous analytic predictions, finding that additional components must be included in error budgets to match the simulation results. This extra error contribution is small for surveys that sample large areas of sky (>{approx}10{sup 0}-100{sup 0}), but dominant for {approx}1 deg{sup 2} fields. We conclude by presenting a step-by-step, optimized recipe for reconstructing redshift distributions from cross-correlation information using standard correlation measurements.

  6. Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-08-30

    Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) is a global leader in hydrokinetic technology and project development. ORPC develops hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of oceans and rivers to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC’s technology consists of a family of modular hydrokinetic power systems: the TidGen® Power System, for use at shallow to medium-depth tidal sites; the RivGen™ Power System, for use at river and estuary sites; and the OCGen® Power System, presently under development, for use at deep tidal and offshore ocean current sites. These power systems convert kinetic energy in moving water into clean, renewable, grid-compatible electric power. The core technology component for all ORPC power systems is its patented turbine generator unit (TGU). The TGU uses proprietary advanced design cross flow (ADCF) turbines to drive an underwater permanent magnet generator mounted at the TGU’s center. It is a gearless, direct-drive system that has the potential for high reliability, requires no lubricants and releases no toxins that could contaminate the surrounding water. The hydrokinetic industry shows tremendous promise as a means of helping reduce the U.S.’s use of fossil fuels and dependence on foreign oil. To exploit this market opportunity, cross-flow hydrokinetic devices need to advance beyond the pre-commercial state and more systematic data about the structure and function of cross-flow hydrokinetic devices is required. This DOE STTR project, “Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils,” refined the cross-flow turbine design process to improve efficiency and performance and developed turbine manufacturing processes appropriate for volume production. The project proposed (1) to overcome the lack of data by extensively studying the properties of cross flow turbines, a particularly competitive design approach for extracting hydrokinetic energy and (2) to help ORPC mature its pre-commercial hydrokinetic technology into a commercially viable product over a three-year period by means of a design-for-manufacture process to be applied to the turbines which would result in a detail turbine design suitable for volume manufacture. In Phase I of the Project, ORPC systematically investigated performance of cross flow turbines by varying design parameters including solidity, foil profile, number of foils and foil toe angle using scale models of ORPC’s turbine design in a tow tank at the University of Maine (UMaine). Data collected provided information on interactions between design variables and helped ORPC improve turbine efficiency from 21% to greater than 35%. Analytical models were developed to better understand the physical phenomena at play in cross-flow turbines. In Phase II of the Project, ORPC expanded on data collected in Phase I to continue improving turbine efficiency, with a goal to optimally approach the Betz limit of 59.3%. Further tow tank testing and development of the analytical models and techniques was completed at UMaine and led to a deeper understanding of the flow phenomena involved. In addition, ORPC evaluated various designs, materials and manufacturing methods for full-scale turbine foils, and identified those most conducive to volume manufacture. Selected components of the turbine were structurally tested in a laboratory environment at UMaine. Performance and structural testing of the full scale turbine design was conducted as part of the field testing. The work funded by this project enabled the development of design tools for the rapid and efficient development of high performance cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine foils. The analytical tools are accurate and properly capture the underlying physical flow phenomena present in hydrokinetic cross-flow turbines. The ability to efficiently examine the design space provides substantial economic benefit to ORPC in that it allows for rapid design iteration at a low computational cost. The design-for-manufacture work enabled the delivery of a turbine design suitable for manufacture in intermediate to large quantity, lowering the unit cost of turbines and the levelized cost of electricity from ORPC hydrokinetic turbine. ORPC fielded the turbine design in a full scale application – the Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project which began operation off the coast of Eastport, Maine in September 2012. This is the first commercial, grid-connected tidal energy project in North America and the only ocean energy project not involving a dam which delivers power to a utility grid anywhere in the Americas. ORPC received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission pilot project license to install and operate this project in February 2012. Construction of the TidGen® Power System began in March 2012, and the system was grid-connected on September 13, 2012. A 20-year commercial power purchase agreement to sell the power generated by the project was completed with Bangor Hydro Electric Company and is the first and only power purchase agreement for tidal energy. This is the first project in the U.S. to receive Renewable Energy Certificates for tidal energy production. The STTR project is a benefit to the public through its creation of jobs. ORPC’s recent deployment of the TidGen™ Power System is part of their larger project, the Maine Tidal Energy Project. According to ORPC’s report to the Maine Public Utilities Commission and the 20-year power purchase agreement, the Maine Tidal Energy Project will create and/or retain at least 80 direct full-time equivalent jobs in Maine during the development, construction and installation phase (2011 through 2016). In addition, the Maine Tidal Energy Project will create and/or retain at least 12 direct full-time equivalent jobs in Maine during the operating and maintenance phase (2016 through 2020). The STTR project has facilitated new and expanded services in manufacturing, fabrication and assembly, including major business growth for the composite technologies sector; creation of deepwater deployment, maintenance and retrieval services; and the expansion and formation of technical support services such as site assessment and design services, geotechnical services, underwater transmission services, and environmental monitoring services. The Maine Tidal Energy Project’s impact on workforce will enable other ocean energy projects – be they offshore wind, wave or additional tidal opportunities – to succeed in Maine. ORPC received a 2013 Tibbetts Award by the U.S. Small Business Administration.

  7. Measurements of the total and differential Higgs boson production cross sections combining the H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? decay channels at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections of Higgs boson production are performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of ?s = 8 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are obtained from measured H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? event yields, which are combined accounting for detector efficiencies, fiducial acceptances, and branching fractions. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of Higgs boson transverse momentum, Higgs boson rapidity, number of jets in the event, and transverse momentum of the leading jet. Themoretotal production cross section is determined to be ?pp?H = 33.0 5.3 (stat) 1.6 (syst) pb. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art predictions.less

  8. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  9. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

    2013-06-04

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  10. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas D.; Burgard, Anthony R.; Pharkya, Priti

    2011-09-27

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  11. Simultaneous evaluation of interrelated cross sections by generalized least-squares and related data file requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1984-10-25

    Though several cross sections have been designated as standards, they are not basic units and are interrelated by ratio measurements. Moreover, as such interactions as /sup 6/Li + n and /sup 10/B + n involve only two and three cross sections respectively, total cross section data become useful for the evaluation process. The problem can be resolved by a simultaneous evaluation of the available absolute and shape data for cross sections, ratios, sums, and average cross sections by generalized least-squares. A data file is required for such evaluation which contains the originally measured quantities and their uncertainty components. Establishing such a file is a substantial task because data were frequently reported as absolute cross sections where ratios were measured without sufficient information on which reference cross section and which normalization were utilized. Reporting of uncertainties is often missing or incomplete. The requirements for data reporting will be discussed.

