Sample records for determination geologic characterization

  1. area geological characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL sequestration pilot studies to determine...

  2. Geological Characterization of California's Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sequestration pilot studies to determine which technologies for permanently storing CO2 in underground electricity from baseload facilities meet the state's greenhouse gas emission performance standard emissions to 1990 levels by 2020; by developing costeffective longterm geologic sequestration

  3. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  4. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

  5. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  6. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

  7. Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

  8. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatise of Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields,A-A’). phy, geology, stratigraphic contacts, oil and gas andgeology, initial information available from hydrogeology, oil

  9. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

  10. Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE's) Coal Program...

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central Basin Platform, West Texas, Geophysics, 2006, inthe Midland Basin, West Texas Geological Society Bulletin,Central Basin Platform of West Texas, Blumen- tritt et al. (

  12. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH SITE SCREENING AND SELECTION FOR CO 2 STORAGE D. A.77 ASSESSING AND EXPANDING CO 2 STORAGE CAPACITY IN DEPLETEDFOR CO 2 GEOLOGICAL STORAGE IN CENTRAL COAL BASIN (NORTHERN

  13. Proceedings of ICMS' 05, 22 24 November 2005, Marrakech, Morocco1 3D modeling and dielectric characterization of geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    characterization of geological profiles. Application to the improvement of the study of the moisture of grounds is to characterize these geological structures by calculating their equivalent permittivity in order to be able in this paper is to develop a numerical model to simulate complex geological structures. The goal of this model

  14. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

  15. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W PROGRAMME Geological characterization prior to repositoryShort-term Characterization Program Geological Formations toexisting geological information, site characterization and

  16. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the...

  18. Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage Using'expériences -- Dans le contexte de l'étude du stockage géologique du dioxyde de carbone dans les réservoirs al. (2007) Energy Convers. Manage. 48, 1782-1797; Gunter et al. (1999) Appl. Geochem. 4, 1

  19. Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

  20. Conversion of the Big Hill geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Hill salt dome, located in southeastern Texas, is home to one of four underground oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Big Hill site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 14 oil storage caverns at the site. This work provides a realistic and internally consistent geologic model of the Big Hill site that can be used in support of future work.

  1. Conversion of the West Hackberry geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Hackberry salt dome, in southwestern Louisiana, is one of four underground oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the West Hackberry site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary layers, mapped faults, and a portion of the oil storage caverns at the site. This work provides a realistic and internally consistent geologic model of the West Hackberry site that can be used in support of future work.

  2. Conversion of the Bayou Choctaw geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic model implicit in the original site characterization report for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been converted to a numerical, computer-based three-dimensional model. The original site characterization model was successfully converted with minimal modifications and use of new information. The geometries of the salt diapir, selected adjacent sedimentary horizons, and a number of faults have been modeled. Models of a partial set of the several storage caverns that have been solution-mined within the salt mass are also included. Collectively, the converted model appears to be a relatively realistic representation of the geology of the Bayou Choctaw site as known from existing data. A small number of geometric inconsistencies and other problems inherent in 2-D vs. 3-D modeling have been noted. Most of the major inconsistencies involve faults inferred from drill hole data only. Modem computer software allows visualization of the resulting site model and its component submodels with a degree of detail and flexibility that was not possible with conventional, two-dimensional and paper-based geologic maps and cross sections. The enhanced visualizations may be of particular value in conveying geologic concepts involved in the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site to a lay audience. A Microsoft WindowsTM PC-based viewer and user-manipulable model files illustrating selected features of the converted model are included in this report.

  3. Standard guide for characterization of spent nuclear fuel in support of geologic repository disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide provides guidance for the types and extent of testing that would be involved in characterizing the physical and chemical nature of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of its interim storage, transport, and disposal in a geologic repository. This guide applies primarily to commercial light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and spent fuel from weapons production, although the individual tests/analyses may be used as applicable to other spent fuels such as those from research and test reactors. The testing is designed to provide information that supports the design, safety analysis, and performance assessment of a geologic repository for the ultimate disposal of the SNF. 1.2 The testing described includes characterization of such physical attributes as physical appearance, weight, density, shape/geometry, degree, and type of SNF cladding damage. The testing described also includes the measurement/examination of such chemical attributes as radionuclide content, microstructure, and corrosion product c...

  4. Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

  5. Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

  6. Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of the geologic isolation of radioactive materials from the biosphere requires an intimate knowledge of site geologic conditions, which is gained through precharacterization and site characterization studies. This report presents the results of an intensive literature review, analysis and compilation to delineate the information needs, applicable techniques and evaluation criteria for programs to adequately characterize a site in six geologic media. These media, in order of presentation, are: granite, shale, basalt, tuff, bedded salt and dome salt. Guidelines are presented to assess the efficacy (application, effectiveness, and resolution) of currently used exploratory and testing techniques for precharacterization or characterization of a site. These guidelines include the reliability, accuracy and resolution of techniques deemed acceptable, as well as cost estimates of various field and laboratory techniques used to obtain the necessary information. Guidelines presented do not assess the relative suitability of media. 351 refs., 10 figs., 31 tabs.

  7. The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior suggestive of CO{sub 2} seepage without need for detailed understanding of natural system processes. Because of the local extrema in CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in natural systems, simple steepest-descent algorithms are not effective and evolutionary computation algorithms are proposed as a paradigm for dynamic monitoring networks to pinpoint CO{sub 2} seepage areas.

  8. Geologic Maps Geology 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Geologic Maps Geology 200 Geology for Environmental Scientists #12;Geologic Map of the US #12;Symbols found on geologic maps #12;Horizontal Strata #12;Geologic map of part of the Grand Canyon. Each color represents a different formation. #12;Inclined Strata #12;Dome #12;Geologic map of the Black Hills

  9. Quality characterization of western Cretaceous coal from the Colorado Plateau as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Colorado Plateau Coal Assessment program is to provide an overview of the geologic setting, distribution, resources, and quality of Cretaceous coal in the Colorado Plateau. This assessment, which is part of the US Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program, is different from previous coal assessments in that the major emphasis is placed on coals that are most likely to provide energy over the next few decades. The data is also being collected and stored in digital format that can be updated as new information becomes available. Environmental factors may eventually control how coal will be mined, and determine to what extent measures will be implemented to reduce trace element emissions. In the future, increased emphasis will also be placed on coal combustion products and the challenges of waste product disposal or utilization. Therefore, coal quality characterization is an important aspect of the coal assessment program in that it provides important data that will influence future utilization of this resource. The Colorado Plateau study is being completed in cooperation with the US Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, Arizona Geological Survey, Colorado Geological Survey, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, and the Utah Geological Survey. Restrictions on coal thickness and overburden will be applied to the resource calculations and the resources will be categorized by land ownership. In some areas these studies will also delineate areas where coal mining may be restricted because of land use, industrial, social, or environmental factors. Emphasis is being placed on areas where the coal is controlled by the Federal Government.

  10. Listed waste determination report. Environmental characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 23, 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice clarifying interim status requirements for the management of radioactive mixed waste thereby subjecting the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and other applicable Department of Energy (DOE) sites to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Therefore, the DOE was required to submit a Part A Permit application for each treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) unit within the INEL, defining the waste codes and processes to be regulated under RCRA. The September 1990 revised Part A Permit application, that was approved by the State of Idaho identified 101 potential acute and toxic hazardous waste codes (F-, P-, and U- listed wastes according to 40 CFR 261.31 and 40 CFR 261.33) for some TSD units at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Most of these waste were assumed to have been introduced into the High-level Liquid Waste TSD units via laboratory drains connected to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) evaporator (PEW system). At that time, a detailed and systematic evaluation of hazardous chemical use and disposal practices had not been conducted to determine if F-, P-, or Unlisted waste had been disposed to the PEW system. The purpose of this investigation was to perform a systematic and detailed evaluation of the use and disposal of the 101 F-, P-, and Unlisted chemicals found in the approved September 1990 Part A Permit application. This investigation was aimed at determining which listed wastes, as defined in 40 CFR 261.31 (F-listed) and 261.33 (P & Unlisted) were discharged to the PEW system. Results of this investigation will be used to support revisions to the RCRA Part A Permit application.

  11. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  13. Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study was performed at West Coalinga Field in California.

  14. Reservoir architecture modeling: Nonstationary models for quantitative geological characterization. Final report, April 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, D.; Epili, D.; Kelkar, M.; Redner, R.; Reynolds, A.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was comprised of four investigations: facies architecture; seismic modeling and interpretation; Markov random field and Boolean models for geologic modeling of facies distribution; and estimation of geological architecture using the Bayesian/maximum entropy approach. This report discusses results from all four investigations. Investigations were performed using data from the E and F units of the Middle Frio Formation, Stratton Field, one of the major reservoir intervals in the Gulf Coast Basin.

  15. Use of integrated geologic and geophysical information for characterizing the structure of fracture systems at the US/BK Site, Grimsel Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, S.J.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture systems form the primary fluid flow paths in a number of rock types, including some of those being considered for high level nuclear waste repositories. In some cases, flow along fractures must be modeled explicitly as part of a site characterization effort. Fractures commonly are concentrated in fracture zones, and even where fractures are seemingly ubiquitous, the hydrology of a site can be dominated by a few discrete fracture zones. We have implemented a site characterization methodology that combines information gained from geophysical and geologic investigations. The general philosophy is to identify and locate the major fracture zones, and then to characterize their systematics. Characterizing the systematics means establishing the essential and recurring patterns in which fractures are organized within the zones. We make a concerted effort to use information on the systematics of the fracture systems to link the site-specific geologic, borehole and geophysical information. This report illustrates how geologic and geophysical information on geologic heterogeneities can be integrated to guide the development of hydrologic models. The report focuses on fractures, a particularly common type of geologic heterogeneity. However, many aspects of the methodology we present can be applied to other geologic heterogeneities as well. 57 refs., 40 figs., 1 tab.

  16. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m in diameter. 2) geological characterization - includingBasic Objectives Geological characterization Is the process

  17. RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well characterized with much of its data being non-proprietary...

  18. Heavy crude and tar sands: Hydrocarbons for the 21st century. Volume 1, Geology, characterization and mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 1 is concerned with the geology of the resources and with the mining of those occurring at or near the earth`s surface. The chemical characterization of natural bitumens and heavy oil is the subject of 15 papers. These concentrate on those properties which govern the exploitability and use of these hydrocarbons. Six reports deal with exploration for bitumens and certain aspects of their later development. No less than three of the papers investigate the trace metals and their possible role in comprehending the occurrence of the bitumens and, therefore, the clues they may offer for the location of additional deposits. Another eight reports are concerned directly with the geologic occurrence of specific resource accumulations. These deposits are found in Canada, China, Madagascar, Nigeria, and Venezuela. One report describes a model that may be applied in basin analysis for predicting the composition of heavy oils expelled from the sources rocks of the basin. Additional papers then characterize the resources found in Indonesia, Iran, and the USA. Volume 1 concludes with the reports on the many kinds of bitumen extraction and use. Not only are innovative techniques evolving for the extraction of the material but also for its economic enhancement through the exploitation of coproducts. Ten papers deal with bitumen mining and its present, or prospective, utilization in places like the Mongolia Republic, the State of Utah in the USA, Trinidad in Latin America or Nigeria in Africa. Each paper has been processed separately for the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in the J/TR section based on neutron log porosity values. The only zones in Rizer #1 that appear to be porous were fractured diabase units where saline formation water was flowing into the borehole. Two geocellular models were created for the SC and GA study area. Flow simulation modeling was performed on the SC data set. The injection simulation used the newly acquired basin data as well as the Petrel 3-D geologic model that included geologic structure. Due to the new basin findings as a result of the newly acquired data, during phase two of the modeling the diabase unit was used as reservoir and the sandstone units were used as caprock. Conclusion are: 1) the SGR basin is composed of numerous sub-basins, 2) this study only looked at portions of two sub-basins, 3) in SC, 30 million tonnes of CO2 can be injected into the diabase units if the fracture network is continuous through the units, 4) due to the severity of the faulting there is no way of assuring the injected CO2 will not migrate upward into the overlying Coastal Plain aquifers, 5) in Georgia there appears to porous zones in the J/TR sandstones, 6) as in SC there is faulting in the sub-basin and the seismic suggest the faulting extends upward into the Coastal Plain making that area not suitable for CO2 sequestration, 7) the complex faulting observed at both study areas appear to be associated with transfer fault zones (Heffner 2013), if sub-basins in the Georgia portion of the SGR basin can be located that are far away from the transfer fault zones there is a strong possibility of sequestering CO2 in these areas, and 9) the SGR basin covers area in three states and this project only studied two small areas so there is enormous potential for CO2 sequestration in other portions the basin and further research needs to be done to find these areas.

  20. Geological characterization and 3D visualizations of the gas storage reservoir at Hillsboro field, Montgomery County, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Huff, B.G. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological characterizations, modeling and 3-D computer-generated visualizations of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone at the Hillsboro Gas Storage field in Montgomery County, Illinois, are discussed. Petrophysical analyses reveal four distinct hydraulic flow units in six cored wells. Furthermore, four lithologies, identified by thin section petrography, are associated with the various hydraulic units. Fieldwide visualizations of 3-D distributions of petrophysically-derived attributes reservoir quality index (RQI) and flow zone indicator (FZI) -- show considerable vertical variability but lateral continuity. This finding explains why it is easier to expand the gas bubble laterally than vertically. Advantages of the 3-D reservoir description of Hillsboro Gas Storage field include (1) improved definition of the spatial porosity distribution which leads to better estimation of reservoir volumetrics; (2) improved definition of reservoir hydraulic flow zones; and (3) development of realistic reservoir model(s) for the simulation and management of the gas storage field.

  1. Characterizing fault-plume intersection probability for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage of CO{sub 2} out of the designated storage region via faults is a widely recognized concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The probability of such leakage can be separated into the probability of a plume encountering a fault and the probability of flow along such a fault. In the absence of deterministic fault location information, the first probability can be calculated from regional fault population statistics and modeling of the plume shape and size. In this study, fault statistical parameters were measured or estimated for WESTCARB's Phase III pilot test injection in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Combining CO{sub 2} plume model predictions with estimated fault characteristics resulted in a 3% probability that the CO{sub 2} plume will encounter a fault fully offsetting the 180 m (590 ft) thick seal. The probability of leakage is lower, likely much lower, as faults with this offset are probably low-permeability features in this area.

  2. 20 y 50 y 500 y Geological characterization of the TEEP study area is based on the examination of two deep wells,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Geological characterization of the TEEP study area is based on the examination of two deep by 360 km2) structural basin, bounded by the Big Horn Mountains and Casper Arch on the west, Miles City to the south, located in northeast Wyoming and eastern The Two Elk Energy Park (TEEP) is a commercialscale

  3. Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. Performed a theoretical and numerical study to examine which subsurface features the surface seismic method actually resolves.

  4. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  5. Geologic reservoir characterization of Humphreys sandstone (Pennsylvanian), east Velma field, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowen, M.K.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Velma field is located in the Ardmore basin, Stephens County, Oklahoma, on the north flank of a truncated anticline with dips that range from 30/degrees/-60/degrees/. The discovery well of the Humphreys sand unit was drilled in April 1951 and an original oil in place of 32.7 million bbl was calculated. Primary depletion was by solution gas drive with gas reinjection and gravity drainage which was enhanced by the steep structural dip of the field. A waterflood that was initiated in 1983 and a proposed CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement program to further enhance field recovery prompted the need to develop a detailed geologic description of the reservoir. Core studies indicate that the Humphreys sandstone was deposited in a shallow marine, tidally dominated environment. Subfacies include sand-rich tidal flat and tidal channel deposits. The unit is primarily composed of very fine to fine-grained, moderately to well-sorted quartzarenites. Dominant sedimentary structures include bidirectional and unidirectional current ripples, cross-laminations, common slump structures, and zones abundant and scattered burrows.

  6. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

  7. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  8. Petrofacies analysis - the petrophysical tool for geologic/engineering reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.; Guy, W.J.; Gerlach, P.M. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petrofacies analysis is defined as the characterization and classification of pore types and fluid saturations as revealed by petrophysical measures of a reservoir. The word {open_quotes}petrofacies{close_quotes} makes an explicit link between petroleum engineers concerns with pore characteristics as arbiters of production performance, and the facies paradigm of geologists as a methodology for genetic understanding and prediction. In petrofacies analysis, the porosity and resistivity axes of the classical Pickett plot are used to map water saturation, bulk volume water, and estimated permeability, as well as capillary pressure information, where it is available. When data points are connected in order of depth within a reservoir, the characteristic patterns reflect reservoir rock character and its interplay with the hydrocarbon column. A third variable can be presented at each point on the crossplot by assigning a color scale that is based on other well logs, often gamma ray or photoelectric effect, or other derived variables. Contrasts between reservoir pore types and fluid saturations will be reflected in changing patterns on the crossplot and can help discriminate and characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Many hundreds of analyses of well logs facilitated by spreadsheet and object-oriented programming have provided the means to distinguish patterns typical of certain complex pore types for sandstones and carbonate reservoirs, occurrences of irreducible water saturation, and presence of transition zones. The result has been an improved means to evaluate potential production such as bypassed pay behind pipe and in old exploration holes, or to assess zonation and continuity of the reservoir. Petrofacies analysis is applied in this example to distinguishing flow units including discrimination of pore type as assessment of reservoir conformance and continuity. The analysis is facilitated through the use of color cross sections and cluster analysis.

  9. Development of Enabling Scientific Tools to Characterize the Geologic Subsurface at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenna, Timothy C.; Herron, Michael M.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report to the Department of Energy provides a summary of activities conducted under our exploratory grant, funded through U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program in the category of enabling scientific tools, which covers the period from July 15, 2010 to July 14, 2013. The main goal of this exploratory project is to determine the parameters necessary to translate existing borehole log data into reservoir properties following scientifically sound petrophysical relationships. For this study, we focused on samples and Ge-based spectral gamma logging system (SGLS) data collected from wells located in the Hanford 300 Area. The main activities consisted of 1) the analysis of available core samples for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical; 2) evaluation of selected spectral gamma logs, environmental corrections, and calibration; 3) development of algorithms and a proposed workflow that permits translation of log responses into useful reservoir properties such as lithology, matrix density, porosity, and permeability. These techniques have been successfully employed in the petroleum industry; however, the approach is relatively new when applied to subsurface remediation. This exploratory project has been successful in meeting its stated objectives. We have demonstrated that our approach can lead to an improved interpretation of existing well log data. The algorithms we developed can utilize available log data, in particular gamma, and spectral gamma logs, and continued optimization will improve their application to ERSP goals of understanding subsurface properties.

  10. Characterizing the Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions in Different Subsurface Geologic Environments Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Molly

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow aquifers located near streams can be affected by groundwater contamination as a result of recharge from surface water; however, stream stage variation, subsurface geology, and seasonal changes can alter the magnitude of groundwater...

  11. YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    YOUNG GEOLOGY UNIVERSITY May, 1962 GEOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN WASATCH MOUNTAINS AND VICIN~IM,UTAH C O ....................J. Keith Rigby 80 Economic Geology of North-Central Utah ...,............... Kcnneth C.Bdodc 85 Rod Log ........................Lehi F. Hintze, J. Ka# Ri&, & ClydeT. Hardy 95 Geologic Map of Southern

  12. Bibliography of publications related to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project prepared by U.S. Geological Survey personnel through April 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glanzman, V.M.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personnel of the US Geological Survey have participated in nuclear-waste management studies in the State of Nevada since the mid-1970`s. A bibliography of publications prepared principally for the US Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (formerly Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations) through April 1991 contains 475 entries in alphabetical order. The listing includes publications prepared prior to the inception of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project in April 1977 and selected publications of interest to the Yucca Mountain region. 480 refs.

  13. Determination and Characterization of Ice Propagation Mechanisms on Surfaces Undergoing Dropwise Condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Jeffrey B.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms responsible for ice propagation on surfaces undergoing dropwise condensation have been determined and characterized. Based on experimental data acquired non-invasively with high speed quantitative microscopy, the freezing process...

  14. Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles, for Large-Scale Geologic Storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Geomechanics Technologies has completed a detailed characterization study of the Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California area for large-scale CO2 storage. This effort has included: an evaluation of existing wells in both State and Federal waters, field acquisition of about 175 km (109 mi) of new seismic data, new well drilling, development of integrated 3D geologic, geomechanics, and fluid flow models for the area. The geologic analysis indicates that more than 796 MMt of storage capacity is available within the Pliocene and Miocene formations in the Graben for midrange geologic estimates (P50). Geomechanical analyses indicate that injection can be conducted without significant risk for surface deformation, induced stresses or fault activation. Numerical analysis of fluid migration indicates that injection into the Pliocene Formation at depths of 1525 m (5000 ft) would lead to undesirable vertical migration of the CO2 plume. Recent well drilling however, indicates that deeper sand is present at depths exceeding 2135 m (7000 ft), which could be viable for large volume storage. For vertical containment, injection would need to be limited to about 250,000 metric tons per year per well, would need to be placed at depths greater than 7000ft, and would need to be placed in new wells located at least 1 mile from any existing offset wells. As a practical matter, this would likely limit storage operations in the Wilmington Graben to about 1 million tons per year or less. A quantitative risk analysis for the Wilmington Graben indicate that such large scale CO2 storage in the area would represent higher risk than other similar size projects in the US and overseas.

  15. Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

  16. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1995-96, the third year of the project. Most work consisted of interpreting the large quantity of data collected over two field seasons. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies. The primary objective of the regional stratigraphic analysis is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy and gross reservoir characteristics of the Ferron Sandstone as exposed in outcrop. The primary objective of the case-studies work is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir.

  17. Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html Revised: 03/2013 Geology is a scientific discipline that aims to understand every aspect of modern and ancient Earth. A degree in geology the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees. A master

  18. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald S. Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  19. Determination of platinum and palladium in geologic samples by ion exchange chromatography with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.J.; Biggs, W.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative procedure to the classical fire assay method for determining Pt and Pd in sulfide ores, concentrates, and furnace mattes is presented. A suitable amount of sample is digested with aqua regla and filtered and any remaining gangue is digested with a mixture of HF and HClO/sub 4/. The solution is filtered and the residue fused with sodium peroxide granules. The fused salts are dissolved in a dilute HCl acid solution and all three solutions combined. The resultant solution is passed through a Bio-Rad AG 50W-X8 cation exchange resin in the H/sup +/ form. The chlorocomplex anions of Pt and Pd are not retained by the cation exchange resin while the base metal cations are efficiently removed from the eluent. Pt and Pd concentrations are subsequently determined with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Preliminary experiments showing the method's potential expandability to Au are included.

  20. Moderately to Poorly Welded Tuff, Bishop, California: Geophysical and Geological Characterization to Determine the Source of Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    of Earth, Material, and Planetary Sciences, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio@swri.org) , Department of Earth, Material, and Planetary Sciences, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San in the Volcanic Tableland (Bishop, California) as an analog site because some Martian volcanoes and the Stealth

  1. MODERATELY TO POORLY WELDED TUFF, BISHOP, CALIFORNIA: GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF RADAR SCATTERING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    . Stillman2 , 1 Dept. of Earth, Material, and Planetary Sci- ences, Southwest Research Institute,® 6220- bleland, Bishop, California (Fig. 1), as an analog [1] because some Martian volcanoes and the Stealth

  2. Characterization of the geology, geochemistry, hydrology and microbiology of the in-situ air stripping demonstration site at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, C.A.; Looney, B.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Kaback, D.S.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is the location of an Integrated Demonstration Project designed to evaluate innovative remediation technologies for environmental restoration at sites contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. This demonstration utilizes directionally drilled horizontal wells to deliver gases and extract contaminants from the subsurface. Phase I of the Integrated Demonstration focused on the application and development of in-situ air stripping technologies to remediate soils and sediments above and below the water table as well as groundwater contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. The objective of this report is to provide baseline information on the geology, geochemistry, hydrology, and microbiology of the demonstration site prior to the test. The distribution of contaminants in soils and sediments in the saturated zone and groundwater is emphasized. These data will be combined with data collected after the demonstration in order to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping. New technologies for environmental characterization that were evaluated include depth discrete groundwater sampling (HydroPunch) and three-dimensional modeling of contaminant data.

  3. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the ferron sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Allison, M.L.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1994-95, the second year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also continued to develop preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

  4. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be collected. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1993-94, the first year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also developed preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) development of reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

  5. Geology and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Anderson, P.B.; Morris, T.H.; Dewey, J.A. Jr.; Mattson, A.; Foster, C.B.; Snelgrove, S.H.; Ryer, T.A.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone (Utah) project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a 3-D model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies. The primary objective of the regional stratigraphic analysis is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy and gross reservoir characteristics of the Ferron Sandstone as exposed in outcrop. The primary objective of the case-studies work is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir. Work on tasks 3 and 4 consisted of developing two- and three-dimensional reservoir models at various scales. The bulk of the work on these tasks is being completed primarily during the last year of the project, and is incorporating the data and results of the regional stratigraphic analysis and case-studies tasks.

  6. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  7. A Handbook for Geology Students Why study Geology?.............................................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    1 A Handbook for Geology Students #12;2 Contents Why study Geology ..................................................................................7 Why Appalachian Geology?................................................................................10 Geology Faculty and Staff

  8. Structural Geology of a Central Segment of the Qilian Shan-Nan Shan Thrust Belt: Implications for the Magnitude of Cenozoic Shortening in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reith, Robin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization of the Gangcha complex in the West Qinling terrane, central China: Journal of the Geological

  9. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Deliverable 2.5.4, Ferron Sandstone lithologic strip logs, Emergy & Sevier Counties, Utah: Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip logs for 491 wells were produced from a digital subsurface database of lithologic descriptions of the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale. This subsurface database covers wells from the parts of Emery and Sevier Counties in central Utah that occur between Ferron Creek on the north and Last Chance Creek on the south. The lithologic descriptions were imported into a logging software application designed for the display of stratigraphic data. Strip logs were produced at a scale of one inch equals 20 feet. The strip logs were created as part of a study by the Utah Geological Survey to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and qualitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir using the Ferron Sandstone as a surface analogue. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Geoscience/Engineering Reservoir Characterization Program.

  10. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

  11. Regional Geologic Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  12. Regional Geologic Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  13. GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    177Geology GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE A major in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology 160, 185, 211, 311, 330, 350

  14. Seismic characterization of fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JM Carcione

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

  15. Geologic report for the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary geologic site characterization study was conducted at the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits Site, which is part of the Weldon Spring Site, in St. Charles County, Missouri. The Raffinate Pits Site is under the custody of the Department of Energy (DOE). Surrounding properties, including the Weldon Spring chemical plant, are under the control of the Department of the Army. The study determined the following parameters: site stratigraphy, lithology and general conditions of each stratigraphic unit, and groundwater characteristics and their relation to the geology. These parameters were used to evaluate the potential of the site to adequately store low-level radioactive wastes. The site investigation included trenching, geophysical surveying, borehole drilling and sampling, and installing observation wells and piezometers to monitor groundwater and pore pressures.

  16. Computer Modelling of 3D Geological Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodge, B G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geological surveying presently uses methods and tools for the computer modeling of 3D-structures of the geographical subsurface and geotechnical characterization as well as the application of geoinformation systems for management and analysis of spatial data, and their cartographic presentation. The objectives of this paper are to present a 3D geological surface model of Latur district in Maharashtra state of India. This study is undertaken through the several processes which are discussed in this paper to generate and visualize the automated 3D geological surface model of a projected area.

  17. Surface roughness and geological mapping at sub-hectometer scale from the High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cord, Aurélien

    and characterized in terms of roughness. Key words: Geological Processes, Impact Processes, Image Processing, Mars valuable insights into the characterization of and discrimination between these geological processesSurface roughness and geological mapping at sub-hectometer scale from the High Resolution Stereo

  18. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part

  19. An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

  20. Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces Krista Pursuing a degree within the Geology & Geological Engineering department Record of financial need the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in geological engineering in 1982. After earning

  1. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section Read Ch. 7 before you begin. The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic

  2. Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html Revised: 04/2004 Environmental geology in environmental geology provides the diverse skills required to work in many different employment settings issues. Within the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees

  3. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  4. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walls, Joel; Taner, M. Turhan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for seismic characterization of subsurface Earth formations includes determining at least one of compressional velocity and shear velocity, and determining reservoir parameters of subsurface Earth formations, at least including density, from data obtained from a wellbore penetrating the formations. A quality factor for the subsurface formations is calculated from the velocity, the density and the water saturation. A synthetic seismogram is calculated from the calculated quality factor and from the velocity and density. The synthetic seismogram is compared to a seismic survey made in the vicinity of the wellbore. At least one parameter is adjusted. The synthetic seismogram is recalculated using the adjusted parameter, and the adjusting, recalculating and comparing are repeated until a difference between the synthetic seismogram and the seismic survey falls below a selected threshold.

  5. Occurrence and Stability of Glaciations in Geologic Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Kelin

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth is characterized by episodes of glaciations and periods of minimal or no ice through geologic time. Using the linear energy balance model (EBM), nonlinear EBM with empirical ice sheet schemes, the general circulation model coupled with an ice...

  6. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. 1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES · For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to understand Material Characterization for Intermediate-scale Testing to Develop Strategies for Geologic Sequestration to generate comprehensive data sets. Due to the nature of the CO2 geological sequestration where supercritical

  9. Quantitative determination and characterization of iron coatings on rice root surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cy-Chain

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joe B. Dixon Iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) formed on rice root surfaces by the ox- idation of ferrous ions in the soil solution by oxygen released from the roots. The FeOOH coatings were extracted by dithionite...-citrate- bi. carbonate treatment. Three factors (rice variety, growth stage of rice and soil type) were determined to be statistically significant in relation to the amount of iron oxyhydroxide per unit weight of dry root. The accumulation of Fe...

  10. Characterizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective Binding of AlkaliImpact of

  11. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, July 12, 1990--September 12, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since reservoirs are heterogeneous, nonuniform, and anisotropic, the success or failure of many enhanced oil recovery techniques rests on our prediction of internal variability and the paths of fluid flow in the reservoir. The main objective of this project is to develop a greater understanding of reservoir heterogeneities through dispersion measurement. In this annual report, an approach to ways to estimate the dispersivities of reservoir rocks from well logs is presented. From a series of rock property measurements and dispersion tests the following studies have been made: A measure of rock heterogeneity is developed by using the effluent concentration at one pore volume injection in a matched viscosity miscible displacement. By this approach, a heterogeneity factor is determined from the measured S-shaped dispersion curve. The parameter f in the Coats-Smith capacitance model is redefined as the dispersion fraction f{sub d} (or mechanical mixing fraction). At the f{sub d} pore volume injection, the dynamic miscible displacement efficiency reaches maximum. Reflected on the dispersion curve, this number corresponds to the peak of the first derivative of concentration. With the concept of dispersion fraction, a unique solution to the capacitance model is obtained, and then an equivalent dispersivity is defined. Through experimental data on Berea and Brown sandstone samples, it has been found that the equivalent dispersivity is an exponential function of the heterogeneity factor and can be used as a reservoir characteristic. Through a key parameter of tortuosity, dispersivity is related to rock petrophysical properties. This semi-theoretical relationship forms the basis for determining dispersivities from well logs. The approach is validated through experimental studies on Berea and Brown sandstone samples. It has been found that the equivalent dispersivity is an exponential function of the heterogeneity factor and can be used as a reservoir characteristic.