  12. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  13. Elastic Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Molecules Relevant to Plasma Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, J.-S.; Song, M.-Y.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Cho, H.

    2010-09-15

    Absolute electron-impact cross sections for molecular targets, including their radicals, are important in developing plasma reactors and testing various plasma processing gases. Low-energy electron collision data for these gases are sparse and only the limited cross section data are available. In this report, elastic cross sections for electron-polyatomic molecule collisions are compiled and reviewed for 17 molecules relevant to plasma processing. Elastic cross sections are essential for the absolute scale conversion of inelastic cross sections, as well as for testing computational methods. Data are collected and reviewed for elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and, for each molecule, the recommended values of the cross section are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2010.

  14. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process.

  15. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, A.T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1996-12-10

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process. 4 figs.

  16. Freight Shuttle System: Cross-Border Movement of Goods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    The Freight Shuttle System (FSS) is designed to provide freight transportation services between those short and intermediate distance locations (within 600 miles) that are currently handling large volumes of freight traffic. Much like trucks, the FSS's transporters are autonomous: each transporter has its own propulsion and travels independently of other transporters. Inspired by railroads, each FSS transporter has steel wheels operating on a steel running surface and can carry either a standardsize freight container or an over-the-road truck trailer. However, unlike either rail or trucks, the FSS runs on an elevated, dedicated guideway to avoid the interference of other transportation systems. The objective of this report is to examine the potential viability for an alternative transportation system for trailers and containers in a multi-national, cross-border setting. The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez region serves as the environment of this analysis.

  17. Cross-media approach to saving the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    A project EPA began in August will investigate the possibility of cross-media emissions trading as a new approach to reducing nitrogen loadings to the Chesapeake Bay. Working with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the Agency hopes to device a NO{sub x} trading framework along the lines of existing sulfur dioxide trading plans to control acid rain. The Chesapeake Air Project will examine the feasibility of using emissions trading between and water sources, including trading credits between power plants and mobile sources, to reduce the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to the bay. The progress of the Bay Program nutrient reduction goals is up for reevaluation in 1997, and Knopes and EDF economist Brian Morton have high hopes that the trading plan, which would place a cap on the mass of emissions and rate of deposition allowed by all sources, will become the atmospheric deposition portion of the Chesapeake Bay Program`s Nutrient Reduction Strategy. 6 refs.

  18. Nonlinear particle behavior during cross-type optical particle separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang Bok; Lee, Kyung Heon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-12-28

    The effects of varying the ratio of the optical force to the viscous drag force, termed S, on cross-type optical particle separation were investigated experimentally to test previous theoretical predictions. The experiments were performed for various flow velocities, powers of the laser beam, and radii of the laser beam waist and the particles. The behaviors of the particles during optical separation were examined by measuring the retention distances and analyzing the particle trajectories. For small values of S, the particles move with constant velocity in the flow direction and the retention distance increases linearly with S. However, the particles accelerate and decelerate within the laser beam and the retention distance increases nonlinearly with S when S increases further.

  19. SCWR Once-Through Calculations for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ganda, francesco

    2012-07-01

    It is the purpose of this report to document the calculation of (1) the isotopic evolution and of (2) the 1-group cross sections as a function of burnup of the reference Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR), in a format suitable for the Fuel Cycle Option Campaign Transmutation Data Library. The reference SCWR design was chosen to be that described in [McDonald, 2005]. Super Critical Water Reactors (SCWR) are intended to operate with super-critical water (i.e. H2O at a pressure above 22 MPa and a temperature above 373oC) as a cooling – and possibly also moderating – fluid. The main mission of the SCWR is to generate lower cost electricity, as compared to current standard Light Water Reactors (LWR). Because of the high operating pressure and temperature, SCWR feature a substantially higher thermal conversion efficiency than standard LWR – i.e. about 45% versus 33%, mostly due to an increase in the exit water temperature from ~300oC to ~500oC – potentially resulting in a lower cost of generated electricity. The coolant remains single phase throughout the reactor and the energy conversion system, thus eliminating the need for pressurizers, steam generators, steam separators and dryers, further potentially reducing the reactor construction capital cost. The SCWR concept presented here is based on existing LWR technology and on a large number of existing fossil-fired supercritical boilers. However, it was concluded in [McDonald, 2005], that: “Based on the results of this study, it appears that the reference SCWR design is not feasible.” This conclusion appears based on the strong sensitivity of the design to small deviations in nominal conditions leading to small effects having a potentially large impact on the peak cladding temperature of some fuel rods. “This was considered a major feasibility issue for the SCWR” [McDonald, 2005]. After a description of the reference SCWR design, the Keno V 3-D single assembly model used for this analysis, as well as the calculated results, are presented. Additionally, the follwing information, presented in the appendixes, is intended to provide enough guidance that a researcher repeating the same task in the future should be able to obtain a vector of nuclei and cross sections ready for insertion into the transmutation library without any need for further instructions: (1) Complete TRITON/KENO-V input used for the analysis; (2) Inputs and detailed description of the usage of the OPUS utility, used to postproces and to extract the nuclei concentrations for the transmutation library; (3) Inputs and detailed description of the usage of the XSECLIST utility, used to postproces and to extract the 1-group cross sections for the transmutation library; (4) Details of an ad-hoc utility program developed to sort the nuclei and cross sections for the transmutation library.

  20. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  1. Validation of a large activation cross-section library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, D.W.; Wilson, W.B.

    1994-06-01

    The 63-group neutron cross-section library used for neutron activation studies in the Nuclear Theory and Applications Group at Los Alamos has a variety of sources of widely varying levels of quality. This heterogeneous aspect, which is a common feature of all libraries used in activation studies, is a direct consequence of the need to quickly obtain data for up to 15,000 different excitation functions involving 750 different targets. Because of the need to assess the reliability of this library and ten to improve it, we have initiated a systematic comparison of this library with three main data sources, especially the large CSISRS online data system, maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We report on the results of extensive comparisons between the experimental data and the multigroup library. We briefly mention new theoretical approaches data evaluation that are suitable for meeting future data needs in this area.