  12. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  13. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  14. Geology 102 --Earth, Life, and Time University of Tennessee --Fall 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    -- tornados, hurricanes, volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, and the constant threat of global warming. Yet interactions throughout the geologic past. Finally, we will examine the geologic record to determine the causes

  15. BS in GEOLOGY (694022) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    351 Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology

  16. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for geologic carbon sequestration in the Midcontinent Rift System in Minnesota, Minnesota Geological Survey IN THE MIDCONTINENT RIFT SYSTEM OF MINNESOTA : ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL FOR DEEP GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION OF CARBONMINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director POTENTIAL CAPACITY FOR GEOLOGIC CARBON

  17. REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ASTER that operate in visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum and Reflection Radiometer) Imagery Collection in CPRM Examples of sensors used in the CPRM geologic projects #12

  18. BS in GEOLOGY: Environmental Geology Emphasis (694029) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology Geol 410

  19. CX-005159: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005159: Categorical Exclusion Determination United States-China Advanced Coal Technologies Consortium - Indiana Geological Survey CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  20. Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well and geomechanical data; 2) determination of the potential mechanisms of deformation and failure, and their numerical

  1. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  2. Verification of geological/engineering model in waterflood areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, B.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Honarpour, M.; Schatzinger, R.A.; Tillman, R.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a detailed geological/engineering model is the basis for development of the methodology for characterizing reservoir heterogeneity. The NIPER geological/engineering model is the subject of this report. The area selected for geological and production performance studies is a four-section area within the Powder River Basin which includes the Tertiary Incentive Project (TIP) pilot. Log, well test, production, and core data were acquired for construction of the geological model of a barrier island reservoir. In this investigation, emphasis was on the synthesis and quantification of the abundant geological information acquired from the literature and field studies (subsurface and outcrop) by mapping the geological heterogeneities that influence fluid flow. The geological model was verified by comparing it with the exceptionally complete production data available for Bell Creek field. This integration of new and existing information from various geological, geophysical, and engineering disciplines has enabled better definition of the heterogeneities that influence production during different recovery operations. 16 refs., 26 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Geologic provinces of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northcutt, R.A.; Campbell, J.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The location of most of Oklahoma`s oil and gas resources are either influenced by, or are the direct result of Pennsylvanian tectonics and sedimentation patterns. Therefore, the present study also defines provinces in the subsurface on the basis of geological criteria. The authors have attempted to use the originally published names for the recognized provinces. However, we have also used the most geologically correct names, i.e., Nemaha Uplift, Nemaha Fault Zone, and Central Oklahoma Fault, in lieu of Nemaha {open_quotes}Ridge.{close_quotes} Oklahoma is separated into five major uplifts and five major basins. The Gulf Coastal Plain is not included in this study because it is a veneer of Cretaceous cover that masks significant structures. Faults are the most common boundary element. Although their precise age commonly is known only approximately, their geographic location is less controversial, except in detail. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries are based on less precise geological information. The major example of a surface stratigraphic/structural boundary is the southwestern limit of the Ozark Uplift in eastern Oklahoma. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries in the subsurface are commonly based on structural or isopachous contours from well or geophysical data, or on a structural trend, as well as the experience of the authors. Basement structure is preferred. An example is the boundary that separates the Marietta Basin from adjacent geologic elements.

  4. GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION Deformations around transpressive plate boundaries numerical models constrained by global positioning system (GPS) observations and Geology, September 2010; v. 38; no. 9; p. 823­826; doi: 10.1130/G30963.1; 3 figures; 1 table. © 2010 Geological Society

  5. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

  6. The Lapworth Museum of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    The Lapworth Museum of Geology www.lapworth.bham.ac.uk www.bham.ac.uk Events The Lapworth Lectures take place on evenings during University term time. These lectures are on a wide range of geological geological topics, usually based around collections in the museum. These provide an opportunity to see

  7. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  8. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  9. Thesis submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Geology (University of Canterbury) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thesis submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Geology (University of Canterbury of Geological Sciences (Christchurch, New Zealand) Thesis defended on the 9th of February 2010 PhD Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3 Characterization and comparison of landslide dynamics in different tec- tonic and climatic

  10. Geo-Logical Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks* Dulanjalie C. Dhanapala and Anura P. Jayasumana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayasumana, Anura P.

    Geo-Logical Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks* Dulanjalie C. Dhanapala and Anura P. Jayasumana Abstract-- Geo-Logical Routing (GLR) is a novel technique that combines the advantages of geographic. In logical domain, a node is characterized by a VC vector consisting of minimum number of hops to a set

  11. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  12. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  13. Petroleum geology of Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burollet, P.F. (CIFEG, Paris (France)); Ferjami, A.B.; Mejri, F. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discoveries and important oil shows have proven the existence of hydrocarbons in newly identified depocenters and reservoirs. In general, except for some areas around the producing fields, Tunisia is largely underdrilled. The national company ETAP has decided to release data and to publish a synthesis on the petroleum geology of Tunisia. The geology of Tunisia provides a fine example of the contrast between Alpine folding, which typifies northern Tunisia and the African craton area of the Saharan part. Eastern Tunisia corresponds to an unstable platform forming plains or low hills and extending eastwards to the shallow Pelagian Sea. There are a wide variety of basins: central and northern Tunisia represents a front basin the Saharan Ghadames basin or the Chott trough are sag basins; the Gulf of Gabes was formed as a distension margin the Gulf of Hammamet is a composite basin and several transversal grabens cut across the country, including offshore, and are rift-type basins. All these features are known to be oil prolific throughout the world. Two large fields and many modest-size pools are known in Tunisia. Oil and gas fields in the surrounding countries, namely the Saharan fields of Algeria and Libya the large Bouri field offshore Tripolitania and discoveries in the Italian part of the Straits of Sicily, suggest a corresponding potential in Tunisia. Exposed paleogeographic and structural maps, balanced sections, and examples of fields and traps will support an optimistic evaluation of the future oil exploration in Tunisia.

  14. WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum (structural)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum Geology GEL 3300 (structural) GEL 3400 (sed/strat) Geology Elective 1 Geology Elective 2 Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 PHY 2130/31 MAT 2010 PHY 2140/41 CHEM 1220/30 MAT 1800 Cognates GEL 5593 (writing intensive) GEL 3160 (petrology) GEL 3650 (field camp) Geology Elective 3 GEL 2130

  15. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  16. CX-011005: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-011005: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scalable, Automated, Semi permanent Seismic Method for Detecting Carbon Dioxide Plume Extent During Geological... CX(s) Applied:...

  17. CX-011006: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-011006: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scalable, Automated, Semi Permanent Seismic Method for Detecting Carbon Dioxide Plume Extent During Geological... CX(s) Applied:...

  18. GRADUATE PROGRAM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5342 Geological Engineering: Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 EOSC 535 Transport Processes in Porous Media 3 2 Site Investigation and Management 3 2 CIVL 574 Experimental Soil Mechanics 3 2 CIVL 579 Geosynthetics 2 Geological Engineering Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 CIVL 408 Geo-Environmental Engineering 3 2 CIVL 410

  19. GEOLOGY AND FRACTURE SYSTEM AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkiewicz, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of underground test site •• 1.5 Regional bedrock geology.Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine area.Fig. 2.1 Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine

  20. Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eliason, Jay R. (Richland, WA); Eliason, Valerie L. C. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

  1. OPTIMAL GEOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE DISPOSAL IN SALINE AQUIFERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan D. Hovorka

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  2. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  3. Degradation(%) Bureau of Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and geomechanical modeling Randy Marrett, DGS; quantitative analysis and structural geology Julia Gale, BEG; Develop the capability to accurately predict reservoir-scale deformation using geomechanical, structural, diagenetic, and linked geomechanical/diagenetic models; Improve the usefulness of seismic response

  4. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. ? Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. ? Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  5. Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    4-H 340 Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology Member Guide OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE #12;Contents 4-H Geology Project 3 Project Recommendations 3 Books on Geology 4 Trip Planning 4 Contests 7 Identification of Rocks and Minerals 7 Physical Properties of Minerals 8 Generalized Geologic

  6. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  7. 242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Geology Chairperson: Abdel. Assistant Instructor: P Hajj-Chehadeh, Abdel-Halim The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology, and Master of Science degrees in certain areas of the vast

  8. Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012 1. Learning Goals ALL students in geology, classification schemes, geologic history and processes, and the structure of the Earth. 3. demonstrate an understanding of the variability, complexity, and interdependency of processes within geologic systems. 4. use

  9. Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, David

    Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, miningCareers in Geology Department of Geosciences #12;Geology is the scientific study of planet Earth on the following pages. UNL students examine tidal flats on a recent trip to the Bahamas. #12; Economic geology

  10. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE WWW.GEOLOGY" for a complete range of advising information plus the latest Environmental Geology requirements. CORE COURSES (check each as completed): (30 credits) ____Choose one of the following introductory geology classes

  11. What Geology Has To Say About Global Warming William Menke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    insights about earth's climate that can be applied to the present-day global warming debate. The geological record of ancient climate is excellent. Ancient temperatures can be determined very precisely, because the composition of the shells of corals and other marine organisms varies measurably with it. Furthermore

  12. Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Memoir 2008/03 (CG2008_M03) The Douvilleiceratidae (Ammonoidea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Carnets de Géologie / Notebooks on Geology - Memoir 2008/03 (CG2008_M03) 1 The Douvilleiceratidae genus or subgenus characterizes a discrete stratigraphic interval. In addition, the Cheloniceras stratotype area at Cassis-La Bédoule (SE France).- Carnets de Géologie / Notebooks on Geology, Brest, Memoir

  13. pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart 1101, 1102, 1103,1104, 1105 2250 3160 2500 hours geology junior standing; six hours geology depends on course senior standing, permission hours geology six hours geology Evolution of the Earth Geophysics Physical Geology , Historical Geology

  14. Geologic history of the National Geotechnical Experimentation Sites, Texas A&M University Riverside Campus, Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Susan Patricia

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science Foundation. The NGES sites were created to accelerate research in geotechnical and geo-environmental engineering by allowing multi-user access to well characterized sand and clay areas. The geologic history in this report will contribute...

  15. www.geology.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geomorphology, geomechanics, engineering geology, and teaching and learning. e PSU program serves geology majors Glaciology Geomechanics Environmental and engineering geology K-12 education In addition to their work

  16. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

  17. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

  18. Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, AnticipatingUSA Macdougall, Doug. Why Geology Matters: Decoding theE-book available. Why Geology Matters pursues two goals: to

  19. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington State Department of Natural Resources Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey Wyoming State Geological Survey...

  20. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  1. Performance of Assisted History Matching Techniques When Utilizing Multiple Initial Geologic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Akshay

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the geological information, and performed petrophysical log evaluation along with well test data calibration. The ensemble of static models obtained was carried through the AHM methodology. I used sensitivity analysis to determine the most important dynamic...

  2. Geological Disposal Concept Selection Aligned with a Voluntarism Process - 13538

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, Glenda; King, Samantha [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)] [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK's Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD) is currently at a generic stage in its implementation programme. The UK site selection process is a voluntarist process and, as yet, no communities have decided to participate. RWMD has set out a process to describe how a geological disposal concept would be selected for the range of higher activity wastes in the UK inventory, including major steps and decision making points, aligned with the stages of the UK site selection process. A platform of information is being developed on geological disposal concepts at various stages of implementation internationally and, in order to build on international experience, RWMD is developing its approach to technology transfer. The UK has a range of different types of higher activity wastes with different characteristics; therefore a range of geological disposal concepts may be needed. In addition to identifying key aspects for considering the compatibility of different engineered barrier systems for different types of waste, RWMD is developing a methodology to determine minimum separation distances between disposal modules in a co-located geological disposal facility. RWMD's approach to geological disposal concept selection is intended to be flexible, recognising the long term nature of the project. RWMD is also committed to keeping alternative radioactive waste management options under review; an approach has been developed and periodic reviews of alternative options will be published. (authors)

  3. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle, Juab and Utah Counties, Utah of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle, Juab and Utah Counties, Utah* MARK E. JENSEN UtahGeological and Mineral orogeny, Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle were folded and thrust

  4. GEOLOGY, July 2011 683 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    GEOLOGY, July 2011 683 INTRODUCTION Calcite (CaCO3 ) sedimentation in the ocean represents in the rate and locations of CaCO3 sedimentation and their association with carbon cycle per- turbations over system (e.g., Lyle et al., 2008). However, reconstructing global changes in CaCO3 sedimentation pat

  5. Geology in coal resource utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 37 papers in this book were compiled with an overriding theme in mind: to provide the coal industry with a comprehensive source of information on how geology and geologic concepts can be applied to the many facets of coal resource location, extraction, and utilization. The chapters have been arranged to address the major coal geology subfields of Exploration and Reserve Definition, Reserve Estimation, Coalbed Methane, Underground Coal Gasification, Mining, Coal Quality Concerns, and Environmental Impacts, with papers distributed on the basis of their primary emphasis. To help guide one through the collection, the author has included prefaces at the beginning of each chapter. They are intended as a brief lead-in to the subject of the chapter and an acknowledgement of the papers' connections to the subject and contributions to the chapter. In addition, a brief cross-reference section has been included in each preface to help one find papers of interest in other chapters. The subfields of coal geology are intimately intertwined, and investigations in one area may impact problems in another area. Some subfields tend to blur at their edges, such as with reserve definition and reserve estimation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. GEOLOGY, February 2008 151 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Yemane Asmerom Victor Y. Polyak Department of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, Florida 33149, USA Peter Cole Department of Geology, Cornell College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Ann F. Budd Department of Geoscience

  7. Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    2011 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook #12 Environmental Management 14 Environmental Science 18 Geography 22 Geographic Information Science 26 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook Editors David Hayward, Ilse

  8. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

  9. Roadmap: Geology Environmental Geology -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO] College of Arts This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses on page 2 General Elective 8 #12;Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS

  10. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL) GEOL 102 Our Dynamic Earth: intrODuctiOn tO GEOLOGy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Emphasis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Laboratory study

  11. ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has promoted the systematic philosophical and fundamental study of geology since 1893. The Journal publishes original research across a broad range of subfields in geology, including geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology

  12. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL) geoL 102 our dynAMiC eArtH: introduCtion to geoLogy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Empha- sis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Labo- ratory study

  13. Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break 2015 Interested in field geology? Interested in environmental hazards and climate? Want to visit #12;Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan This is a 3-week course for students interested in mixing field

  14. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baran, Sándor

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological there is a large amount of missing observations, which often is the case in geological applications. We make,predictions,MarkovchainMonteCarlo,simulatedannealing,incomplete observations. INTRODUCTION In many geological applications, there is an interest in predicting properties

  15. R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro-leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Kingdom) and a geological con- sultant for various oil companies. His research focused primarilyAUTHORS R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro- leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Texas 77060; rene.jonk@exxonmobil.com Rene Jonk received his M.Sc. degree in structural geology from

  16. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  17. , UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    , UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

  18. GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

  19. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBONATION AS A CARBON SEQUESTRATION METHOD IN MINNESOTA L. H. Thorleifson, Minnesota Geological Survey carbonation as a carbon sequestration method in Minnesota: Minnesota Geological Survey Open-File Report 11: Minnesota Geological Survey 2 #12;POTENTIAL FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF MINERAL CARBONATION AS A CARBON

  20. Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University © 2006 #12;i PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Ninth Edition Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University #12;ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank

  1. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  2. MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology, Stratigraphy Paleontology, Geography and Environment, Dynamic Geology and Tectonics/ Hydrogeology, Geophysics

  3. Geology and hydrocarbon prospects of Latvia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freimanis, A. (Latvian Dept. of Geology, Riga (Latvia)); Margulis, L.; Brangulis, A.; Kanev, S.; Pomerantseva, R. (Inst. of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Riga (Latvia))

    1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil prospects in Latvia are associated with the Baltic syneclise. Latvia occupies about one fourth of that large tectonic depression; zones of oil accumulation continue there from adjacent areas: the Telshai rampart (Lithuania) and the Leba nose (Polish offshore). The oil prospects in separate areas are determined by their position regarding the sources of oil generation--the Gdansk-Kura and Liepaya depressions. The most prospective areas are the Liepaya-Saldus zone of highs and the Pape-Barta trough. The Liepaya-Saldus zone was situated so that the hydrocarbon migration path crossed it. It probably is an important oil accumulation zone. The paper describes the geology of Latvia and the one oil field in Latvia.