  2. Reconstruction of petrophysical images using cross-well traveltime tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza-Amuchastegui, J.A.; Ramirez-Cruz, L.C.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors present the results obtained from a cross-well seismic tomography experiment carried out in an oil producing field of the West Permian Basin, Texas. Three fundamental stages can be identified from the tomographic method: field data acquisition, data conditioning, and the actual tomographic process including forward modeling and inversion. For this case, they present a synopsis of each. The resulting V{sub P} and V{sub S} tomograms show a clear separation of high and low velocity zones that are in agreement with sonic logs. From the final tomograms, they computed images of V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratio, Poisson ratio, porosity and density using well known empirical formulas. The results attained from the experiment provide an idea of the potential usefulness of the tomographic method as an alternative for in-field exploration and detailed characterization of hydrocarbon producing reservoirs.

  3. OBSERVATION OF FLUX-TUBE CROSSINGS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, L.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Yan, Y.

    2013-03-20

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in the solar wind. They are a major source of the solar wind MHD turbulence intermittency. They may result from nonlinear interactions of the solar wind MHD turbulence or are the boundaries of flux tubes that originate from the solar surface. Some current sheets appear in pairs and are the boundaries of transient structures such as magnetic holes and reconnection exhausts or the edges of pulsed Alfven waves. For an individual current sheet, discerning whether it is a flux-tube boundary or due to nonlinear interactions or the boundary of a transient structure is difficult. In this work, using data from the Wind spacecraft, we identify two three-current-sheet events. Detailed examination of these two events suggests that they are best explained by the flux-tube-crossing scenario. Our study provides convincing evidence supporting the scenario that the solar wind consists of flux tubes where distinct plasmas reside.

  4. (n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections of neutron-induced reactions on 150Sm for En from threshold to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G; Kawano, T; Becker, J; Wu, C; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R; Kunieda, S

    2009-03-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt discrete {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on a {sup 150}Sm sample fo 1550 mg/cm{sup 2} of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched to 95.6% in {sup 150}Sm. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach model calculations including the pre-equilibrium reactions. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Incident neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for thirteen individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 0.8 MeV in {sup 149}Sm and one {gamma}-ray transition between the first excited and ground state in {sup 148}Sm were measured. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were calculated using GNASH, an enhanced Hauser-Feshbach statistical nuclear reaction model code, and compared with the experimental results. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with new systematic 'global' optical model potential parameters. The coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model was employed to calculate the particle transmission coefficients. The pre-equilibrium part of the spin distribution in {sup 150}Sm was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK) and incorporated into the GNASH reaction model code. the partial cross sections for discrete {gamma}-ray cascade paths leading to the ground state in {sup 149}Sm and {sup 148}Sm have been summed (without double counting) to estimate lower limits for reaction cross sections. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations to deduce the reaction channel cross sections. These reaction channel cross sections agree with previously measured experimental and ENDF/B-VII evaluations.

  5. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fortier, Nancy E.; Fritz, James S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present.

  6. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fortier, N.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present. 1 fig.

  7. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    geological boring near 9 structure locations along the existing ED2-ED5 230-kV transmission line located in Pinal County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A, Proposed Action: Western proposes to do geologic borings within our right-of-way near structures 21/5,22/5,23/6,25/4,26/5,27/6,28/5,29/5 & 30/4 along the existing ED2-ED5 230-kV transmission line. This project involves accessing each bore hole location with a auger/drill rig and light crew trucks, setting up the

  8. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  9. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  10. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  11. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thilly, William G.; Keohavong, Phouthone

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  12. NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Determine Baseline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determine Baseline Energy Consumption To create a climate action plan for your research campus, begin by determining current energy consumption and the resulting greenhouse gas ...

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Pantex Site Office | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 18, 2015 CX-013480: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lightning Mapping Array ... December 27, 2013 CX-011714: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lightning Mapping Array ...

  14. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: West Valley Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 8, 2011 CX-009529: Categorical Exclusion Determination WVDP-2011-01 Erdman Brook ... September 8, 2011 CX-006811: Categorical Exclusion Determination Erdman Brook Erosion ...

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Energy ...

  16. Determinations and Coverage Rulemakings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determinations and Coverage Rulemakings Determinations and Coverage Rulemakings The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) (42 U.S.C. 6292(a)) contains a list of 19 consumer ...

  17. CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Coupled Thermo-Mechanical and Photo-Chemical Degradation Mechanisms that Determine ... coupled thermo-mechanical and photo-chemical degradation mechanisms that determine ...

  18. CX-007095: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Determination CX-007095: Categorical Exclusion Determination Paving the Way with Propane: The AutoGas Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10132011...

  19. CX-007096: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Determination CX-007096: Categorical Exclusion Determination Paving the Way with Propane: The AutoGas Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10132011...

  20. CX-011970: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-011970: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tuscarora Phase II Geothermal Observation Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 02222013 Location(s):...

  1. CX-001087: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    87: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001087: Categorical Exclusion Determination State of Nevada Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - American Recovery and...

  2. CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09012011 Location(s): Florida...

  3. CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.16 Date: 01272012...

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Florida | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 16, 2015 CX-100377 Categorical Exclusion Determination US-INDIA CONSORTIUM FOR ... September 8, 2015 CX-100367 Categorical Exclusion Determination US-India Consortium for ...

  5. CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Biomass Production Across a Landscape CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07262010...

  6. CX-004247: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-004247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 10142010 Location(s): Indian Trail,...

  7. CX-008810: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-008810: Categorical Exclusion Determination One Nevada Optimization of Microwave Telecommunication System CX(s) Applied: B1.19, B4.6 Date: 05292012...

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Kentucky | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... May 14, 2013 CX-010281: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Temperature Nitrous Oxide ... Determination Cost-Effective Treatment of Flowback and Produced Water via an ...

  9. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, Donald O.; Burger, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    An optically transparent furnace (10) having a detection apparatus (29) with a pedestal (12) enclosed in an evacuated ampule (16) for growing a crystal (14) thereon. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater (20), a base heater (24) and a cold finger (26) such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material (18) to grow the crystal (14). A quartz halogen lamp (32) projects a collimated beam (30) onto the crystal (14) and a reflected beam (34) is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer (40) and the detected peak position (48) in the reflected energy spectrum (44) of the reflected beam (34) is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal (14).

  10. V-026: RSA Data Protection Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Let Local Users Bypass Security Restrictions | Department of Energy 26: RSA Data Protection Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks and Let Local Users Bypass Security Restrictions V-026: RSA Data Protection Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks and Let Local Users Bypass Security Restrictions November 16, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA Data Protection Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks and Let Local Users Bypass Security Restrictions. PLATFORM: RSA

  11. V-048: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vulnerability | Department of Energy 8: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery Vulnerability V-048: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery Vulnerability December 17, 2012 - 1:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco Wireless Lan Controller Cross-Site Request Forgery Vulnerability PLATFORM: Cisco Wireless LAN Controller (WLC) ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Cisco Wireless LAN Controller. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027886 Secunia Advisory

  12. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections Title: Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections Comprehensive catalogue of drill-hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross-sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Authors: Faulds, James E. Publication Date: 2013-12-31

  13. V-230: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy 0: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities V-230: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities August 29, 2013 - 4:10am Addthis PROBLEM: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks. PLATFORM: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform 2.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities are

  14. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 18. Cross-Reference of Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigators, Projects, and Organizations | Department of Energy 8. Cross-Reference of Project Investigators, Projects, and Organizations 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 18. Cross-Reference of Project Investigators, Projects, and Organizations DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008_merit_review_18.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 Annual Merit Review Results Cross Reference of PIs and Organizations DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review

  15. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coupled-channels method (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method We calculate nuclear cross sections on excited nuclei in the fast neutron energy range. We partition the whole process into two contributions: the direct reaction part and the compound nuclear

  16. 16-SN-2198 Report Cover for CrossConnects_r3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -SN-2198 Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology Summary Report of the CrossConnects 2015 Workshop Julian Borrill, Eli Dart, Brooklin Gore, Salman Habib, Steven T. Myers, Peter Nugent, Don Petravick, Rollin Thomas CrossConnects WORKSHOP SERIES Where Science & Technology Meet Summary Report of the CrossConnects 2015 Workshop on Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology Julian Borrill 1 , Eli Dart 1 , Brooklin Gore 1 , Salman Habib 2 ,

  17. Measuring n-N Deep Inelastic Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    + Cross Section Results from MiniBooNE Mike Wilking TRIUMF / University of Colorado NuInt 22 May 2009 CCπ + in Oscillation Experiments  The next generation of ν oscillation experiments lie at low, mostly unexplored ν energies  CCQE is the signal process for oscillation measurements  At these energies, CCπ + is the dominant charged-current background T2K NOνA CCπ + CCQE DIS Charged Current Cross Sections Previous CCπ + Measurements  The plot shows previous absolute cross

  18. Generation of Collapsed Cross Sections for Hatch 1 Cycles 1-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, Brian J

    2012-11-01

    Under NRC JCN V6361, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to develop and run SCALE/TRITON models for generation of collapsed few-group cross sections and to convert the cross sections to PMAXS format using the GENPMAXS conversion utility for use in PARCS/PATHS simulations of Hatch Unit 1, cycles 1-3. This letter report documents the final models used to produce the Hatch collapsed cross sections.

  19. Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based fuel core using experimental data (Conference) | SciTech Connect Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data Considering the importance of thorium data and concerning about the accuracy of Th-232 cross section library, a series of experiments of thorium critical

  20. Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Implantation Technique (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer

  1. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  2. V-221: WordPress A Forms Plugin Cross-Site Request Forgery and Form Field Script Insertion Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This vulnerability can be exploited to conduct cross-site request forgery and script insertion attacks

  3. T-673: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

  4. U-093: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Flaws Permit Remote Code Execution, Information Disclosure, and Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mozilla Firefox Multiple Flaws Permit Remote Code Execution, Information Disclosure, and Cross-Site Scripting.

  5. Cross-language information retrieval using PARAFAC2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, Brett William; Chew, Peter; Abdelali, Ahmed; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2007-05-01

    A standard approach to cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) uses Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) in conjunction with a multilingual parallel aligned corpus. This approach has been shown to be successful in identifying similar documents across languages - or more precisely, retrieving the most similar document in one language to a query in another language. However, the approach has severe drawbacks when applied to a related task, that of clustering documents 'language-independently', so that documents about similar topics end up closest to one another in the semantic space regardless of their language. The problem is that documents are generally more similar to other documents in the same language than they are to documents in a different language, but on the same topic. As a result, when using multilingual LSA, documents will in practice cluster by language, not by topic. We propose a novel application of PARAFAC2 (which is a variant of PARAFAC, a multi-way generalization of the singular value decomposition [SVD]) to overcome this problem. Instead of forming a single multilingual term-by-document matrix which, under LSA, is subjected to SVD, we form an irregular three-way array, each slice of which is a separate term-by-document matrix for a single language in the parallel corpus. The goal is to compute an SVD for each language such that V (the matrix of right singular vectors) is the same across all languages. Effectively, PARAFAC2 imposes the constraint, not present in standard LSA, that the 'concepts' in all documents in the parallel corpus are the same regardless of language. Intuitively, this constraint makes sense, since the whole purpose of using a parallel corpus is that exactly the same concepts are expressed in the translations. We tested this approach by comparing the performance of PARAFAC2 with standard LSA in solving a particular CLIR problem. From our results, we conclude that PARAFAC2 offers a very promising alternative to LSA not only for multilingual document clustering, but also for solving other problems in cross-language information retrieval.

  6. MiniBooNE Charged Current Charged Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muon Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Charged Pion Production Cross Sections on Mineral Oil at Enu~1 GeV", arXiv:1011.3572 [hep-ex], submitted to Phys. Rev. D. The following MiniBooNE information for the 2010 CC π+ cross section paper is made available to the public. Tables A root file containing histograms of all of the cross section results in the paper can be found here. A text file of the cross section results can be found here. The MiniBooNE muon neutrino flux distribution can be

  7. U-020: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability U-020: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability October 26, 2011 - 9:00am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee Web Gateway Web Access Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability. PLATFORM: The vulnerability is reported in versions prior to 7.1.5.2. ABSTRACT: Cross-Site Scripting vulnerabilities allow a third party to manipulate the content or behavior of a web application in a user's browser, without

  8. Cross-conjugated polymers for organic electronic devices and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    Cross-conjugated donor-acceptor polymers, methods for their preparation, devices that include polymers, and methods for the preparation and use of the devices.