  4. Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

  5. CX-007112: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin - 3-Dimension Seismic SurveyCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1Date: 10/05/2011Location(s): Colleton County, South CarolinaOffice(s): Fossil Energy

  6. CX-008301: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Materials Characterization Laboratory & RadiologicalEnvironment, Safety and Health Training...

  8. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste...

  9. CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s)...

  10. Characterization Activities to Determine the Extent of DNAPL in the Vadose Zone at the A-014 Outfall of A/M Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to perform characterization activities necessary to confirm the presence and extent of DNAPL in the shallow vadose zone near the headwaters of the A-014 Outfall. Following the characterization, additional soil vapor extraction wells and vadose monitoring probes were installed to promote and monitor remediation activities in regions of identified DNAPL.

  11. Marine geology of the Bay of Campeche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creager, Joe S.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY /i & L IBRRAYA B/ iA&Co MARINE GEOLOGY OP SHE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGER ? ? ? Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August, 1958 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography MARINE GEOLOGY OF THE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGEB Approved as to style and content by: JLN. Chairman of Committee Heady Department...

  12. Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic: Fieldstone, natural stone, diagenesis, microscopy with a great interest in sedimentation processes and diagenesis, in petrology and Flemish stratigraphy

  13. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

  14. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

  16. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  17. Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  18. Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, William F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOLOGY AND ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF A WILCOX LIGNITE DEPOSIT IN NORTHEASTERN RUSK COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by William F. Cole Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) ad of Department) August 1980 ABSTRACT Geology and Engineering Geology of a Wilcox Lignite Deposit in Northeastern Rusk County, Texas (August, 1980) William 7. Cole, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman...

  19. Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

  20. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSTRAIN CO2 INJECTION FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOTEOR, and coupled process modeling will investigate the total system including preliminary estimates of CO2

  1. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herron et al 1996) Geomechanics Central to managing anSpectroscopy Core analysis Geomechanics Seismic, VSP Densityare slow reactions. A geomechanics module that features the

  2. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming (Figure 1), we haveextension to the edge of the PRB; and extensive work hasfracture growth in PRB coals from water enhancement

  3. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is from the Upper Slochteren Forma- tion, Rotliegend, offorms the top seal of the Slochteren Sst of the K12B field.

  4. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    may necessitate in drilling additional wells and fur- thercompromised by the drilling of wells. Well bores representoptimal points for drilling new well(s) are automatically

  5. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be necessary to extract coal seam methane or groundwater inCalifornia, March 20-22, 2006 Unmineable coal seams Finally,unmineable coal seams pose substantial chal- lenges in all

  6. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    157 WELL INTEGRITY IN CO 2 ENVIRONMENTS: PERFORMANCE, RISK,of CO 2 injection, wells integrity and long term behavior ofcan compromise the well integrity and thus its functional

  7. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative models enables linking risk to the failure of a specific component, for ex- ample using sensitivity analysis.analysis of the Risks associated to well leakage: aquifer contamination and CO 2 release. Quantitative

  8. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential large-scale commercial projects involving CCS. Apotential risks to human health and the environment from the application of CCS

  9. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that ground and airborne magnetometry can detect steel-casedairborne surveys etc. ). Not all wells can be located with magnetometry.

  10. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,abandoned wells represent a potentially direct route from reservoirabandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,oil well abandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

  12. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN DEPLETED AND NEAR- DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS V. A. KuuskraaDEPLETED AND NEAR-DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS Vello A. Kuuskraaof CO 2 in a depleted oil reservoir: an overview,

  13. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Publication 31, p. 127-155, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1982. Galloway,on Improved Oil Recovery, Tulsa, April 17-21, 2004. King,Oil Recovery Sym- posium, Tulsa, April 21-24. Holm, L.W. ,

  14. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was built according to the seismic interpretation of the Topdimensional surface seismic survey interpretations were not2c 9c Figure 2. Interpretation of seismic lineaments in the

  15. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2c 9c Figure 2. Interpretation of seismic lineaments in thewas built according to the seismic interpretation of the Topdimensional surface seismic survey interpretations were not

  16. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Angeles, Ventura, and Salinas basins, followed by thebasins. Examination of other Paleozoic units shows some fluid density reversals associated with Silurian Salina

  17. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coal bed methane recovery (ECBM). Data from reservoirs incoal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. Also, since oil and gas reservoirs

  18. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are sensitive to rock properties behind the casing and toAttrib- utes and Rock Properties for Mapping Porositybecause information on rock properties is only available

  19. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the rock volume. Oil-production data indicate that theal. , 2006). Historical oil production at depths around 2400logs in regionally dis- oil production tributed wells Well

  20. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery project as a prototypeCO 2 injection for enhanced oil recovery. Indeed, most near-as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery projects. REFERENCES

  1. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are founded on a detailed reservoir data base of over 1,500Reservoirs Large Oil Reservoirs Data Base Reservoirs OOIP (and gas and water wells, reservoir data, and sample location

  2. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH HETEROGENEITY IN OIL AND GAS RESERVOIRS APPLIED TO CO 2sedimentary basins, oil and gas fields, and industrial CO 2Harr, C.L. , 1996, Paradox oil and gas potential of the Ute

  3. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus GroupSherrell

  4. 26 AUGUST 2009, GSA TODAY Murray Hitzman, Dept. of Geology and Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    geology. Economic geology flourished from the end of World War II into the early 1970s, with major, industrial minerals, construction aggregates, and uranium but excludes carbon-based energy resources geology in academia: An impending crisis? (~15%) of the 2007 U.S. gross domestic product. The United

  5. College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Geology and Geological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Robert J. Weimer Distinguished Chair in Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology Mines is an EEO.D. degrees, with sub-disciplines of economic geology, petroleum geosciences, geological engineering and Engineering that includes the departments of Geophysics, Mining Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. Mines

  6. Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

  7. US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

  8. Dynamic Evolution of Cement Composition and Transport Properties under Conditions Relevant to Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunet, Jean-Patrick Leopold; Li, Li; Karpyn, Zuleima T.; Strazisar, Brian; Bromhal Grant

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the possibility of CO{sub 2} leakage is one of the major challenges for geological carbon sequestration. Injected CO{sub 2} can react with wellbore cement, which can potentially change cement composition and transport properties. In this work, we develop a reactive transport model based on experimental observations to understand and predict the property evolution of cement in direct contact with CO{sub 2}-saturated brine under diffusion-controlled conditions. The model reproduced the observed zones of portlandite depletion and calcite formation. Cement alteration is initially fast and slows down at later times. This work also quantified the role of initial cement properties, in particular the ratio of the initial portlandite content to porosity (defined here as ?), in determining the evolution of cement properties. Portlandite-rich cement with large ? values results in a localized “sharp” reactive diffusive front characterized by calcite precipitation, leading to significant porosity reduction, which eventually clogs the pore space and prevents further acid penetration. Severe degradation occurs at the cement–brine interface with large ? values. This alteration increases effective permeability by orders of magnitude for fluids that preferentially flow through the degraded zone. The significant porosity decrease in the calcite zone also leads to orders of magnitude decrease in effective permeability, where fluids flow through the low-permeability calcite zone. The developed reactive transport model provides a valuable tool to link cement–CO{sub 2} reactions with the evolution of porosity and permeability. It can be used to quantify and predict long-term wellbore cement behavior and can facilitate the risk assessment associated with geological CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  9. High-resolution reservoir characterization by an acoustic impedance inversion of a Tertiary deltaic clinoform system in the North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    High-resolution reservoir characterization by an acoustic impedance inversion of a Tertiary deltaic a low level of parameterization embedded in a geologic framework and is computationally fast. The second in the geologic settings of the res- ervoir; however, there is no explicit geologic significance and the method

  10. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  11. The U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    U sing a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.525 trillion barrels of oil in place in seventeen oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado.

  12. Geological Sciences Jeffrey D. Keith, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    , such as assessment and forecasting of natural hazards, environmental change, and discovery of energy and mineral resources. Some of the diverse disciplines that can be studied in this department include general geology Catalog. Global Geology Program Each year the department provides opportunities for advanced

  13. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3 CONTENTS Three Creeks Caldera ................................................................................................................................... Scott Dean Geology of the Antelope Peak Area of the Southern .................................................................................................................. Craig D. Hall Geology of the Longlick and White Mountain Area, Southern San Francisco Mountains

  14. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I Preble Formation, a Cambrian Outer ..........................................................................J. Roger Olsen Geology of the Sterling Quadrangle, Sanpete County, Utah ..............................................................................James Michael Taylor Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Aertalphorograph rhowing

  15. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Chair: Dr. Clarence R Technical Exchange (open) Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: DOE & Performance Analysis and the Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: Repository

  16. Report on geologic exploration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breslin, J.; Laughon, R. B.; Hall, R. J.; Voss, J. W. [comps.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the geological exploration activities being carried out as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, which has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop the technology and provide the facilities for the safe, environmentally acceptable isolation of civilian high-level and transuranic nuclear wastes, including spent fuel elements, for which the Federal government is responsible. The principal programmatic emphasis is on disposal in mined geologic repositories. Explorations are being conducted or planned in various parts of the country to identify potential sites for such repositories. The work is being undertaken by three separate but coordinated NWTS project elements. Under the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), basalt formations underlying DOE's Hanford Reservation are being investigated. Granite, tuff, and shale formations at the DOE Nevada Test Site (NTS) are being similarly studied in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI). The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) is investigating domed salt formations in several Gulf Coast states and bedded salt formations in Utah and Texas. The ONWI siting studies are being expanded to include areas overlying crystalline rocks, shales, and other geohydrologic systems. The current status of these NWTS efforts, including the projected budgets for FY 1981, is summarized, and the criteria and methodology being employed in the explorations are described. The consistency of the overall effort with the recommendations presented in the Report to the President by the Interagency Review Group on Nuclear Waste Management (IRG), as well as with documents representing the national technical consensus, is discussed.

  17. The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivers, Jon Blake

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was calculated in each of these directions to determine the distance between correlated and uncorrelated porosity values. The results show that the German Sandstone is correlated for about 5 mm in all three directions considered. In the Austin Chalk, porosity..., Y-I WRITE(7, *) A(H), C(H), G(H) 60 CO~ STOP 72 APPENDIX D CORE SAMPLE GEOLOGY The Austin Chalk is best characterized as a very fine- grained carbonate mud containing coarser skeletal tests and fragments. The grain size of the chalk...

  18. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  19. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  20. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  1. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

  2. Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Abstract Geology...

  3. arizona geologic framework: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Geological Engineering Engineering Websites Summary: Lowell Professional Program in Mineral Resources Department of Mining & Geological Engineering Fall 2013 Non-Credit Short...

  4. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  5. Page 1 | B.S. in Geology | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    in topics like sedimentology, structural geology and mineralogy. Extracurricular experiences are important in the subjects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and structural geology. In addition, students at UNC Charlotte

  6. Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

    1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

  7. JUDSON MEAD GEOLOGIC FIELD STATION OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2013 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Geology G Structural Geology G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sophomore G

  8. Technical Basis for the Determination that Current Characterization Data and Processes are Sufficient to Ensure Safe Storage and to Design Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMPSON, B.C.

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the technical basis for closure of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5 Implementation Plan milestone 5.6.3.13, ''Core sample all tanks by 2002'' (DOE-RL 1996). The milestone was based on the need for characterization data to ensure safe storage of the waste, to operate the tanks safely, and to plan and implement retrieval and processing of the waste. Sufficient tank characterization data have been obtained to ensure that existing controls are adequate for safe storage of the waste in the 177 waste tanks at the Hanford Site. In addition, a process has been developed, executed, and institutionalized to systemically identify information needs, to integrate and prioritize the needs, and to reliably obtain and analyze the associated samples. This document provides a technical case that the remaining 45 incompletely sampled tanks no longer require sampling to support the intent of the Implementation Plan milestone. Sufficient data have been obtained to close the Unreviewed Safety Questions (USQs), and to ensure that existing hazard controls are adequate and appropriately applied. However, in the future, additional characterization of tanks at the site will be required to support identified information needs. Closure of this milestone allows sampling and analytical data to be obtained in a manner that is consistent with the integrated priority process.

  9. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  10. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  11. GEOLOGIC NOTE Fault linkage and graben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    . Schultz $ Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering/172 (1982), and his Ph.D. in geomechanics from Purdue University (1987). He worked at the Lunar

  12. Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2014-3954P Geologic Storage of Hydrogen Anna S. Lord Geologist Geotechnology & Engineering Department & Peter H....

  13. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone #12;Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem Era (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source Weathering

  14. Montana State University 1 Geology Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Tectonics, Sedimentary Petrology, two geographic information science (GIS) courses, and Field Geology (a - Sedimentary Petrology 3 GEO 449 - Metamorphic Petrology*** or GEO 450 - Igneous Petrology 3 Take at least

  15. Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoversten, Shanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expensive, real reduction in CO2 emissions from their ownstored CO2 must create an actual reduction in the emissionsCO2 is instead obtained from geologic formations then the goal of the emission reduction

  16. Relationships between geology and geothermal gradients in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavnes, S.A.; Steeples, D.W.; Ruscetta, C.A. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom hole temperature values from existing oil and gas wells and thermal logging data from geothermal wells are used to determine the factors responsible for geographic variation in the subsurface temperature distribution in Kansas. Geothermal gradient data range from 25/sup 0/C/km to 55/sup 0/C/km in the upper 300 m. The geologic factors proposed to explain this variation are: (1) topography of the crystalline basement surface; (2) variation in rates of heat production in the crystalline basement; (3) variation in thermal conductivity in the sedimentary section; and (4) possible convection upward and eastward from the Denver-Julesberg Basin. (MJF)

  17. A geologic application of Biot's buckling theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinze, William Daniel

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Geophysics A GEOLOGIC APPLlCATION OF BIOT'S BUCKLING THEORY A Thesis by WILLIAM DANIEL HEINZE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commit e) (Head of Department-Member) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT A Geologic..., et al. , (1967) indicates that the Georgetown was never buried by more than 2000 meters of sediment. The Del Rio Mark, 20 m thick, is predominantly clay and calcareous clay intercalated with thin lenses of clayey limestone. The thick-bedded Buda...

  18. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 2 Lower and Middle Ordovician at Section G, Ibex, Utah. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah o ~ l z gUfziversity Geology Studies is published by the Department of Geology. This publication

  19. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1 Papers reviewing geology of field trip areas, 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28 ....................................................................................................................................................... Geology of Volcanic Rocks and Mineral Deposits in the Southern Thomas Range, Utah: A Brief Summary

  20. November 47 Geological Society of America 2012 Annual Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , Jason F., Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 615 E. Peabody Dr, Champaign, IL 61820, jthomaso@illinois.edu and KEEFER, Donald A., Illinois State Geological Survey, Prairie, Quaternary and Engineering Geology Section, Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign

  1. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    · Sedimentology/Paleontology/Petroleum Exploration In Geology and Geochemistry, opportunities for research at both

  2. The conscience and the dream: an analysis of the influence of Mark Twain's determinism on characterization and thematic unity in Huckleberry Finn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Mikie Leslene

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finn in Review 89 2. The Determinist in 1885 101 BIB LI 0G RAP H Y . 102 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The Scholars on the Development of Twain's Determinism Most Mark Twain scholars agree that sometime during the last fifteen years of his life Mark... to his master- piece. Covici, in Mark Twain's Humor: The Ima e of a World, deals more directly with Twain's determinism than Blair; however, his scope of discussion is narrow ? even more so than Bellamy's, though it 10 Walter Blair, Mark Twain...