  9. U-276: VMware vCenter Operations Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 76: VMware vCenter Operations Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability U-276: VMware vCenter Operations Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability October 8, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: VMware vCenter Operations Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerability PLATFORM: VMware vCenter Operations 1.x ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in VMware vCenter Operations, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks. reference LINKS: Original Advisory

  10. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections (Dataset...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill-hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database ... area; Well Lithology Data; Drill-hole database; Geologic Cross-Sections; Gravity ...

  11. Photoionization and photoabsorption cross sections for the aluminum iso-nuclear sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witthoeft, M.C.; Garca, J.; Kallman, T.R.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; INPAS, Universit de Lige, B-4000 Lige

    2013-01-15

    K-shell photoionization and photoabsorption cross sections are presented for Li-like to Na-like Al. The calculations are performed using the BreitPauli R-matrix method where the effects of radiation and Auger dampings are included. We provide electronic data files for the raw cross sections as well as those convolved with a Gaussian of width ?E/E=10{sup ?4}. In addition to total cross sections for photoabsorption and photoionization, partial cross sections are available for photoionization.

  12. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  13. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

  14. V-153: Symantec Brightmail Gateway Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Symantec’s Brightmail Gateway management console is susceptible to stored cross-site scripting (XSS) issues found in some of the administrative interface pages.

  15. High Conductivity Single-ion Cross-linked Polymers for Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Conductivity Single-ion Cross-linked Polymers for Lithium Batteries and Fuel Cells ... for use as membranes in lithium batteries, fuel cells, and electrochromic windows. ...

  16. Non-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries Lawrence Berkeley ... have invented nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes for lithium ion batteries. ...

  17. T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  18. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  19. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugmire, David L; Wetteland, Chris J; Duncan, Wanda S; Lakis, Rollin E; Schwartz, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  20. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  1. Final report for CCS cross-layer reliability visioning study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M; Dehon, Andre; Carter, Nicj

    2010-12-20

    The geometric rate of improvement of transistor size and integrated circuit performance known as Moore's Law has been an engine of growth for our economy, enabling new products and services, creating new value and wealth, increasing safety, and removing menial tasks from our daily lives. Affordable, highly integrated components have enabled both life-saving technologies and rich entertainment applications. Anti-lock brakes, insulin monitors, and GPS-enabled emergency response systems save lives. Cell phones, internet appliances, virtual worlds, realistic video games, and mp3 players enrich our lives and connect us together. Over the past 40 years of silicon scaling, the increasing capabilities of inexpensive computation have transformed our society through automation and ubiquitous communications. Looking forward, increasing unpredictability threatens our ability to continue scaling integrated circuits at Moore's Law rates. As the transistors and wires that make up integrated circuits become smaller, they display both greater differences in behavior among devices designed to be identical and greater vulnerability to transient and permanent faults. Conventional design techniques expend energy to tolerate this unpredictability by adding safety margins to a circuit's operating voltage, clock frequency or charge stored per bit. However, the rising energy costs needed to compensate for increasing unpredictability are rapidly becoming unacceptable in today's environment where power consumption is often the limiting factor on integrated circuit performance and energy efficiency is a national concern. Reliability and energy consumption are both reaching key inflection points that, together, threaten to reduce or end the benefits of feature size reduction. To continue beneficial scaling, we must use a cross-layer, Jull-system-design approach to reliability. Unlike current systems, which charge every device a substantial energy tax in order to guarantee correct operation in spite of rare events, such as one high-threshold transistor in a billion or one erroneous gate evaluation in an hour of computation, cross-layer reliability schemes make reliability management a cooperative effort across the system stack, sharing information across layers so that they only expend energy on reliability when an error actually occurs. Figure 1 illustrates an example of such a system that uses a combination of information from the application and cheap architecture-level techniques to detect errors. When an error occurs, mechanisms at higher levels in the stack correct the error, efficiently delivering correct operation to the user in spite of errors at the device or circuit levels. In the realms of memory and communication, engineers have a long history of success in tolerating unpredictable effects such as fabrication variability, transient upsets, and lifetime wear using information sharing, limited redundancy, and cross-layer approaches that anticipate, accommodate, and suppress errors. Networks use a combination of hardware and software to guarantee end-toend correctness. Error-detection and correction codes use additional information to correct the most common errors, single-bit transmission errors. When errors occur that cannot be corrected by these codes, the network protocol requests re-transmission of one or more packets until the correct data is received. Similarly, computer memory systems exploit a cross-layer division of labor to achieve high performance with modest hardware. Rather than demanding that hardware alone provide the virtual memory abstraction, software page-fault and TLB-miss handlers allow a modest piece of hardware, the TLB, to handle the common-case operations on a cyc1e-by-cycle basis while infrequent misses are handled in system software. Unfortunately, mitigating logic errors is not as simple or as well researched as memory or communication systems. This lack of understanding has led to very expensive solutions. For example, triple-modular redundancy masks errors by triplicating computations in either time or area. This mitigation methods imposes a 200% increase in energy consumption for every operation, not just the uncommon failure cases. At a time when computation is rapidly becoming part of our critical civilian and military infrastructure and decreasing costsfor computation are fueling our economy and our well being, we cannot afford increasingly unreliable electronics or a stagnation in capabilities per dollar, watt, or cubic meter. If researchers are able to develop techniques that tolerate the growing unpredictability of silicon devices, Moore's Law scaling should continue until at least 2022. During this 12-year time period, transistors, which are the building blocks of electronic devices, will scale their dimensions (feature sizes) from 45nm to 4.5nm.

  2. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays,more » fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.« less

  3. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  4. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 Kmore » in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  5. Modeling fatigue crack growth in cross ply titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakuckas, J.G. Jr.; Johnson, W.S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of fiber bridging matrix cracks in cross-ply SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates containing center holes was investigated. Experimental observations revealed that matrix cracking was far more extensive and wide spread in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates compared to that in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. In addition, the fatigue life of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates was significantly longer than that of the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. The matrix cracking observed in both material systems was analyzed using a fiber bridging (FB) model which was formulated using the boundary correction factors and weight functions for center hole specimen configurations. A frictional shear stress is assumed in the FB model and was used as a curve fitting parameter to model matrix crack growth data. The higher frictional shear stresses calculated in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates resulted in lower stress intensity factors in the matrix and higher axial stresses in the fibers compared to those in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates at the same applied stress levels.

  6. Photodiode arrays having minimized cross-talk between diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guckel, Henry; McNamara, Shamus P.

    2000-10-17

    Photodiode arrays are formed with close diode-to-diode spacing and minimized cross-talk between diodes in the array by isolating the diodes from one another with trenches that are formed between the photodiodes in the array. The photodiodes are formed of spaced regions in a base layer, each spaced region having an impurity type opposite to that of the base layer to define a p-n junction between the spaced regions and the base layer. The base layer meets a substrate at a boundary, with the substrate being much more heavily doped than the base layer with the same impurity type. The trenches extend through the base layer and preferably into the substrate. Minority carriers generated by absorption of light photons in the base layer can only migrate to an adjacent photodiode through the substrate. The lifetime and the corresponding diffusion length of the minority carriers in the substrate is very short so that all minority carriers recombine in the substrate before reaching an adjacent photodiode.

  7. Measurement of differential production cross-sections for a Z boson in association with b-jets in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-24

    We report measurements of differential production cross-sections of a Z boson in association with b-jets in pp collisions at √ s = 7 TeV. The data analysed correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Particle-level cross-sections are determined for events with a Z boson decaying into an electron or muon pair, and containing b-jets. For events with at least one b-jet, the cross-section is presented as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum and rapidity, together with the inclusive b-jet cross-section as a function of b-jet transverse momentum,more » rapidity and angular separations between the b-jet and the Z boson. For events with at least two b-jets, the cross-section is determined as a function of the invariant mass and angular separation of the two highest transverse momentum b-jets, and as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum and rapidity. Lastly, results are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.« less

  8. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-05-20

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile. 8 figs.

  9. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile.

  10. 2015 Secretarial Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretarial Determination 2015 Secretarial Determination On May 1, 2015, the Secretary of Energy determined that continued uranium transfers for cleanup services at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and for down-blending of highly-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium will not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, conversion, or enrichment industry ("2015 Secretarial Determination"). This Determination covers continued transfers at the rates specified

  11. Is disaggregation the holy grail of energy efficiency? The case of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armel, KC; Gupta, A; Shrimali, G; Albert, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to address two timely energy problems. First, significant low-cost energy reductions can be made in the residential and commercial sectors, but these savings have not been achievable to date. Second, billions of dollars are being spent to install smart meters, yet the energy saving and financial benefits of this infrastructure - without careful consideration of the human element - will not reach its full potential. We believe that we can address these problems by strategically marrying them, using disaggregation. Disaggregation refers to a set of statistical approaches for extracting end-use and/or appliance level data from an aggregate, or whole-building, energy signal. In this paper, we explain how appliance level data affords numerous benefits, and why using the algorithms in conjunction with smart meters is the most cost-effective and scalable solution for getting this data. We review disaggregation algorithms and their requirements, and evaluate the extent to which smart meters can meet those requirements. Research, technology, and policy recommendations are also outlined. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Total Cross Sections as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture: An Opportunity to Accurately Constrain (n,γ) Cross Sections for Nuclides Beyond the Reach of Direct Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, Paul E.

    2014-03-05

    There are many (n,γ) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics and to nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current measurement techniques, and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In contrast, total neutron cross sections currently are feasible for many of these nuclides and provide almost all the information needed to accurately calculate the (n,γ) cross sections via the nuclear statistical model (NSM). I demonstrate this for the case of 151Sm; NSM calculations constrained using average resonance parameters obtained from total cross section measurements made in 1975, are in excellent agreement with recent 151Sm (n,γ) measurements across a wide range of energy. Furthermore, I demonstrate through simulations that total cross section measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10μg. Samples of this size should be attainable for many nuclides of interest. Finally, I estimate that over half of the radionuclides identified ∼20 years ago as having (n,γ) cross sections of importance to s-process nucleosynthesis studies (24/43) and radiochemical diagnostics (11/19), almost none of which have been measured, can be constrained using this technique.

  13. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre Dame (UND), will focus on three specific items: (1) making a precision (better than 10 %) determination of the absolute cross section of the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction as a function of energy; (2) determining the spectrum of neutrons and γ-rays emitted from 19F(α,n)22Na over an energy range pertinent to NDA; and (3) performing simulations with this new cross section to extract the neutron yield (neutrons/gram/second) and resulting neutron- and gamma ray-spectra when α particles interact with fluorine nuclei in actinide samples, to aid in the design and reduce uncertainty of future NDA measurements and simulations.

  14. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  15. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  16. Cross sections for proton-induced reactions on Pd isotopes at energies relevant for the {gamma} process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, I.; Coquard, L.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Marganiec, J.; Uberseder, E.; Giesen, U.; Heiske, A.; Feinberg, G.; Hentschel, D.; Hilpp, S.; Leiste, H.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-07-15

    Proton-activation reactions on natural and enriched palladium samples were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range of E{sub p}=2.75-9 MeV, close to the upper end of the respective Gamow window of the {gamma} process. We have determined cross sections for {sup 102}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 103}Ag, {sup 104}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 105}Ag, and {sup 105}Pd(p, n){sup 105}Ag, as well as partial cross sections of {sup 104}Pd(p, n){sup 104}Ag{sup g}, {sup 105}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, {sup 106}Pd(p, n){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, and {sup 110}Pd(p, n){sup 110}Ag{sup m} with uncertainties between 3% and 15% for constraining theoretical Hauser-Feshbach rates and for direct use in {gamma}-process calculations.

  17. Recent Measurements of the cos(n{phi}{sub h}) Azimuthal Modulations of the Unpolarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross-section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Giordano, Francesca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-12-17

    The cross section for hadron production in deep-inelastic lepton scattering contains azimuthal modulations which can be related to transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions. The former provide a picture of how the quarks are moving within nucleons. Specifically, the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} modulations of the unpolarized cross section relate quark spin and quark transverse momentum. These moments have been carefully measured at the HERMES experiment in a fully differential way, as a function of x, y, z, and P{sub hperpendicular} for positive and negative hadrons produced from hydrogen and deuterium targets. These measurements give new access to the flavor dependent TMDs via their charge and target dependence. These data must be compared to comprehensive models to determine which terms contribute significantly to the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} moments and allow access to the underlying structure functions.

  18. Neutron physics of the Re/Os clock. II. The (n,n{sup '}) cross section of {sup 187}Os at 30 keV neutron energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2010-07-15

    The inelastic neutron-scattering cross section of {sup 187}Os has been determined in a time-of-flight experiment at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator. An almost monoenergetic beam of 30-keV neutrons was produced at the threshold of the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Information on the inelastic channel is required for reliable calculations of the so-called stellar enhancement factor, by which the laboratory cross section of {sup 187}Os must be corrected in order to account for the thermal population of low-lying excited states at the temperatures of s-process nucleosynthesis, in particular of the important state at 9.75 keV. This correction represents a crucial step in the interpretation of the {sup 187}Os/{sup 187}Re pair as a cosmochronometer.