  3. Facies Analysis and Reservoir Characterization of Subtidal, Intertidal, and Supratidal Zones of the Mudstone-rich Entrada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    the Utah Geological Survey's Characterization of Utah's Hydrocarbon Reservoir and Potential New ReservesFacies Analysis and Reservoir Characterization of Subtidal, Intertidal, and Supratidal Zones Thomas H. Morris John H. Mcbride Scott M. Ritter Department of Geology Brigham Young University April

  4. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  5. Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  6. Characterization and significance of a stylolitic fracture system determined from horizontal core and borehole imaging data, Hanifa Reservoir, Abqaiq Field (SA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Wiltse, E. [Schlumberger, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field, eastern Saudi Arabia, consists of microporous (up to 30% porosity) lime mudstones with low matrix permeability (< 10 md). SEM imagery reveals a crystal framework texture of micro-rhombic calcite crystals with 2-5 {mu}m-sized intercrystalline pore spaces. Fluid transmissibility was preliminarily identified as via fractures as indicated by no stratigraphic predictability to fluid flow, high flow over thin stratigraphic intervals, little relationship between high flow and high porosity intervals, large disparity between core Kh and well-test Kh, and observation offractures in cores and borehole imaging logs front horizontal Hanifa wells. Integration of descriptions from over 4000 fractures observed in borehole images together with descriptions of over 500 fractures identified from vertica1 and horizontal cores has resulted in further characterization of the fracture system. The fractures are open to partially-open, with an east-to northeast orientation, and they cluster in low porosity zones which are characterized by intense stylolitization. These sub-parallel, nearly vertical, discontinuous fractures terminate at stylolites, or pinchout locally into tight carbonate matrix, and contain appreciable amounts of dead oil and calcite cement. In zones of particularly intense stylolitization, fracturing may be locally pervasive, giving the rock a brecciated appearance. Together, the stylolites and stylolite-related fractures form the primary permeability system ofthe Hanifa reservoir. This fracture system architecture is critical to understanding the production characteristics of the reservoir, which include anomalously high fluid flow in low porosity zones or transition zones between high and low porosity, radial flow behavior from well tests, smaller than expected differences in well productivity between vertical and horizontal wells, and limited injection water breakthrough.

  7. Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    ) Calamostachys, Lower Black Coal (cones) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 3 Pteridophyta ambigua, Pennsylvanian of Indiana University Sphenopteris fern foliage, Lower Black Coal Progymnosperms (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

  8. Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1 *, P.D.C. Défossez1 storage of CO2 in unmineable coal seams could be a very interesting option in the sustainable management of coal basins. However, the various chemical and physical parameters that determine the success

  9. Mineral ID Self-Instruction Lab Name _________________________ Geology 100 Harbor Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Mineral ID Self-Instruction Lab Name _________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor Section Your goal for this lab is to become familiar with the physical properties used to identify minerals. Physical properties are determined by the chemical and crystalline properties of the given mineral. However

  10. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 By Joyce A. Ober

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 LITHIUM By Joyce A. Ober The United States has been sell lithium as mineral concentrate, brine, compound, data for lithium from a voluntary survey of U of the material to determine if sales of the mercury-contaminated material presented a risk to environmental

  11. CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  12. CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  13. CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied:...

  14. CX-005052: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-005052: Categorical Exclusion Determination Shoot 2-Dimensional Seismic at Characterization Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 01192011 Location(s): Craig,...

  15. CX-002474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Full Scale Testing Characterization, System Optimization, Demonstration of Grid Connected Wind Turbines and Wind Powered Water Desalination...

  16. Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present report lists the technical reviews and comments made during the fiscal year 1988 and summarizes the technical progress of the topical studies. In the area of technical assistance, there were numerous activities detailed in the next section. These included 24 geotechnical support activities, including reviews of 6 Study Plans (SP) and participation in 6 SP Review Workshops, review of one whole document Site Characterization Plan (SCP) and participation in the Assembled Document SCP Review Workshops by 6 LBL reviewers; the hosting of a DOE program review, the rewriting of the project statement of work, 2 trips to technical and planning meetings; preparation of proposed work statements for two new topics for DOE, and 5 instances of technical assistance to DOE. These activities are described in a Table in the following section entitled Geoscience Technical Support for Nuclear Waste Geologic Repositories.''

  17. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  18. Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Ellen D [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

  19. Intraseasonal characterization of tropospheric O3 in the North of the Buenos Aires Province: determining four months cycle and teleconnection evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cionco, Rodolfo G; Quaranta, Nancy; Agosta, Eduardo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropospheric ozone (O3T) is a secondary pollutant whose formation involved primarily solar radiation, NOx and volatile organic compounds. The North of the Buenos Aires Province has great agricultural-industrial activity; therefore, O3T study is an important issue in the area. In this paper, we present the first results tend to estimate and characterize O3T in San Nicol\\'as de los Arroyos, North of Buenos Aires. Due to a lack of in situ data, we analyse the observations of the instrument OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) of land remote sensing satellite AURA (GSFC/NASA). The data cover the years 2004-2013. Applying the multitaper technique (MTM), very suitable for short and noisy data series, spectral analysis is performed on a grid corresponding 1{\\deg} in latitude by 1.5{\\deg} in longitude, centred South of the Province of Santa Fe. The most remarkable result is the emergence of a significant peak (95%) of four months cycle. To test the validity of this signal in San Nicol\\'as, daily solar radiation data (Q)...

  20. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  1. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  3. Paris Basin, seal integrity Predicting long-term geochemical alteration of wellbore cement in a generic geological CO21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    abandoned wells is particularly high, such as it often occurs in depleted gas and/or oil fields. The12 of an idealized abandoned wellbore at the top of the Dogger aquifer in Paris18 Basin, France, where CO2 geological from reservoir: (i) a first,24 "clogging" stage, characterized by a decrease in porosity due to calcite

  4. Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region (RMCCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, Brian; Matthews, Vince

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the “Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region” project, or RMCCS project, is to characterize the storage potential of the most promising geologic sequestration formations within the southwestern U.S. and the Central Rocky Mountain region in particular. The approach included an analysis of geologic sequestration formations under the Craig Power Station in northwestern Colorado, and application or extrapolation of those local-scale results to the broader region. A ten-step protocol for geologic carbon storage site characterization was a primary outcome of this project.

  5. MINED GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEM (MGDS) MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEMS CENTRALIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McGrath

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to identify and document Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) requirements for centralized command and control. Additionally, to further develop the MGDS monitoring and control functions. This monitoring and control report provides the following information: (1) Determines the applicable requirements for a monitoring and control system for repository operations and construction (excluding Performance Confirmation). (2) Makes a determination as to whether or not centralized command and control is required.

  6. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  7. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

  8. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

  9. Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

  10. Kinetics of the Dissolution of Scheelite in Groundwater: Implications for Environmental and Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Stephanie Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten, Its History, Geology, Ore-dressing, Metallurgy,5.1 Implications for Environmental Geology…………………………..26 5.2Implications for Economic Geology………………………………..27 6. Future

  11. Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: a short description of the AEGIS approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silviera, D.J.; Harwell, M.A.; Napier, B.A.; Zellmer, J.T.; Benson, G.L.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet licensing criteria and protection standards for HLW disposal, research programs are in progress to determine acceptable waste forms, canisters, backfill materials for the repository, and geological formations. Methods must be developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the total system. To meet this need, methods are being developed to assess the long-term effectiveness of isolating nuclear wastes in geologic formations. This work was started in 1976 in the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and continues in the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program. The evaluation of this long-term effectiveness involves a number of distinct steps. AEGIS currently has the methods for performing these evaluation steps. These methods are continuously being improved to meet the inreasing level of sophistication which will be required. AEGIS develops a conceptual description of the geologic systems and uses computer models to simulate the existing ground-water pathways. AEGIS also uses a team of consulting experts, with the assistance of a computer model of the geologic processes, to develop and evaluate plausible release scenarios. Then other AEGIS computer models are used to simulate the transport of radionuclides to the surface and the resultant radiation doses to individuals and populations. (DLC)

  13. Geoacoustic characterization by the image source method: a sensitivity study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geoacoustic characterization by the image source method: a sensitivity study S. Pinsona , L in the localization of the image sources. 1 Introduction Most of the present techniques to characterize the seafloor. The configuration is a broadband source and a vertical or an horizontal array. The method con- siders geological

  14. Mine roof geology information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Sasaoka, T.; Tang, D.X.; Wilson, Y.; Wilson, G.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Industry of Future (Mining) program was initiated five years ago. In this project a patented drill control unit (DCU) installed DIN. the J.H. Flecher & Co.'s roof bolter was used to record the drilling parameter for experiments conducted in the mines and laboratory. Today, the drilling parameters have been recorded for more than 1,000 roof bolt holes. This article summarizes the results to date including the methods for determining quantitatively the location of voids/fractures and estimation of roof rock strength from the recorded roof bolter drilling parameters. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SURFACE EXPLORATORY STUDIES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Byrne

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This DIE applies to the surface facilities component of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (W) ESF. The ESF complex-including surface and subsurface accommodations--encompasses an area that is approximately six miles wide and nine miles long (approximately 30,000 acres total) (United States Department of Energy [DOE] 1997, p. 9.04). It is located on federally withdrawn lands, near the southwest border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada (DOE 1997, p. 9.04). Site characterization activities are conducted within the subsurface ESF to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Most ESF surface facilities are located within the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB) (DOE 1997, p. 9.04), with the exception of the southeastern most portions of the H-Road and the Water Supply System. Various SBT activities are also conducted throughout the Yucca Mountain region as a part of the overall site-characterization effort. In general, the DIE for SBT Activities (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 1998a) evaluates activities associated with SBT. Potential test-to-test interference and waste isolation impacts associated with SBT activities are also evaluated in CRWMS M&O (1998a).

  16. GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary? P K. Haft Division of Earth and Ocean 27708 Ie-mail: /wff@geo.duke_eciul ABSTRACT Ongoing ctisruption of ancient, varnished desert pavement that the pavement disturbances reported here ~ue rarc on the millcnnhll time scale of desert varnish format ion

  17. CLARA S. CHAN Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    19716 302-831-1819 Delaware Biotechnology Institute 15 Innovation Way Newark, DE 19711 302 and Environmental Engineering, 1998 B. S. Stanford University Geological and Environmental Sciences, 1997, PI. 2000-2006 Geologist and Environmental Engineer CDM (now CDM Smith), Walnut Creek, CA 1998

  18. Department of Geological Sciences Undergraduate Handbook 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    about future sea-level rise, and are there untapped energy and mineral resources both onshore and offshore New Zealand; are also increasingly important concerns both at the regional and global scales. Come-exploration, volcanology, hazard management, engineering geology, environmental planning, water resources, science teaching

  19. Department of Geological Sciences Postgraduate Handbook 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    about future sea-level rise, and are there untapped energy and mineral resources both onshore and offshore New Zealand; are also increasingly important concerns both at the regional and global scales. Come-exploration, volcanology, hazard management, engineering geology, environmental planning, water resources, science teaching

  20. 145Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201314

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    . An introduction to seismic, gravity, and magnetic methods and their interpretation procedures and applications and their methods of interpretation. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL 221 and GEOL 222. GEOL 306 Economic Minerals Geology.2; 3 cr. A course on the principles of air photo interpretation and remote sensing; the construction

  1. 149Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An introduction to seismic, gravity, and magnetic methods and their interpretation procedures and applications and their methods of interpretation. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL 221 and GEOL 222. GEOL 306 Economic Minerals Geology.2; 3 cr. A course on the principles of air photo interpretation and remote sensing; the construction

  2. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437 SPRING 2014 OF NATURAL RESOURCES INCLUDING OIL, COAL, MINERALS AND GROUNDWATER. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF GEOPHYSICS MAY, IF AVAILABLE, WE WILL VISIT AN OIL DRILLING RIG IN OPERATION. DATES FOR FIELD TRIPS WILL DEPEND ON THE WEATHER

  3. Petrology GEOL 315 SIUC Department of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Petrology GEOL 315 SIUC Department of Geology Spring 2014 Syllabus Professor Dr. Justin: 6184534849 TA: Ben Farcy Email: bfarcy@siu.edu Text: Petrology, Blatt, Tracy and Owens, third addition, May 9 Chapt # Lab Week 1 Intro to Petrology/Minerals 1, 2 Week 2 Classification 3 Intro

  4. INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH ADVANCED CONSTRAINED INVERSIONS by Peter George framework (i.e. minimization of an objective function). I developed several methods to reach this goal constraints to the inverse problem. Lastly, I developed an iterative procedure for cooperatively inverting

  5. Briefing Topic: Geologic Tools for the Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Briefing Topic: Geologic Tools for the Moon Review of Apollo David A. Kring 29 December 2009 #12 Apollo Lunar Sample Return Container 55 Small Tool Carrier 58 Large Tool Carrier 62 Crew Training on Apollo · Apollo 11 and 12 · 860 g (1.9 lb) · 41 cm hammer length · 16 cm head length · Apollo 14, 15, 16

  6. University College Dublin UCD School of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , production geology, petroleum geochemistry, petrophysics, reservoir engineering, reservoir modellingUniversity College Dublin UCD School of Geological Sciences Tullow Oil Professorship of Petroleum Geoscience Temporary 5year post Tullow Oil Lecturer in Petroleum Geoscience Two temporary 5year posts

  7. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Geologic Storage of CO2, in Carbon Dioxide Capture forFormations - Results from the CO2 Capture Project: GeologicBenson, Process Modeling of CO2 Injection into Natural Gas

  8. Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Internal Geology and...

  9. Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hoe Creek, Wyoming underground coal gasification site and comparison with the Hanna, Wyoming site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ethridge, F.C.; Burns, L.K.; Alexander, W.G.; Craig, G.N. II; Youngberg, A.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978 the third test (Hoe Creek III) in a series of underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments was completed at a site south of Gillette, Wyoming. The post-burn study of the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock of the two coal seams affected by the experiment is based on the study of fifteen cores. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock and to determine and evaluate the mineralogical and textural changes that were imposed by the experiment. Within the burn cavity the various sedimentary units have been brecciated and thermally altered to form several pyrometamorphic rock types of paralava rock, paralava breccia, buchite, buchite breccia and hornfels. High temperature minerals of mullite, cordierite, oligo-clase-andesine, tridymite, cristobalite, clinopyroxenes, and magnetite are common in the pyrometamorphic rocks. The habit of these minerals indicates that they crystallized from a melt. These minerals and textures suggest that the rocks were formed at temperatures between 1200/sup 0/ and 1400/sup 0/C. A comparison of geologic and geological-technological factors between the Hoe Creek III site, which experienced substantial roof collapse, and the Hanna II site, which had only moderate roof collapse, indicates that overburden thickness relative to coal seam thickness, degree of induration of overburden rock, injection-production well spacing, and ultimate cavity size are important controls of roof collapse in the structural setting of the two sites.

  10. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

  11. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geochemistry in carbon sequestration environments. Abstractimplications for carbon sequestration. Environ Earth Sci. ,from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic

  12. GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN, SOUTHERN UASCSTCH H Q - W T A X H E i i - UT&H #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Department of Gedogy Provo, Utah #12;GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN PART OF DRY MOUNTAIN, SOUTHERN WASATCH M O U N

  13. What can I do with a degree in Geology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    What can I do with a degree in Geology? Science Planning your career Choosing a career involves.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Geology? Geology in the twenty-first century is a fascinating, exciting,incredibly diverse,earthquakes,dramatic and varied geomorphology,and its 500 million years of pre and post-Gondwana geological history,is one

  14. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN By R.M. Flores,1 C.W. Keighin,1 A.M. Ochs,2 P.D. Warwick,1 L.R. Bader,1 and E.C. Murphy3 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 3 North

  15. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Geological Engineering CEE 330 & GLE 474 or instructor consent 3 0.0 CEE 631 Toxicants in the Environment

  16. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal...

  17. Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

  18. Lab 4: Plate Tectonics Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    1 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics ­ Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction The likelihood of major geologic hazards associated with the lithosphere, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, is not uniform around provides a ready explanation for the distribution of these types of geologic hazards. It is useful

  19. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik difficult to produce a reliable subdivision. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological samples

  20. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik Difficult to Produce a Reliable Subdivision The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often the area, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological

  1. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to ductivities. Geologic logs sometimes show thin layers limit further spreading of contaminants. This flow model accounts for of potentially high hydraulic conductivity embedded complex geologic units that vary measured different methods can be employed to represent thein a geologic unit. A composite model was used

  2. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3 CONTENTS Studies for Students #lo, Geologic Guide to Provo Canyon and Weber Canyon, Central Wasatch Mountains, Utah ............................................................................................................................. Randy L. Chamberlain The Geology of the Drum Mountains, Millard and Juab Counties, Utah

  3. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I Papers presented at the 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28-29, 1978, at Brig- ham Young ............................................................................................................................Publications and Maps of the Geology Department 91 Cover The Great Basrn seen from a htgh

  4. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2 CONTENTS The Kinnikinic Quartzite ........................................................Robert Q. Oaks,Jr., and W . Calvin James Geology of the Sage Valley 7 W'Quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho, and Lincoln County, Wyoming ....................J ohn L. Conner Geology of the Elk Valley Quadrangle, Bear

  5. Semantic e-Science and Geology Clinton Smyth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, David

    Semantic e-Science and Geology Clinton Smyth1 , David Poole2 and Rita Sharma3 1 Georeference Online@cs.ubc.ca Abstract e-Science, as implemented for the study of geology with Geographic Information Systems over the Internet, has highlighted the need for standardization in the semantics of geology, and stimulated

  6. CHAPTER II GEOLOGY Blank page retained for pagination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER II GEOLOGY #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;SHORELINES AND COASTS OF THE GULF or discordant with the grain (dominant trend) of the geologic structures of a coastal regi?n, but King (1942, pIOnal geology, geomorphology, sedimentation, oceanography of the inshore zone, meteorology, climatology, biol

  7. SEPM (Society for Sedementary Geology) Twenhofel medal awarded to USGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    SEPM (Society for Sedementary Geology) Twenhofel medal awarded to USGS Scientist Emeritus Walter the highest award given by the Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) -- the Twenhofel medal. Walt joins an illustrious list of past Twenhofel recipients, which reads as a veritable "Who's Who" of sedimentary geology

  8. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2013 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  9. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA b Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713

  10. Job Vacancy Notice Job Title: Assistant Professor -Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    1 Job Vacancy Notice Job Title: Assistant Professor - Geology Job ID: 6477 Location: Regular-track Assistant Professor in the general area of "hardrock" geology. The SEES community includes 14 full-time faculty members, 25 Masters and PhD candidates, and approximately 150 Geology, Environmental Science

  11. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  12. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  13. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4 The Fossil Vertebrates of Utah Salt Lake Gty, Utah 84102 W .E. Miller Deparlment~of Geology and Zoology Bngham Young Unrwerrrly Provo of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblln Cynthia M. Gardner Issue

  14. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  15. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2012 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  16. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology College of Sciences geoscience.unlv.edu/ Mission of the College: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Geology Career Geoscientists are stewards understanding of Earth processes and history. Value of the Geology Degree Opportunities for interesting

  17. SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, David L.

    SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology Course Syllabus Spring 2011 Instructor: Professor David L. Kimbrough email: dkimbrough@geology.sdsu.edu, Phone: 594-1385 Office: GMCS-229A; Office Necessary: Field notebook similar to "Rite in the Rain" all-weather Geological Field Book No., 540F J

  18. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2 CONTENTS Studies for Students ............................................................................................................................... Robert C. Ahlborn Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Sahara dune sand, X130. Photo, Univer~ityof Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham

  19. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2 CONTENTS Stratigraphy ...................................................................................................... Terry C. Gosney 27 Geology of the Champlin Peak Quadrangle,Juab and Millard Counties, Utah ..................................................................................................................................... David R. Keller 103 Publications and Maps of the Department of Geology 117 Cover: Rafted orjoreign

  20. Inverse Modelling in Geology by Interactive Evolutionary Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    Inverse Modelling in Geology by Interactive Evolutionary Computation Chris Wijns a,b,, Fabio of geological processes, in the absence of established numerical criteria to act as inversion targets, requires evolutionary computation provides for the inclusion of qualitative geological expertise within a rigorous

  1. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1 CONTENTS Diagenetic Aspects ................................................................................................... Steven G. Driese Geology of the Dog Valley-Red Ridge Area, Southern Pavant Mountains, Millard County .................................................................................................. Lynn C Meibos Geology of the Southwestern Quarter of the Scipio North (15-Minute) Quadrangle, Millard

  2. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2014 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  3. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3 CONTENTS Remains of Ornithopod ...........................................................................................................................................................ames M. Stolle Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Index to volumes 21-25 of Brigham Young University Geology Studies ........................................Carol T . Smith and Nathan M. Smith Cwec

  4. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2 CONTENTS A New Large Theropod................................................................................................................................................................ Danny J. Wyatt Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Cretaceouscoals near Castle Gate, Utab. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors

  5. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;P I - #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3 Conodont Biostratigraphy-meeting field trip held in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain section, Geological Society of America of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblin Cynthia M

  6. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  7. VOLUMF -31, PART 1 BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Y O U N G VOLUMF -31, PART 1 #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES VOLUME 31.PART 1 CONTENTS .................................................................. Ralph E.Lambert Geology of the Mount Ellen Quadrangle. Henry Mountains. Garfield County. Utah near White Horse Pass. Elko County. Nevada ............Stephen M Smith Geology of the Steele Butte

  8. The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski S Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski Submitted to the Department capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs

  9. Comparison of methods for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in saline formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Angela L. [U.S. DOE; Bromhal, Grant S. [U.S. DOE; Strazisar, Brian [U.S. DOE; Rodosta, Traci D. [U.S. DOE; Guthrie, William J. [U.S. DOE; Allen, Douglas E. [ORISE; Guthrie, George D. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary estimates of CO{sub 2} storage potential in geologic formations provide critical information related to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) technologies to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. Currently multiple methods to estimate CO{sub 2} storage and multiple storage estimates for saline formations have been published, leading to potential uncertainty when comparing estimates from different studies. In this work, carbon dioxide storage estimates are compared by applying several commonly used methods to general saline formation data sets to assess the impact that the choice of method has on the results. Specifically, six CO{sub 2} storage methods were applied to thirteen saline formation data sets which were based on formations across the United States with adaptations to provide the geologic inputs required by each method. Methods applied include those by (1) international efforts – the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (Bachu et al., 2007); (2) United States government agencies – U.S. Department of Energy – National Energy Technology Laboratory (US-DOE-NETL, 2012) and United States Geological Survey (Brennan et al., 2010); and (3) the peer-reviewed scientific community – Szulczewski et al. (2012) and Zhou et al. (2008). A statistical analysis of the estimates generated by multiple methods revealed that assessments of CO{sub 2} storage potential made at the prospective level were often statistically indistinguishable from each other, implying that the differences in methodologies are small with respect to the uncertainties in the geologic properties of storage rock in the absence of detailed site-specific characterization.

  10. Geology Department Graduate Certificates: These certificates are designed to provide practicing professionals an opportunity to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geology Department Graduate Certificates: These certificates are designed to provide practicing are offered: Certificate in Engineering Geology Purpose The Graduate Certificate in Engineering Geology provides practicing geologists an opportunity to upgrade their engineering geology credentials while

  11. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  12. Simplified vibratory characterization of alluvial basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-François; Duval, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the analysis of seismic wave amplification, modal methods are interesting tools to study the modal properties of geological structures. Modal approaches mainly lead to information on such parameters as fundamental frequencies and eigenmodes of alluvial basins. For a specific alluvial deposit in Nice (France), a simplified modal approach involving the Rayleigh method is considered. This approach assumes a set of admissible shape functions for the eigenmodes and allows a fast estimation of the fundamental frequency of the basin. The agreement between modal numerical results and experimental ones is satisfactory. The simplified modal method then appears as an efficient mean for the global vibratory characterization of geological structures towards resonance.

  13. The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P.N.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

  14. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  15. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  16. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  17. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  18. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  19. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  20. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  1. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  2. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  3. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  4. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  5. Joint flow-seismic inversion for characterizing fractured reservoirs: theoretical approach and numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, seismic interpretation is performed without any account of the flow behavior. Here, we present a methodology to characterize fractured geologic media by integrating flow and seismic data. The key element of ...

  6. International Journal of Geography and Geology, 2013, 2(1):1-13 THE REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY, NEW CHALLENGES FOR GEOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    International Journal of Geography and Geology, 2013, 2(1):1-13 1 THE REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY, NEW CHALLENGES FOR GEOLOGICAL AND MINING MAPPING IN THE WEST AFRICAN CRATON - THE EXAMPLE OF CÔTE D'IVOIRE Gbele of the evolution on the use of remote sensing imagery for geological and mining mapping in West Africa

  7. Archaeology of the Colonial Period Gulf of Fonseca, Eastern El Salvador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Esteban

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization. EDXRF analysis is a geochemical method for determining obsidian composition and subsequent geological

  8. NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff`s concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation`s first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE`s SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC`s specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE`s program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director`s Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff`s concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE`s program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC`s responsibilities with respect to DOE`s SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Analysis of anions in geological brines using ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.M.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion chromatographic procedures for the determination of the anions bromide, sulfate, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and iodide in brine samples have been developed and are described. The techniques have been applied to the analysis of natural brines, and geologic evaporites. Sample matrices varied over a range from 15,000 mg/L to 200,000 mg/L total halogens, nearly all of which is chloride. The analyzed anion concentrations ranged from less than 5 mg/L in the cases of nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate, to 20,000 mg/L in the case of sulfate. A technique for suppressing chloride and sulfate ions to facilitate the analysis of lower concentration anions is presented. Analysis times are typically less than 20 minutes for each procedure and the ion chromatographic results compare well with those obtained using more time consuming classical chemical analyses. 10 references, 14 figures.

  10. Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

  11. Geological well log analysis. Third ed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirson, S.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

  12. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finley

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, and an immiscible CO{sub 2} flood pilot was conducted in the Jackson sandstone (Mississippian System Big Clifty Sandstone Member) at the Sugar Creek Field in Hopkins County, western Kentucky. Up to 12% incremental oil recovery was estimated based on these pilots. A CO{sub 2} huff â??nâ?? puff (HNP) pilot project was conducted in the Cypress Sandstone in the Loudon Field. This pilot was designed to measure and record data that could be used to calibrate a reservoir simulation model. A pilot project at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois, tested the potential storage of CO{sub 2} in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} storage and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot results from all four sites showed that CO{sub 2} could be injected into the subsurface without adversely affecting groundwater. Additionally, hydrocarbon production was enhanced, giving further evidence that CO{sub 2} storage in oil reservoirs and coal beds offers an economic advantage. Results from the MVA program at each site indicated that injected CO{sub 2} did not leave the injection zone. Topical reports were completed on the Middle and Late Devonian New Albany Shale and Basin CO{sub 2} emissions. The efficacy of the New Albany Shale as a storage sink could be substantial if low injectivity concerns can be alleviated. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Illinois Basin were projected to be dominated by coal-fired power plants.

  13. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  14. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  15. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  16. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  17. Constructing a large-scale 3D Geologic Model for Analysis of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J; Myers, S

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern Great Basin, in support of a seismic wave propagation investigation of the 1993 Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The model is centered on the NPE and spans longitude -119.5{sup o} to -112.6{sup o} and latitude 34.5{sup o} to 39.8{sup o}; the depth ranges from the topographic surface to 150 km below sea level. The model includes the southern half of Nevada, as well as parts of eastern California, western Utah, and a portion of northwestern Arizona. The upper crust is constrained by both geologic and geophysical studies, while the lower crust and upper mantle are constrained by geophysical studies. The mapped upper crustal geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary deposits, pre-Tertiary deposits, intrusive rocks of all ages, and calderas. The lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized with 5 layers, including the Moho. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geology at the NTS. Digital geologic outcrop data were available for both Nevada and Arizona, whereas geologic maps for California and Utah were scanned and hand-digitized. Published gravity data (2km spacing) were used to determine the thickness of the Cenozoic deposits and thus estimate the depth of the basins. The free surface is based on a 10m lateral resolution DEM at the NTS and a 90m lateral resolution DEM elsewhere. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a framework compilation of reflection/refraction studies. We used Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. For seismic studies, the geologic units are mapped to specific seismic velocities. The gross geophysical structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface-wave studies. For regional seismic simulations we convert this realistic geologic model into elastic parameters. Upper crustal units are treated as seismically homogeneous while the lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized by a smoothly varying velocity profile. In order to mitigate spurious reflections, the lower crust and upper mantle are treated as velocity gradients as a function of depth.

  18. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

  19. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer...

  20. Comprehensive, Quantitative Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepinski, James

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quantitative Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (QFMEA) was developed to conduct comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and sequestration or use in deep saline aquifers, enhanced oil recovery operations, or enhanced coal bed methane operations. The model identifies and characterizes potential risks; identifies the likely failure modes, causes, effects and methods of detection; lists possible risk prevention and risk mitigation steps; estimates potential damage recovery costs, mitigation costs and costs savings resulting from mitigation; and ranks (prioritizes) risks according to the probability of failure, the severity of failure, the difficulty of early failure detection and the potential for fatalities. The QFMEA model generates the necessary information needed for effective project risk management. Diverse project information can be integrated into a concise, common format that allows comprehensive, quantitative analysis, by a cross-functional team of experts, to determine: What can possibly go wrong? How much will damage recovery cost? How can it be prevented or mitigated? What is the cost savings or benefit of prevention or mitigation? Which risks should be given highest priority for resolution? The QFMEA model can be tailored to specific projects and is applicable to new projects as well as mature projects. The model can be revised and updated as new information comes available. It accepts input from multiple sources, such as literature searches, site characterization, field data, computer simulations, analogues, process influence diagrams, probability density functions, financial analysis models, cost factors, and heuristic best practices manuals, and converts the information into a standardized format in an Excel spreadsheet. Process influence diagrams, geologic models, financial models, cost factors and an insurance schedule were developed to support the QFMEA model. Comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments were conducted on three (3) sites using the QFMEA model: (1) SACROC Northern Platform CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Permian Basin, Scurry County, TX, (2) Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-ECBM Site in the San Juan Basin, San Juan County, NM, and (3) Farnsworth Unit CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Anadarko Basin, Ochiltree County, TX. The sites were sufficiently different from each other to test the robustness of the QFMEA model.

  1. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  2. Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)] [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

  3. geologic-sequestration | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., Decembergangh Ames LaboratorySpectralGeological

  4. Florida Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A S JumpWindfarm Holdings Ltd Jump to:Geological

  5. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  6. The Geology and Marine Science Departments invite you to: Annual Symposium of Caribbean Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    The Geology and Marine Science Departments invite you to: The 28th Annual Symposium of Caribbean Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program) Conference Title: Multipurpose Sea Level Network in the Caribbean Time: 3, and Adaptation in the Caribbean Region Time: 5:00 PM ­ 5:30 PM #12;

  7. Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary The objective of the DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) is to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments...

  8. Geologic setting of the low-level burial grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, K.A.; Jaeger, G.K. [CH2M Hill Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Slate, J.L. [Associated Western Universities Northwest, Richland, WA (United States); Swett, K.J.; Mercer, R.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the regional and site specific geology of the Hanford Sites low-level burial grounds in the 200 East and West Areas. The report incorporates data from boreholes across the entire 200 Areas, integrating the geology of this area into a single framework. Geologic cross-sections, isopach maps, and structure contour maps of all major geological units from the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group to the surface are included. The physical properties and characteristics of the major suprabasalt sedimentary units also are discussed.

  9. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insulation. These characteristics CROATIA CH. Figure 7.3.Geologic map of Croatia:. 1- Precambrian (metamorphicChina Other Studies China Croatia Site Selection of Low and

  10. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 Geological Storage and Ground Water Resources U.S.and Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) State and Federal Statutes Storage,

  11. SciTech Connect: Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal Research:...

  12. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -...

  13. Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and...