  19. Using a Time Projection Chamber to Measure High Precision Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Brett

    2015-08-06

    2014 LANSCE run cycle data will provide a preliminary 239Pu(n,f) cross section and will quantify uncertainties: PID and Target/beam non-uniformities. Continued running during the 2015 LANSCE run cycle: Thin targets to see both fission fragments and 239Pu(n,f) cross section and fully quantified uncertainties

  20. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton ... Title: Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV ...

  1. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections A measurement of the top quark pair production (t-tbar)

  2. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.36

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    B1.36: Determinations of excess real propertyDeterminations that real property is excess to the needs of DOE and, in the case of acquired real property, the subsequent reporting of such...

  3. CX-004531: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination CX-004531: Categorical Exclusion Determination Surprise Valley Multiple Use Geothermal Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.12 Date: 11242010 Location(s):...

  4. CX-100322 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100322 Categorical Exclusion Determination Plug and Play Photovoltaics for American Homes Award Number: DE-EE0006035 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15...

  5. CX-100193 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100193 Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Solar Panels at Municipal Owned Facilities Award Number: DE-EE0003195 CX(s) Applied: B5.1...

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Intelligence and Counterintelligence

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Intelligence and Counterintelligence Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Intelligence and Counterintelligence Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Intelligence and Counterintelligence. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD No downloads found for this office.

  7. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD No downloads found for this office.

  8. CX-100317 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100317 Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Hot Water Project in Greenburgh, NY Award Number: DE-EE0003193 CX(s) Applied: B5.16...

  9. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Program and Field Offices |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Determinations: Program and Field Offices Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Program and Field Offices This page contains links (below) to pages on DOE Program, Field, or Site Office websites containing the CX determinations required to be posted under this policy, and also some for which documentation and posting are optional, i.e., determinations involving classes of actions listed in Appendix A or made before the policy's effective date of November 2, 2009. You may

  10. NREL Programmatic NEPA Determinations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programmatic NEPA Determinations NREL Programmatic NEPA Determinations The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has developed five Programmatic NEPA Determinations (PND) to address routine activities and ongoing research conducted at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) facilities. These determinations were conducted as part of a joint DOE and NREL NEPA Enhancement Project that was developed to help streamline the NEPA process for activities

  11. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #26 Official Worksite Determinations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6 Official Worksite Determinations POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #26 Official Worksite Determinations The following information is provided to assist in determinations of official worksites for remote workers. This guidance applies to Federal employees and employees hired under the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA). PDF icon POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #26 Official Worksite Determinations Responsible Contacts Ahtora Brooks Human Resource Specialists E-mail

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act: Crump Geyser - High Precision Geophysics & ... Novel Hybrid Microbial Electrochemical System for Efficient ... Determination Microchannel Solar Receiver Development Award ...

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturing Loan Program | Department of Energy Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 6, 2011 CX-006488: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chrysler Group LLC, Revised Specific Project Application 2, Retooling, Reequipping and Engineering

  14. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: NNSA-Proliferation Detection |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Proliferation Detection Categorical Exclusion Determinations: NNSA-Proliferation Detection Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by NNSA-Proliferation Detection. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 17, 2010 CX-004080: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fisk University Nonproliferation Grant CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Tennessee Office(s): NNSA-Proliferation Detection

  15. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb{sup -1}. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high x{sub T}. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons require a good understanding of the background, mainly dominated by light mesons ({pi}{sup 0} and {eta}) which decay into two very collinear photons. Since these photons are produced within a jet, they tend to be non-isolated in most of the cases, and can be suppressed by requiring the photon candidates to be isolated in the calorimeter. In the case the hard scattered parton hadronizes leaving most of its energy to the meson, the photon produced in the decay will not be surrounded by large energy depositions. To further reduce this remaining isolated background, we present a new technique based on the isolation distribution in the calorimeter. The measured cross section is compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) pQCD calculations, which have been corrected for non-perturbative contributions. This thesis is organized as follows: we start with a brief review of QCD theory and the formalism to calculate cross sections in Chapter 2, where we also introduce the physics of prompt photon production and summarize the current status of the prompt photon phenomenology. Chapter 3 contains a description of the Tevatron and the CDF detector. The experimental measurement is described in Chapter 4, where we provide details on the different datasets used in the measurement, the trigger, and the event selection requirements. Most of this Chapter is devoted to the explanation of the background subtraction method and the determination of the photon signal fraction. The systematic uncertainties on the measurement are evaluated in Chapter 5, while Chapter 6 discusses the final results and the comparison to the theoretical predictions. Finally, the conclusions are presented in Chapter 7.

  16. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.

  17. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connectingmore » the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.« less

  18. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  19. Measurement of the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) cross section from 20 meV to 500 keV with a high efficiency, highly segmented 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, E.-I.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Glover, S. E.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Mertz, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, A. M.; Hatarik, R.

    2008-03-15

    The {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}){sup 238}Np cross section has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 500 keV using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new facility allows experiments with submilligram samples and is therefore well suited to investigate isotopes with half-lives as low as a few hundred days. In this benchmark measurement, only 0.42 mg of {sup 237}Np was sufficient to determine differential cross sections relative to the well-known resonance at 0.5 eV. The thermal cross section was measured to {sigma}{sub 2200m/s}=177{+-}5 barn, {sigma}{sub kT=25.3meV}=167{+-}4 barn and the resonance integral to RI=693{+-}6 barn.

  20. Verification of the MCNP (TM) Perturbation Correction Feature for Cross-Section Dependent Tallies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. K. Hess; G. W. McKinney; J. S. Hendricks; L. L. Carter

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MCNP version 4B perturbation capability has been extended to cross-section dependent tallies and to the track-length estimate of Iqff in criticality problems. We present the complete theory of the MCNP perturbation capability including the correction to MCNP4B which enables cross-section dependent perturbation tallies. We also present the MCNP interface as an upgrade to the MCNP4B manual. Finally, we present test results demonstrating the validity of the perturbation capability in MCNP, particularly cross-section dependent problems.