  14. Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff,J. N. Gardner. Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal System, New Mexico. Map. Place of publication not provided. Los Alamos National...

  15. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  16. annual engineering geology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    da Silva, Paulo 302 GEOLOG is an independent and privately owned oilfield services company with a strong track record of growth and international Specialized in Surface...

  17. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  18. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  19. GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD:...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL...

  20. Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Energy Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Thesis: Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications for...

  1. Conceptual Geologic Model and Native State Model of the Roosevelt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Conceptual Geologic Model and Native State Model of the...

  2. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER...

  3. A seismic modeling methodology for monitoring CO2 geological ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    May 20, 2011 ... possible causes of the greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the. 30 options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide ...

  4. Paleomagnetism, Potassium-Argon Ages, and Geology of Rhyolites...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Dalrymple, 1966). Authors Richard R. Doell, G. Brent Dalrymple, Robert Leland Smith and Roy A. Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoirs, 1968 DOI...

  5. Geophysics, Geology and Geothermal Leasing Status of the Lightning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leasing Status of the Lightning Dock KGRA, Animas Valley, New Mexico Author C. Smith Published New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  6. Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas Valley and Pyramid Mountains,...

  7. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

  8. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada...

  9. Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1- A Tool for informing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock Oil Shale Research in the United States...

  10. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Publications AASG State Geological Survey National Geothermal Data Systems Data Acquisition and Access National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance...

  11. doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1975)32.0.CO;2 1975;3;361-363Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Geology doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1975)32.0.CO;2 1975;3;361-363Geology R. Gordon Gastil Geological Society of America on July 8, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on July 8, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on July 8, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on July 8, 2011geology

  12. Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist in cross section and the channel flows along a boundary between the t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Results Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist length. The highest percentage of bedrock coverage per geologic type appears in combined categories (Fig

  13. Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

  14. Collector/Receiver Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities for collector/receiver characterization: determining optical efficiency, measuring heat loss, developing and testing concentrators, concentrating the sun's power, and optically characterizing CSP plants.

  15. Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  16. Geology Page 145Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog DEPARTMENT OFFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Geology Page 145Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OFFICE Darwin Hall 116 (707) 664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology DEPARTMENT CHAIR Matthew J. James ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Cory Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Earth Sciences Minor in Geology Minor

  17. Page 148 Geology Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog DEPARTMENT OFFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Page 148 Geology Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OFFICE Darwin Hall 116 (707) 664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology DEPARTMENT CHAIR Matthew J. James ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR. Smith Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Earth Science Minor in Geology

  18. Page144 Geology Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Department Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Page144 Geology Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog geology Department Office DarwinHall116 (707)664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology Department chair MatthewJ.James aDministrative cE.Smith Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Earth Science Minor in Geology Minor

  19. CX-009465: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182012...

  20. CX-009462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 1018...

  1. CX-009463: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182012...

  2. CX-009464: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 1018...

  3. CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  4. CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  5. CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  6. CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  7. CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  8. CX-005689: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-005689: Categorical Exclusion Determination Joint Inversion of Electrical and Seismic Data for Fracture Characterization and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems...

  9. Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

  10. GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Sally M.; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Doughty, Christine A.; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Hoversten, Mike; Gasperikova, Erica; Daley, Thomas; Majer, Ernie; Lippmann, Marcelo; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Knauss, Kevin; Johnson, James; Foxall, William; Ramirez, Abe; Newmark, Robin; Cole, David; Phelps, Tommy J.; Parker, J.; Palumbo, A.; Horita, J.; Fisher, S.; Moline, Gerry; Orr, Lynn; Kovscek, Tony; Jessen, K.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Cakici, M.; Hovorka, Susan; Holtz, Mark; Sakurai, Shinichi; Gunter, Bill; Law, David; van der Meer, Bert

    2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of the GEO-SEQ project was a multidisciplinary effort focused on investigating ways to lower the cost and risk of geologic carbon sequestration. Through our research in the GEO-SEQ project, we have produced results that may be of interest to the wider geologic carbon sequestration community. However, much of the knowledge developed in GEO-SEQ is not easily accessible because it is dispersed in the peer-reviewed literature and conference proceedings in individual papers on specific topics. The purpose of this report is to present key GEO-SEQ findings relevant to the practical implementation of geologic carbon sequestration in the form of a Best Practices Manual. Because our work in GEO-SEQ focused on the characterization and project development aspects, the scope of this report covers practices prior to injection, referred to as the design phase. The design phase encompasses activities such as selecting sites for which enhanced recovery may be possible, evaluating CO{sub 2} capacity and sequestration feasibility, and designing and evaluating monitoring approaches. Through this Best Practices Manual, we have endeavored to place our GEO-SEQ findings in a practical context and format that will be useful to readers interested in project implementation. The overall objective of this Manual is to facilitate putting the findings of the GEO-SEQ project into practice.

  11. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  12. Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

  13. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

  14. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  15. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  16. 1919-32: Geology Department In School of Commerce: 190508 Geology taught by Prof. John F. Fulton, Metallurgy and Mining Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1919-32: Geology Department In School of Commerce: 1905­08 Geology taught by Prof. John F. Fulton, Metallurgy and Mining Engineering 1907­13 Geology course o ered in the School of Engineering and Mechanical Art 1900­04 Geology course o ered in the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy 1913­1923 Henry Parks

  17. The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories Robert G. McWilliams Professor Emeritus Department of Geology Miami University Oxford, Ohio 45056 mcwillrg@muohio.edu #12;The Geology of North

  18. Checklist for Minor in GEOLOGY The minor in geology is flexible, so that it can complement the student's major in the best

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Checklist for Minor in GEOLOGY The minor in geology is flexible, so that it can complement the student's major in the best possible manner. Students minoring in Geology are strongly encouraged to plan their programs with an undergraduate geology advisor. A total of 20 credits are required for the minor as follows

  19. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 1999 0882-8121/99/0100-0113$16.00/1 1999 International Association for Mathematical Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Association for Mathematical Geology 113 On the Ergodicity Hypothesis in Heterogeneous Formations1 Hongbin

  20. MINING CLAIM PROCEDURES NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA RENO MINING CLAIM PROCEDURES NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY Mackay School of Mines Fifth Edition FOR NEVADA PROSPECTORS AND MINERS by Keith G. Papke and David A. Davis #12;1 MINING CLAIM PROCEDURES NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY Fifth Edition FOR NEVADA PROSPECTORS AND MINERS

  1. CO2 geological storage safety assessment: methodological developments , G. Bellenfanta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    production. Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage (CCS) is seen as a decisive technology, France b IRIT, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France Abstract: Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is seen as a promising technology to mitigate greenhouse gas atmospheric emissions. Its wide

  2. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

  3. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, Nick

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross?section.

  4. FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology Internal Use Version Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4: Total UD Credits: 46 Total Credits: 120 3/19/12 #12;FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

  5. A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

  6. Improved reservoir characterization of the Rose Run sandstone on the East Randolph Field, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safley, I.E. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Thomas, J.B. [Belden & Blake Corp., North Canton, OH (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The East Randolph Field, located in Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio, produces oil and gas from the Cambrian Rose Run sandstone unit, a member of the Knox Supergroup. Field development and infill drilling opportunities illustrate the need for improved reservoir characterization of the hydrocarbon productive intervals. This reservoir study is conducted under the Department of Energy`s Reservoir Management Program with professionals from BDM-Oklahoma and Belden & Blake Corporation. Well log and core analyses were conducted to determine the reservoir distribution, the heterogeneity of the hydrocarbon producing intervals, and the effects of faulting and fracturing on well productivity. The Rose Run sandstones and interbedded dolomites were subdivided into three productive intervals. Cross sections were constructed for correlation of individual layers and identification of localized faulting. The geologic data was input into GeoGraphix software for construction of structure, net pay, production, and gas- and water-oil ratio maps.

  7. Geology of the Olkaria Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogoso-Odongo, M.E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to now development of the resource in Olkaria geothermal field, Kenya, has been based on fragmental information that is inconclusive in most respects. Development has been concentrated in an area of 4 km/sup 2/ at most, with well to well spacing of less than 300 m. The move now is to understand the greater Olkaria field by siting exploratory wells in different parts of the area considered of reasonable potential. To correlate the data available from the different parts of the field, the geology of the area, as a base for the composite field model, is discussed and shown to have major controls over fluid movements in the area and other features.

  8. Primary geologic controls on coalbed methane content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Hines, R.A.

    1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Three primary factors that control gas content in coal beds are present depth of coal, maximum original burial depth, and depositional environments of the coal. Complex distribution of gas content suggests an interplay between these primary factors, as well as other controls. Present depth can be predicted in terms of surface geology and structure. Four closely spaced core holes in the Tuscaloosa area provide detailed data for interpretation of depositional environments and for inference of relative original depth of burial. Gas content apparently is higher in bayfill and bay-margin coals than in coals that were deposited in other environments. Data from petrophysical logs of petroleum wells can be used for regional stratigraphic mapping to outline extent of depositional systems. Correlations show that the section in the Cahaba synclinorium is thicker and contains more coal beds than that in the Black Warrior basin. 15 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Unstructured grid modelling to create 3-D Earth models that unify geological and geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Unstructured grid modelling to create 3-D Earth models that unify geological and geophysical Conclusion The common Earth model Geophysical inversion Geological and geophysical models Instructured meshes Geophysical inversion Geological and geophysical models Instructured meshes Motivation: The common Earth model

  10. Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

  11. Public Geology at Griffith Park in Los Angeles: A Sample Teachers’ Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    http://www.geo.cornell.edu/geology/faculty/RWA/programs.htmlR. J. (1987). Quaternary geology and seismic hazard of the1953). Special Report 33: Geology of the Griffith Park area,

  12. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1972 Mathematical Techniques for Paleocurrent Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jammalamadaka, S. Rao

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1972 Mathematical Techniques for Paleocurrent Analysis procedure. Finally, theprocedures for testing the homogeneity of directional data from several geological directions from different geological formations belong to significantly different populations. KEY WORDS

  13. GARY KOCUREK Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School, University of Texas, 1 University Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    .D., Geology, University of Wisconsin, 1980 RESEARCH AREAS: Sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, aeolian ­ Sedimentary Geology, Sedimentology, Summer Field Camp, Field Methods, Geology of the National Parks, Earth Committee, First International Conference on Mars Sedimentology & Stratigraphy, 2009 - 2010, El Paso Field

  14. Apollo 16 site geology and impact melts - Implications for the geologic history of the lunar highlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spudis, P.D.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The geology of the Apollo 16 site is reconsidered on the basis of data from photogeology, geochemical remote sensing, and lunar samples. The site possesses an upper surface of anorthositic gabbro and related rocks. Mafic components were deposited as basin ejecta. The events involved in its geological evolution were the Nectaris impact and the Imbrium impact. The role of large, local craters in the history of the region was to serve as topographic depressions to accumulate basin ejecta. The most abundant melt composition at Apollo 16 is an aluminous variety of LKFM basalt supplied by the Nectaris impact as ejected basin impact melt. The mafic LKFM melt may have been supplied by the Imbrium impact. More aluminous melt groups are probably derived from local, small craters. The remainder of the deposits in the region are composed of anorthositic clastic debris derived from the Nectaris basin, the local crustal substrate, and Imbrium and other basins.

  15. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance characterization efforts within the SunShot Systems Integration activities focus on collaborations with U.S. solar companies to:

  16. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Certification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Certification Plan Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Certification Plan This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of...

  17. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Acceptable Knowledge Documentation Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentation This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the...

  18. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Authorized Methods for Payload Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized Methods for Payload Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  19. Central Characterization Program (CCP) TRU Nonconforming Item...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TRU Nonconforming Item Reporting and Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) TRU Nonconforming Item Reporting and Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  20. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Abstract: Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the...

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02328 Geological Survey of Canada Open File 4350

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02­328 Geological Survey of Canada Open File 4350 August, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6, Canada #12;ISBN: 0 of Canada and the University of Victoria. This meeting was held at the University of Victoria's Dunsmuir

  2. LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology Laboratory. Our catalog also includes material housed in the separately administered Law Library in White Hall and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in the Department

  3. Geology of the Strait of Sicily: An example of geological mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yutsis, V.V. (Moscow State Univ. (USSR))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strait of Sicily is a comparatively shallow-water threshold which divides the Mediterranean into western and eastern deep-water hollows. The author composed a geologic map of the bottom of the Sicilian Strait and adjacent aquatories with a scale of 1:500,000. This map is based on the geologic-geophysical data of Soviet and foreign investigations (including more than 15,000 km of seismic reflection profiles, dredging, sampling, and drilling data) and their seismostratigraphic interpretation. Most of this region is underlain by the continental crust with a thick sedimentary cover. The most widespread sediments are Pliocene-Quaternary. On the map they are shown only in basins where thickness exceeds 200 m (Hammamet, Gabes, Tunisian, etc). Additionally, there are mapped outcrops of Messinian evaporites at the steep slopes of the Malta escarpment, Pantelleria and Malta grabens, Adventure and Skerki banks, etc. Also shown are outcrops of Paleogene, Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Upper Triassic rocks. This new geologic map should generate great interest because of the high petroleum potential of this region.

  4. Geological and production characteristics of strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.; Jackson, S.; Madden, M.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) primary mission in the oil research program is to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. The Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program supports DOE`s mission through cost-shared demonstrations of improved Oil Recovery (IOR) processes and reservoir characterization methods. In the past 3 years, the DOE has issued Program Opportunity Notices (PONs) seeking cost-shared proposals for the three highest priority, geologically defined reservoir classes. The classes have been prioritized based on resource size and risk of abandonment. This document defines the geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of the fourth reservoir class, strandplain/barrier islands. Knowledge of the geological factors and processes that control formation and preservation of reservoir deposits, external and internal reservoir heterogeneities, reservoir characterization methodology, and IOR process application can be used to increase production of the remaining oil-in-place (IOR) in Class 4 reservoirs. Knowledge of heterogeneities that inhibit or block fluid flow is particularly critical. Using the TORIS database of 330 of the largest strandplain/barrier island reservoirs and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (sufactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000.