  1. V-033: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities V-033: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities November 26, 2012 - 2:00am Addthis PROBLEM: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: ownCloud 4.5.2, 4.5.1, 4.0.9 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in ownCloud REFERENCE LINKS: ownCloud Server Advisories Secunia Advisory SA51357 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) Input passed via the

  2. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attacks | Department of Energy 9: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 28, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Several vulnerabilities were reported in IBM Lotus iNotes PLATFORM: IBM Lotus iNotes 8.5.x ABSTRACT: IBM Lotus iNotes 8.5.x contains four cross-site scripting vulnerabilities REFERENCE LINKS: Security Tracker Alert ID 1028954 IBM Security Bulletin 1647740

  3. A measurement of the differential cross section for the reaction $\gamma n

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    \to \pi^{-} p$ from deuterium (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: A measurement of the differential cross section for the reaction $$\gamma n \to \pi^{-} p$$ from deuterium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A measurement of the differential cross section for the reaction $$\gamma n \to \pi^{-} p$$ from deuterium We report a measurement of the differential cross section for the $$\gamma n \to \pi^- p$$ process from the CLAS detector at

  4. Covariance of Neutron Cross Sections for {sup 16}O through R-matrix Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.; Paris, M.; Hale, G.M.; Shibata, K.; Fukahori, T.

    2015-01-15

    Through the R-matrix analysis, neutron cross sections as well as the covariance are estimated for {sup 16}O in the resolved resonance range. Although we consider the current results are still preliminary, we present the summary of the cross section analysis and the results of data uncertainty/covariance, including those for the differential cross sections. It is found that the values obtained highlight consequences of nature in the theory as well as knowledge from measurements, which gives a realistic quantification of evaluated nuclear data covariances.

  5. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E.  D.; Conrad, J.  M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D.  A.; Ford, R.; et al

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  6. T-701: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation Flaw in Logon Portal Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation Flaw in Logon Portal Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks.

  7. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  8. Excitation of the 6p7s {sup 3}P{sub 0,1} states of Pb atoms by electron impact: Differential and integrated cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milisavljevic, S.; Rabasovic, M. S.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Pejcev, V.; Filipovic, D. M.; Sharma, Lalita; Srivastava, Rajesh; Stauffer, A. D.

    2007-08-15

    Experimental measurements of electron impact excitation of the 6p7s {sup 3}P{sub 0,1} states of Pb atoms have been made at incident electron energies E{sub 0}=10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 eV and scattering angles from 10 deg. to 150 deg. In addition, relativistic distorted-wave calculations have been carried out at these energies. The data obtained include the differential (DCS), integral (Q{sub I}), momentum transfer (Q{sub M}), and viscosity (Q{sub V}) cross sections. Absolute values for the differential cross sections have been obtained by normalizing the relative DCSs at 10 deg. to the experimental DCS values of [S. Milisavljevic, M. S. Rabasovic, D. Sevic, V. Pejcev, D. M. Filipovic, L. Sharma, R. Srivastava, A. D. Stauffer, and B. P. Marinkovic, Phys. Rev. A 75, 052713 (2007)]. The integrated cross sections were determined by numerical integration of the absolute DCSs. The experimental results have been compared with the corresponding calculations and good agreement is obtained.

  9. Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Graf C. P.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; La Cruz I. Heredia-De; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-05-04

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Gamma}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Gamma}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top-quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Gamma}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb}| < 0.59 for a high-mass fourth-generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth-generation quark-mixing matrix.

  10. MiniBooNE NC 1π0 Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    νμ and ν̅μ induced neutral current single π0 production cross sections on mineral oil at Eν~O(1 GeV)", arXiv:0911.2063 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D81, 013005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 NC 1π0 cross section paper is made available to the public: Neutrino Mode Running νμ NC 1π0 pπ0 Differential Cross Section 1D array of bin boundaries partitioning the momentum of the π0 1D array of the value of the differential cross section in each bin in units of 10-40

  11. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  12. Cross-Linked Conjugated Polymer Fibrils: Robust Nanowires from Functional Polythiophene Diblock Copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, Brenton A. G.; Bokel, Felicia A.; Hayward, Ryan C.; Emrick, Todd

    2011-09-27

    A series of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)-based diblock copolymers were prepared and examined in solution for their assembly into fibrils, and post-assembly cross-linking into robust nanowire structures. P3HT-b-poly(3-methanol thiophene) (P3MT), and P3HT-b-poly(3-aminopropyloxymethyl thiophene) (P3AmT) diblock copolymers were synthesized using Grignard metathesis (GRIM) polymerization. Fibrils formed from solution assembly of these copolymers are thus decorated with hydroxyl and amine functionality, and cross-linking is achieved by reaction of diisocyanates with the hydroxyl and amine groups. A variety of cross-linked structures, characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were produced by this method, including dense fibrillar sheets, fibril bundles, or predominately individual fibrils, depending on the chosen reaction conditions. In solution, the cross-linked fibrils maintained their characteristic vibronic structure in solvents that would normally disrupt (dissolve) the structures.

  13. Measurement of cross sections for the Cu-63(alpha,gamma)Ga-67...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measurement of cross sections for the Cu-63(alpha,gamma)Ga-67 reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV Authors: Basunia, M S ; Norman, E B ; Shugart, H A ; Smith, A R ; Dolinski, M J ; ...

  14. Red Cross honors LLNL as biggest blood donor west of Mississippi...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Red Cross honors LLNL as biggest blood donor west of Mississippi Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 3:19pm For more than 22 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has ...

  15. Measurement of Cross Sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga Reaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measurement of Cross Sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga Reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV Authors: Basunia, M S ; Norman, E B ; Shugart, H A ; Smith, A R ; Dolinski, M J ; ...

  16. Federal Power Act section 202(c)- Cross-Sound Cable Company, August 2002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 16, 2002, due to concerns regarding the availability of electricity on Long Island in the State of New York, a 202(c) order was issued directing Cross-Sound Cable Company to operate the...

  17. U-212: RSA Authentication Manager Flaws Permit Cross-Site and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A remote user can conduct cross-frame scripting attacks CVE-2012-2280. Imp act: A remote user can access the target user's cookies (including authentication cookies), if any, ...

  18. U-129: RSA enVision Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting, SQL Injection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in RSA enVision. A remote user can access the system. A remote authenticated user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. A remote ...

  19. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  20. Why Did the Electron Cross the Solar Cell? William Tisdale Knows...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Why Did the Electron Cross the Solar Cell? William Tisdale ... Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 ... Tisdale is using the data to design easy-to-produce ...