  5. Flow of groundwater and transport of contaminants through saturated fractured geologic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, T.D.; Kunkel, J.R.; Way, S.C.; Koenig, R.A.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of several field investigations conducted during the early part of 1988 to characterize the Roza Member basalt aquifer of the Wanapum Formation of the Columbia River Basalt Group. A research wellfield was implemented and field tests conducted to lithologically classify subsurface geologic media and hydrologic parameters in an 800- by 1400-foot area located in the northwest quarter of Section 16, T.25N, R.34E, six miles south of the town of Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. This final project report assimilates the data and information generated by the study for possible eventual application to repository site characterization and performance prediction in fractured geologic media. The relatively high-yielding aquifers of the Roza Member basalt are separated by claystone aquitards and are hydrologically interrupted by at least two different subsurface hydrologic structures. Water-level data were collected over an 18-month period and used to assess seasonal variations in regional and local hydraulic gradient. Additional wellbore slug tests and two more passive (nonpumping) tracer tests enabled calculation of equivalent hydraulic apertures and effective porosities for the Roza basalt flow top. Analysis of data from two pumping tests provided a basis for calculation of transmissivities and storage coefficients for the Roza basalt. 31 refs., 97 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Fifth Biennial Geographic Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Organizations ........................................................................ 2 Review Process, SRTM, Digital Photogrammetry, and LIDAR- Derived Digital Elevation Models: Implications for Geological Digital Geologic Mapping at Yucca Mountain, Nevada ............................................. 13

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  8. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  9. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  10. Society for Geology Applied to Ore Deposits GENEVA MINERALS: Industry and Academia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    Society for Geology Applied to Ore Deposits GENEVA MINERALS: Industry and Academia Creating links Tripodi, Vanga Resources, Geneva · A student view of economic geology. Honza Catchpole, President

  11. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  12. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  13. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  14. ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE EFFECTS ON THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEMS - EBS INPUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Greenberg, H R; Sharma, M

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. The planning, construction, and operation of a nuclear disposal facility is a long-term process that involves engineered barriers that are tailored to both the geologic environment and the waste forms being emplaced. The UFD Campaign is considering a range of fuel cycles that in turn produce a range of waste forms. The UFD Campaign is also considering a range of geologic media. These ranges could be thought of as adding uncertainty to what the disposal facility design will ultimately be; however, it may be preferable to thinking about the ranges as adding flexibility to design of a disposal facility. For example, as the overall DOE-NE program and industrial actions result in the fuel cycles that will produce waste to be disposed, and the characteristics of those wastes become clear, the disposal program retains flexibility in both the choice of geologic environment and the specific repository design. Of course, other factors also play a major role, including local and State-level acceptance of the specific site that provides the geologic environment. In contrast, the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository license application (LA) is based on waste forms from an open fuel cycle (PWR and BWR assemblies from an open fuel cycle). These waste forms were about 90% of the total waste, and they were the determining waste form in developing the engineered barrier system (EBS) design for the Yucca Mountain Repository design. About 10% of the repository capacity was reserved for waste from a full recycle fuel cycle in which some actinides were extracted for weapons use, and the remaining fission products and some minor actinides were encapsulated in borosilicate glass. Because the heat load of the glass was much less than the PWR and BWR assemblies, the glass waste form was able to be co-disposed with the open cycle waste, by interspersing glass waste packages among the spent fuel assembly waste packages. In addition, the Yucca Mountain repository was designed to include some research reactor spent fuel and naval reactor spent fuel, within the envelope that was set using the commercial reactor assemblies as the design basis waste form. This milestone report supports Sandia National Laboratory milestone M2FT-12SN0814052, and is intended to be a chapter in that milestone report. The independent technical review of this LLNL milestone was performed at LLNL and is documented in the electronic Information Management (IM) system at LLNL. The objective of this work is to investigate what aspects of quantifying, characterizing, and representing the uncertainty associated with the engineered barrier are affected by implementing different advanced nuclear fuel cycles (e.g., partitioning and transmutation scenarios) together with corresponding designs and thermal constraints.

  15. Influence of site-specific geology on oil shale fragmentation experiments at the Colony Mine, Garfield County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.M.; Harper, M.D.; Craig, J.L.; Edwards, C.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory executed 19 intermediate scale cratering experiments in oil shale at the Colony Mine in Garfield County, Colorado. These experiments have led to a better understanding of fracture characteristics and fragmentation of in situ oil shale by use of a conventional high explosive. Geologic site characterization included detailed mapping, coring, and sample analyses. Site-specific geology was observed to be a major influence on the resulting crater geometry. The joint patterns at the experimental site frequently defined the final crater symmetry. Secondary influences included vugs, lithology changes, and grade fluctuations in the local stratigraphy. Most experiments, in both the rib and floor, were conducted to obtain data to investigate the fragmentation results within the craters. The rubble was screened for fragment-size distributions. Geologic features in proximity to the explosive charge had minimal effect on the rubble due to the overpowering effect of the detonation. However, these same features became more influential on the fracture and rubble characteristics with greater distances from the shothole. Postshot cores revealed a direct relationship between the grade of the oil shale and its susceptibility to fracturing. The Colony Mine experiments have demonstrated the significant role of geology in high explosive/oil shale interaction. It is probable that this role will have to be considered for larger applications to blast patterns and potential problems in retort stability in the future of oil shale development.

  16. High-resolution reservoir characterization by 2-D model-driven seismic Bayesian inversion: an example from a Tertiary deltaic clinoform system in the North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    High-resolution reservoir characterization by 2-D model-driven seismic Bayesian inversion the match with the seismic data. This low- parameterization inversion approach thus uses geological shapes of block F3 in the North Sea. Field description Geological setting F3 is a block in the Dutch sector

  17. Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lietzke, D.A. (Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)); McMaster, W.M. (McMaster (William M.), Heiskell, TN (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

  18. Outcrop gamma-ray logging applied to subsurface petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatt, R.M.; Borer, J.M.; Horn, B.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a gamma-ray log profile of an outcrop with a hand-held scintillometer has many applications to subsurface petroleum geology. The outcrop gamma-ray log provides a readily understandable bridge between what is observed in outcrop and what is to be interpreted on well logs and seismic records. Several examples are presented in this paper that demonstrate major applications. An outcrop from the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in Colorado provides an excellent example of the use of outcrop gamma-ray logs to better visualize spatial variability of depositional settings for improved well log correlations. Out crops from the Cretaceous Almond Formation, Niobrara Formation, and Graneros Shale in Colorado serve as examples of outcrop gamma-ray logging used to correlate outcrops with their subsurface equivalents for improved lithologic and stratigraphic interpretation of well logs. Outcrops of the Cretaceous Sharon Springs Member of the Pierre Shale in Colorado and the Eocene Green River Formation in Wyoming provide examples of the application of outcrop-gamma ray logging to identify and characterize organic-rich shales in outcrops and on well logs. Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Formation in Arkansas demonstrate the use of outcrop logging to yield improved interpretation of reservoir quality on well logs and for one- and two-dimensional seismic modeling. An outcrop of Precambrian and Cambro-Ordovician rocks from Algeria provides an example of outcrop logging to recognize unconformities and other major surfaces on well logs. An outcrop of the Niobrara Formation in Colorado is used as an example for improved understanding of horizontal gamma-ray log response. The example logs presented are all drived with a hand-held scintillometer. This technique is simple, quick, and relatively inexpensive, so is recommended for any outcrop work that is intended to be applied t;o subsurface well logs or seismic interpretation.

  19. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M. J.; Huckins-Gang, H. E.; Prothro, L. B.; Reed, D. N.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  20. doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1994)0222.3.CO;2 1994;22;1023-1026Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Geology doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1994)0222.3.CO;2 1994;22;1023-1026Geology Michael.S. government employees within scope of their Notes Geological Society of America on May 27, 2010geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on May 27, 2010geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on May 27, 2010geology

  1. THE CAPE ANN PLUTONIC SUITE: A FIELD TRIP FOR PETROLOGY CLASSES John B. Brady, Department of Geology, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01060

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, John B.

    of Geology, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01060 John T. Cheney, Department of Geology, Amherst College

  2. Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon Editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson Editor, G.S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The broad range of activities on radioactive waste isolation that are summarized in Table 1.1 provides a comprehensive picture of the operations that must be carried out in working with this problem. A comparison of these activities with those published in the two previous reviews shows the important progress that is being made in developing and applying the various technologies that have evolved over the past 20 years. There are two basic challenges in perfecting a system of radioactive waste isolation: choosing an appropriate geologic barrier and designing an effective engineered barrier. One of the most important developments that is evident in a large number of the reports in this review is the recognition that a URL provides an excellent facility for investigating and characterizing a rock mass. Moreover, a URL, once developed, provides a convenient facility for two or more countries to conduct joint investigations. This review describes a number of cooperative projects that have been organized in Europe to take advantage of this kind of a facility in conducting research underground. Another critical development is the design of the waste canister (and its accessory equipment) for the engineered barrier. This design problem has been given considerable attention in a number of countries for several years, and some impressive results are described and illustrated in this review. The role of the public as a stakeholder in radioactive waste isolation has not always been fully appreciated. Solutions to the technical problems in characterizing a specific site have generally been obtained without difficulty, but procedures in the past in some countries did not always keep the public and local officials informed of the results. It will be noted in the following chapters that this procedure has caused some problems, especially when approval for a major component in a project was needed. It has been learned that a better way to handle this problem is to keep all stakeholders fully informed of project plans and hold periodic meetings to brief the public, especially in the vicinity of the selected site. This procedure has now been widely adopted and represents one of the most important developments in the Third Worldwide Review.

  3. Geologic Study of the Coso Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

  4. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  5. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  6. Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager (Energy Sciences Area, LBNL) An organization chart of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 Research Teams: Thrust 1: Fractured Shale Ian Bourg, Thrust 1 Lead,...

  7. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depression and the West Fore-Balkan), In: Concept of B A SCretaceous in the Fore-Balkan), Geology of Bulgaria, Series:Lower Cretaceous in the Fore-Balkan between the rivers of k.

  8. Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidari, Arman S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

  9. Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological...

  10. Geologic evolution of Iron Mountain, central Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Stefan S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, petrologic study, and U-Pb geochronology at Iron Mountain, 20 km southwest of Barstow, California, place important constraints on the paleogeographic affinities of metasedimentary ...

  11. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Online Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) #12;Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem: detrital (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source

  12. Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sizer, Calvin Gregory

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

  13. Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Archean rocks of the footwall. Beneath the detachment lies a 100 to 300m-thick top-to-the-east extensional shear zone. Geologic mapping, strain and kinematic analysis,...

  14. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Online Exam 2 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    boundary types (transform, divergent, convergent); microplates Orogenesis Cycles of mountain building, ophiolites Examples in the modern world Wilson (Supercontinent) Cycles Geochemical Cycles Energy sources for geology: solar, gravity, internal heat Reservoirs (sources and sinks) and fluxes; residence time Positive

  15. Geology and Geothermal Potential of the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area, Beaver County, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Thesis: Geology and Geothermal Potential of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Area, Beaver...

  16. Louisiana Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Act (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law establishes that carbon dioxide and sequestration is a valuable commodity to the citizens of the state. Geologic storage of carbon dioxide may allow for the orderly withdrawal as...

  17. Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County, Nevada, in: Gold and Silver...

  18. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  19. State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Funding Level (total award amount) 15,799,947.00 Awardee Cost Share 0.00 Total Project Cost 15,799,947.00 Principal Investigator(s) M. Lee Allison, Arizona Geological Survey...

  20. DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. 12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

    This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

  2. 12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perron, Taylor

    This course introduces students to the basics of geology. Through a combination of lectures, labs, and field observations, we will address topics ranging from formation of the elements, mineral and rock identification, and ...

  3. Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  4. Junior Research Fellowship in Geology (Test Codes: GEA and GEB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    theory, Measures of central tendency, Dispersion, Binomial-Poisson-Normal distributions, Student's T test, ANOVA models, Snedecor's F test, Correlation & regression. Test GEB Structural Geology and tectonics of sediments by fluids. Sedimentary structures. Texture of sedimentary rocks. Environments of deposition

  5. CO{sub 2} Sequestration Capacity and Associated Aspects of the Most Promising Geologic Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region: Local-Scale Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laes, Denise; Eisinger, Chris; Morgan, Craig; Rauzi, Steve; Scholle, Dana; Scott, Phyllis; Lee, Si-Yong; Zaluski, Wade; Esser, Richard; Matthews, Vince; McPherson, Brian

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of individual local-­?scale CCS site characterization studies conducted in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. These site-­? specific characterization analyses were performed as part of the “Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region” (RMCCS) project. The primary objective of these local-­?scale analyses is to provide a basis for regional-­?scale characterization efforts within each state. Specifically, limits on time and funding will typically inhibit CCS projects from conducting high-­? resolution characterization of a state-­?sized region, but smaller (< 10,000 km{sup 2}) site analyses are usually possible, and such can provide insight regarding limiting factors for the regional-­?scale geology. For the RMCCS project, the outcomes of these local-­?scale studies provide a starting point for future local-­?scale site characterization efforts in the Rocky Mountain region.

  6. Geology and geohydrology of the east Texas Basin. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies (1979)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitler, C.W.; Agagu, O.K.; Basciano, J.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program to investigate the suitability of salt domes in the east Texas Basin for long-term nuclear waste repositories addresses the stability of specific domes for potential repositories and evaluates generically the geologic and hydrogeologic stability of all the domes in the region. Analysis during the second year was highlighted by a historical characterization of East Texas Basin infilling, the development of a model to explain the growth history of the domes, the continued studies of the Quaternary in East Texas, and a better understanding of the near-dome and regional hydrology of the basin. Each advancement represents a part of the larger integrated program addressing the critical problems of geologic and hydrologic stabilities of salt domes in the East Texas Basin.

  7. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic waste repository: 1. Theory, illustrations, and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J; Normani, S D; Sudicky, E A; Sykes, J F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, if radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from a repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time that radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport adjoint equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to defi...

  8. The facts on file. Dictionary of geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapidus, D.F.; Coates, D.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference to the basic vocabulary of geology and geophysics has more than 3,000 clear and concise entries defining the entire range of geological phenomena. This book covers such areas as types of rocks and rock formations, deformation processes such as erosion and plate tectonics, volcanoes, glaciers and their effects on topography, geodesy and survey methods, earthquakes and seismology, fuels and mineral deposits.

  9. APOLLO 17 VOICE TRANSCRIPT PERTAINING TO THE GEOLOGY OF THE LANDING SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO 17 VOICE TRANSCRIPT PERTAINING TO THE GEOLOGY OF THE LANDING SITE #12;APOLLO 17 VOICE TRANSCRIPT Pertaining to the geology of the landing site by N.G. Bai ley and G.E. Ulrich U.s. Geological 5. Report Date Apollo 17 Voice Transcript 1975 Pertaining to the Geology of the Landing Site 6. 7

  10. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores,1 A.M. Ochs,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 1999

  11. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEology College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907-474-7565 www.uaf.edu/geology/ MS, phD Degrees Minimum Requirements for Degrees: MS: 30 credits; PhD: 18 thesis credits Graduates in geology have broad backgrounds in the earth sciences and firm foundations

  12. Physical Geology Laboratory J Bret Bennington, Charles Merguerian and John E. Sanders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual J Bret Bennington, Charles Merguerian and John E. Sanders Geology Department Hofstra University © 1999 #12;PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Third Edition (Revised) by J Bret Bennington, Charles Merguerian, and John E. Sanders Department of Geology Hofstra University

  13. University of Calgary, Department of Geoscience Sessional Instructor Position in Petroleum Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garousi, Vahid

    in Petroleum Engineering Geology The Department of Geoscience at the University of Calgary is seeking a Sessional Instructor to fill 1/3 of course as lecturer for Geology 377 (Petroleum Engineering Geology to engineering students as part of the course GLGY 377 (Petroleum Engineering Geology). The topics covered

  14. * * * *APOLLO 12 VOICE TRANSCRIPT PERTAINING TO THE GEOLOGY OF THE LANDING SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    * * * *APOLLO 12 VOICE TRANSCRIPT PERTAINING TO THE GEOLOGY OF THE LANDING SITE #12;APOLLO 12 VOICE TRANSCRIPT Pertaining to the geology of the landing site by N.G. Bailey and G.E. Ulrich U.S. Geological to the Geology of the Landing Site 7. Auchor(s) 8. Performing Organization Repr. N. G. Bailey and G. E. Ulrich No

  15. U.S. Geological Survey Library Classification By R. Scott Sasscer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    U.S. Geological Survey Library Classification System By R. Scott Sasscer U.S. Geological Survey classification system is a tool for classifying and retrieving geoscience library materials. The index promotes.S. Geological Survey Library classification system / by R. Scott Sasscer. p. cm. ­ (U.S. Geological Survey

  16. Northwestern University Archives Evanston, Illinois Department of Geology Field Notebooks and Catalogs, 1881-1953

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geology. Mathematical techniques were applied to the exploitation of oil-bearing formations and otherNorthwestern University Archives · Evanston, Illinois Department of Geology Field Notebooks, instructors, and students of the Geology Department between the years 1881 through 1953. History Geology

  17. Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological Survey;#12;Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological Survey management plan for groundwater activities by the U.S. Geological Survey in Kansas, 2014: U.S. Geological

  18. October 27-30 Geological Society of America 2013 Annual Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    -D geologic mapping program--Paper Withdrawn Keefer, Donald A., Illinois State Geological Survey/710 Threedimensional geologic mapping of Lake County, Illinois: no small task Brown, Steven, E., Illinois State Geological Survey Separate workshop publication as: Thorleifson, L. H., Berg, R. C., and Russell, H. A. J

  19. BS in EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE EDUCATION (694020) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology Geol 405 Applied Math in Geol Sciences Geol 435

  20. BS in EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE EDUCATION (694020) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of the Planets Geol 230 Geological Communications Geol 351 Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology