Sample records for determination distributed dynamic

  1. Dynamical Energy Analysis - determining wave energy distributions in complex vibro-acoustical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Tanner

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach towards determining the distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave energy in complex built-up structures. The technique interpolates between standard Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and full ray tracing containing both these methods as limiting case. By writing the flow of ray trajectories in terms of linear phase space operators, it is suggested here to reformulate ray-tracing algorithms in terms of boundary operators containing only short ray segments. SEA can now be identified as a low resolution ray tracing algorithm and typical SEA assumptions can be quantified in terms of the properties of the ray dynamics. The new technique presented here enhances the range of applicability of standard SEA considerably by systematically incorporating dynamical correlations wherever necessary. Some of the inefficiencies inherent in typical ray tracing methods can be avoided using only a limited amount of the geometrical ray information. The new dynamical theory - Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA) - thus provides a universal approach towards determining wave energy distributions in complex structures.

  2. Introduction to Dynamic Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Introduction to Dynamic Distributed SystemsSystems #12;Outline Introduction Churn Building Applications in Dynamic Distributed Systems RegistersRegisters Eventual Leader election Connectivity in Dynamic Distributed Systems #12;Dynamic Distributed Systems: Context & Motivations Advent of Complex Distributed

  3. A feasibility study for experimentally determining dynamic force distribution in a lap joint.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayes, Randall Lee

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing constitutive models of the physics in mechanical joints is currently stymied by inability to measure forces and displacements within the joint. The current state of the art estimates whole joint stiffness and energy loss per cycle from external measured force input and one or two acceleration responses. To validate constitutive models beyond this state requires a measurement of the distributed forces and displacements at the joint interface. Unfortunately, introducing measurement devices at the interface completely disrupts the desired physics. A feasibility study is presented for a non-intrusive method of solving for the interface dynamic forces from an inverse problem using full field measured responses. The responses come from the viewable surface of a beam. The noise levels associated with digital image correlation and continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry are evaluated from typical beam experiments. Two inverse problems are simulated. One utilizes the extended Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT). The second is a new approach dubbed the method of truncated orthogonal forces. These methods are much more robust if the contact patch geometry is well identified. Various approaches to identifying the contact patch are investigated, including ion marker tracking, Prussian blue and ultrasonic measurements. A typical experiment is conceived for a beam which has a lap joint at one end with a single bolt connecting it to another identical beam. In a virtual test using the beam finite element analysis, it appears that the SWAT inverse method requires evaluation of too many coefficients to adequately identify the force distribution to be viable. However, the method of truncated orthogonal forces appears viable with current digital image correlation (and probably other) imaging techniques.

  4. Structure, Charge Distribution, and Electron Hopping Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charge Distribution, and Electron Hopping Dynamics in Magnetite (Fe3O4) (100) Surfaces from First Principles. Structure, Charge Distribution, and Electron Hopping Dynamics in...

  5. Complex Dynamics Effect on Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Tekkoyun

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems, which are mathematical models of mechanical systems, were introduced on the horizontal and the vertical distributions of tangent and cotangent bundles. Finally, some geometrical and physical results related to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamical systems were deduced.

  6. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhamdhere, Dhananjay Madhav

    Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems D. M. Dhamdhere \\Lambda Sridhar R. Iyer E for detecting the termination of a dis­ tributed computation is presented. The algorithm does not require global are provided. Keywords Distributed algorithms, Distributed computation, Distributed termination, Dynamic

  7. Distributed Compressed Sensing in Dynamic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldar, Yonina

    Distributed Compressed Sensing in Dynamic Networks Stacy Patterson Department of Computer Science theoretical results to develop a distributed version of IHT for dynamic networks. Evaluations show that our throughout the network, it is desirable to perform this recovery within the network in a distributed fashion

  8. Dynamic Voltage Regulation Using Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many distributed energy resources (DE) are near load centres and equipped with power electronics converters to interface with the grid, therefore it is feasible for DE to provide ancillary services such as voltage regulation, nonactive power compensation, and power factor correction. A synchronous condenser and a microturbine with an inverter interface are implemented in parallel in a distribution system to regulate the local voltage. Voltage control schemes of the inverter and the synchronous condenser are developed. The experimental results show that both the inverter and the synchronous condenser can regulate the local voltage instantaneously, while the dynamic response of the inverter is faster than the synchronous condenser; and that integrated voltage regulation (multiple DE perform voltage regulation) can increase the voltage regulation capability, increase the lifetime of the equipment, and reduce the capital and operation costs.

  9. Evaluation of Dynamic Data Distributions on NUMA Shared Memory Multiprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelrahman, Tarek S.

    Evaluation of Dynamic Data Distributions on NUMA Shared Memory Multiprocessors Tarek S. Abdelrahman, Canada M5S 3G4 Abstract Dynamic data distributions offer a number of performance benefits, but require. Recent work [1, 2] has shown that data distributions [7] provide a good abstraction for compiler

  10. Distributed Computation in Dynamic Networks : Technical Fabian Kuhn1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Distributed Computation in Dynamic Networks : Technical Report Fabian Kuhn1 Nancy Lynch2 Rotem 02139, USA Abstract In this paper we investigate distributed computation in dynamic networks in which in the theory of distributed computing in wireless, mobile and dy- namic networks. #12;1 Introduction The study

  11. approximate distributed dynamic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 The Relation between Approximation in Distribution and Shadowing in Molecular Dynamics Mathematics Websites Summary: analysis is to explain the apparent reliabil- ity of...

  12. Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard III, Golden G.

    Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina , Golden G. Another distinguishing character- istic for tree generation algorithms is centralized versus distributed, efficient network utilization becomes a growing concern. Multicast transmission may use network bandwidth

  13. Building Dynamic Computing Infrastructures over Distributed Clouds Pierre Riteau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Building Dynamic Computing Infrastructures over Distributed Clouds Pierre Riteau University--The emergence of cloud computing infrastructures brings new ways to build and manage computing systems objectives. First, leveraging virtualization and cloud computing infrastruc- tures to build distributed large

  14. Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination Pinak Tulpule architecture was used as globally shared memory structure for detection of algorithm termination. This paper of algorithm termination. Keywords--autonomous agent-based reconfiguration, dis- tributed algorithms, shipboard

  15. Method of determining interwell oil field fluid saturation distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Erle C. (Bartlesville, OK); Sutterfield, F. Dexter (Bartlesville, OK)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining the oil and brine saturation distribution in an oil field by taking electrical current and potential measurements among a plurality of open-hole wells geometrically distributed throughout the oil field. Poisson's equation is utilized to develop fluid saturation distributions from the electrical current and potential measurement. Both signal generating equipment and chemical means are used to develop current flow among the several open-hole wells.

  16. Dynamic server selection using fuzzy inference in content distribution networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

    Dynamic server selection using fuzzy inference in content distribution networks Lin Cai, Jun Ye been designed and deployed to distribute content to different cache servers, and to transparently and dynamically redirect user requests to the cache servers according to the latest network and server status

  17. Neural network determination of parton distributions: the nonsinglet case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NNPDF Collaboration; Luigi Del Debbio; Stefano Forte; Jose I. Latorre; Andrea Piccione; Joan Rojo

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a determination of the isotriplet quark distribution from available deep--inelastic data using neural networks. We give a general introduction to the neural network approach to parton distributions, which provides a solution to the problem of constructing a faithful and unbiased probability distribution of parton densities based on available experimental information. We discuss in detail the techniques which are necessary in order to construct a Monte Carlo representation of the data, to construct and evolve neural parton distributions, and to train them in such a way that the correct statistical features of the data are reproduced. We present the results of the application of this method to the determination of the nonsinglet quark distribution up to next--to--next--to--leading order, and compare them with those obtained using other approaches.

  18. A Dynamic Distributed Constraint Satisfaction Approach to Resource Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modi, Jay

    A Dynamic Distributed Constraint Satisfaction Approach to Resource Allocation Pragnesh Jay Modi,jungh,tambe,shen,kulkarnig@isi.edu Abstract. In distributed resource allocation a set of agents must assign their re­ sources to a set and the domain described in this paper: distributed sensor networks. Despite the variety of approaches proposed

  19. A Dynamic Distributed Constraint Satisfaction Approach to Resource Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modi, Jay

    A Dynamic Distributed Constraint Satisfaction Approach to Resource Allocation Pragnesh Jay Modi.edu Abstract. In distributed resource allocation a set of agents must assign their re- sources to a set and the domain described in this paper: distributed sensor networks. Despite the variety of approaches proposed

  20. Dynamic Interactions of PV units in Low Volatge Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Dynamic Interactions of PV units in Low Volatge Distribution Systems M. J. Hossain, J. Lu Griffith. Abstract--Photovoltaic (PV) units along with other distributed energy resources (DERs) are located close, robust control, stability. I. Introduction The integration level of PV units in low and medium voltage

  1. Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems Rekha Bachwani-scale storage systems can be significantly improved by using bet- ter reliability metrics and more efficient on a distributed storage system based on erasure codes. We find that MinI improves relia- bility significantly

  2. Distributed Dynamic State Estimation with Extended Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Pengwei; Huang, Zhenyu; Sun, Yannan; Diao, Ruisheng; Kalsi, Karanjit; Anderson, Kevin K.; Li, Yulan; Lee, Barry

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing complexity associated with large-scale renewable resources and novel smart-grid technologies necessitates real-time monitoring and control. Our previous work applied the extended Kalman filter (EKF) with the use of phasor measurement data (PMU) for dynamic state estimation. However, high computation complexity creates significant challenges for real-time applications. In this paper, the problem of distributed dynamic state estimation is investigated. One domain decomposition method is proposed to utilize decentralized computing resources. The performance of distributed dynamic state estimation is tested on a 16-machine, 68-bus test system.

  3. Dynamics and length distribution of microtubules under force and confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Björn Zelinski; Nina Müller; Jan Kierfeld

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the microtubule polymerization dynamics with catastrophe and rescue events for three different confinement scenarios, which mimic typical cellular environments: (i) The microtubule is confined by rigid and fixed walls, (ii) it grows under constant force, and (iii) it grows against an elastic obstacle with a linearly increasing force. We use realistic catastrophe models and analyze the microtubule dynamics, the resulting microtubule length distributions, and force generation by stochastic and mean field calculations; in addition, we perform stochastic simulations. We also investigate the force dynamics if growth parameters are perturbed in dilution experiments. Finally, we show the robustness of our results against changes of catastrophe models and load distribution factors.

  4. Progress in the Neural Network Determination of Polarized Parton Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rojo; G. Ridolfi; R. D. Ball; V. Bertone; F. Cerutti; L. Del Debbio; S. Forte; A. Guffanti; J. I. Latorre; M. Ubiali

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent progress towards a determination of a set of polarized parton distributions from a global set of deep-inelastic scattering data based on the NNPDF methodology, in analogy with the unpolarized case. This method is designed to provide a faithful and statistically sound representation of parton distributions and their uncertainties. We show how the FastKernel method provides a fast and accurate method for solving the polarized DGLAP equations. We discuss the polarized PDF parametrizations and the physical constraints which can be imposed. Preliminary results suggest that the uncertainty on polarized PDFs, most notably the gluon, has been underestimated in previous studies.

  5. Limits to Species' Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, Lori

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. J. 2003. The structure and dynamics of geographic ranges.8 Chapter 1: Spatial structure and dynamics of breeding birdDistributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding

  6. Determination and optimization of spatial samples for distributed measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Xiaoming (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tran, Hy D.; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Kim, Heeyong (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are no accepted standards for determining how many measurements to take during part inspection or where to take them, or for assessing confidence in the evaluation of acceptance based on these measurements. The goal of this work was to develop a standard method for determining the number of measurements, together with the spatial distribution of measurements and the associated risks for false acceptance and false rejection. Two paths have been taken to create a standard method for selecting sampling points. A wavelet-based model has been developed to select measurement points and to determine confidence in the measurement after the points are taken. An adaptive sampling strategy has been studied to determine implementation feasibility on commercial measurement equipment. Results using both real and simulated data are presented for each of the paths.

  7. Generating generalized distributions from dynamical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.; Laird, Brian Bostian; Leimkuhler, Benedict J.

    2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    virtual momentum related to the actual momentum of the system by p˜5sp.3 The equations of motion generated by the Nose´ Hamiltonian @Eq. ~1!# are dq dt 5M 21p˜/s2, ~2! dp˜ dt 52„V~q!, ~3! ds dt 5 p Q , ~4! dp dt 5 p˜TM21p˜ s3 2gkBT/s . ~5! The Nose´ method... regulates the temperature of the sys- tem through a dynamical time transformation given by dt/dt5s , where t is the Nose´ ~virtual! time and t is real time. The remarkable property of Nose´ dynamics is that mi- crocanonical sampling of the extended phase...

  8. A dynamical interpretation of Patterson-Sullivan distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Emonds

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a compact real hyperbolic space we study the connection between certain phase space distributions, so called Patterson-Sullivan distributions, and dynamical zeta functions. These zeta functions generalize logarithmic derivatives of classical Selberg zeta functions which are defined by closed geodesics which is data from the geodesic ow on phase space. Patterson-Sullivan distributions are asymptotically equivalent to Wigner distributions which play a key role in quantum ergodicity but they are also invariant under the geodesic ow. The surface case was studied before in [AZ07] and thus the emphasis in this work lies on the higher dimensional case.

  9. Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  10. First JAM results on the determination of polarized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accardi, Alberto [Hampton Univ., VA and JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab Angular Momentum (JAM) Collaboration is a new initiative to study the angular momentum dependent structure of the nucleon. First results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions at intermediate and large x from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering are presented. Different aspects of global QCD analysis are discussed, including the effects of nuclear structure of deuterium and {sup 3}He targets, target mass corrections and higher twist contributions to the g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} structure functions.

  11. adhesion dynamics determines: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adhesion dynamics determines First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Coupling of cytoplasm and...

  12. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  13. Determination of leakage and unaccounted-for gas-distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was leakage from ill fitting pipes and the resultant danger of explosions, fires, and asphxiation that delayed for a long time the use of gas in private homes. The industry has solved the problem of ill fitting pipes but safety, profits, and the conservation of a natural resource still demands a keen concern over leakage and unaccounted-for gas. The generally accepted definition of unaccountedfor gas is simple. It is the difference between the amount of gas supplied to and taken out of a piping system. By this definition, leakage is only a part of unaccounted-for gas, although the terms are sometimes used synonymously. It is the need to determine the ''tightness'' or freedom from leaks of the distribution system that requires an operator to evaluate all other components of unaccounted-for gas.

  14. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process.

  15. Econophysical Dynamics of Market-Based Electric Power Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Ho; David P. Chassin

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy markets begin clearing at sub-hourly rates, their interaction with load control systems becomes a potentially important consideration. A simple model for the control of thermal systems using market-based power distribution strategies is proposed, with particular attention to the behavior and dynamics of electric building loads and distribution-level power markets. Observations of dynamic behavior of simple numerical model are compared to that of an aggregate continuous model. The analytic solution of the continuous model suggests important deficiencies in each. The continuous model provides very valuable insights into how one might design such load control system and design the power markets they interact with. We also highlight important shortcomings of the continuous model which we believe must be addressed using discrete models.

  16. CVSys: A Coordination Framework for Dynamic and Fully Distributed Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    CVSys: A Coordination Framework for Dynamic and Fully Distributed Cardiovascular Modeling and dynamic simulation control. This coordination framework uniquely incorporates attributes of open indigenous and a more integrated system representation. Dynamic simulation control serves to interject new

  17. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic D.M. Dhamdhere Sridhar Iyer E.K.K.Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Sridhar

    Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems D.M. Dhamdhere Sridhar Iyer E.K.K.Reddy Dept of Computer Science IIT Bombay Mumbai, INDIA Abstract A symmetric algorithm for detecting the termination Distributed algorithms, Distributed computation, Distributed termination, Dynamic systems, Termination

  18. Network Control as a Distributed, Dynamic Game Sarosh Talukdar and Eduardo Camponogara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Network Control as a Distributed, Dynamic Game Sarosh Talukdar and Eduardo Camponogara ECE The operation of large, widely distributed networks can be modeled as distributed dynamic games. This paper. Three Sub-Networks Large networks for the wide spread distribution of goods and services

  19. Experimental determination of the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon: A transient photocurrent analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, D.P.; Chan, F.Y.M.; Zou, X.C.; Chan, Y.C.; Lam, Y.W.; Lin, S.H.; O'Leary, S.K.; Lim, P.K.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental developments have cast doubt on the validity of the common assumption that the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon exhibits a single exponential functional form. The authors employ transient photocurrent decay measurements to determine this distribution of tail states. In their approach, however, they determine the distribution of tail states directly from the experimental data, without assuming, a priori, a specific functional form. It is found that these experimental results are consistent with other more recent experimental determinations of the distribution of tail states, suggesting the possibility of deviations from a single exponential distribution of tail states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  20. Impact of Dynamic PHEVs Load on Renewable Sources based Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Impact of Dynamic PHEVs Load on Renewable Sources based Distribution System F. R. Islam, H. R. Pota.Roy@student.adfa.edu.au Abstract--In this paper, charging effect of dynamic Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is presented in a renewable energy based electricity distribution system. For planning and designing a distribution system

  1. A dynamic slack management technique for real-time distributed embedded systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Subrata

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a novel slack management technique, the Service Rate Based Slack Distribution Technique, for dynamic real-time distributed embedded systems targeting the reduction and management of energy consumption. Energy minimization...

  2. Price Discovery in Dynamic Power Markets with Low-Voltage Distribution-Network Participants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caramanis, Michael

    -distribution network locational marginal prices; power flow; reactive power compensation; voltage control; distributed application to Electric Power [2, 3] dynamic Locational-Marginal-Price (LMP) based Wholesale Power Markets to clear markets and discover dynamic Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) that promoted more efficient

  3. Dynamic Module Replacement in Distributed Protocols Nigamanth Sridhar, Scott M. Pike, and Bruce W. Weide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weide, Bruce W.

    Dynamic Module Replacement in Distributed Protocols Nigamanth Sridhar, Scott M. Pike, and Bruce W nsridhar,pike,weide @cis.ohio-state.edu Abstract Dynamic module replacement -- the ability to hot swap-neutral technique for dynamic module replacement using Service Facilities (Serfs) -- a pattern- based design

  4. Platform-independent dynamic reconfiguration of distributed applications Joo Paulo A. Almeidaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sinderen, Marten

    Platform-independent dynamic reconfiguration of distributed applications João Paulo A. Almeidaa. In recent years, support for transparent dynamic reconfiguration has been added to middleware platforms. These approaches to dynamic reconfiguration are mostly platform-specific and depend on particular implementation

  5. Determination of pore-size distribution in low-dielectric thin films D. W. Gidleya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidley, David

    -size distribution on pore shape/dimensionality and sample temperature is predicted using a simple quantum mechanicalDetermination of pore-size distribution in low-dielectric thin films D. W. Gidleya) and W. E. Frieze Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 T. L. Dull, J. Sun, and A

  6. The Astrophysical Journal, in press A Determination of the Coronal Emission Measure Distribution in the Young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guedel, Manuel

    to this temperature regime. We argue that the DEM distribution seen in EK Dra is induced by the propertiesThe Astrophysical Journal, in press A Determination of the Coronal Emission Measure Distribution of a coronal differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the nearby analog of the young Sun, EK Draconis

  7. Environmental determinants of unscheduled residential outages in the electrical power distribution of Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    service. The reliability of electrical power is important because many other infrastructures are directly of the electric power distribution infrastructure. There are many studies on the vulnerability of infrastructuresEnvironmental determinants of unscheduled residential outages in the electrical power distribution

  8. Mesoscale distribution of zooplankton biomass in the northeast Atlantic Ocean determined with an Optical Plankton Counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale distribution of zooplankton biomass in the northeast Atlantic Ocean determined Available online 2 June 2009 Keywords: Zooplankton Biomass Size distribution Mesoscale eddies Optical plankton counter Pelagic environment Northeast Atlantic Ocean a b s t r a c t We examined the mesoscale

  9. Price Discovery in Dynamic Power Markets with Low-Voltage Distribution-Network Participants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caramanis, Michael

    but not least distribution network rent. Keywords-distribution network locational marginal prices; power flow application to Electric Power [2, 3] dynamic Locational-Marginal-Price (LMP) based Wholesale Power Markets load-side market participation and the use of Distribution network Locational Marginal Prices (DLMP

  10. Summarizing and Mining Inverse Distributions on Data Streams via Dynamic Inverse Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormode, Graham

    Summarizing and Mining Inverse Distributions on Data Streams via Dynamic Inverse Sampling Graham data stream management systems approach this problem by sum- marizing and mining the distributions for summariz- ing and mining inverse distributions of data streams: they rely on a novel technique to maintain

  11. Linking Stochastic Dynamics to Population Distribution: An Analytical Framework of Gene Expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    expression. (a) Kinetic schLinking Stochastic Dynamics to Population Distribution: An Analytical Framework of Gene Expression propagation in a simple genetic network. This model allows for the extraction of kinetic parameters of gene

  12. Dynamic Distributed Multimedia: Seamless Sharing and Reconfiguration of Multimedia Flow Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohse, Marco

    Dynamic Distributed Multimedia: Seamless Sharing and Reconfiguration of Multimedia Flow Graphs Abstract Mobile devices with multimedia and networking capabilities are quickly becoming ubiquitous through the availability of small note- books, PDA, and in particular, mobile phones. However, most multimedia systems

  13. Robust Distributed Routing in Dynamical Networks - Part II: Strong Resilience, Equilibrium Selection and Cascaded Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Como, Giacomo

    Strong resilience properties of dynamical networks are analyzed for distributed routing policies. The latter are characterized by the property that the way the outflow at a non-destination node gets split among its outgoing ...

  14. Network Coding in Distributed, Dynamic, and Wireless Environments: Algorithms and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Mohammad

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    NETWORK CODING IN DISTRIBUTED, DYNAMIC, AND WIRELESS ENVIRONMENTS: ALGORITHMS AND APPLICATIONS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD ASAD REHMAN CHAUDHRY Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2011 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering Network Coding in Distributed, Dynamic, and Wireless Environments: Algorithms and Applications Copyright 2011 Mohammad Asad Rehman Chaudhry NETWORK...

  15. An Approximate Dynamic Programming Approach for a Product Distribution Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topaloglu, Huseyin

    of a company manufacturing a certain product in numerous plants and distributing it to different regional with geographically distributed manufacturing facilities requires careful coordination. While planning the delivery, the forecasts of customer demands, the production capacities and the forecasts of future production quantities

  16. Equilibration of experimentally determined protein structures for molecular dynamics simulation Emily B. Walton and Krystyn J. VanVliet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    Equilibration of experimentally determined protein structures for molecular dynamics simulation well studied, ranging from refinements of static x-ray crystallog- raphy structures to dynamic Preceding molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular interactions, the molecule of interest is often

  17. Robust distributed routing in dynamical networks with cascading failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Como, Giacomo

    We consider a dynamical formulation of network flows, whereby the network is modeled as a switched system of ordinary differential equations derived from mass conservation laws on directed graphs with a single origin-destination ...

  18. Power-like corrections and the determination of the gluon distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hautmann

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-suppressed corrections to parton evolution may affect the theoretical accuracy of current determinations of parton distributions. We study the role of multigluon-exchange terms in the extraction of the gluon distribution for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Working in the high-energy approximation, we analyze multi-gluon contributions in powers of 1/Q^2. We find a moderate, negative correction to the structure function's derivative d F_2 / d \\ln Q^2, characterized by a slow fall-off in the region of low to medium Q^2 relevant for determinations of the gluon at small momentum fractions.

  19. A differentiable dynamic network loading model that yields queue length distributions and accounts for spillback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    A differentiable dynamic network loading model that yields queue length distributions and accounts, this is so because the kinematic wave model (KWM), the mainstay of traffic flow theory, only applies for spillback Carolina Osorio Gunnar Fl¨otter¨od Michel Bierlaire Abstract We derive a dynamic network

  20. Coupling between motor proteins determines dynamic behaviors of motor protein assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling between motor proteins determines dynamic behaviors of motor protein assemblies Jonathan W of intracellular cargos by multiple microtubule motor proteins is believed to be a common and significant phenomenon in vivo, yet signatures of the microscopic dynamics of multiple motor systems are only now

  1. The F-Landscape: Dynamically Determining the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evolve our Multiverse Blueprints to characterize our local neighborhood of the String Landscape and the Multiverse of plausible string, M- and F-theory vacua. Building upon the tripodal foundations of i) the Flipped SU(5) Grand Unified Theory (GUT), ii) extra TeV-Scale vector-like multiplets derived out of F-theory, and iii) the dynamics of No-Scale Supergravity, together dubbed No-Scale F-SU(5), we demonstrate the existence of a continuous family of solutions which might adeptly describe the dynamics of distinctive universes. This Multiverse landscape of F-SU(5) solutions, which we shall refer to as the F-Landscape, accommodates a subset of universes compatible with the presently known experimental uncertainties of our own universe. We show that by secondarily minimizing the minimum of the scalar Higgs potential of each solution within the F-Landscape, a continuous hypervolume of distinct minimum minimorum can be engineered which comprise a regional dominion of universes, with our own universe cast as the bellwether. We conjecture that an experimental signal at the LHC of the No-Scale F-SU(5) framework's applicability to our own universe might sensibly be extrapolated as corroborating evidence for the role of string, M- and F-theory as a master theory of the Multiverse, with No-Scale supergravity as a crucial and pervasive reinforcing structure.

  2. Mesoscale simulation of semiflexible chains. I. Endpoint distribution and chain dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Groot

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The endpoint distribution and dynamics of semiflexible fibers is studied by numerical simulation. A brief overview is given over the analytical theory of flexible and semiflexible polymers. In particular, a closed expression is given for the relaxation spectrum of wormlike chains, which determines polymer diffusion and rheology. Next a simulation model for wormlike chains with full hydrodynamic interaction is described, and relations for the bending and torsion modulus are given. Two methods are introduced to include torsion stiffness into the model. The model is validated by simulating single chains in a heat bath, and comparing the endpoint distribution of the chains with established Monte Carlo results. It is concluded that torsion stiffness leads to a slightly shorter effective persistence length for a given bending stiffness. To further validate the simulation model, polymer diffusion is studied for fixed persistence length and varying polymer length N. The diffusion constant shows crossover from Rouse to reptation behaviour. The terminal relaxation time obtained from the monomer displacement is consistent with the theory of wormlike chains. The probability for chain crossing has also been studied. This probability is so low that it does not influence the present results.

  3. Mass distribution of highly flattened galaxies and modified Newtonian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Kao

    2006-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of spiral galaxies derived from a given surface mass density has been derived earlier in a classic paper. We try to transform the singular elliptic function in the integral into a compact integral with regular elliptic function. Solvable models are also considered as expansion basis for RC data. The result makes corresponding numerical evaluations easier and analytic analysis possible. It is applied to the study of the dynamics of Newtonian system and MOND as well. Careful treatment is shown to be important in dealing with the cut-off of the input data.

  4. Distributed Array of GPS Receivers for 3D Wind Profile Determination in Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Distributed Array of GPS Receivers for 3D Wind Profile Determination in Wind Farms Derek Chen, and inexpensively is critical for both optimizing the installation of wind turbines on a wind farm, and predicting. Finally, the system is tested on a local wind farm. It has been shown that GPS provides a viable method

  5. Comparison of acoustic and net sampling systems to determine patterns in zooplankton distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Comparison of acoustic and net sampling systems to determine patterns in zooplankton distribution and with predicted volume backscatter calculated from a coincident net tow. Spatially and temporally coincident data)) and from a 1 m2 Multiple Opening Closing Net and Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). The combined net

  6. Numerical solutions for determining wave-induced pressure distributions around buried pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Ngok-Wai

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Richard. F. Dominguez Numerical models using both the finite difference and i'inite element technique are developed to simulate the interaction of a two-dimensional pipe-soil-wave system. The wave-induced pressure distribution in the soil... in the soil media in the immediate vicinity of the pipelines. Numerical models using both the finite difference and. finite element technique are developed to simulate the pipe-soil-wave system. The dynamic damping of wave pressure through soil sediment...

  7. Ethanol Distribution, Dispensing, and Use: Analysis of a Portion of the Biomass-to-Biofuels Supply Chain Using System Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L. J.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and widespread use of high ethanol blends in flexible-fuel vehicles.

  8. Momentum distribution, vibrational dynamics and the potential of mean force in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin Lin; Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car; Michele Parrinello

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    By analyzing the momentum distribution obtained from path integral and phonon calculations we find that the protons in hexagonal ice experience an anisotropic quasi-harmonic effective potential with three distinct principal frequencies that reflect molecular orientation. Due to the importance of anisotropy, anharmonic features of the environment cannot be extracted from existing experimental distributions that involve the spherical average. The full directional distribution is required, and we give a theoretical prediction for this quantity that could be verified in future experiments. Within the quasi-harmonic context, anharmonicity in the ground state dynamics of the proton is substantial and has quantal origin, a finding that impacts the interpretation of several spectroscopies.

  9. Small-Signal Stability Assessment of Active Distribution Networks with Dynamic Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    the flow of power and the voltage profiles of the system and these profiles are different for different types of loads [3]. In addition to the power flow at and around N. K. Roy, H. R. Pota, and T. F. OrchiSmall-Signal Stability Assessment of Active Distribution Networks with Dynamic Loads N. K. Roy

  10. PERSONAL DISTRIBUTED ENVIRONMENT -SECURING THE DYNAMIC SERVICE PLATFORMS BEYOND 3G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Robert C

    of different devices interconnected by one or more Personal Area Networks (PANs). The DMP concept permitsPERSONAL DISTRIBUTED ENVIRONMENT - SECURING THE DYNAMIC SERVICE PLATFORMS BEYOND 3G S K Goo, J M users flexible access to information and services using a combination of different end-user devices

  11. Molecular dynamic simulations of electric microfield distributions in a nonideal electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadykova, S. P.; Ebeling, W.; Sokolov, I. M. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany); Valuev, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A symmetric model of a two-component plasma is considered and the distributions of electric microfields acting on charged and neutral particles are calculated using the method of molecular dynamics at a fixed temperature of T = 30000 K and different values of the coupling parameter 0.2 {<=} {Gamma} {<=} 1.2. Changes in these distributions with varying {Gamma} are discussed. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the distribution tails. The behavior of these tails at a neutral point is shown to agree with the tails of the Holtsmark distribution, whereas the tails of the distribution at a charge are considerably heavier and are characterized by the exponent that varies within the range from -2.2 up to -1.8 as {Gamma} increases.

  12. Statistics of voltage drop in distribution circuits: a dynamic programming approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turitsyn, Konstantin S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a power distribution line with high penetration of distributed generation and strong variations of power consumption and generation levels. In the presence of uncertainty the statistical description of the system is required to assess the risks of power outages. In order to find the probability of exceeding the constraints for voltage levels we introduce the probability distribution of maximal voltage drop and propose an algorithm for finding this distribution. The algorithm is based on the assumption of random but statistically independent distribution of loads on buses. Linear complexity in the number of buses is achieved through the dynamic programming technique. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm by analyzing a simple 4-bus system with high variations of load levels.

  13. Process Biochemistry 37 (2002) 10571065 Dynamics of yard trimmings composting as determined by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Biochemistry 37 (2002) 1057­1065 Dynamics of yard trimmings composting as determined of the composting process. In the present study, four different biochemical parameters (dehydrogenase activity, ATP of yard trimmings composting; and (2) to relate these parameters to changes in microbial numbers, physico

  14. Integrating GIS with Distributed Applications Using Dynamic Data-Sharing Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, Robert A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Tzemos, Spyridon (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stoops, LaMar R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective integration of a stand-alone GIS (e.g., ArcView 3.x) into a complex distributed software application requires an efficient, reliable mechanism for passing data and function requests to and from the GIS component. This paper describes the use of dynamic data-sharing and inter-process communication mechanisms to integrate GIS capability into a multi-jurisdictional distributed emergency management information system. These mechanisms include dynamic layer updates from spatial and attribute information shared via a distributed relational database across multiple sites; storage of private and shared ViewMarks to facilitate consistent GIS views; and asynchronous inter-process communication using function queuing and a data sharing library.

  15. A theoretical method for determining slam impact pressure distributions on ship sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, P. [Hydromechanics, Inc., Delray Beach, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A capability for time domain computer simulation of ship motions and structural loads, including the effects due to slamming, for monohull ships in a seaway has recently been demonstrated, with good correlation exhibited with experimental data. Such information is very useful for structural design purposes, where the global loads (such as bending moments and shears) results are used with finite element structural analyses and/or related reliability studies for purposes of assessment of ship structural survivability. The present paper describes a procedure for determining pressure distribution information by use of calculation and analysis procedures that are also employed within the work in the cited reference. In that way the desired pressure distribution information can then be adjoined to the motion and load results obtained from the output of the simulation procedure, so that a complete representation of all important features associated with ship slamming will then be available in a cohesive package.

  16. Distribution and dynamics of entanglement in high-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soojoon Lee; Jeong San Kim; Barry C. Sanders

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop theories of entanglement distribution and of entanglement dynamics for qudit systems, which incorporate previous qubit formulations. Using convex-roof extended negativity, we generalize previous qubit results for entanglement distribution with isotropic states and for entanglement dynamics with the depolarizing channel, and we establish a relation between these two types of entanglement networks.

  17. Distribution and dynamics of entanglement in high-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Soojoon; Sanders, Barry C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop theories of entanglement distribution and of entanglement dynamics for qudit systems, which incorporate previous qubit formulations. Using convex-roof extended negativity, we generalize previous qubit results for entanglement distribution with isotropic states and for entanglement dynamics with the depolarizing channel, and we establish a relation between these two types of entanglement networks.

  18. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  19. Fault Detection in Distributed Climate Sensor Networks using Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, George; Choudhury, Sutanay; Kangas, Lars J.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Marquez, Andres

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program operated by U.S. Department of Energy is one of the largest climate research programs dedicated to the collection of long-term continuous measurements of cloud properties and other key components of the earth’s climate system. Given the critical role that collected ARM data plays in the analysis of atmospheric processes and conditions and in the enhancement and evaluation of global climate models, the production and distribution of high-quality data is one of ARM’s primary mission objectives. Fault detection in ARM’s distributed sensor network is one critical ingredient towards maintaining high quality and useful data. We are modeling ARM’s distributed sensor network as a dynamic Bayesian network where key measurements are mapped to Bayesian network variables. We then define the conditional dependencies between variables by discovering highly correlated variable pairs from historical data. The resultant dynamic Bayesian network provides an automated approach to identifying whether certain sensors are malfunctioning or failing in the distributed sensor network. A potential fault or failure is detected when an observed measurement is not consistent with its expected measurement and the observed measurements of other related sensors in the Bayesian network. We present some of our experiences and promising results with the fault detection dynamic Bayesian network.

  20. 2002 AUGUST 24 LIMB FLARE LOOP: DYNAMICS OF MICROWAVE BRIGHTNESS DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Ji, H. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Melnikov, V. F.; Gorbikov, S. P.; Pyatakov, N. P. [Radiophysical Research Institute (NIRFI), Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Myagkova, I. N. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vreznikova@nirfi.sci-nnov.ru

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution radio observation of Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 and 34 GHz allowed studying the dynamics of microwave brightness distribution along the giant limb flaring loop in the event of 2002 August 24. It is found that on the rising phase of the radio burst the brightness distribution was highly asymmetric, with a strong maximum near the southern footpoint (SFP) and much weaker brightness enhancements near the loop top (LT) and northern footpoint. On the decay phase, the LT gradually became most bright. The similar dynamics of brightness distribution are shown to happen for all major temporal subpeaks of the burst. Results of our diagnostics show two important properties: (1) the number density of mildly relativistic electrons in the LT is much higher than near the footpoints (FPs) during rise, maximum and decay of each major peak; and (2) the ratio of the electron number densities in the LT and an FP increases from the maximum to decay phase. Model simulations with making use of the nonstationary Fokker-Planck equation have allowed us to find the model explaining the major properties of the microwave brightness distribution and dynamics. The model is characterized by a compact source of electrons located near the center of an asymmetric magnetic loop; the source is nonstationary, long lasting, and injecting high-energy electrons with the pitch-angle distribution mostly directed toward the SFP but also having a very weak isotropic component. This easily explains the observed brightness asymmetry. The observed dynamics comes due to two reasons: faster precipitation of electrons having their mirror points near the ends of the magnetic trap, and relatively faster decay of the lower energy electrons responsible for the gyrosynchrotron emission near the FPs with higher magnetic field.

  1. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  2. Automated Data Collection for Determining Statistical Distributions of Module Power Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Spataru, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for increasing the frequency of data collection and reducing the time and cost of accelerated lifetime testing of photovoltaic modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID). This consists of in-situ measurements of dark current-voltage curves of the modules at elevated stress temperature, their use to determine the maximum power at 25 degrees C standard test conditions (STC), and distribution statistics for determining degradation rates as a function of stress level. The semi-continuous data obtained by this method clearly show degradation curves of the maximum power, including an incubation phase, rates and extent of degradation, precise time to failure, and partial recovery. Stress tests were performed on crystalline silicon modules at 85% relative humidity and 60 degrees C, 72 degrees C, and 85 degrees C. Activation energy for the mean time to failure (1% relative) of 0.85 eV was determined and a mean time to failure of 8,000 h at 25 degrees C and 85% relative humidity is predicted. No clear trend in maximum degradation as a function of stress temperature was observed.

  3. The relative grain boundary area and energy distributions in a ferritic steel determined from three-dimensional electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    The relative grain boundary area and energy distributions in a ferritic steel determined from three The relative grain boundary area and energy distributions of a ferritic steel were characterized as a function planes with the (111) orientation had the minimum energy and the largest relative areas. The most

  4. Use of ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy to determine the size distribution of clay tactoids in aqueous suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samim Ali; Ranjini Bandyopadhyay

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersion processes of aqueous samples of clay are studied using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy. The attenuation spectra that are acquired in the frequency range $10-100$ MHz are used to determine the particle size distributions (PSDs) for different concentrations and ages of the clay suspensions. Our analysis, using equivalent spherical diameter (ESD) for circular discs under Stokes drag in samples of concentrations greater than 1.5\\% w/v, shows that a substantial fraction of the aggregates in suspension are actually tactoids that are composed of more than one platelet. This is in contrast to the general belief that clay disperses into individual platelets in the concentration range where their suspensions exhibit glassy behavior. We conclude that the incomplete fragmentation of the clay tactoids arises from the rapid enhancement of the inter-tactoid Coulombic repulsion.

  5. Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ros; G. A. Medina-Tanco; C. De Donato; L. del Peral; D. Rodríguez-Frías; J. C. D'Olivo; J. F. Valdés-Galicia; F. Arqueros; .

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_{opt}, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_{opt}), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_{opt} as a function of surface detector separation, energy and zenith angle and we demonstrate the advantage of using the r_{opt} value of each individual shower instead of a same fixed distance for every shower, specially in dealing with events with saturated stations. The effects on the determined spectrum are also shown.

  6. Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ros, G; De Donato, C; Del Peral, L; Rodríguez-Frías, D; D'Olivo, J C; Valdés-Galicia, J F; Arqueros, F

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_{opt}, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_{opt}), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_{opt} as a function of surface detector separation, energy and zenith angle and we demonstrate the advantage of using the r_{opt} value of each individual shower instead of a same fixed distance for every shower, specially in dealing with events with saturated stations. The effects on the determined spectrum are also shown.

  7. Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Sims, Kelly M [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

  8. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  9. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J. [Département de Physique et Regroupement Québécois sur les Matériaux de Pointe (RQMP), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  10. Distributed delay model for density wave dynamics in gas lifted wells Laure Sin`egre, Nicolas Petit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed delay model for density wave dynamics in gas lifted wells Laure Sin`egre, Nicolas Petit in the tubing D. dynamical choking is used to stabilise the density wave instability. In this paper, we propose instabilities cause production losses. One of these instabilities, referred to as the "density-wave

  11. An Energy-Aware Simulation Model and Transaction Protocol for Dynamic Workload Distribution in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    An Energy-Aware Simulation Model and Transaction Protocol for Dynamic Workload Distribution an energy-aware network transaction protocol that dynamically redistributes the computational workload among for detailed evaluation of the performance of different energy management policies in a MANET. Next it presents

  12. Correspondence between classical dynamics and energy level spacing distribution in the transition billiard systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soo-Young Lee; Sunghwan Rim; Eui-Soon Yim; C. H. Lee

    1998-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Robnik billiard is investigated in detail both classically and quantally in the transition range from integrable to almost chaotic system. We find out that a remarkable correspondence between characteristic features of classical dynamics, especially topological structure of integrable regions in the Poincar\\'{e} surface of section, and the statistics of energy level spacings appears with a system parameter $\\lambda$ being varied. It is shown that the variance of the level spacing distribution changes its behavior at every particular values of $\\lambda$ in such a way that classical dynamics changes its topological structure in the Poincar\\'{e} surface of section, while the skewness and the excess of the level spacings seem to be closely relevant to the interface structure between integrable region and chaotic sea rather than inner structure of intergrable regoin.

  13. Quantification of model mismatch errors of the dynamic energy distribution in a stirred-tank reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmich, Mark Raymond

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments Moo- Young and Chan (1971) proposed a model which consisted of a dual series of well-mixed regions and dead space in series with a plug- flow region. The system studied consisted of a viscous fluid flowing in a cylindrical tank fitted with four...QUANTIFICATION OF MODEL MISMATCH ERRORS OF THE DYNAMIC ENERGY DISTRIBUTION IN A STIRRED- TANK REACTOR A Thesis by MARK RAYMOND KIMMICH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  14. Vertical transport and dynamic size distribution of New Bedford Harbor sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Stephanie Carol

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    02? 1000 0 E 0 08 0 0 06- o IO OO. . " 6 Krone 1000 m 530 O. C 2- 120 0~~~1 oOI- Allersma 0 61- 0 I- 06- 06 04 06[ 02 0 0 2 4 8 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 Salinity (ppt) Fig. 8. - Variation of Particle Settling Velocity...VERTICAL ~SPORT AND DYNAMIC SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NEW BEDFORD HARBOR SEDIMENTS A Thesis STEPHANIE CAROL SANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&:M University in partia! fulfillment of the requuements for the degree...

  15. 1750 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 59, NO. 7, JULY 2014 Distributed Control of Networked Dynamical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    to the inherent difficulties with distributed PI control, automatic fre- quency control of power systems1750 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 59, NO. 7, JULY 2014 Distributed Control-order networked dynamical systems. We propose a class of nonlinear consensus controllers where the input of each

  16. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  17. Experiment and Simulation of Dynamic Voltage Regulation in Multiple Distributed Energy Resources Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed energy (DE) resources are power sources located near load centers and equipped with power electronics converters to interface with the grid, therefore it is feasible for DE to provide reactive power (along with active power) locally for dynamic voltage regulation. In this paper, a synchronous condenser and a microturbine with an inverter interface are implemented in parallel in a distribution system to regulate the local voltage. Developed voltage control schemes for the inverter and the synchronous condenser are presented. Experimental results show that both the inverter and the synchronous condenser can regulate the local voltage instantaneously although the dynamic response of the inverter is much faster than the synchronous condenser. In a system with multiple DEs performing local voltage regulation, the interaction between the DEs is studied. The simulation results show the relationship between the voltages in the system and the reactive power required for the voltage regulation. Also, integrated voltage regulation (multiple DEs performing voltage regulation) can increase the voltage regulation capability of DEs and reduce the capital and operating costs.

  18. DETERMINATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION AND INVENTORY OF RADIONUCLIDES WITHIN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WATERWAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the radionuclide inventory within the Lower Three Runs (LTR) Integrator Operable Unit (IOU) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this effort included the analysis of previously existing sampling and analysis data as well as additional streambed and floodplain sampling and analysis data acquired to delineate horizontal and vertical distributions of the radionuclide as part of the ongoing SRS environmental restoration program, and specifically for the LTR IOU program. While cesium-137 (Cs-137) is the most significant and abundant radionuclide associated with the LTR IOU it is not the only radionuclide, hence the scope included evaluating all radionuclides present and includes an evaluation of inventory uncertainty for use in sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. The scope involved evaluation of the radionuclide inventory in the P-Reactor and RReactor cooling water effluent canal systems, PAR Pond (including Pond C) and the floodplain and stream sediment sections of LTR between the PAR Pond Dam and the Savannah River. The approach taken was to examine all of the available Sediment and Sediment/Soil analysis data available along the P- and R-Reactor cooling water re-circulation canal system, the ponds situated along those canal reaches and along the length of LTR below Par Pond dam. By breaking the IOU into a series of sub-components and sub-sections, the mass of contaminated material was estimated and a representative central concentration of each radionuclide was computed for each compartment. The radionuclide inventory associated with each sub-compartment was then aggregated to determine the total radionuclide inventory that represented the full LTR IOU. Of special interest was the inventory of Cs-137 due to its role in contributing to the potential dose to an offsite member of the public. The overall LTR IOU inventory of Cs-137 was determined to be 75.5 Ci, which is similar to two earlier estimates. This investigation provides an independent, ground-up estimate of Cs-137 inventory in LTR IOU utilizing the most recent field data.

  19. Determination of the Distribution and Inventory of Radionuclides within a Savannah River Site Waterway - 13202

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.A.; Phifer, M.A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNS Bldg. 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNS Bldg. 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the radionuclide inventory within the Lower Three Runs (LTR) Integrator Operable Unit (IOU) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this effort included the analysis of previously existing sampling and analysis data as well as additional stream bed and flood plain sampling and analysis data acquired to delineate horizontal and vertical distributions of the radionuclide as part of the ongoing SRS environmental restoration program, and specifically for the LTR IOU program. While cesium-137 (Cs-137) is the most significant and abundant radionuclide associated with the LTR IOU it is not the only radionuclide, hence the scope included evaluating all radionuclides present and includes an evaluation of inventory uncertainty for use in sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. The scope involved evaluation of the radionuclide inventory in the P-Reactor and R-Reactor cooling water effluent canal systems, PAR Pond (including Pond C) and the flood plain and stream sediment sections of LTR between the PAR Pond Dam and the Savannah River. The approach taken was to examine all of the available Sediment and Sediment/Soil analysis data available along the P- and R-Reactor cooling water re-circulation canal system, the ponds situated along those canal reaches and along the length of LTR below Par Pond dam. By breaking the IOU into a series of sub-components and sub-sections, the mass of contaminated material was estimated and a representative central concentration of each radionuclide was computed for each compartment. The radionuclide inventory associated with each sub-compartment was then aggregated to determine the total radionuclide inventory that represented the full LTR IOU. Of special interest was the inventory of Cs-137 due to its role in contributing to the potential dose to an offsite member of the public. The overall LTR IOU inventory of Cs-137 was determined to be 2.87 E+02 GBq, which is similar to two earlier estimates. This investigation provides an independent, ground-up estimate of Cs-137 inventory in LTR IOU utilizing the most recent field data. (authors)

  20. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokri, Nima, E-mail: nima.shokri@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI{sub 2} solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 ?m and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI{sub 2} concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  1. A numerical technique for the determination of the pressure distribution in the presence of convective motion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croft, Robert Landis

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , . . . . . . . . . , SECTION 7 SUNMARY 'Page 48 REFERENCES. APPENDIX A. APPENDIX B. 51 52 55 APPENDIX C. 61 VITA 66 LIST OF FIGURRS Figure The finite difference grid over R. . 3. The matrix T n Actual potential temperature distribution, T, fcr the hydrostatic... case. 18 40 n distribution (solid line) and 9 distribution (dashed line) for the hydrostatic case. . . . . . , . . . . C. l. Solution surface for the motion case with y=l/10. Method of storage of values in arrays F and U. . . . 45 64 LIST...

  2. Thermal environment in indoor spaces with under-floor air distribution systems: 2. Determination of design parameters (1522-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Thermal environment in indoor spaces with under-floor air distribution systems: 2. Determination of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA 2 Building Energy and Environment Engineering LLP, Lafayette, Indiana 47905, USA 3 School of Environmental Science and Engineering

  3. The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivers, Jon Blake

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone appeared to be very isotropic while the Austin Chalk exhibited varying degrees of correlation in the directions considered. A comparison between the correlation of MRI derived core plug size porosity distributions and foot by foot whole core.... . Spatial Correlation of Porosity Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comparison with Foot by Foot Vertical Data. . Composite Sample Distribution. . Reproducibility. . 22 , 25 . . . . 30 . . . . . 4 2 . 44 . 47 CHAPTER V ? CONCLUSIONS...

  4. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to “play back” disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with “play back” capability.

  5. The uncertainties due to quark energy loss on determining nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. G. Duan; N. Liu; G. L. Li

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    By means of two different parametrizations of quark energy loss and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order phenomenological analysis is performed on the nuclear Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei for E772 experimental data. It is shown that there is the quark energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process apart from the nuclear effects on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering. The uncertainties due to quark energy loss effect is quantified on determining nuclear sea quark distribution by using nuclear Drell-Yan data. It is found that the quark energy loss effect on nuclear Drell-Yan cross section ratios make greater with the increase of quark momentum fraction in the target nuclei. The uncertainties from quark energy loss become bigger as the nucleus A come to be heavier. The Drell-Yan data on proton incident middle and heavy nuclei versus deuterium would result in an overestimate for nuclear modifications on sea quark distribution functions with neglecting the quark energy loss. Our results are hoped to provide good directional information on the magnitude and form of nuclear modifications on sea quark distribution functions by means of the nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data.

  6. Dynamics of two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Terada; Toshio Aoyagi

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large variety of rhythms have been observed in nature. These rhythms can be often regarded to interact with each other, such as electroencephalogram (EEG) in the brain. To investigate the dynamical properties of such systems, in this paper, we consider two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions, particularly under the condition that the average frequency of fast oscillators is almost equal to the integral multiple of that of slow oscillators. What is the most important point is that we have to use the specific type of the coupling function derived from the phase reduction theory. Under some additional assumption, moreover, we can reduce the system consisting of two populations of coupled phase oscillators to a low-dimensional system in the continuum limit. As a result, we find chimera states in which clustering and incoherent states coexist. We also confirm that the behaviors of the derived low-dimensional model fairly agree with that of the original one.

  7. A particle size distribution was determined from the image analysis. With more expensive equipment,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    contributes to fines generation during mining operations, the best practice is to replace drill bits Distribution Analysis Overview Kennametal, Incorporated is a major manufacturer of drill bits for mining ideally sized, half-inch pieces of coal. Because dull drill bits on mining machines significantly

  8. Ion distribution dynamics near the Earth's bow shock: rst measurements with the 2D ion energy spectrometer CORALL on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of supra- thermal ion populations upstream and downstream from the bow shock do not depend on the solarIon distribution dynamics near the Earth's bow shock: ®rst measurements with the 2D ion energy the Earth's bow shock is studied on the basis of quasi-3D measurements of ion energy spectra in the range

  9. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  10. A system for the tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teruya, A.; Elmer, J.; O`Brien, D.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer tomographic technique was developed to measure the current density distribution in electron beams. This technique uses electron-beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high power beams. The beam profile data is acquired by sweeping the beam across a narrow slit. The beam current, integrated along the axis of the slit, is captured by a Faraday cup and its waveform is recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. The slit is repeatedly rotated and beam current waveforms are recorded at regularly spaced angles. A 2-dimensional image of the current density distribution in the beam is reconstructed from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. This paper discusses the techniques used to record beam profiles, discusses the computer tomographic reconstruction of beams, and presents an example of how this method can be used to control beam focus in an unbiased way. 7 refs.

  11. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  12. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  13. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O'Brien, D.W.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique is disclosed for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0[degree] to 360[degree] and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figures.

  14. An electrical resistance method for determining the fiber length distribution of cotton lint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartstack, Albert W

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . ~. . . o ~ o . i e ~ e Specimen Clamp Vise ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page ~ ~ ~ 14 5 16 Instrumentation for %ms u'ing and Recotrd&g the Length of Cotton Fibers. . . . ~ IB 5. Ezpcrimsntal Setup for Nsasuring the Length Distribution... the difference 'n fiber length was cl earil reer, o?sibbs for inferior processing arid yarn quality, Abided et al (5) nake this statement conci ming length: A review of the previous work done on the relationship between the fiber-properties and the spinrdng...

  15. Funnel-Like Organization in Sequence Space Determines the Distributions of Protein Stability and Folding Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    determinants of protein folding, we map out the complete organization of thermody- namic and kinetic properties simplified models of protein folding. We obtain a stability map and a folding rate map in sequence space. Proteins 2004;55:107­114. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: protein folding; protein sequence struc- ture

  16. Dynamical coupled-channels model of $K^- p$ reactions (I): Determination of partial-wave amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kamano; S. X. Nakamura; T. -S. H. Lee; T. Sato

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels model of K^- p reactions, aiming at extracting the parameters associated with hyperon resonances and providing the elementary antikaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes that can be used for investigating various phenomena in the strangeness sector such as the production of hypernuclei from kaon-nucleus reactions. The model consists of (a) meson-baryon (MB) potentials v_{M'B',MB} derived from the phenomenological SU(3) Lagrangian, and (b) vertex interactions Gamma_{MB,Y*} for describing the decays of the bare excited hyperon states (Y*) into MB states. The model is defined in a channel space spanned by the two-body barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, and K Xi states and also the three-body pi pi Lambda and pi barK N states that have the resonant pi Sigma* and barK* N components, respectively. The resulting coupled-channels scattering equations satisfy the multichannel unitarity conditions and account for the dynamical effects arising from the off-shell rescattering processes. The model parameters are determined by fitting the available data of the unpolarized and polarized observables of the K^- p --> barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, K Xi reactions in the energy region from the threshold to invariant mass W=2.1 GeV. Two models with equally good chi^2 fits to the data have been constructed. The partial-wave amplitudes obtained from the constructed models are compared with the results from a recent partial-wave analysis by the Kent State University group. We discuss the differences between these three analysis results. Our results at energies near the threshold suggest that the higher partial waves should be treated on the same footing as the S wave if one wants to understand the nature of Lambda(1405)1/2^- using the data below the barK N threshold, as will be provided by the J-PARC E31 experiment.

  17. Experimental determination of the MHD-EMP effects on power distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, B.W.; Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Tesche, F.M. (Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a well-established fact that geomagnetic storms influence electrical power transmission and distribution systems. Previous cases of such storms in the northern latitudes have resulted in occasional power disruptions, and in some cases, damage to transformers. These effects are caused by a time variation of the earth's magnetic field creating an induced electric field along the surface of the earth. This E-field acts as a voltage source along long power transmission or distribution lines, and if the line is connected to the earth at both ends, a quasi-dc current can flow. This current can cause unwanted saturation in the magnetic cores of transformers in the power system, and this, in turn produces harmonic distortion and transformer heating. This can lead to system upset (shutdown) and possibly transformer burn-out. The detonation of a high altitude nuclear explosion is also known to affect the magnetosphere, producing late-time variations of the earth's magnetic field for several hundreds of seconds. Known as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP), or E{sub 3}, this environment is of particular concern to electrical power systems in the event of a nuclear attack. Although the MHD-EMP induced currents can be significantly larger in magnitude, they last for a shorter period of time than do those from a geomagnetic storm. The effect of this environment compounds the adverse effects of the early-time high altitude EMP (HEMP) environment, posing a potentially serious threat to the electrical system. The present paper documents an experimental program designed to better understand the behavior of distribution-class transformers subjected to quasi-dc current excitation. Given the knowledge of the MHD-EMP-induced current flowing in a long power line, and the transformer response characteristics obtained in this program, it will be possible to make more accurate assessments of the behavior of the overall power system to EMP. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Understanding plume splitting of laser ablated plasma: A view from ion distribution dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plume splitting in low-pressure ambient air was understood in view of ion distribution dynamics from the laser ablated Al plasma (1064 nm 0.57 J/mm{sup 2}) by combining fast photography and spatially resolved spectroscopy. In the beginning, the spectral lines were mainly from the Al III ion. Then, the Bragg peak in stopping power of the ambient gas to Al III could be the dominant reason for the enhanced emission from the fast moving part, and the recombination of Al III to Al I-II ions near the target surface was response to the radiations from the slow moving/stationary part. As the ambient gas pressure increased, stopping distances of the Al III decreased, and radiation from the air ions became pronounced. The laser shadowgraph image at 1100 Pa indicated that the shock wave front located between the fast moving and slow moving parts. Electron densities of the fast moving plasma, which peaked at the plasma front, were on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}, and the electron temperatures were 2–3 eV.

  19. Distributed and Adaptive Algorithms for Vehicle Routing in a Stochastic and Dynamic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, Marco; Bullo, Francesco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present distributed and adaptive algorithms for motion coordination of a group of m autonomous vehicles. The vehicles operate in a convex environment with bounded velocity and must service demands whose time of arrival, location and on-site service are stochastic; the objective is to minimize the expected system time (wait plus service) of the demands. The general problem is known as the m-vehicle Dynamic Traveling Repairman Problem (m-DTRP). The best previously known control algorithms rely on centralized a-priori task assignment and are not robust against changes in the environment, e.g. changes in load conditions; therefore, they are of limited applicability in scenarios involving ad-hoc networks of autonomous vehicles operating in a time-varying environment. First, we present a new class of policies for the 1-DTRP problem that: (i) are provably optimal both in light- and heavy-load condition, and (ii) are adaptive, in particular, they are robust against changes in load conditions. Second,...

  20. Virtual reality and dynamic statistical graphics: A bidirectional link in a heterogeneous, distributed computing environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    , distributed computing environment Martin Schneider Philipps-Universit¨at Marburg Dept. of Mathemathics

  1. Policy Building Blocks: Helping Policymakers Determine Policy Staging for the Development of Distributed PV Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing body of qualitative and a limited body of quantitative literature supporting the common assertion that policy drives development of clean energy resources. Recent work in this area indicates that the impact of policy depends on policy type, length of time in place, and economic and social contexts of implementation. This work aims to inform policymakers about the impact of different policy types and to assist in the staging of those policies to maximize individual policy effectiveness and development of the market. To do so, this paper provides a framework for policy development to support the market for distributed photovoltaic systems. Next steps include mathematical validation of the framework and development of specific policy pathways given state economic and resource contexts.

  2. Applications of radon distribution and radon flux for the determination of oceanic mixing and air-sea gas exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Robert Lewis

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATIONS OF RADON DISTRIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERS 1INATION Ol OCEANIC IvfIXING AND AIR -SEA GAS EXCHA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT I. EWIS BREWER Submitted to the Graduate College oi T e xa s A '4 I'. 1 Univ c r s i ty in partial... luiiillment of the requirement for the degree of KIASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Oceanography APPLICATIONS OF RADON DIS TBIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERMINATION OF OCEANIC MIXING A ND AIR ? SEA GAS EXCIdA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT LEWIS...

  3. Regularization Method And Its Application In Problem Of Determination A Radial Distribution Of Spectral Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuceljic, M. J. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Natural Science and Mathematic, Podgorica (Serbia)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a lot of methods dealing with the problems how to get the local radial intensity from a measured lateral intensity of the spectral line. All of them need some a priori information and often a preliminary filtering of the signal. Thus, it is always a question about loosing the useful information of the signal. One of the methods for determination radial intensity is a Tikhonov regularization method. This method requires minimum a priori information such as: the intensity is a monotone positive function. To check applicability limitations of the method, some model functions have been introduced. Special attention was devoted to the model function with the fine structure.

  4. The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivers, Jon Blake

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was calculated in each of these directions to determine the distance between correlated and uncorrelated porosity values. The results show that the German Sandstone is correlated for about 5 mm in all three directions considered. In the Austin Chalk, porosity..., Y-I WRITE(7, *) A(H), C(H), G(H) 60 CO~ STOP 72 APPENDIX D CORE SAMPLE GEOLOGY The Austin Chalk is best characterized as a very fine- grained carbonate mud containing coarser skeletal tests and fragments. The grain size of the chalk...

  5. LandScan USA: A High Resolution Geospatial and Temporal Modeling Approach for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution population distribution data are critical for successfully addressing important issues ranging from socio-environmental research to public health to homeland security, since scientific analyses, operational activities, and policy decisions are significantly influenced by the number of impacted people. Dasymetric modeling has been a well recognized approach for spatial decomposition of census data to increase the spatial resolution of population distribution. However, enhancing the temporal resolution of population distribution poses a greater challenge. In this paper, we discuss the development of LandScan USA, a multi-dimensional dasymetric modeling approach, which has allowed creation of very high resolution population distribution data both over space and time. At a spatial resolution of 3 arc seconds (~90m), the initial LandScan USA database contains both a nighttime residential as well as a baseline daytime population distribution that incorporates movement of workers and students. Challenging research issues of disparate and misaligned spatial data integration and modeling to develop a database at a national scale, as well as model verification and validation approaches are illustrated and discussed. Initial analyses indicate a high degree of accuracy for LandScan USA distribution model and data. High resolution population data such as LandScan USA, which describes both distribution and dynamics of human population, clearly has the potential to profoundly impact on multiple domain applications of national and global priority.

  6. Altitude Distribution of the Auroral Acceleration Potential Determined from Cluster Satellite Data at Different Heights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marklund, Goeran T.; Sadeghi, Soheil; Karlsson, Tomas; Lindqvist, Per-Arne [Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH, SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, Hans [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE 981 28 Kiruna (Sweden); Forsyth, Colin; Fazakerley, Andrew [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Lucek, Elizabeth A. [Space and Atmospheric Physics Group, Blacket Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Pickett, Jolene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1479 (United States)

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Aurora, commonly seen in the polar sky, is a ubiquitous phenomenon occurring on Earth and other solar system planets. The colorful emissions are caused by electron beams hitting the upper atmosphere, after being accelerated by quasistatic electric fields at 1-2 R{sub E} altitudes, or by wave electric fields. Although aurora was studied by many past satellite missions, Cluster is the first to explore the auroral acceleration region with multiprobes. Here, Cluster data are used to determine the acceleration potential above the aurora and to address its stability in space and time. The derived potential comprises two upper, broad U-shaped potentials and a narrower S-shaped potential below, and is stable on a 5 min time scale. The scale size of the electric field relative to that of the current is shown to depend strongly on altitude within the acceleration region. To reveal these features was possible only by combining data from the two satellites.

  7. Trigger probe for determining the orientation of the power distribution of an electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining the orientation of electron beams being profiled. To accurately time the location of an electron beam, the probe is designed to accept electrons from only a narrowly defined area. The signal produced from the probe is then used as a timing or triggering fiducial for an operably coupled data acquisition system. Such an arrangement eliminates changes in slit geometry, an additional signal feedthrough in the wall of a welding chamber and a second timing or triggering channel on a data acquisition system. As a result, the present invention improves the accuracy of the resulting data by minimizing the adverse effects of current slit triggering methods so as to accurately reconstruct electron or ion beams.

  8. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H. [CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoover, M.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po, and the short-lived decay products of {sup 222}Rn with {sup 230}Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 {mu}m activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 {mu}m AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 {mu}m AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 {mu}m AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower.

  9. Quantitative Determination of Chemical Processes by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Haifeng

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) provides several orders of magnitude of NMR signal enhancement by converting the much larger electron spin polarization to nuclear spin polarization. Polarization occurs at ...

  10. Development of new parameters for structure determination and dynamic investigations on biomacromolecules by NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchardt, Elke, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is unique in the content of structural as well as dynamic information that it can provide at atomic resolution. The aim of this PhD-thesis was to contribute to the understanding ...

  11. Determining Space from Place for Natural History Collections: In a Distributed Digital Library Environment Search | Back Issues | Author Index | Title Index | Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Determining Space from Place for Natural History Collections: In a Distributed Digital Library Digital Library Environment Reed Beaman Peabody Museum, Yale University John management systems that represent a solid foundation for comprehensive digital libraries in the museum

  12. Dynamical description of the moments of the energy distribution of fission fragments and scission of a fissile nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borunov, M. V., E-mail: bmv@opsb.ru; Nadtochy, P. N.; Adeev, G. D. [Omsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multidimensional stochastic approach to fission dynamics on the basis of three-dimensional Langevin equations is applied systematically to calculating the first four moments of the energy distribution of fission fragments over a broad range of Coulomb parameter values (700 < Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} < 1700). For the scission of a fissile nucleus into fragments, use was made of various criteria traditional in modern fission theory: the vanishing of the neck radius at the scission instant and the equality of the neck radius to about 0.3R{sub 0} at this instant. In calculating the energy distribution, both of the criteria used lead to a fairly good description of experimental data on the first two moments and to a satisfactory description of data on the third and fourth moments of the distribution. However, the quality of the description of available experimental data is insufficiently good for giving preference to any of these criteria. Within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics, it is shown that the vanishing-radius criterion leads to unexpectably good agreement with experimental data on the first four moments of the energy distribution. A modified version of one-body dissipation where the coefficient that takes into account the reduction of the wall-formula contribution was set to k{sub s} = 0.25 was used in the calculations.

  13. Dynamic Service Placement in Geographically Distributed Clouds Qi Zhang, Quanyan Zhu, Mohamed Faten Zhani, Raouf Boutaba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    performance requirements (e.g. response time) are assured. Furthermore, the dynamic nature of both demand the desired objective dynamically over time according to both demand and resource price fluctuations. We on realistic topologies, demand and resource prices, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our solution

  14. Dynamical kurtosis of net and total proton distributions in STAR at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiming Li

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the energy and centrality dependence of dynamical kurtosis for Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV at RHIC. The dynamical kurtosis of net-proton is compared to that of total-proton. The results are also compared with AMPT model calculations.

  15. Experimental determination of dynamic force coefficients of a pocket damper seal at higher frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Ashish

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at higher frequencies than tested previously. The seal coefficients are determined by measuring the logarithmic decrement and damped natural frequency in non-rotating free vibration tests and by computer simulations of these results using a computer program...

  16. The experimental determination of the dynamic radial stiffness of an angular contact ball bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Brent Lee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the A. B. Jones bearing stiffness predictions on an angular contact ball bearing, experimental testing on an angular contact ball bearing was conducted. Objectives of the testing were to determine the effects of thrust load, rotational...

  17. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  18. Marine particle dynamics : sinking velocities, size distributions, fluxes, and microbial degradation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Andrew M. P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sinking flux of particulate matter into the ocean interior is an oceanographic phenomenon that fuels much of the metabolic demand of the subsurface ocean and affects the distribution of carbon and other elements ...

  19. Dodging the dark matter degeneracy while determining the dynamics of dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busti, Vinicius C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key issues in cosmology is to establish the nature of dark energy, and to determine whether the equation of state evolves with time. When estimating this from distance measurements there is a degeneracy with the matter density. We show that there exists a simple function of the dark energy equation of state and its first derivative which is independent of this degeneracy at all redshifts, and so is a much more robust determinant of the evolution of dark energy than just its derivative. We show that this function can be well determined at low redshift from supernovae using Gaussian Processes, and that this method is far superior to a variety of parameterisations which are also subject to priors on the matter density. This shows that parametrised models give very biased constraints on the evolution of dark energy.

  20. Determination of the dynamic Young's modulus, shear modulus, and internal friction as a function of temperature and microstructure in Uranium - 2.4wt% Niobium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chancellor, Wayne Morrow

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF THE DYNAMIC YOUNG'S MODULUS, SHEAR MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN URANIUM ? 2. 4vtXNIOBIUM A Thesis by WAYNE MORROW CHANCELLOR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF THE DYNAMIC YOUNG'S MODULUS, SHEAR MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE...

  1. An approach to determining nearshore bathymetry using remotely sensed ocean surface dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    of the hydrodynamic coupling between the water depth and the wave kinematics, methods which would determine the ocean-dimensional algorithm developed to estimate water depths from remotely sensed information of the water surface, using. Wave conditions including monochromatic and irregular waves are simulated in the model. Mean flow

  2. The potential for dynamic distribution systems to create a new energy marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    photovoltaic (PV) systems has fallen, on average, six to seven percent every year since 1998 (Feldman & Barbose microgrid technology developed through the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS reliability. The challenge is to further develop the dynamic disitribution system technology, including its

  3. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  4. Determination of power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of data from in-core monitors by means of a metric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryanev, A. V.; Udumyan, D. K. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPHI,” (Russian Federation); Kurchenkov, A. Yu., E-mail: s327@vver.kiae.ru; Gagarinskiy, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with determining the power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of a neutron-physics calculation and data from in-core monitors are considered. A new mathematical scheme is proposed for this on the basis of a metric analysis. In relation to the existing mathematical schemes, the scheme in question improves the accuracy and reliability of the resulting power distribution.

  5. Determination of the number of catalytic sites for ethylene-octene copolymers made with heterogeneous catalyst via interpretation of ?p13?sC NMR sequence distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moldovan, Daniel Gene

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF THE NUMBER OF CATALYTIC SITES FOR ETHYLENE-OCTENE COPOLYMERS MADE WITH HETEROGENEOUS CATALYST VIA INTERPRETATION OF C NMR SEQUENCE DISTRIBUTION A Thesis by DANIEL GENE MOLDOVAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... VIA INTERPRETATION OF C NMR SEQUENCE DISTRIBUTION A Thesis by DANIEL GENE MOLDOVAN Approved as to style and content by: C. A. J. oeve (Chair of t e committee) E. A. Meyers (Member) E. T. Ad m" (Member) J. S. Ham (Member) M. B. Hall (Head...

  6. ON QUIET-TIME SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN DYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH LANGMUIR TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaheer, S. [Permanent address: Department of Physics, Forman Christian College, Lahore, Punjab 54000, Pakistan. (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Also at SSR, KHU, Yongin, Korea. (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent series of papers put forth a self-consistent theory of an asymptotically steady-state electron distribution function and Langmuir turbulence intensity. The theory was developed in terms of the ? distribution which features Maxwellian low-energy electrons and a non-Maxwellian energetic power-law tail component. The present paper discusses a generalized ? distribution that features a Davydov-Druyvesteyn type of core component and an energetic power-law tail component. The physical motivation for such a generalization is so that the model may reflect the influence of low-energy electrons interacting with low-frequency kinetic Alfvénic turbulence as well as with high-frequency Langmuir turbulence. It is shown that such a solution and the accompanying Langmuir wave spectrum rigorously satisfy the balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced emission processes in both the particle and wave kinetic equations, and approximately satisfy the similar balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced scattering processes, which are nonlinear. In spite of the low velocity modification of the electron distribution function, it is shown that the resulting asymptotic velocity power-law index ?, where f{sub e} ? v {sup –?} is close to the average index observed during the quiet-time solar wind condition, i.e., ? ? O(6.5) whereas ?{sub average} ? 6.69, according to observation.

  7. Evaluation of the modified Anderson sampler for determining particle size distributions and respirable concentrations of particulate matter present in the working environment of cottonseed oil mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlock, Stanley Wayne

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND RESPIRABLE CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE MATTER PRESENT IN THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT OF COTTONSEED OIL MILLS A Thesis by STANLEY WAYNE MATLOCK Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering FVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE...

  8. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  9. Structural changes in block copolymer solution under shear flow as determined by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Rychkov; Kenichi Yoshikawa

    2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulation on microsegregated solutions of symmetrical diblock copolymers is reported. As the polymer concentration increases, the system undergoes phase transitions in the following order: body centered cubic (BCC) micelles, hexagonal (HEX) cylinders, gyroid (GYR) bicontinuous networks, and lamellae (L), which are the same morphologies that have been reported for block copolymer melts. Structural classification is based on the patterns of the anisotropic static structure factor and characteristic 3-dimensional images. The systems in the BCC micellar ($\\rho\\sigma^{3}=0.3$) and HEX cylindrical ($\\rho\\sigma^{3}=0.4$) phases were then subjected to a steady planar shear flow. In weak shear flow, the segregated domains in both systems tend to rearrange into sliding parallel close-packed layers with their normal in the direction of the shear gradient. At higher shear rates both systems adopt a perpendicular lamellar structure with the normal along the neutral direction. A further increase in the shear rate results in a decrease in lamellar spacing without any further structural transitions. Two critical shear rate values that correspond to the demarcation of different structural behaviors were found.

  10. Reaction dynamics of weakly-bound nuclei at near-barrier energies: impact of incomplete fusion on the angular distribution of direct alpha-production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexis Diaz-Torres

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical trajectory model with stochastic breakup for nuclear collision dynamics of weakly-bound nuclei is further developed. It allows a quantitative study of the importance of incomplete fusion dynamics in the angular distribution of direct alpha-production. Model calculations indicate that the incomplete fusion contribution diminishes with decreasing energy towards the Coulomb barrier, notably separating in angles from the contribution of no-capture breakup events. This should facilitate the experimental disentanglement of these competing reaction processes.

  11. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard (Delmar, NY)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  12. Neutron to proton mass difference, parton distribution functions and baryon resonances from dynamics on the Lie group u(3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ole L. Trinhammer

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a hamiltonian structure on the Lie group u(3) to describe the baryon spectrum. The ground state is identified with the proton. From this single fit we calculate approximately the relative neutron to proton mass shift to within half a percentage of the experimental value. From the same fit we calculate the nucleon and delta resonance spectrum with correct grouping and no missing resonances. For specific spin eigenfunctions we calculate the delta to nucleon mass ratio to within one percent. Finally we derive parton distribution functions that compare well with those for the proton valence quarks. The distributions are generated by projecting the proton state to space via the exterior derivative on u(3). We predict scarce neutral flavour singlets which should be visible in neutron diffraction dissociation experiments or in invariant mass spectra of protons and negative pions in B-decays and in photoproduction on neutrons. The presence of such singlet states distinguishes experimentally the present model from the standard model as does the prediction of the neutron to proton mass splitting. Conceptually the Hamiltonian may describe an effective phenomenology or more radically describe interior dynamics implying quarks and gluons as projections from u(3) which we then call allospace.

  13. Using GIS and species distribution modelling techniques to determine new locations for botanical collecting surveys in Nepal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Christine

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding botanical distributions and plant biodiversity is of importance to conservationists, and also to others such as land managers, biogeographers and horticulturalists. In Nepal, a globally important biodiversity hot-spot, many plant...

  14. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  15. The Separate Physics and Dynamics Experiment (SPADE) framework for determining resolution awareness: A case study of microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Xiao, Heng; Singh, Balwinder; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to use multi-resolution dynamical cores for weather and climate modeling is pushing the atmospheric community towards developing scale aware or, more specifically, resolution aware parameterizations that will function properly across a range of grid spacings. Determining the resolution dependence of specific model parameterizations is difficult due to strong resolution dependencies in many pieces of the model. This study presents the Separate Physics and Dynamics Experiment (SPADE) framework that can be used to isolate the resolution dependent behavior of specific parameterizations without conflating resolution dependencies from other portions of the model. To demonstrate the SPADE framework, the resolution dependence of the Morrison microphysics from the Weather Research and Forecasting model and the Morrison-Gettelman microphysics from the Community Atmosphere Model are compared for grid spacings spanning the cloud modeling gray zone. It is shown that the Morrison scheme has stronger resolution dependence than Morrison-Gettelman, and that the ability of Morrison-Gettelman to use partial cloud fractions is not the primary reason for this difference. This study also discusses how to frame the issue of resolution dependence, the meaning of which has often been assumed, but not clearly expressed in the atmospheric modeling community. It is proposed that parameterization resolution dependence can be expressed in terms of "resolution dependence of the first type," RA1, which implies that the parameterization behavior converges towards observations with increasing resolution, or as "resolution dependence of the second type," RA2, which requires that the parameterization reproduces the same behavior across a range of grid spacings when compared at a given coarser resolution. RA2 behavior is considered the ideal, but brings with it serious implications due to limitations of parameterizations to accurately estimate reality with coarse grid spacing. The type of resolution awareness developers should target in their development depends upon the particular modeler’s application.

  16. A Characterisation of Dynamic Distributed Systems Felix Garcia-Neiva, Ruben de Juan-Marin and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    -Mar´in and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Institut Universitari Mixt Tecnol`ogic d'Inform`atica Universitat Polit`ecnica de Characterisation of Dynamic Distributed Systems F´elix Garc´ia-Neiva, Rub´en de Juan-Mar´in and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  17. On the distribution schemes for determining flows through a merge W. L. Jin and H. M. Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    of a general Riemann problem will be of interest in future studies. Keywords: The kinematic wave traffic flow of realistic size. The kinematic wave model is a promising candidate for these tasks since it describes traffic for simulating traffic dynamics in a large network. In the seminal kinematic wave model by Lighthill

  18. Using Sediment Records to Determine Sources, Distribution, Bioavailability, and Potential Toxicity of Dioxins in the Houston Ship Channel: A Multi-proxy Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seward, Shaya M.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2010 Major Subject: Oceanography USING SEDIMENT RECORDS TO DETERMINE SOURCES, DISTRIBUTION..., BIOAVAILABILITY, AND POTENTIAL TOXICITY OF DIOXINS IN THE HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL: A MULTI-PROXY APPROACH A Thesis by SHAYA MARIE SEWARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  19. Determination of the respective density distributions of low-and high-density lipoprotein particles in bovine plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .006-1.210 g/ml were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation into 25 fractions. Their respective apo-I and apo B. Gradient distributions of apo A-I (d 1.046-1.180 g/ml; max at d 1.080 g/ml) and apo B (d 1: Intestinal Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism (Windler E, Greten H, eds), W Zuckschwerdt Verlag, Munchen, 50

  20. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  1. Study of catalytic diffusion in coal. Final report for 1983/1984 SOMED Project. [Determination of pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of our studies is to determine the pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution in standard bituminous coal samples from various Alabama coal seams such as that of the Mary Lee, Black Creek and Pratt during and after swelling of the coal with different solvents at various temperatures. These samples come from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank at Pennsylvania State University Coal Research Section and from Alabama's Mineral Industries. Methods have been developed in the laboratory whereby free radical probes of varying sizes can be diffused into the coal under various conditions. These probes can be detected and the environment surrounding the probes can be deduced by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. To date, we have found that not only can the shape and size of the pores be determined, but that the size distribution varies from one bituminous coal seam to another, even for coal of the same rank, suggesting a different optimal catalyst should be used for each seam. The effect of oxygen on the coal samples during grinding has been studied; however, the free radical technique appears to be insensitive to the presence of oxygen effects. It is our goal to determine the structural differences between various bituminous coals. 9 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  2. Performance of a Dynamically Controlled Inverter in a Photovoltaic System Interconnected with a Secondary Network Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coddington, M. H.; Kroposki, B. D.; Basso, T.; Berger, D.; Crowell, K.; Hayes, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, a 300 kW{sub peak} photovoltaic (PV) system was installed on the rooftop of the Colorado Convention Center (CCC). The installation was unique for the electric utility, Xcel Energy, as it had not previously permitted a PV system to be interconnected on a building served by the local secondary network distribution system (network). The PV system was installed with several provisions; one to prevent reverse power flow, another called a dynamically controlled inverter (DCI), that curtails the output of the PV inverters to maintain an amount of load supplied by Xcel Energy at the CCC. The DCI system utilizes current transformers (CTs) to sense power flow to insure that a minimum threshold is maintained from Xcel Energy through the network transformers. The inverters are set to track the load on each of the three phases and curtail power from the PV system when the generated PV system current reaches 95% of the current on any phase. This is achieved by the DCI, which gathers inputs from current transformers measuring the current from the PV array, Xcel, and the spot network load. Preventing reverse power flow is a critical technical requirement for the spot network which serve this part of the CCC. The PV system was designed with the expectation that the DCI system would not curtail the PV system, as the expected minimum load consumption was historically higher than the designed PV system size. However, the DCI system has operated many days during the course of a year, and the performance has been excellent. The DCI system at the CCC was installed as a secondary measure to insure that a minimum level of power flows to the CCC from the Xcel Energy network. While this DCI system was intended for localized control, the system could also reduce output percent if an external smart grid control signal was employed. This paper specifically focuses on the performance of the innovative design at this installation; however, the DCI system could also be used for new s- art grid-enabled distribution systems where renewables power contributions at certain conditions or times may need to be curtailed.

  3. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stener, M., E-mail: stener@univ.trieste.it; Decleva, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy) [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Unita'di Trieste, 34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM DEMOCRITOS, 34149 Trieste (Italy)] [Italy; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)] [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Yoshida, H. [Department of Chemistry, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hirosima 739-8526 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hirosima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  4. Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around {sup 192}Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 55, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate {sup 192}Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate ({approx}0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a {sup 192}Ir wire source.

  5. The determination of the Reynolds shear stress distribution in the transition region resulting from a sudden increase in wall roughness in a two-dimensional channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heilhecker, Joe Keith

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DETERMINATION OF THE REYNOLDS SHEAR STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN THE TRANSITION REGION RESULTING FROM A SUDDEN INCREASE IN WALL ROUGHNESS IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By JOE K. HEI LHE CKER Submitted to the Graduate School... REGION RESULTING FROM A SUDDEN INCREASE IN WALL ROUGHNESS IN A TWO-DIMEN4$ONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By JOE K. HEI LHE CKER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm o C mittee) (Head of Department) May 1962 TAB LE OF CONTE NT S Page List...

  6. Determining Lamprey Species Composition, Larval Distribution and Adult Abundance in the Deschutes River Subbasin, Oregon ; 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Matt; Graham, Jennifer C. [Department of Natural Resources, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We will report results of an ongoing project in the Deschutes River Subbasin to describe Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) life history. Project objectives were to determine adult lamprey escapement from Sherars Falls located at Rkm 70.4 and determine lamprey focal spawning areas, spawn timing and habitat through radio telemetry. A mark-recapture study and tribal creel was conducted to determine adult escapement. Lamprey were radio tagged and are currently being mobile, aerial and fixed site tracked to describe spawning. Adult lamprey were collected at Sherars Falls using a long-handled dip net from June-September 2007. The fate of lamprey collected at Sherars Falls was determined based on girth measurements. Fish measuring less than 10.5 cm received two markings for the mark-recapture estimation while those measuring 10.5 cm or greater were implanted with radio transmitters. Two-hundred and nine lamprey were marked during first event sampling, 2,501 lamprey inspected for marks and 64 recaptured during second event sampling. We estimate lamprey abundance to be 8,083 (6,352-10,279) with a relative precision of 19.8. Tribal harvest was 2,303 +/- 88. Escapement was estimated at 5,780 adult lamprey. Thirty-six lamprey received radio transmitters. Lamprey were transported upstream 6.3 Rkm for surgery, held to recover from anesthesia and released. Mobile tracking efforts started mid-July 2007 and are on-going. To date 35 of the 36 lamprey have been detected. Upon release, extensive ground-based tracking was conducted until fish became dormant in mid-October. Since, fixed site downloading and tracking have occurred weekly on the mainstem Deschutes River. Majority of lamprey (88%) are holding in the mainstem Deschutes River. Three lamprey moved upstream more than 70 Rkms into westside tributaries from August-December. Three moved approximately 18 Rkms downstream of the release site. Tracking will continue through the spawning season when redd characteristics will be measured and reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  7. Dynamical friction in modified Newtonian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Nipoti; L. Ciotti; J. Binney; P. Londrillo

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested a previous analytical estimate of the dynamical friction timescale in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with fully non-linear N-body simulations. The simulations confirm that the dynamical friction timescale is significantly shorter in MOND than in equivalent Newtonian systems, i.e. systems with the same phase-space distribution of baryons and additional dark matter. An apparent conflict between this result and the long timescales determined for bars to slow and mergers to be completed in previous N-body simulations of MOND systems is explained. The confirmation of the short dynamical-friction timescale in MOND underlines the challenge that the Fornax dwarf spheroidal poses to the viability of MOND.

  8. The role of structure and entropy in determining differences in dynamics for glass formers with different interaction potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreyee Banerjee; Shiladitya Sengupta; Srikanth Sastry; Sarika Maitra Bhattacharyya

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of two model liquids with different interaction potentials, exhibiting similar structure but significantly different dynamics at low temperatures. By evaluating the configurational entropy, we show that the differences in the dynamics of these systems can be understood in terms of their thermodynamic differences. Analyzing their structure, we demonstrate that differences in pair correlation functions between the two systems, through their contribution to the entropy, dominate the differences in their dynamics, and indeed overestimate the differences. Including the contribution of higher order structural correlations to the entropy leads to smaller estimates for the relaxation times, as well as smaller differences between the two studied systems.

  9. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell: Gas productionDynamic , and Static ,

  10. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benke, Roland R. (Helotes, TX); Kearfott, Kimberlee J. (Ann Arbor, MI); McGregor, Douglas S. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, system and a radiation detector system for use therein are provided for determining the depth distribution of radiation-emitting material distributed in a source medium, such as a contaminated field, without the need to take samples, such as extensive soil samples, to determine the depth distribution. The system includes a portable detector assembly with an x-ray or gamma-ray detector having a detector axis for detecting the emitted radiation. The radiation may be naturally-emitted by the material, such as gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, or emitted when the material is struck by other radiation. The assembly also includes a hollow collimator in which the detector is positioned. The collimator causes the emitted radiation to bend toward the detector as rays parallel to the detector axis of the detector. The collimator may be a hollow cylinder positioned so that its central axis is perpendicular to the upper surface of the large area source when positioned thereon. The collimator allows the detector to angularly sample the emitted radiation over many ranges of polar angles. This is done by forming the collimator as a single adjustable collimator or a set of collimator pieces having various possible configurations when connected together. In any one configuration, the collimator allows the detector to detect only the radiation emitted from a selected range of polar angles measured from the detector axis. Adjustment of the collimator or the detector therein enables the detector to detect radiation emitted from a different range of polar angles. The system further includes a signal processor for processing the signals from the detector wherein signals obtained from different ranges of polar angles are processed together to obtain a reconstruction of the radiation-emitting material as a function of depth, assuming, but not limited to, a spatially-uniform depth distribution of the material within each layer. The detector system includes detectors having different properties (sensitivity, energy resolution) which are combined so that excellent spectral information may be obtained along with good determinations of the radiation field as a function of position.

  11. Moments of the Hilbert-Schmidt probability distributions over determinants of real two-qubit density matrices and of their partial transposes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slater, Paul B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonnegativity of the determinant of the partial transpose of a two-qubit (4 x 4) density matrix is both a necessary and sufficient condition for its separability. While the determinant is restricted to the interval [0,1/256], the determinant of the partial transpose can range over [-1/16,1/256], with negative values corresponding to entangled states. We report here the exact values of the first nine moments of the probability distribution of the partial transpose over this interval, with respect to the Hilbert-Schmidt (metric volume element) measure on the nine-dimensional convex set of real two-qubit density matrices. Rational functions C_{2 j}(m), yielding the coefficients of the 2j-th power of even polynomials occurring at intermediate steps in our derivation of the m-th moment, emerge. These functions possess poles at finite series of consecutive half-integers (m=-3/2,-1/2,...,(2j-1)/2), and certain (trivial) roots at finite series of consecutive natural numbers (m=0, 1,...). Additionally, the (nontri...

  12. Power law and exponential ejecta size distributions from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded Cu and Sn metals under melt conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study and to model the ejecta production from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded metals under melt conditions. A generic 3D crystal in contact with vacuum containing about 10{sup 8} atoms and with a sinusoidal free surface roughness is shock loaded so as to undergo a solid-liquid phase change on shock. The reflection of the shock wave at the interface metal/vacuum gives rise to the ejection of 2D jets/sheets of atoms (Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in the continuum limit), which develop and break up, forming ejecta (fragments) of different volumes (or mass). The fragmentation process is investigated by analyzing the evolution of the resulting volume distribution of the ejecta as a function of time. Two metals are studied (Cu and Sn) and the amplitude of the roughness is varied. The simulations show that the associated distributions exhibit a generic behavior with the sum of two distinct terms of varying weight, following the expansion rate of the jets: in the small size limit, the distribution obeys a power law dependence with an exponent equal to 1.15?±?0.08; and in the large size limit, it obeys an exponential form. These two components are interpreted, with the help of additional simple simulations, as the signature of two different basic mechanisms of fragmentation. The power law dependence results from the fragmentation of a 2D network of ligaments arranged following a fractal (scale free) geometry and generated when the sheets of liquid metal expand and tear. The exponential distribution results from a 1D Poisson fragmentation process of the largest ligaments previously generated. Unlike the power law distribution, it is governed by a characteristic length scale, which may be provided by energy balance principle.

  13. Dynamic Jiles-Atherton Model for Determining the Magnetic Power Loss at High Frequency in Permanent Magnet Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Ruoyang; Student Member; IEEE; Robertson, Paul

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of Variation of B-H Properties on Loss and Flux Inside Silicon Steel Lamination,” IEEE Trans. Magn., vol. 47, no. 5, pp. 1346–1349, May 2011. [31] L. Santi, R. L. Sommer, A. Magni, G. Durin, F. Colaiori, and S. Zapperi, “Dynamic hysteresis in finemet thin...

  14. Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed Internet Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, A.K.M. Ashikur

    and efficiently manage the electricity cost of distributed IDCs based on the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP on the electricity price in- formation of the regions where IDCs are located. Based on this observation various of all, due to electricity-price based biased work- load distribution, the IDCs located at relatively

  15. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, K., E-mail: fujii@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8540 (Japan)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8540 (Japan); Goto, M.; Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (?20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmer-? emissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  16. DETERMINING THE OPTIMUM PLACEMENT OF A PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS (PCM) THERMAL SHIELD INSIDE FRAME WALLS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reshmeen, Silvia

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This thesis presents the results of an experimental study to determine the optimum placement and the thermal performance of a Phase Change Materials (PCMs) thermal shield incorporated into frame wall insulation systems for the purpose...

  17. Essays on Dynamic Value Change Perspective in Resource Based View, Determinants of Alliance Formation and Risk Preference in Alliance Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Ik Su

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on addressing some critical shortcomings in recent developments of the field of strategic management with three essays; shortcomings in the ubiquitous Resource Based View (RBV) on matters regarding the origins and processes of value.... Such asymmetry inherently occurs due to bounded rationality and resource constraint of the stakeholders. However, this asymmetry evolves through competitive interactions among stakeholders. Thus, this chapter develops a dynamic approach to firm value creation...

  18. Modeling kinetic partitioning of secondary organic aerosol and size distribution dynamics: representing effects of volatility, phase state, and particle-phase reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Shilling, John E.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence is mounting that the majority of the climatically active aerosols are produced through the growth of smaller particles via secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gas-to-particle conversion of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The timescale of SOA partitioning and the associated size distribution dynamics are expected to depend on the gas-phase oxidation of the precursor VOCs and their products, volatility of these organic solutes, composition and phase state of the pre-existing particles, and diffusivity and reactivity of the solute within the particle phase. This paper describes a new framework for modeling kinetic gas-particle partitioning of SOA, with an analytical treatment for the diffusion-reaction process within the particle phase. The formulation is amenable for eventual use in regional and global climate models, although it currently awaits implementation of the actual particle-phase reactions that are important for SOA formation. In the present work, the model is applied to investigate the competitive growth dynamics of the Aitken and accumulation mode particles while the Kelvin effect and coagulation are neglected for simplicity. The timescale of SOA partitioning and evolution of number and composition size distributions are evaluated for a range of solute volatilities (C*), particle-phase bulk diffusivities (Db), and particle-phase reactivity, as exemplified by a pseudo-first-order rate constant (kc). Results show that irreversible condensation of non-volatile organic vapors (equivalent to ) produces significant narrowing of the size distribution. At the other extreme, non-reactive partitioning of semi-volatile organic vapors is volume-controlled in which the final (equilibrium) size distribution simply shifts to the right on the diameter axis while its shape remains unchanged. However, appreciable narrowing of the size distribution may occur when the pre-existing particles are highly viscous semi-solids such that small particles reach quasi-equilibrium much faster than the large ones. In the case of reactive partitioning (finite ), the size distribution experiences permanent narrowing, which is especially pronounced for Db < 10-13 cm2 s-1 and kc > 0.01 s-1. As a result, both number and composition size distributions are needed to effectively constrain and evaluate the next generation of SOA models that treat phase state thermodynamics, particle-phase diffusion and particle-phase chemical reactions.

  19. Unification of Dynamical Determination and Bare Minimal Phenomenological Constraints in No-Scale F-SU(5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the construction of the viable parameter space of No-Scale F-SU(5), a model built on the F-lipped SU(5)xU(1)_X gauge group, supplemented by a pair of F-theory derived vector-like multiplets at the TeV scale, and the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity. Employing an updated numerical algorithm and a substantially upgraded computational engine, we significantly enhance the scope, detail and accuracy of our prior study. We sequentially apply a set of "bare-minimal" phenomenological constraints, consisting of i) the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity, ii) consistent radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, iii) precision LEP constraints on the light supersymmetric mass content, iv) the world average top-quark mass, and v) a light neutralino satisfying the 7-year WMAP cold dark matter relic density measurement. The overlap of the viable parameter space with key rare-process limits on the branching ratio for b to s gamma and the muon anomalous magnetic moment is identified as the "golden strip" of F-SU(5). A cross check for top-down theoretical consistency is provided by application of the "Super No-Scale" condition, which dynamically selects a pair of undetermined model parameters in a manner that is virtually identical to the corresponding phenomenological (driven primarily by the relic density) selection. The predicted vector-like particles are candidates for production at the future LHC, which is furthermore sensitive to a distinctive signal of ultra-high multiplicity hadronic jets. The lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass is predicted to be 120+3.5-1 GeV, with an additional 3-4 GeV upward shift possible from radiative loops in the vector-like multiplets. The predominantly bino flavored lightest neutralino is suitable for direct detection by the Xenon collaboration.

  20. The Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A. Carreras M. Kirchner I. Dobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    on the robustness of the power transmission grid using a dynamic model of the power transmission system (OPA renewable, power sources, coupled with a drive for decentralization, the fraction of electric power and the engineering responses to failure. In this model, the power demand is increased at a constant rate and is also

  1. Distributed Paging Yair Bartal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Yair

    . We survey distributed data management problems including distributed paging, file allocation fantastically on an annual basis. This survey deals with distributed data management problems. Such prob­ lems in distributed data management is the de­ sign of a dynamic allocation of file copies in a network in order

  2. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The Second deployment site is the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12) Charleston, SC was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Navy Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Base upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth the project team has collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and experimental reflection line. At the time of preparing this report VSP data and experimental reflection line data has been collected and has have preliminary processing on the data sets.

  3. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for Task 4 site evaluation, Task 5 seismic reflection design and acquisition, and Task 6 seismic reflection processing and interpretation on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. During this reporting period the project had an ASME peer review. The findings and recommendation of the review panel, as well at the project team response to comments, are in Appendix A. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM and the peer review it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. Under the rescope of the project, Task 4 would be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC and not at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) project at SRS. The project team had already completed Task 4 at the M-area seepage basin, only a few hundred yards away from the DUS site. Because the geology is the same, Task 4 was not necessary. However, a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was conducted in one well to calibrate the geology to the seismic data. The first deployment to the DUS Site (Tasks 5 and 6) has been completed. Once the steam has been turned off these tasks will be performed again to compare the results to the pre-steam data. The results from the first deployment to the DUS site indicated a seismic amplitude anomaly at the location and depths of the known high concentrations of DNAPL. The deployment to another site with different geologic conditions was supposed to occur during this reporting period. The first site selected was DOE Paducah, Kentucky. After almost eight months of negotiation, site access was denied requiring the selection of another site. An alternate, site the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Navy Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Tasks 4, 5, and 6 will be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station. Task 4 will be executed twice. The project team had almost completed Task 4 at Paducah before access was denied.

  4. Population dynamics and within field distribution of the greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), and its parasitoids in Central Texas winter wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kring, T. J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    throughout the study period. The low greenbug densities prevented descriptton of a meaning- ful szgntficant immigration and/or emigration pattern based on slate p d ' . R. d ' b d h pl p production of the panicle. Primary parasitotds reared from... in the Texas Panhandle. Descriptions of greenbug age distribution as it changes through time on wheat is limited zn the United States to Kieckhefer's (1975) work rn South Dakota. Kieckhefer distinguished density gradients of nymphal, apterous and slate...

  5. Concerning effects of low-beta region fringe fields and multipole error distribution on dynamics in LHC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.; Paris, A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of fringe fields in separation dipoles D1/D2 and low-{beta} quadrupoles Q1-Q3 of LHC interaction regions in collision optics are investigated by means of stepwise ray-tracing in terms of aberrations, beam envelopes and other detunings. Effects of the longitudinal distribution of b{sub 10} error coefficient are next investigated in a similar way for assessment and comparison.

  6. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  7. Cost-and Energy-Aware Load Distribution Across Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost- and Energy-Aware Load Distribution Across Data Centers Kien T. Le Ricardo Bianchini Margaret a framework to manage energy and cost Determine a request distribution across data centers Minimize cost while OverallCost = periods of day, data centers DCCost DCCost = Base Energy + Dynamic Energy Assume Load

  8. On the Study of Collective Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids through the Statistics of the Iso-Configurational Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asaph Widmer-Cooper; Peter Harrowell

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the isoconfigurational ensemble to explore structure-dynamic correlations in supercooled liquids is examined. The statistical error of the dynamic propensity and its spatial distribution are determined. The authors present the spatial distribution of the particle non-Gaussian parameter as a measure of the intermittency with which particles exhibit their propensity for motion. The ensemble average of the direction of particle motion is introduced to establish the anisotropy of the dynamic propensity.

  9. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  10. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  11. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  12. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), Task 5 (2D seismic design, acquisition, and processing), and Task 6 (2D seismic reflection, interpretation, and AVO analysis) on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford Site. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as a monitoring tool to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The second deployment is to the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Naval Weapons Station Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12), Charleston, SC to further test the technique to detect high concentrations of DNAPL. The Charleston Naval Weapons Station SWMU-12 site was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Based upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth, the project team collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and an experimental P-wave seismic reflection line. After preliminary data analysis of the VSP data and the experimental reflection line data, it was decided to proceed with Task 5 and Task 6. Three high resolution P-wave reflection profiles were collected with two objectives; (1) design the reflection survey to image a target depth of 20 feet below land surface to assist in determining the geologic controls on the DNAPL plume geometry, and (2) apply AVO analysis to the seismic data to locate the zone of high concentration of DNAPL. Based upon the results of the data processing and interpretation of the seismic data, the project team was able to map the channel that is controlling the DNAPL plume geometry. The AVO analysis located a major amplitude anomaly, which was tested using a Geoprobe{trademark} direct push system. The Geoprobe{trademark} was equipped with a membrane interface probe (MIP) that was interfaced with a sorbent trap/gas chromatograph (GC) system. Both the Photo Ionization Detector (PID) and Electron Capture Detector (ECD) on the GC exceeded the maximum measurement values through the anomaly. A well was installed to collect a water sample. The concentration of chlorinated solvents in the water sample was in excess of 500 ppm. Other amplitude anomalies located directly under an asphalt road were also tested. Both the PID and ECD were zero. It appears that editing of poor quality near-offset traces during data processing caused these anomalies. Not having the full range of source to receiver offset traces in those areas resulted in a false anomaly during AVO analysis. This phenomenon was also observed at the beginning and end of each seismic profile also for the same reason. Based upon the water samples and MIP probes, it appears that surface seismic and AVO analysis were able to detect the area of highest concentration of DNAPL.

  13. Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

  14. Dynamic evidential networks in system reliability analysis: A Dempster Shafer Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dynamic evidential networks in system reliability analysis: A Dempster Shafer Approach Philippe for modeling and analyzing the system reliability based on Dynamic Evidential Networks (DEN). This method. The current system state determine the probability distribution over the next states. In the work reported

  15. In situ investigation of explosive crystallization in a-Ge: Experimental determination of the interface response function using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolova, Liliya; MacLeod, Jennifer M.; Ibrahim, Heide [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stern, Mark J.; Siwick, Bradley J., E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Center for the Physics of Materials, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; LaGrange, Thomas, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Rosei, Federico, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Centre for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization of amorphous semiconductors is a strongly exothermic process. Once initiated the release of latent heat can be sufficient to drive a self-sustaining crystallization front through the material in a manner that has been described as explosive. Here, we perform a quantitative in situ study of explosive crystallization in amorphous germanium using dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Direct observations of the speed of the explosive crystallization front as it evolves along a laser-imprinted temperature gradient are used to experimentally determine the complete interface response function (i.e., the temperature-dependent front propagation speed) for this process, which reaches a peak of 16?m/s. Fitting to the Frenkel-Wilson kinetic law demonstrates that the diffusivity of the material locally/immediately in advance of the explosive crystallization front is inconsistent with those of a liquid phase. This result suggests a modification to the liquid-mediated mechanism commonly used to describe this process that replaces the phase change at the leading amorphous-liquid interface with a change in bonding character (from covalent to metallic) occurring in the hot amorphous material.

  16. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (?17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 × 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

  17. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector system includes detectors having different properties (sensitivity, energy resolution) which are combined so that excellent spectral information may be obtained along with good determinations of the radiation field as a function of position.

  18. Dynamic distributions and changing copulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew C

    #0; !): (12) If #25;t were ?xed the same MSE would be obtained with a sample size of approximately (2#0; !)=(1#0; !): When ! is close to one, MSE(e#25;t) ' e#25;t(1#0; e#25;t)(1 #0; !): Thus for ! = :99; the RMSEs for #25; = 0:5; 0:25 and 0:1 are approximately... ; may need to be re- de?ned and this requires some judgement. One possibility is to set #24;0 = ymin and #24;N = ymax, but a more stable choice is the 1% and 99% quantiles. By construction, e#28; k#0;1;t < e#28; k;t so the time series of b#24;t(#28;)0s...

  19. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  20. DETERMINATION DE LA FONCTION DE DISTRIBUTION DE L'ENERGIE ELECTRONIQUE DANS DES COLONNES POSITIVES D'HELIUM ET D'HELIUM-ARGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    D'HELIUM ET D'HELIUM-ARGON P. Davy P. Rabache Laboratoire de Physique Electronique, Universite de) have been determined in helium, and helium-argon positiv columns. Between q 06 and q 3 torr, for currents varying between 25 and 400mA, the EDF in helium i s a Maxwell one with a lack of fast electrons

  1. The economics of US greenhouse gas emissions reduction policy : assessing distributional effects across households and the 50 United States using a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Look, Wesley Allen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The political economy of US climate policy has revolved around state- and district- level distributional economics, and to a lesser extent household-level distribution questions. Many politicians and analysts have suggested ...

  2. This document is a preprint of the final paper: L. Meng, T. Dragicevic, J. M. Guerrero, "Dynamic consensus algorithm based distributed global efficiency optimization of a droop controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    consensus algorithm based distributed global efficiency optimization of a droop controlled dc microgrid Distributed Global Efficiency Optimization of a Droop Controlled DC Microgrid Lexuan Meng, Tomislav Dragicevic for transferring power from external grid to a DC microgrid. Droop control is used for the distributed load sharing

  3. Appears in the 21st International ACM Symposium on High-Performance Parallel and Distributed Computing (HPDC'12) Locality-Aware Dynamic VM Reconfiguration on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    virtualization, has been expanding its services to distributed data-intensive platforms such as Map-communication Net- works]: Distributed Systems Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work computing has been expanding its services to data-intensive computing on distributed platforms such as Map

  4. ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, Justin, E-mail: jhanlon@orayainc.com; Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)] [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C{sub scat}) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C{sub mat}) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be performed with a source to detector distance of 20 cm even though the SAD is 15 cm during treatment. C{sub scat} varied from 1.102 to 1.106 within the range of depths of interest. The experimental variance among repeated measurements of C{sub mat} was larger than depth dependence, so C{sub mat} was estimated as1.019 for all depths of interest. Conclusions: Equipment selection, measurement techniques, and formalism for the determination of dose rate to the macula during stereotaxy for AMD have been determined and are strongly recommended by the authors of this paper to be used by clinical medical physicists.

  5. Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

  6. CX-011295: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-011295: Categorical Exclusion Determination Material Dynamics and Kinetics Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10172013 Location(s): Pennsylvania...

  7. CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  8. CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  9. Determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer quantum dots via spectral analysis of optical signature of the Aharanov-Bohm excitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Roy, Bidisha; Kuskovsky, Igor L. [Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY, Queens, New York 11367 (United States); The Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Shuvayev, Vladimir [Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY, Queens, New York 11367 (United States); Deligiannakis, Vasilios; Tamargo, Maria C. [The Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Department of Chemistry, City College of CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Ludwig, Jonathan [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Smirnov, Dmitry [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Wang, Alice [Evans Analytical Group, Sunnyvale, California 94086 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For submonolayer quantum dot (QD) based photonic devices, size and density of QDs are critical parameters, the probing of which requires indirect methods. We report the determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer QDs, based on spectral analysis of the optical signature of Aharanov-Bohm (AB) excitons, complemented by photoluminescence studies, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and numerical calculations. Numerical calculations are employed to determine the AB transition magnetic field as a function of the type-II QD radius. The study of four samples grown with different tellurium fluxes shows that the lateral size of QDs increases by just 50%, even though tellurium concentration increases 25-fold. Detailed spectral analysis of the emission of the AB exciton shows that the QD radii take on only certain values due to vertical correlation and the stacked nature of the QDs.

  10. Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems, (ICDCS'2002). Adaptive and Virtual Reconfigurations for Effective Dynamic Job Scheduling in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Songqing

    this problem. We propose a software method incorporating with dynamic load sharing, which adaptively reserves the adaptive software method in a dynamic load sharing system. We show the adaptive process causes little the blocking problem is high, and the existing load sharing schemes are unable to effectively han- dle

  11. Adaptive Cruise Control: Hybrid, Distributed, and Now Formally Verified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is that faithful models of distributed car control have both distributed systems and hybrid systems dynamics dynamics. Distributed car control follows a hybrid dynamics, because cars move continuously alongAdaptive Cruise Control: Hybrid, Distributed, and Now Formally Verified Sarah M. Loos, Andr

  12. Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and an improved determination of light parton distribution functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. With a sample of more than twenty million W to mu nu events, the statistical precision is greatly improved in comparison to previous measurements. These new results provide additional constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton in the range of the Bjorken scaling variable x from 10E-3 to 10E-1. These measurements and the recent CMS measurement of associated W + charm production are used together with the cross sections for inclusive deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA in a next-to-leading-order QCD analysis. The determination of the valence quark distributions is improved, and the strange-quark distribution is probed directly through the leading-order process g + s to W + c in proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

  13. Hierarchical Network Structure Promotes Dynamical Robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron Smith; Raymond S. Puzio; Aviv Bergman

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between network topology and system dynamics has significant implications for unifying our understanding of the interplay among metabolic, gene-regulatory, and ecosystem network architecures. Here we analyze the stability and robustness of a large class of dynamics on such networks. We determine the probability distribution of robustness as a function of network topology and show that robustness is classified by the number of links between modules of the network. We also demonstrate that permutation of these modules is a fundamental symmetry of dynamical robustness. Analysis of these findings leads to the conclusion that the most robust systems have the most hierarchical structure. This relationship provides a means by which evolutionary selection for a purely dynamical phenomenon may shape network architectures across scales of the biological hierarchy.

  14. CX-000940: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-000940: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Generation Wind Power at Navy Sites - Second Meteorological tower at Naval Station Newport,...

  15. Distribution and Abundance Patterns of Spiders Inhabiting Cotton in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, D.A.; Sterling, W.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . L. Sterling Department of Entomology Texas A&M University Abstract Patterns of the distribution and abundance of spiders were determined in the major cotton growing areas of Texas during 1982-83. M isumenops spp., Oxyopes saiticus Hentz... to predict this neutrality is important since spiders could then be eliminated as an important factor in predicting the dynamics of other arthropods. The cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus [Reuter]) model (Hartstack and Sterling 1986) uses...

  16. Local Soot Loading Distribution in Cordierite Diesel Particulate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Local Soot Loading Distribution in Cordierite Diesel Particulate Filters by Dynamic Neutron Radiography Local Soot Loading Distribution in Cordierite Diesel Particulate Filters by...

  17. Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generation DOE U.S. Department of Energy DPR Dynamic Power Resource DS distributed storage DSM demand side management D-SMES distributed superconducting magnetic energy...

  18. Hierarchical Network Structure Promotes Dynamical Robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron Smith; Raymond S. Puzio; Aviv Bergman

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of dynamical systems that attempts to model chemical reaction, gene-regulatory, population, and ecosystem networks all rely on models having interacting components. When the details of these interactions are unknown for biological systems of interest, one effective approach is to study the dynamical properties of an ensemble of models determined by evolutionary constraints that may apply to all such systems. One such constraint is that of dynamical robustness. Despite previous investigations, the relationship between dynamical robustness-an important functional characteristic of many biological systems-and network structure is poorly understood. Here we analyze the stability and robustness of a large class of dynamical systems and demonstrate that the most hierarchical network structures, those equivalent to the total ordering, are the most robust. In particular, we determine the probability distribution of robustness over system connectivity and show that robustness is maximized by maximizing the number of links between strongly connected components of the graph representing the underlying system connectivity. We demonstrate that this can be understood in terms of the fact that permutation of strongly connected components is a fundamental symmetry of dynamical robustness, which applies to networks of any number of components and is independent of the distribution from which the strengths of interconnection among components are sampled. The classification of dynamical robustness based upon a purely topological property provides a fundamental organizing principle that can be used in the context of experimental validation to select among models that break or preserve network hierarchy. This result contributes to an explanation for the observation of hierarchical modularity in biological networks at all scales.

  19. Chiral Dynamics and Single-Spin Asymmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis Sivers

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-conserving single-spin asymmetries provide a specific measure of coherent spin-orbit dynamics in quantum chromodynamics. The origin of these effects can be traced to the interplay of chiral dynamics and confinement in the theory. The most elegant display of the relevant mechanisms occurs in the Collins functions and the polarizing fragmentation functions and fracture functions for particles with spin. In the nucleon, these same dynamical mechanisms generate virtual quantum structures leading to the Boer-Mulders functions and orbital distributions. Two complementary formalisms for these distributions appear. The familiar gauge-link formalism incorporates oll nonperturbative dynamics into nonlocal correlators. The constructive formalism introduced by the author describes distributions normalized to an intrinsic property of the nucleon, namely, the currents specified in the Bakker-Leader-Trueman sum rule. The connection between these two approaches can be explored in the process dependence of single-spin asymmetries in various hard-scattering processes. The study of the SU(2) Weyl-Dirac equation in spherical coordinates allows typical Wilson operators that determine this process dependence to be evaluated in the coordinate gauge.

  20. Combustion fume structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagan, R.C.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research program is on elucidating the fundamental processes that determine the particle size distribution, composition, and agglomerate structures of coal ash fumes. The ultimate objective of this work is the development and validation of a model for the dynamics of combustion fumes, describing both the evolution of the particle size distribution and the particle morphology. The study employs model systems to address the fundamental questions and to provide rigorous validation of the models to be developed. This first phase of the project has been devoted to the development of a detailed experimental strategy that will allow agglomerates with a broad range of fractal dimensions to be studied in the laboratory. (VC)

  1. Two Phase Dynamics as the Origin to: 0.25 keV and 0.1 keV X-ray Diffuse Backgrounds, CMB, Global Quantized Redshift, 10 Mpc Space distributions and 30 Myr Cycles at Earth Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo del Pozo Garcia

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An Alternative to explain the origin of matter-background connections from the paper "Do Cosmic Backgrounds Cyclical Renew by Matter and Quanta Emissions?..." proposed: A sequence of discontinuous small changes of light speed in time as the cause, which provoke that criticality processes take place every 26-30 million years. Then, matter particles and quanta reach at one threshold value, and are compelled to reorganize their internal energy and make emissions that later becomes in current cosmic backgrounds. The small discontinues relative decreasing of c of about 10 -5) should do some small effects on planet and living bodies. Cyclic small reorganization of matter particles is consider as the astrophysical origin of Earth cyclic catastrophes. And at space global distribution: quantized redshift, change of galaxy fractal distribution at 10 Mpc scale, galaxy average luminosity and the luminosity fluctuation of galaxy pairs are enhanced out to separations near 10 Mpc. Also proposed: Like the Universe is observed flat in distance and time, the gravitational constant G might decrease with time, which may originate the Earth orbit eccentricity cycle of 100000 yr and, provoke the former mentioned sequence of c decrease in time. And, every 6 million years, the accumulation of G relative decrease of about 10-5 in G compelled space-time to reach at one threshold value that, trigger small relative decrease of light speed c of about 10-5 cyclically. This is interpreted as the Universe has two dynamical phases following one each other cyclically with intervals of 26-30 million years respectively: One of about 0.1 million years, called "activation phase", at which the critical processes take place, follows by longer "inhibition phase". The present approach indicates the existence of a subtle non linear dynamics, which could also contribute to the origin of galaxy fractal distribution.

  2. The environment of a geomaterial (soil, rock, concrete) determines its susceptibility to failure: grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore fluid chemistry, current state of stress, history, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    to failure: grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore fluid chemistry, current state

  3. Parton Distribution Functions: Impact of HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunihiro Nagano; for the H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progresses of the proton structure measurements and determination of parton distribution functions by $ep$ collisions at HERA are introduced.

  4. Determination of the dynamic Young's modulus, shear modulus, and internal friction as a function of temperature and microstructure in Uranium - 2.4wt% Niobium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chancellor, Wayne Morrow

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the PUCOT equations used today [7]. In 1974, Robinson and Edgar derived those equations by correcting Marx's equations, and verified them with a variety of experimental techniques [8]. Robinson and Edgar also determined the maximum and minimum values..., is therefore given by E=4L p/t 2 2 The shear modulus, G, can be represented in a similar manner as a function of the period of oscillation for a torsional mode. B. Internal Friction and Strain Am litude (10a) Robinson and Edgar showed that it is possible...

  5. Uniform Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly and equally likely a point in that interval), the uniform distribution ... Roughly speaking, this means that from any distribution we can create the uniform.

  6. From Entropic Dynamics to Quantum Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-relativistic quantum theory is derived from information codified into an appropriate statistical model. The basic assumption is that there is an irreducible uncertainty in the location of particles so that the configuration space is a statistical manifold. The dynamics then follows from a principle of inference, the method of Maximum Entropy. The concept of time is introduced as a convenient way to keep track of change. The resulting theory resembles both Nelson's stochastic mechanics and general relativity. The statistical manifold is a dynamical entity: its geometry determines the evolution of the probability distribution which, in its turn, reacts back and determines the evolution of the geometry. There is a new quantum version of the equivalence principle: 'osmotic' mass equals inertial mass. Mass and the phase of the wave function are explained as features of purely statistical origin.

  7. Maximum Entropy Models of Shortest Path and Outbreak Distributions in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauckhage, Christian; Hadiji, Fabian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of networks are often characterized in terms of features such as node degree distributions, average path lengths, diameters, or clustering coefficients. Here, we study shortest path length distributions. On the one hand, average as well as maximum distances can be determined therefrom; on the other hand, they are closely related to the dynamics of network spreading processes. Because of the combinatorial nature of networks, we apply maximum entropy arguments to derive a general, physically plausible model. In particular, we establish the generalized Gamma distribution as a continuous characterization of shortest path length histograms of networks or arbitrary topology. Experimental evaluations corroborate our theoretical results.

  8. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Elijah H [ORNL; Goniche, M. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Hillairet, J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Isler, Ralph C [ORNL; Caughman, J. B. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Colledani, G. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Lotte, Ph. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Litaudon, X [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Harris, Jeffrey H [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be important, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies ($E_{LH}$) was announced (Phys. Rev. Lett., 110:215005, 2013). The measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the processing of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique is investigated. It was found through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra pulses that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled $E_{LH}$ when the launched power exceeds 0.5MW. For low power the measurement becomes formidable utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.

  9. DISTRIBUTED SHORTESTPATH PROTOCOLS TIMEDEPENDENT NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orda, Ariel

    DISTRIBUTED SHORTEST­PATH PROTOCOLS for TIME­DEPENDENT NETWORKS Ariel Orda Raphael Rom+ Department and the dynamic behavior of networks, since a distributed solution enables constant tracking of changes 32000 October 1992 Revised May 1994, October 1995 ABSTRACT This paper addresses algorithms for networks

  10. CX-009465: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182012...

  11. CX-009462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 1018...

  12. CX-009463: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182012...

  13. CX-009464: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 1018...

  14. Dynamical Models for the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Dehnen; James Binney

    1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The only way to map the Galaxy's gravitational potential $\\Phi({\\bf x})$ and the distribution of matter that produces it is by modelling the dynamics of stars and gas. Observations of the kinematics of gas provide key information about gradients of $\\Phi$ within the plane, but little information about the structure of $\\Phi$ out of the plane. Traditional Galaxy models {\\em assume}, for each of the Galaxy's components, arbitrary flattenings, which together with the components' relative masses yield the model's equipotentials. However, the Galaxy's isopotential surfaces should be {\\em determined\\/} directly from the motions of stars that move far from the plane. Moreover, from the kinematics of samples of such stars that have well defined selection criteria, one should be able not only to map $\\Phi$ at all positions, but to determine the distribution function $f_i({\\bf x},{\\bf v})$ of each stellar population $i$ studied. These distribution functions will contain a wealth of information relevant to the formation and evolution of the Galaxy. An approach to fitting a wide class of dynamical models to the very heterogeneous body of available data is described and illustrated.

  15. SUPERTHERMAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This memo discusses the analysis of the high-energy x-ray distribution from a laser-induced plasma to determine the superthermal electron distribution. The methods of deconvolution outlined in I are similar to formulae derived in the literature not including and including effects due to electron stopping. In II the methods are applied to an x-ray spectrum from an Au disc irradiated by ARGUS.

  16. Dynamic strength of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logunova, V.A.; Rudenko, V.V.; Radionov, A.K.; Sokolov, I.B.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations for evaluating the dynamic strength of concrete structures at hydroelectric power stations are given. Both existing and planned structures are addressed. Equations are provided for determing the design compressive and tensile strength of concrete. A formula is provided for determining design dynamic strength of concrete of various ages under uniform compression. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Can Natural Sunlight Induce Coherent Exciton Dynamics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Olšina; Arend G. Dijkstra; Chen Wang; Jianshu Cao

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitation of a model photosynthetic molecular aggregate by incoherent sunlight is systematically examined. For a closed system, the excited state coherence induced by the sunlight oscillates with an average amplitude that is inversely proportional to the excitonic gap, and reaches a stationary amplitude that depends on the temperature and coherence time of the radiation field. For an open system, the light-induced dynamical coherence relaxes to a static coherence determined by the non-canonical thermal distribution resulting from the entanglement with the phonon bath. The decay of the excited state population to the common ground state establishes a non-equilibrium steady-state flux driven by the sunlight, and it defines a time window to observe the transition from dynamical to static coherence. For the parameters relevant to photosynthetic systems, the exciton dynamics initiated by the sunlight exhibits a non-negligible amount of dynamical coherence (quantum beats) on the sub-picosecond timescale; however, this sub-picosecond time-scale is long enough for light-harvesting systems to establish static coherence, which plays a crucial role in efficient energy transfer. Further, a relationship is established between the non-equilibrium steady-state induced by the sunlight and the coherent dynamics initiated from the ground state by a laser $\\delta$-pulse, thereby making a direct connection between incoherent sunlight excitation and ultrafast spectroscopy.

  18. CX-001417: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Field Verification of High-Penetration Levels of Photovoltaic into the Distribution Grid with Advanced Power Conditioning Systems CX(s) Applied:...

  19. CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09112013...

  20. CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 05272014...

  1. Heat Controller: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-15004)...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Heat Controller, Inc. finding that the room air conditioner distributed in commerce by Heat Controller as Comfort Aire brand models...

  2. A Dynamic Platform for Runtime Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Hubert

    We present a middleware platform for assembling pervasive applications that demand fault-tolerance and adaptivity in distributed, dynamic environments. Unlike typical adaptive middleware approaches, in which sophisticated ...

  3. Probing the Environment with Galaxy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Romanowsky

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I present various projects to study the halo dynamics of elliptical galaxies. This allows one to study the outer mass and orbital distributions of ellipticals in different environments, and the inner distributions of groups and clusters themselves.

  4. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  5. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project...

  6. Distributed Dynamic Clustering Algorithm in Uneven Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the sensor networks energy efficient [3][4][5]. This helps to increase the lifetime of the sensor nodes and energy efficient routing has been presented in recent research literature [1]-[16]. In [1] an intelligent energy efficient de- ployment algorithm for cluster based WSNs is described, in which the sensor node

  7. Visualizations of Spatial Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    number. - Determines 3D structure around a chosen molecule - The SDF gives radial and angular distribution - to study the SDF of water and hydronium around sulfonate group and side chain. Spatial Distribution Function (SDF) #12;3D Isodensity Surfaces - points around atom A where it's equally probable

  8. Spin dependent parton distributions and structure functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; T. Ito; A. W. Thomas; K. Yazaki

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear parton distributions and structure functions are determined in an effective chiral quark theory. We also discuss an extension of our model to fragmentation functions.

  9. Comparisons of LET Distributions for Protons with Energies between50 and 200 MeV Determined Using a Spherical Tissue-EquivalentProportional Counter (TEPC) and a Position-Sensitive Silicon Spectrometer(RRMD-III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borak, Thomas B.; Doke, Tadayoshi; Fuse, T.; Guetersloh, StephenB.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hara, K.; Moyers, Michael; Suzuki, S.; Taddei, Phillip; Terasawa, K.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed to measure the response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a silicon-based LET spectrometer (RRMD-III) to protons with energies ranging from 50 200 MeV. This represents a large portion of the energy distribution for trapped protons encountered by astronauts in low-Earth orbit. The beam energies were obtained using plastic polycarbonate degraders with a monoenergetic beam that was extracted from a proton synchrotron. The LET spectrometer provided excellent agreement with the expected LET distribution emerging from the energy degraders. The TEPC cannot measure the LET distribution directly. However, the frequency mean value of lineal energy, y bar f, provided a good approximation to LET. This is in contrast to previous results for high-energy heavy ions wherey barf underestimated LET, whereas the dose-averaged lineal energy, y barD, provided a good approximation to LET.

  10. Distributed DBMS Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline Introduction What is a distributed DBMS Problems Current state-of-affairs Background Distributed DBMS Architecture Distributed Database Design Semantic Data Control Distributed Query Processing Distributed Transaction Management Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS

  11. Marine Protists : : Distributions, Diversity and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasulka, Alexis Leah

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 13 C isotope signatures and 13 C-enrichment patterns intheir 13 C-enrichment patterns in the isotope labelingenrichment of 13 C (Peterson & Fry 1987), we might expect that folliculinid carbon isotope

  12. Marine Protists : : Distributions, Diversity and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasulka, Alexis Leah

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sulfide flux at gas hydrate deposits from the Cascadiaoxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NEoxidation of methane above gas hydrate at Hydrate Ridge, NE

  13. Distributed computational fluid dynamics Karl Jenkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    of large and complex datasets. Thus, remote access to this information is an integral part of the CFD turbulent combustion pro- cesses is a strong coupling between turbulence, chemical kinetics and heat release provides a route around the departmental firewalls. The clusters run Globus and Condor for remote job

  14. Marine Protists : : Distributions, Diversity and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasulka, Alexis Leah

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ali Friebott and Lorena Linacre for ciliate counts, Andrew Taylor and John Wokuluk for epifluorescence microscopy, and Karen

  15. Marine Protists : : Distributions, Diversity and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasulka, Alexis Leah

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NEoxidation of methane above gas hydrate at Hydrate Ridge, NEand sulfide flux at gas hydrate deposits from the Cascadia

  16. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  17. Thermophoretic effects on soot distribution in a direct-injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed stochastic particle approach for computing soot particle dynamics is implemented in a three-dimensional model for flows, sprays, combustion and emissions in Diesel engines. The model is applied to study the distribution of soot particles in a direct-injection Diesel engine. In particular, the effect of thermophoresis on soot distribution is examined. It is shown that thermophoresis could be important once the soot particles are brought close to the walls, i.e. within the boundary layer, by turbulent eddy convection or as a result of the orientation of the sprays. Thermophoresis does not appear to result in a change in the distribution of soot in the regions outside the boundary layer as the characteristic time associated with turbulent eddy convection is at least an order of magnitude shorter than that associated with thermophoresis and it and bulk convection are by far the dominant factors in determining the soot distribution.

  18. Evaluation of data and request distribution policies in clustered servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaleel, Adnan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . However, the choice of request distribution and data distribution can play an important role in determining overall system performance. Round Robin type distribution schemes achieve ideal load balancing while ignoring server loading whereas locality based...

  19. Shape Dynamics. An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Barbour

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape dynamics is a completely background-independent universal framework of dynamical theories from which all absolute elements have been eliminated. For particles, only the variables that describe the shapes of the instantaneous particle configurations are dynamical. In the case of Riemannian three-geometries, the only dynamical variables are the parts of the metric that determine angles. The local scale factor plays no role. This leads to a shape-dynamic theory of gravity in which the four-dimensional diffeomorphism invariance of general relativity is replaced by three-dimensional diffeomorphism invariance and three-dimensional conformal invariance. Despite this difference of symmetry groups, it is remarkable that the predictions of the two theories -- shape dynamics and general relativity -- agree on spacetime foliations by hypersurfaces of constant mean extrinsic curvature. However, the two theories are distinct, with shape dynamics having a much more restrictive set of solutions. There are indications that the symmetry group of shape dynamics makes it more amenable to quantization and thus to the creation of quantum gravity. This introduction presents in simple terms the arguments for shape dynamics, its implementation techniques, and a survey of existing results.

  20. DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chengfei

    D DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION The development of network and data communication tech- nology distributed database management. Naturally, the decen- tralized approach reflects the distributed aspects in the definition of a distributed database exist. First, a distributed database is distributed

  1. Ultrafast Strong-Field Vibrational Dynamics Studied by Femtosecond Extreme-Ultraviolet Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosler, Erik Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics. Tunnel ionization rate determinations are employed to model the pump, while electronic structure calculations

  2. A Massively Parallel Sparse Eigensolver for Structural Dynamics Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, David M.; Reese, G.M.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eigenanalysis is a critical component of structural dynamics which is essential for determinating the vibrational response of systems. This effort addresses the development of numerical algorithms associated with scalable eigensolver techniques suitable for use on massively parallel, distributed memory computers that are capable of solving large scale structural dynamics problems. An iterative Lanczos method was determined to be the best choice for the application. Scalability of the eigenproblem depends on scalability of the underlying linear solver. A multi-level solver (FETI) was selected as most promising for this component. Issues relating to heterogeneous materials, mechanisms and multipoint constraints have been examined, and the linear solver algorithm has been developed to incorporate features that result in a scalable, robust algorithm for practical structural dynamics applications. The resulting tools have been demonstrated on large problems representative of a weapon's system.

  3. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 203 Distribution Locational Marginal Pricing for Optimal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    (DSO) determines distribution locational marginal prices (DLMPs) by solving the social welfare, distribution locational marginal prices (DLMPs), distribution locational marginal pricing (DLMP), distribution at node . System locational marginal price (LMP) at time period for the node feeding the distribution grid

  5. Delineating parton distributions and the strong coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [JLAB; Reya, Edwald [Technische Universitat Dortmund

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global fits for precision determinations of parton distributions, together with the highly correlated strong coupling ?s, are presented up to next-to-next-to- leading order (NNLO) of QCD utilizing most world data (charm and jet production data are used where theoretically possible), except Tevatron gauge boson production data and LHC data which are left for genuine predictions. This is done within the 'dynamical' (valencelike input at Q02 = 0.8 GeV2 ) and 'standard' (input at Q02 = 2 GeV2) approach. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative higher-twist terms, nuclear corrections as well as target mass corrections, and by applying various (Q2, W2) cuts on available data. In addition, the Q02 dependence of the results is studied in detail. Predictions are given, in particular for LHC, on gauge and Higgs boson as well as for top-quark pair production. At NNLO the dynamical approach results in ?s(MZ2) = 0.1136 ± 0.0004, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives ?s(MZ2) = 0.1162 ± 0.0006.

  6. Delineating parton distributions and the strong coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Reya, Edwald

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global fits for precision determinations of parton distributions, together with the highly correlated strong coupling ?s, are presented up to next-to-next-to- leading order (NNLO) of QCD utilizing most world data (charm and jet production data are used where theoretically possible), except Tevatron gauge boson production data and LHC data which are left for genuine predictions. This is done within the 'dynamical' (valencelike input at Q02 = 0.8 GeV2 ) and 'standard' (input at Q02 = 2 GeV2) approach. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative higher-twist terms, nuclear corrections as well as target mass corrections,more »and by applying various (Q2, W2) cuts on available data. In addition, the Q02 dependence of the results is studied in detail. Predictions are given, in particular for LHC, on gauge and Higgs boson as well as for top-quark pair production. At NNLO the dynamical approach results in ?s(MZ2) = 0.1136 ± 0.0004, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives ?s(MZ2) = 0.1162 ± 0.0006.« less

  7. Delineating parton distributions and the strong coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Jimenez-Delgado; Ewald Reya

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Global fits for precision determinations of parton distributions, together with the highly correlated strong coupling $\\alpha_s$, are presented up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) of QCD utilizing most world data (charm and jet production data are used where theoretically possible), except TeVatron gauge boson production data and LHC data which are left for genuine predictions. This is done within the `dynamical' (valencelike input at $Q_0^2=0.8$ GeV$^2$) and `standard' (input at $Q_0^2=2$ GeV$^2$) approach. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative higher-twist terms, nuclear corrections as well as target mass corrections, and by applying various ($Q^2,W^2$) cuts on available data. In addition, the $Q_0^2$ dependence of the results is studied in detail. Predictions are given, in particular for LHC, on gauge and Higgs boson as well as for top-quark pair production. At NNLO the dynamical approach results in $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2)=0.1136\\pm0.0004$, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2)=0.1162\\pm0.0006$.

  8. Determinants of Meme Popularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, James P; Baños, Raquel A; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online social media have greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what are the fundamental mechanisms driving dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior and analytically show, using techniques from mathematical population genetics, that competition between memes for the limited resource of user attention leads to a type of self-organized criticality, with heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity: a few memes "go viral" but the majority become only moderately popular. The time-dependent solutions of the model are shown to fit empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, and to predict novel scaling features of the data. The presented framework, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  9. Thermostat for non-equilibrium multiparticle collision dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien-Cheng Huang; Anoop Varghese; Gerhard Gompper; Roland G. Winkler

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC), a particle-based mesoscale simulation technique for com- plex fluid, is widely employed in non-equilibrium simulations of soft matter systems. To maintain a defined thermodynamic state, thermalization of the fluid is often required for certain MPC variants. We investigate the influence of three thermostats on the non-equilibrium properties of a MPC fluid under shear or in Poiseuille flow. In all cases, the local velocities are scaled by a factor, which is either determined via a local simple scaling approach (LSS), a Monte Carlo-like procedure (MCS), or by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energy (MBS). We find that the various scal- ing schemes leave the flow profile unchanged and maintain the local temperature well. The fluid viscosities extracted from the various simulations are in close agreement. Moreover, the numerically determined viscosities are in remarkably good agreement with the respective theoretically predicted values. At equilibrium, the calculation of the dynamic structure factor reveals that the MBS method closely resembles an isothermal ensemble, whereas the MCS procedure exhibits signatures of an adi- abatic system at larger collision-time steps. Since the velocity distribution of the LSS approach is non-Gaussian, we recommend to apply the MBS thermostat, which has been shown to produce the correct velocity distribution even under non-equilibrium conditions.

  10. Key distributionKey distribution Key distribution, symmetric encryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael

    COMP 522 Key distributionKey distribution COMP 522 Key distribution, symmetric encryption From in a secure way and must keep the key secure" · Important issue: how to distribute secret keys? COMP 522 Key distribution, manual delivery For two parties A and B: · A key could be created by A and delivered physically

  11. The two faces of network dynamics Evolving network models describe the dynamics (assembly, evolution)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, Réka

    with a random network with a given degree distribution P(k). Mark edges with probability T. DisregardThe two faces of network dynamics Evolving network models describe the dynamics (assembly, evolution) OF networks by the addition/removal of nodes and edges. It is possible to have network dynamics

  12. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S. RefiningDistributed EnergyUntapped

  13. CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.11 Date: 09...

  14. CX-011016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.11 Date: 09...

  15. Central Moloney: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-4702)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Central Moloney, Inc. finding that liquid-immersed distribution transformer basic models 30300150 and 32500095 do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  16. Asserting and Checking Determinism for Multithreaded Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    Asserting and Checking Determinism for Multithreaded Programs Jacob Burnim EECS Department, UC provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear

  17. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Preferential Attachment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin Zuev; Fragkiskos Papadopoulos; Dmitri Krioukov

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment, known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton's equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in preferential attachment. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by preferential attachment is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree distributions. In other words, preferential attachment generates nothing but random graphs with power-law degree distribution. The extension of the developed canonical formalism for network analysis to richer geometric network models with non-degenerate groups of symmetries may eventually lead to a system of equations describing network dynamics at small scales.

  18. System Designs for Adaptive, Distributed Network Monitoring and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baras, John S.

    1 System Designs for Adaptive, Distributed Network Monitoring and Control H. Li, S. Yang, H. Xi.umd.edu Abstract We present system designs for adaptive, distributed network monitoring and control. The ideas are to distribute some processing intelligence to network elements, and to design a dynamic interface

  19. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyeon, Choi

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, and linear C{sub n} (n = 4--6).

  20. Air-Con International: Noncompliance Determination and Proposed...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Air-Con International finding that a variety of central air conditioners and air conditioning heat pumps distributed under the Air-Con...

  1. Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cevher, Volkan

    Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network Initialization M. Borkar distribution can be determined in a distributed heterogeneous sensor network with reduced subspace distribution for networks with a variety of sensor types as long as the collective set of measurements from all

  2. Distributed DBMS I Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline I Introduction I Background I Distributed DBMS Architecture I Distributed Data server approach Parallel architectures Parallel DBMS techniques Parallel execution models Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS Database Interoperability Concluding Remarks #12

  3. Distributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    system with a varying number of arbitrarily many cars. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems with joint discrete a multi-agent system, e.g., distributed car control systems. Such systems form distributed hybrid systemsDistributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems David W. Renshaw, Sarah M. Loos

  4. Robustness of Controlled Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Koswara; Raj Chakrabarti

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of multi-level quantum systems is sensitive to implementation errors in the control field and uncertainties associated with system Hamiltonian parameters. A small variation in the control field spectrum or the system Hamiltonian can cause an otherwise optimal field to deviate from controlling desired quantum state transitions and reaching a particular objective. An accurate analysis of robustness is thus essential in understanding and achieving model-based quantum control, such as in control of chemical reactions based on ab initio or experimental estimates of the molecular Hamiltonian. In this paper, theoretical foundations for quantum control robustness analysis are presented from both a distributional perspective - in terms of moments of the transition amplitude, interferences, and transition probability - and a worst-case perspective. Based on this theory, analytical expressions and a computationally efficient method for determining the robustness of coherently controlled quantum dynamics are derived. The robustness analysis reveals that there generally exists a set of control pathways that are more resistant to destructive interferences in the presence of control field and system parameter uncertainty. These robust pathways interfere and combine to yield a relatively accurate transition amplitude and high transition probability when uncertainty is present.

  5. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  6. Complex Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complex Dynamics Bernardo Da Costa, Koushik Ramachandran, Jingjing Qu, and I had a two semester learning seminar in complex analysis and potential ...

  7. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virtanen, J. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sosnick, T. R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, K. F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  8. Report on Distributed Generation Penetration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.; Ye, Z.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents part of a multiyear research program dedicated to the development of requirements to support the definition, design, and demonstration of a distributed generation-electric power system interconnection interface concept. The report focuses on the dynamic behavior of power systems when a significant portion of the total energy resource is distributed generation. It also focuses on the near-term reality that the majority of new DG relies on rotating synchronous generators for energy conversion.

  9. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  10. From superoperator formalism to nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuke Nakamura; Yoshiya Yamanaka

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Emphasizing that the specification of the representation space or the quasiparticle picture is essential in nonequilibrium quantum field system, we have constructed the unique unperturbed representation of the interaction picture in the superoperator formalism. To achieve it, we put the three basic requirements (the existence of the quasiparticle picture at each instant of time, the macroscopic causality and the relaxation to equilibrium). From the resultant representation follows the formulation of nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics (TFD). The two parameters, the number distribution and excitation energy, characterizing the representation, are to be determined by the renormalization condition. While we point out that the diagonalization condition by Chu and Umezawa is inconsistent with the equilibrium theory, we propose a new renormalization condition as a generalization of the on-shell renormalization on the self-energy which derives the quantum transport equation and determines the renormalized excitation energy.

  11. affects spatial distributions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    density of neighbors). The corresponding power-law fits allow us to determine the fractal dimensions of each association's spatial distribution, measure the stellar velocity...

  12. artery spatial distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    density of neighbors). The corresponding power-law fits allow us to determine the fractal dimensions of each association's spatial distribution, measure the stellar velocity...

  13. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility. Using the real options approach, we find naturalDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1.based microgrid via the real options approach to determine

  14. An Efficiency Measure for Dynamic Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    networks with time-varying traffics. "... traffic over the Internet doubling every 100 days..." (Frances of Other Dynamic Networks Oil & Natural gas network Electricity generation and distributionElectricity generation and distribution network Supply chain network #12;Varying Demand in Global OilVarying Demand

  15. Economical Analysis of the Cold Air Distribution System: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the cold air distribution system in detail. The detailed analysis includes the air quality, comfort index, initial cost, life cost, static recycle period, and dynamic recycle period. The advantages and trends of super cold air distribution systems...

  16. Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat and Power potentially increase exposure to air pollutants. When distributed generation is efficiently deployed to determine accurately the efficiencies and emissions of various applications of distributed generation

  17. DISTRIBUTED COGNITIVE MAC FOR ENERGY-CONSTRAINED OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Zhao Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of California, Davis, CA 94536 dynamics, channel fading statistics, and energy consumption characteristics of the secondary user.S. Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for Government purposes notwithstanding any

  18. Dynamical aspects of isotopic scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veselsky, M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of the effect of dynamical stage established that the increasing width of initial Gaussian distributions is reflected by significant modification of the slope of final isoscaling plots after de-excitation. For narrow initial Gaussian distributions, the slope of isoscaling plots assumes the limiting value for two individual initial nuclei while for wide initial Gaussian distributions the slope for hot fragments approaches the initial value. The slopes of isoscaling plots for final cold fragments increase due to secondary emission. The experimentally observed evolution of the isoscaling parameter in the multifragmentation of hot quasiprojectiles at 50 AMeV, fragmentation of 86Kr beam at 25 AMeV and multifragmentation of target spectator at relativistic energies was reproduced by the simulation with dynamical stage described using the appropriate model (deep inelastic transfer and incomplete fusion for Fermi energy domain and spectator-participant model for relativistic energies) and de-excitation ...

  19. (1) Determine how topography is related to the spatial distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and cool dry summers. Dominant tree species include Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western hemlock and 3). Terrain is rugged and steep, with a dense network of streams and a climate with warm wet winters-fire salvage b. Stand Basal Area vs Dead Wood Volume 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 Volume

  20. Determination of leakage and unaccounted-for gas distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, C.M. [Oklahoma Natural Gas Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All gas systems leak. Gas escapes every system in one way or another. This is true because gas is permeable to every system. For instance, with PE2306 pipe, the volume of methane lost through permeation in one mile of two-inch pipe operated at 60 psi is about 0.26 cubic feet per day. So, if every system leaks, then how much do we lose? Hence, we have unaccounted-for gas. Unaccounted-for gas is truly accounted-for gas--but it is missing! It is the difference between the amount of gas accounted into a system and the amount of gas accounted out. Many factors cause unaccounted-for gas. Each should be examined before the missing gas is all attributed to leakage--a single cause of unaccounted-for gas. Factors I would suggest evaluating are the following: (1) Measured conditions; (2) Accounting methods; (3) Meter errors; (4) Gas used for construction and operations; (5) Major damage and relief valve trips; (6) Meter reading errors, stolen gas, etc.; and (7) Leakage.

  1. Neural network determination of the non-singlet quark distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Piccione; Joan Rojo; for the NNPDF Collaboration

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the main features of our approach to parton fitting, and we show a preliminary result for the non-singlet structure function. When comparing our result to other PDF sets, we find a better description of large x data and larger error bands in the extrapolation regions.

  2. Electrical signature of magnetic domain-wall dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Artem.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current-induced domain-wall dynamics is studied in a thin ferromagnetic nanowire. The domain-wall dynamics is described by simple equations with four parameters. We propose a procedure to unambiguously determine these parameters by all...

  3. Distributed road assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  4. Cooperative Fault Tolerant Distributed Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagg, Graham E.

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HARNESS was proposed as a system that combined the best of emerging technologies found in current distributed computing research and commercial products into a very flexible, dynamically adaptable framework that could be used by applications to allow them to evolve and better handle their execution environment. The HARNESS system was designed using the considerable experience from previous projects such as PVM, MPI, IceT and Cumulvs. As such, the system was designed to avoid any of the common problems found with using these current systems, such as no single point of failure, ability to survive machine, node and software failures. Additional features included improved inter-component connectivity, with full support for dynamic down loading of addition components at run-time thus reducing the stress on application developers to build in all the libraries they need in advance.

  5. Event-Based Approach to Modelling Dynamic Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Event-Based Approach to Modelling Dynamic Architecture: Application to Mobile Ad-Hoc Network.Attiogbe@univ-nantes.fr Abstract. We describe an event-based approach to specifiy systems with dynamically evolving architecture tools. Keywords: Specification, Verification, Dynamic Architecture, Event B. 1 Introduction Distributed

  6. Water-Peptide Dynamics during Conformational Transitions Dmitry Nerukh*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Water-Peptide Dynamics during Conformational Transitions Dmitry Nerukh*, and Sergey Karabasov are investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulation with explicit water molecules. The distribution of the surrounding water at different moments before the transitions and the dynamical correlations of water

  7. Longitudinal Dynamics and Tomography in the Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stogin, J [Princeton U.; Sen, T [Fermilab; Moore, R S [Fermilab

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the desire to understand the longitudinal effects of beam-beam forces, we study the longitudinal dynamics of protons and anti-protons at injection and top energy in the Tevatron. Multi-turn data of the longitudinal profiles are captured to reveal information about frequencies of oscillation, and changes in the bunch distributions. Tomographic reconstruction is used to create phase space maps which are subsequently used to find the momentum distributions. Changes in these distributions for both proton and anti-proton beams are also followed through the operational cycle. We report on the details of interesting dynamics and some unexpected findings.

  8. A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc. The author has developed a general systems theory which predicts the observed selforganised criticality as a signature of quantumlike chaos in dynamical systems. The model predictions are (i) The fractal fluctuations can be resolved into an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure. (ii) The probability distribution represents the power (variance) spectrum for fractal fluctuations and follows universal inverse power law form incorporating the golden mean. Such a result that the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability distribution is observed in the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the electron or photon. Therefore the irregular or unpredictable fractal fluctuations exhibit quantumlike chaos. (iii) Atmospheric aerosols are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric aerosol size spectrum is derived in terms of the universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy energy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following two experimentally determined atmospheric aerosol data sets, (i) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000 (CARG) (ii) World Data Centre Aerosols data sets for the three stations Ny {\\AA}lesund, Pallas and Hohenpeissenberg.

  9. Master equation for the probability distribution functions of forces in soft particle packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuniyasu Saitoh; Vanessa Magnanimo; Stefan Luding

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing molecular dynamics simulations of jammed soft particles, we study microscopic responses of force-chain networks to quasi-static isotropic (de)compressions. We show that not only contacts but also interparticle gaps between the nearest neighbors must be considered for the stochastic evolution of the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of forces, where the mutual exchange of contacts and interparticle gaps, i.e. opening and closing contacts, are also crucial to the incremental system behaviors. By numerically determining the transition rates for all changes of contacts and gaps, we formulate a Master equation for the PDFs of forces, where the insight one gets from the transition rates is striking: The mean change of forces reflects non-affine system response, while their fluctuations obey uncorrelated Gaussian statistics. In contrast, interparticle gaps are reacting mostly affine in average, but imply multi-scale correlations according to a wider stable distribution function.

  10. Pretzelosity distribution function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Avakian; A. V. Efremov; P. Schweitzer; F. Yuan

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'pretzelosity' distribution is discussed. Theoretical properties, model results, and perspectives to access experimental information on this leading twist, transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function are reviewed. Its relation to helicity and transversity distributions is highlighted.

  11. Learning poisson binomial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daskalakis, Constantinos

    We consider a basic problem in unsupervised learning: learning an unknown Poisson Binomial Distribution. A Poisson Binomial Distribution (PBD) over {0,1,...,n} is the distribution of a sum of n independent Bernoulli random ...

  12. Abstract--This paper proposes an effective VAR planning based on reactive power margin for the enhancement of dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    , distributed generation (DG), D-STATCOM, reactive power margin, wind turbine. I. INTRODUCTION URRENTLY for the enhancement of dynamic voltage stability in distribution networks with distributed wind generation results showing the effects of composite load on voltage dynamics in the distribution network through

  13. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  14. On Optimal Distributed Output-Feedback Control over Acyclic Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gattami, Ather

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the problem of distributed optimal control of linear dynamical systems with a quadratic cost criterion. We study the case of output feedback control for two interconnected dynamical systems, and show that the linear optimal solution can be obtained from a combination of two uncoupled Riccati equations and two coupled Riccati equations.

  15. Fractal dynamics of earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bak, P.; Chen, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many objects in nature, from mountain landscapes to electrical breakdown and turbulence, have a self-similar fractal spatial structure. It seems obvious that to understand the origin of self-similar structures, one must understand the nature of the dynamical processes that created them: temporal and spatial properties must necessarily be completely interwoven. This is particularly true for earthquakes, which have a variety of fractal aspects. The distribution of energy released during earthquakes is given by the Gutenberg-Richter power law. The distribution of epicenters appears to be fractal with dimension D {approx} 1--1.3. The number of after shocks decay as a function of time according to the Omori power law. There have been several attempts to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law by starting from a fractal distribution of faults or stresses. But this is a hen-and-egg approach: to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law, one assumes the existence of another power-law--the fractal distribution. The authors present results of a simple stick slip model of earthquakes, which evolves to a self-organized critical state. Emphasis is on demonstrating that empirical power laws for earthquakes indicate that the Earth`s crust is at the critical state, with no typical time, space, or energy scale. Of course the model is tremendously oversimplified; however in analogy with equilibrium phenomena they do not expect criticality to depend on details of the model (universality).

  16. Introduction Linear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeghib, Abdelghani

    Introduction Results Linear Dynamics Lorentz Dynamics Actions of discrete groups on stationary Piccione) Geodeycos Meeting, Lyon, 28-30 April 2010 Abdelghani Zeghib Dynamics on Lorentz manifolds #12;Introduction Results Linear Dynamics Lorentz Dynamics Motivations and questions Examples 1 Introduction

  17. Hydration water dynamics and instigation of protein structuralrelaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until a critical hydration level is reached, proteins do not function. This critical level of hydration is analogous to a similar lack of protein function observed for temperatures below a dynamical temperature range of 180-220K that also is connected to the dynamics of protein surface water. Restoration of some enzymatic activity is observed in partially hydrated protein powders, sometimes corresponding to less than a single hydration layer on the protein surface, which indicates that the dynamical and structural properties of the surface water is intimately connected to protein stability and function. Many elegant studies using both experiment and simulation have contributed important information about protein hydration structure and timescales. The molecular mechanism of the solvent motion that is required to instigate the protein structural relaxation above a critical hydration level or transition temperature has yet to be determined. In this work we use experimental quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate hydration water dynamics near a greatly simplified protein system. We consider the hydration water dynamics near the completely deuterated N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA) solute, a hydrophobic amino acid side chain attached to a polar blocked polypeptide backbone, as a function of concentration between 0.5M-2.0M under ambient conditions. We note that roughly 50-60% of a folded protein's surface is equally distributed between hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains, domains whose lengths are on the order of a few water diameters, that justify our study of hydration dynamics of this simple model protein system. The QENS experiment was performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the disk chopper time of flight spectrometer (DCS). In order to separate the translational and rotational components in the spectra, two sets of experiments were carried out using different incident neutron wavelengths of 7.5{angstrom} and 5.5{angstrom} to give two different time resolutions. All the spectra have been measure at room temperature. The spectra were corrected for the sample holder contribution and normalized using the vanadium standard. The resulting data were analyzed with DAVE programs (http://www.ncnr.nist.gov/dave/). The AMBER force field and SPCE water model were used for modeling the NALMA solute and water, respectively. For the analysis of the water dynamics in the NALMA aqueous solutions, we performed simulations of a dispersed solute configuration consistent with our previous structural analysis, where we had primarily focused on the structural organization of these peptide solutions and their connection to protein folding. Further details of the QENS experiment and molecular dynamics simulations are reported elsewhere.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  19. A Smart Energy System: Distributed Resource Management, Control and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    A Smart Energy System: Distributed Resource Management, Control and Optimization Yong Ding, Student of distributed energy resource and consumption management, which proposes to design a networked and embedded platform for realizing a dynamic energy mix and optimizing the energy consumption dy- namically. Based

  20. On Correlated Availability in Internet-Distributed Systems Derrick Kondo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    On Correlated Availability in Internet-Distributed Systems Derrick Kondo INRIA, France dkondo measure and characterize the time dynamics of availability in a large-scale Internet- distributed system with over 110,000 hosts. Our char- acterization focuses on identifying patterns of corre- lated availability

  1. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strickland, Stephen L; Daniels, Karen E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid -- for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants -- will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. Here, we report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moir\\'e-imaging, and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine, a lipid. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling menis...

  2. Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovaiton and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz_vi@nrcki.ru; Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

  3. Introduction to Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pous, Damien

    1 Introduction to Distributed Systems Fabienne Boyer, LIG, fabienne.boyer@inria.fr Sources: Cours d'Olivier Gruber, Sacha Krakowiak, Sara Bouchenak, UJF Fabienne Boyer, Distributed Programming 2 Objectives Study conceptual and practical aspects of distributed systems l Client-server model l Distributed protocols l

  4. Bayesian analysis of joint strong gravitational lensing and dynamic galactic mass in SLACS: evidence of line-of-sight contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio C. C. Guimarães; Laerte Sodré Jr.

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We readdress the calculation of the mass of early-type galaxies using strong gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics. Our sample comprises 27 galaxies in the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. Comparing the mass estimates from these two independent methods in a Bayesian framework, we find evidence of significant line-of-sight mass contamination. Assuming a power-law mass distribution, the best fit density profile is given by $\\rho \\propto r^{-1.69\\pm0.05}$. We show that neglecting the line-of-sight mass contamination produces an overestimate of the mass attributed to the lens-galaxy by the lensing method, which introduces a bias in favor of a SIS profile when using the joint lensing and dynamic analysis to determine the slope of the density profile. We suggest that the line-of-sight contamination could also be important for other astrophysical and cosmological uses of joint lensing and dynamical measurements.

  5. Abstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network with distributed wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    as a major enabler of the smart grid for the integration of small and medium sized renewable energy based that modeling of loads has a significant impact on the voltage dynamics of the distribution systemAbstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network

  6. Statistics as a dynamical attractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michail Zak

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that any statistics can be represented by an attractor of the solution to a corresponding systen of ODE coupled with its Liouville equation. Such a non-Newtonian representation allows one to reduce foundations of statistics to better established foundations of ODE. In addition to that, evolution to the attractor reveals possible micro-mechanisms driving random events to the final distribution of the corresponding statistical law. Special attention is concentrated upon the power law and its dynamical interpretation: it is demonstrated that the underlying dynamics supports a " violent reputation" of the power law statistics.

  7. Fairness and dynamic pricing: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In ''The Ethics of Dynamic Pricing,'' Ahmad Faruqui lays out a case for improved efficiency in using dynamic prices for retail electricity tariffs and addresses various issues about the distributional effects of alternative pricing mechanisms. The principal contrast is between flat or nearly constant energy prices and time-varying prices that reflect more closely the marginal costs of energy and capacity. The related issues of fairness criteria, contracts, risk allocation, cost allocation, means testing, real-time pricing, and ethical policies of electricity market design also must be considered. (author)

  8. Correlated exciton dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Patrick, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorption and dissipation of energy in semiconductor nanostructures are often determined by excited electron dynamics. In semiconductors, one fundamentally important electronic state is an exciton, an excited electron ...

  9. Dynamic Fracture Toughness of Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmeet Kaur

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    bar with required instrumentation to obtain load-history and initiation of crack propagation parameters followed by finite element analysis to determine desired dynamic properties. Single edge notch bend(SENB) type geometry is used for Mode-I fracture...

  10. Dynamical Transition and Heterogeneous Hydration Dynamics in RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeseong Yoon; Jong-Chin Lin; Changbong Hyeon; D. Thirumalai

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced dynamical fluctuations of RNAs, facilitated by a network of water molecules with strong interactions with RNA, are suspected to be critical in their ability to respond to a variety of cellular signals. Using atomically detailed molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures of purine (adenine)- and preQ$_1$ sensing riboswitch aptamers, we show that water molecules in the vicinity of RNAs undergo complex dynamics depending on the local structures of the RNAs. The overall lifetimes of hydrogen bonds (HBs) of surface bound waters are more than at least 1-2 orders of magnitude longer than bulk water. Slow hydration dynamics, revealed in non-Arrhenius behavior of the relaxation time, arises from high activation barriers to break water hydrogen bonds with a nucleotide and by reduced diffusion of water. The relaxation kinetics at specific locations in the two RNAs show a broad spectrum of time scales reminiscent of glass-like behavior, suggesting that the hydration dynamics is highly heterogeneous. Both RNAs undergo dynamic transition at $T = T_D \\gtrsim 200$ K as assessed by the mean square fluctuation of hydrogen atoms $\\langle x^2\\rangle$, which undergoes an abrupt harmonic-to-anharmonic transition at $T_D$. The near universal value of $T_D$ found for these RNAs and previously for tRNA is strongly correlated with changes in hydration dynamics as $T$ is altered. Hierarchical dynamics of waters associated with the RNA surface, revealed in the motions of distinct classes of water with well-separated time scales, reflects the heterogeneous local environment on the molecular surface of RNA. At low temperatures slow water dynamics predominates over structural transitions. Our study demonstrates that the complex interplay of dynamics between water and local environment in the RNA structures could be a key determinant of the functional activities of RNA.

  11. SDI: Statistical dynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blann, M.; Mustafa, M.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Peilert, G.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We focus on the combined statistical and dynamical aspects of heavy ion induced reactions. The overall picture is illustrated by considering the reaction {sup 36}Ar + {sup 238}U at a projectile energy of 35 MeV/nucleon. We illustrate the time dependent bound excitation energy due to the fusion/relaxation dynamics as calculated with the Boltzmann master equation. An estimate of the mass, charge and excitation of an equilibrated nucleus surviving the fast (dynamic) fusion-relaxation process is used as input into an evaporation calculation which includes 20 heavy fragment exit channels. The distribution of excitations between residue and clusters is explicitly calculated, as is the further deexcitation of clusters to bound nuclei. These results are compared with the exclusive cluster multiplicity measurements of Kim et al., and are found to give excellent agreement. We consider also an equilibrated residue system at 25% lower initial excitation, which gives an unsatisfactory exclusive multiplicity distribution. This illustrates that exclusive fragment multiplicity may provide a thermometer for system excitation. This analysis of data involves successive binary decay with no compressional effects nor phase transitions. Several examples of primary versus final (stable) cluster decay probabilities for an A = 100 nucleus at excitations of 100 to 800 MeV are presented. From these results a large change in multifragmentation patterns may be understood as a simple phase space consequence, invoking neither phase transitions, nor equation of state information. These results are used to illustrate physical quantities which are ambiguous to deduce from experimental fragment measurements. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  12. An approximate dynamic programming approach to risk sensitive control of execution costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeria, David (David O. Jeria López)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of optimal execution within a dynamic programming framework. Given an exponential objective function, system variables which are normally distributed, and linear market dynamics, we derive a closed ...

  13. Infrastructure for distributed enterprise simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.M.; Yoshimura, A.S.; Goldsby, M.E. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional discrete-event simulations employ an inherently sequential algorithm and are run on a single computer. However, the demands of many real-world problems exceed the capabilities of sequential simulation systems. Often the capacity of a computer`s primary memory limits the size of the models that can be handled, and in some cases parallel execution on multiple processors could significantly reduce the simulation time. This paper describes the development of an Infrastructure for Distributed Enterprise Simulation (IDES) - a large-scale portable parallel simulation framework developed to support Sandia National Laboratories` mission in stockpile stewardship. IDES is based on the Breathing-Time-Buckets synchronization protocol, and maps a message-based model of distributed computing onto an object-oriented programming model. IDES is portable across heterogeneous computing architectures, including single-processor systems, networks of workstations and multi-processor computers with shared or distributed memory. The system provides a simple and sufficient application programming interface that can be used by scientists to quickly model large-scale, complex enterprise systems. In the background and without involving the user, IDES is capable of making dynamic use of idle processing power available throughout the enterprise network. 16 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  15. Microscale and mesoscale discrete models for dynamic fracture of structures built of brittle material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microscale and mesoscale discrete models for dynamic fracture of structures built of brittle are derived either at microscale with random distribution of material properties or at a mesoscale

  16. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, J.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  17. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics of Jiangsu Province, School of Physics Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Xianlin District, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ma, Qingyu, E-mail: maqingyu@njnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics of Jiangsu Province, School of Physics Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Xianlin District, Nanjing 210023 (China); Laboratory of Modern Acoustics of MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong [Laboratory of Modern Acoustics of MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  18. Distributed Basis Pursuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Index Terms—Basis pursuit, distributed optimization, sensor networks, augmented ... and image denoising and restoration [1], [2], compression, fitting and ...

  19. Transversity Parton Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Prokudin

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transversity distribution is one of the three fundamental parton distributions that completely describe polarized spin 1/2 nucleon. Its chiral odd nature prevented for many years its experimental exploration, however presently we have obtained great deal of information about this distribution. This includes experimental data from Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering, knowledge of scale dependence and phenomenological extractions. I will discuss main features of this distribution and indicate the future improvements of our knowledge.

  20. Flavor Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Murray; for the BRAHMS Collaboration

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of BRAHMS is to survey the dynamics of relativistic heavy ion (as well as pp and d-A) collisions over a very wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum. The sum of these data may give us a glimpse of the initial state of the system, its transverse and longitudinal evolution and how the nature of the system changes with time. Here I will concentrate on the origin and dynamics of the light flavors, i.e. the creation and transport of the up, down and strange quarks. The results presented here are certainly not the end of the story. It is my hope that in a few years new detectors will reveal the rapidity dependence of the charm and bottom quarks.

  1. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, Nancy H. (Corrales, NM); Boyes, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ranade, Satishkumar J. (Las Cruces, NM)

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  2. Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cristadoro

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyze low dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand even simple one dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non smooth dependence of global observable on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

  3. Impact of Distribution-Connected Large-Scale Wind Turbines on Transmission System Stability during Large Disturbances: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Allen, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the dynamic impacts of distributed utility-scale wind power during contingency events on both the distribution system and the transmission system. It is the first step toward investigating high penetrations of distribution-connected wind power's impact on both distribution and transmission stability.

  4. A quantitative quantum-chemical analysis tool for the distribution of mechanical force in molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas, E-mail: dreuw@uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The promising field of mechanochemistry suffers from a general lack of understanding of the distribution and propagation of force in a stretched molecule, which limits its applicability up to the present day. In this article, we introduce the JEDI (Judgement of Energy DIstribution) analysis, which is the first quantum chemical method that provides a quantitative understanding of the distribution of mechanical stress energy among all degrees of freedom in a molecule. The method is carried out on the basis of static or dynamic calculations under the influence of an external force and makes use of a Hessian matrix in redundant internal coordinates (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles), so that all relevant degrees of freedom of a molecule are included and mechanochemical processes can be interpreted in a chemically intuitive way. The JEDI method is characterized by its modest computational effort, with the calculation of the Hessian being the rate-determining step, and delivers, except for the harmonic approximation, exact ab initio results. We apply the JEDI analysis to several example molecules in both static quantum chemical calculations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations in which molecules are subject to an external force, thus studying not only the distribution and the propagation of strain in mechanically deformed systems, but also gaining valuable insights into the mechanochemically induced isomerization of trans-3,4-dimethylcyclobutene to trans,trans-2,4-hexadiene. The JEDI analysis can potentially be used in the discussion of sonochemical reactions, molecular motors, mechanophores, and photoswitches as well as in the development of molecular force probes.

  5. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  6. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB; Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [JLAB; Knudsen, Peter N. [JLAB; Arenius, Dana M. [JLAB; Barrios, Matthew N. [Michigan State; Jones, S. [Michigan State; Johnson, M. [Michigan State; Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  7. Combustion fume structure and dynamics. Period of performance, August 16, 1990--September 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagan, R.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research program is on elucidating the fundamental processes that determine the particle size distribution, comparison, and agglomerate structures of coal ash fumes. The ultimate objective of this work is the development and validation of a model for the dynamics of combustion fumes, describing both the evolution of the particle size distribution and the particle morphology. The study employs model systems to address the fundamental questions and to provide rigorous validation of the models to be developed. This first phase of the project has been devoted to the development of a detailed experimental strategy that will allow agglomerates with a broad range of fractal dimensions to be studied in the laboratory.

  8. Combustion fume structure and dynamics. [Semiannual report], July 16, 1992--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagan, R.C.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research program is on elucidating the fundamental processes that determine the particle size distribution, composition, and agglomerate structures of coal ash fumes. The ultimate objective of this work is the development and validation of a model for the dynamics of combustion fumes, describing both the evolution of the particle size distribution and the particle morphology. The study employs model systems to address the fundamental questions and to provide rigorous validation of the models to be developed. The major objectives of work during this reporting period were (i) to measure directly the rates of aggregation for particles of known mobilities and fractal dimensions, thereby infering the collision cross sections for the aggregates; and (ii) establishing procedures for quantitative measurement of the structural rearrangements that take place as aggregates sinter at high temperatures.

  9. The CJ12 parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accardi, Alberto [JLAB; Owens, Jeff F. [Florida State U.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new sets of next-to-leading order parton distribution functions (PDFs) are presented, determined by global fits to a wide variety of data for hard scattering processes. The analysis includes target mass and higher twist corrections needed for the description of deep-inelastic scattering data at large x and low Q^2, and nuclear corrections for deuterium targets. The PDF sets correspond to three different models for the nuclear effects, and provide a more realistic uncertainty range for the d quark PDF compared with previous fits. Applications to weak boson production at colliders are also discussed.

  10. INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

  11. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  12. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  13. SAW determination of surface area of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N.sub.2 adsorption isotherms are measured from thin films on SAW devices. The isotherms may be used to determine the surface area and pore size distribution of thin films.

  14. Single trap dynamics in electrolyte-gated Si-nanowire field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pud, S.; Li, J.; Offenhäusser, A.; Vitusevich, S. A., E-mail: s.vitusevich@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Gasparyan, F. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Semiconductor Physics and Microelectronics, Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian St., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Petrychuk, M. [Radiophysics Faculty, T. Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 60 Volodymyrska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-gated silicon nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) are fabricated and their transport and dynamic properties are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Random telegraph signal (RTS) fluctuations were registered in the nanolength channel FETs and used for the experimental and theoretical analysis of transport properties. The drain current and the carrier interaction processes with a single trap are analyzed using a quantum-mechanical evaluation of carrier distribution in the channel and also a classical evaluation. Both approaches are applied to treat the experimental data and to define an appropriate solution for describing the drain current behavior influenced by single trap resulting in RTS fluctuations in the Si NW FETs. It is shown that quantization and tunneling effects explain the behavior of the electron capture time on the single trap. Based on the experimental data, parameters of the single trap were determined. The trap is located at a distance of about 2?nm from the interface Si/SiO{sub 2} and has a repulsive character. The theory of dynamic processes in liquid-gated Si NW FET put forward here is in good agreement with experimental observations of transport in the structures and highlights the importance of quantization in carrier distribution for analyzing dynamic processes in the nanostructures.

  15. Sediment dynamics of an impounded river: Yegua Creek, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Adriana Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dams have altered flow distributions in rivers everywhere, causing a host of changes in channel morphology and sediment dynamics. Although major changes in flow regime have occurred along Yegua Creek, Texas, since the closure of Somerville Dam...

  16. Polymer dynamics in random flow with mean shear K. Turitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Polymer dynamics in random flow with mean shear K. Turitsyn Landau Institute for theoretical;Outline · Motivation: Elastic turbulence · Experimental setup · Flow and polymer models · Results: 1. Angular statistics 2. Polymer elongation distribution · Conclusion #12;Elastic Turbulence Elastic

  17. DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF Ni 2 MnGa DETERMINED FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entel, P.

    , Germany b Physics Department, Chelyabinsk State University, 454021 Chelyabinsk, Russia (Phase Transitions

  18. Dynamics of Gas-Fluidized Granular Rods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. J. Daniels; Y. Park; T. C. Lubensky; D. J. Durian

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a quasi-two-dimensional monolayer of granular rods fluidized by a spatially and temporally homogeneous upflow of air. By tracking the position and orientation of the particles, we characterize the dynamics of the system with sufficient resolution to observe ballistic motion at the shortest time scales. Particle anisotropy gives rise to dynamical anisotropy and superdiffusive dynamics parallel to the rod's long axis, causing the parallel and perpendicular mean squared displacements to become diffusive on different timescales. The distributions of free times and free paths between collisions deviate from exponential behavior, underscoring the non-thermal character of the particle motion. The dynamics show evidence of rotational-translational coupling similar to that of an anisotropic Brownian particle. We model rotational-translation coupling in the single-particle dynamics with a modified Langevin model using non-thermal noise sources. This suggests a phenomenological approach to thinking about collections of self-propelling particles in terms of enhanced memory effects.

  19. Implementing Turing Machines in Dynamic Field Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graben, Peter beim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive computation such as e.g. language processing, is conventionally regarded as Turing computation, and Turing machines can be uniquely implemented as nonlinear dynamical systems using generalized shifts and subsequent G\\"odel encoding of the symbolic repertoire. The resulting nonlinear dynamical automata (NDA) are piecewise affine-linear maps acting on the unit square that is partitioned into rectangular domains. Iterating a single point, i.e. a microstate, by the dynamics yields a trajectory of, in principle, infinitely many points scattered through phase space. Therefore, the NDAs microstate dynamics does not necessarily terminate in contrast to its counterpart, the symbolic dynamics obtained from the rectangular partition. In order to regain the proper symbolic interpretation, one has to prepare ensembles of randomly distributed microstates with rectangular supports. Only the resulting macrostate evolution corresponds then to the original Turing machine computation. However, the introduction of rand...

  20. The Writhe Distribution Of Stretched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha

    2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by experiments in which single DNA molecules are stretched and twisted we consider a perturbative approach around very high forces, where we determine the writhe distribution in a simple, analytically tractable model. Our results are in agreement with recent simulations and experiments.

  1. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  2. Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

  3. ASYMMETRIC ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rha, Kicheol; Ryu, Chang-Mo [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A plausible mechanism responsible for producing asymmetric electron velocity distribution functions in the solar wind is investigated by means of one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. A recent paper suggests that the variation in the ion-to-electron temperature ratio influences the nonlinear wave-particle dynamics such that it results in the formation of asymmetric distributions. The present PIC code simulation largely confirms this finding, but quantitative differences between the weak turbulence formalism and the present PIC simulation are also found, suggesting the limitation of the analytical method. The inter-relationship between the asymmetric electron distribution and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio may be a new useful concept for the observation.

  4. Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud.hossain@adfa.edu.au, and H.Pota@adfa.edu.au). Abstract: Connections of distributed generation (DG) in distribution networks are increasing. These connections of distributed generation cause voltage rise in the distribution network

  5. Dynamical evolution of active detached binaries on log Jo - log M diagram and contact binary formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Eker; O. Demircan; S. Bilir; Y. Karatas

    2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbital angular momentum (Jo), systemic mass (M) and orbital period (P) distributions of chromospherically active binaries (CAB) and W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) systems were investigated. The diagrams of log Jo - log P, log M - log P and log Jo-log M were formed from 119 CAB and 102 W UMa stars. The log Jo-log M diagram is found to be most meaningful in demonstrating dynamical evolution of binary star orbits. A slightly curved borderline (contact border) separating the detached and the contact systems was discovered on the log Jo - log M diagram. Since orbital size (a) and period (P) of binaries are determined by their current Jo, M and mass ratio q, the rates of orbital angular momentum loss (dlog Jo/dt) and mass loss (dlog M/dt) are primary parameters to determine the direction and the speed of the dynamical evolution. A detached system becomes a contact system if its own dynamical evolution enables it to pass the contact border on the log Jo - log M diagram. Evolution of q for a mass loosing detached system is unknown unless mass loss rate for each component is known. Assuming q is constant in the first approximation and using the mean decreasing rates of Jo and M from the kinematical ages of CAB stars, it has been predicted that 11, 23 and 39 cent of current CAB stars would transform to W UMa systems if their nuclear evolution permits them to live 2, 4 and 6 Gyrs respectively.

  6. Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Keith; Andrew, Kevin A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing data available from the Kentucky Geonet (KYGeonet.ky.gov) the fossil fuel mining locations created by the Kentucky Geological Survey geo-locating oil and gas wells are mapped using ESRI ArcGIS in Kentucky single plain 1602 ft projection. This data was then exported into a spreadsheet showing latitude and longitude for each point to be used for modeling at different scales to determine the fractal dimension of the set. Following the porosity and diffusivity studies of Tarafdar and Roy1 we extract fractal dimensions of the fossil fuel mining locations and search for evidence of scaling laws for the set of deposits. The Levy index is used to determine a match to a statistical mechanically motivated generalized probability function for the wells. This probability distribution corresponds to a solution of a dynamical anomalous diffusion equation of fractional order that describes the Levy paths which can be solved in the diffusion limit by the Fox H function ansatz.

  7. DIGITAL VISION & PHOTODISC Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeone, Osvaldo

    of scalability and energy efficiency and offers new opportunities through the interplay with specific distributed, to the advances in telegraphy and, later, wireless transmission. Railroad transportation, geodesy (measurement

  8. MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 20, 2007 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: MICHAEL W. OWEN

  9. Distribution of Correspondence

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Defines correct procedures for distribution of correspondence to the Naval Reactors laboratories. Does not cancel another directive. Expired 8-30-97.

  10. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  11. Distributionally Robust Convex Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    2College of Management and Technology, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, ... They also allow us to characterize distributional families in terms of.

  12. 1 Smart Distribution: Coupled Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Lasseter

    Abstract-- The distribution system provides major opportunities for smart grid concepts. One way to approach distribution system problems is to rethinking our distribution system to include the integration of high levels of distributed energy resources, using microgrid concepts. Basic objectives

  13. Plasmon switching: Observation of dynamic surface plasmon steering by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Taco D.

    Plasmon switching: Observation of dynamic surface plasmon steering by selective mode excitation a plasmon steering method that enables us to dynamically control the direction of surface plasmons generated surface plasmons are launched can be controlled. Experiments confirm that it is possible to distribute

  14. Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Chris

    Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Auckland. Abstract : This paper presents a review of fractal and chaotic dynamics distributed processing models and their relation to chaos and overviews reasons why chaotic and fractal

  15. Hyperbolic Dynamics Todd Fisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Todd

    Hyperbolic Dynamics Todd Fisher tfisher@math.umd.edu Department of Mathematics University of Maryland, College Park Hyperbolic Dynamics ­ p. 1/3 #12;What is a dynamical system? Phase space X, elements possible states Hyperbolic Dynamics ­ p. 2/3 #12;What is a dynamical system? Phase space X, elements

  16. Bifurcations of nonlinear ion acoustic travelling waves in the frame of a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in magnetized plasma with a kappa distributed electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Samanta, Utpal [Department of Mathematics, Bankura Christian College, Bankura 722101 (India) [Department of Mathematics, Bankura Christian College, Bankura 722101 (India); Department of Mathematics, Visva Bharati University, Santinekatan 731235 (India); Saha, Asit [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India)] [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Mathematics, Visva Bharati University, Santinekatan 731235 (India)] [Department of Mathematics, Visva Bharati University, Santinekatan 731235 (India)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bifurcations of nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) in a magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold ions and kappa distributed electron are investigated using a two component plasma model. The standard reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for IAWs. By using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems to this ZK equation, the existence of solitary wave solutions and periodic travelling wave solutions is established. All exact explicit solutions of these travelling waves are determined. The results may have relevance in dense space plasmas.

  17. EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    : Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

  18. Dynamics of Block Copolymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in polystyrene homopolymer matrices was carried out using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for temperatures between 120 and 180 °C. For low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymers, the observed dynamics show a crossover from diffusive to hyper-diffusive behavior with decreasing temperatures. For higher molecular weight polystyrene, the nanoparticle dynamics appear hyper-diffusive at all temperatures studied. The relaxation time and characteristic velocity determined from the measured hyper-diffusive dynamics reveal that the activation energy and underlying forces determined are on the order of 2.14 × 10?19 J and 87 pN, respectively. We also carried out a detailed X-ray scattering study of the static and dynamic behavior of a styrene– isoprene diblock copolymer melt with a styrene volume fraction of 0.3468. At 115 and 120 °C, we observe splitting of the principal Bragg peak, which we attribute to phase coexistence of hexagonal cylindrical and cubic double- gyroid structure. In the disordered phase, above 130 °C, we have characterized the dynamics of composition fluctuations via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Near the peak of the static structure factor, these fluctuations show stretched-exponential relaxations, characterized by a stretching exponent of about 0.36 for a range of temperatures immediately above the MST. The corresponding characteristic relaxation times vary exponentially with temperature, changing by a factor of 2 for each 2 °C change in temperature. At low wavevectors, the measured relaxations are diffusive with relaxation times that change by a factor of 2 for each 8 °C change in temperature.

  19. Slide 1Mapping Rail Seat Pressure Distributions Matthew J. Greve, J. Riley Edwards, Marcus S. Dersch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Distributions Outline · RSD Background · Pressure Distribution Relation to RSD · Equipment Overview · Field Data problems associated with concrete crosstie and fastening system performance · Potential RSD mechanisms as determined through research at UIUC: - Abrasion - Crushing - Freeze-thaw - Hydraulic pressure cracking

  20. Chaotic dynamics in quark-gluon cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Temiraliev

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A map to the quark-gluon cascade on the basis of nonlinearity in the quark and gluon distributions in hadrons is proposed. Calculations of the quarks trajectories have shown the presence of the chaotic dynamics as a consequence of bifurcations.

  1. Influence Of Lateral Load Distributions On Pushover Analysis Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colajanni, P.; Potenzone, B. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Universita di Messina, Contrada Di Dio, S. Agata, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of two simple load distributions for pushover analysis recently proposed by the authors is investigated through a comparative study, involving static and dynamic analyses of seismic response of eccentrically braced frames. It is shown that in the upper floors only multimodal pushover procedures provide results close to the dynamic profile, while the proposed load patterns are always conservative in the lower floors. They over-estimate the seismic response less than the uniform distribution, representing a reliable alternative to the uniform or more sophisticated adaptive procedures proposed by seismic codes.

  2. Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The “customer-owned” backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the “customer owned” backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

  3. Determination of Intrinsic Material Flammability Properties from Material Tests assisted by Numerical Modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhaus, Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes are being increasingly used in the field of fire safety engineering. They provide, amongst other things, velocity, species and heat flux distributions throughout the computational ...

  4. Protein structure determination using a database of interatomic distance probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, George N. Jr.

    determination and molecular modeling. An energy function, or database potential, is derived from distributionsProtein structure determination using a database of interatomic distance probabilities MICHAEL E for Advanced Science and Technology and National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois

  5. Software distribution using xnetlib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongarra, J.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Rowan, T.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Wade, R.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xnetlib is a new tool for software distribution. Whereas its predecessor netlib uses e-mail as the user interface to its large collection of public-domain mathematical software, xnetlib uses an X Window interface and socket-based communication. Xnetlib makes it easy to search through a large distributed collection of software and to retrieve requested software in seconds.

  6. DISTRIBUTION John R. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION John R. Jones Qualung aspen is the most widely distributed native North American tree aspen (Populus tremula), has a wider range (Weigle and Frothingham 1911). In the humid East, aspen plateaus. Aspen is one of the most common trees in the interior West, where its range (fig.1)coincides

  7. The Microscopic Linear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear Dynamics Exponentials Matrix Exponential Eigendecomposition Dynamical Modes Nodes State Space Saddles Oscillations Spirals Centres Offsets Retinal Circuit Nullclines Stability Spiking Neurons Fitzhugh-Nagumo Nonlinear Dynamics Linearization Nonlinear Oscillation Excitable

  8. Secure Code Distribution in Dynamically Programmable Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    amount of overhead to a conventional non-secure reprogramming scheme, namely Deluge, and are therefore. For example, the Deluge code propagation protocol [12] implements a three phase Advertise-Request- Data polite is necessary is transmitted. Deluge benefits from a soft state design in that, as data is reliably flooded hop

  9. Stress distributions around hydrofoils using computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharon, Ofer, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research describes the reciprocal influence between two foils, vertically and horizontally oriented, on each other for different gaps between them. Those cases are the focus part of a bigger process of lowering ...

  10. Dynamic equivalencing of distribution network with embedded generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Xiaodan Selina

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy generation will play an important role in solving the climate change problem. With renewable electricity generation increasing, there will be some significant changes in electric power systems, ...

  11. Distributed Control of Networked Dynamical Systems: Static Feedback,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimarogonas, Dimos

    simulations of autonomous satellites, power systems and building temperature control. Index Terms--Agents and autonomous systems, cooperative con- trol, electrical power systems, PI control I. INTRODUCTION A. General of power systems is typically carried out at two levels, an inner and an outer level. In the inner control

  12. A New Analysis Method for Dynamic, Distributed Constraint Satisfaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailler, Roger

    of Tulsa Tandy School of Computer Science Tulsa, Oklahoma mailler@utulsa.edu Huimin Zheng University of Tulsa Tandy School of Computer Science Tulsa, Oklahoma huimin-zheng@utulsa.edu ABSTRACT There has been

  13. Dynamic Multimedia Content Retrieval System in Distributed Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivaraman, R; Sujatha, S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WiCoM enables remote management of web resources. Our application Mobile reporter is aimed at Journalist, who will be able to capture the events in real-time using their mobile phones and update their web server on the latest event. WiCoM has been developed using J2ME technology on the client side and PHP on the server side. The communication between the client and the server is established through GPRS. Mobile reporter will be able to upload, edit and remove both textual as well as multimedia contents in the server.

  14. Dynamic Optimization for Optimal Control of Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertin, Emre

    , Mathew L. Moore and Kevin L. Priddy Battelle Memorial Institute Cognitive Systems Group 505 King Avenue.E.) E.E.: E-mail: ertine@battelle.org, A.N.D.: E-mail: deana@battelle.org M.L.M.: E-mail: mathewml@battelle.org, K.L.P.: E-mail:priddy@battelle.org #12;Figure 1. Boosting station schematics 1977. A uniform

  15. Secure, Reliable and Dynamic Access to Distributed Clinical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    or settles, as to compose differing opinions, or reconciles, as reconciles contending factions. 15. COMPUTES

  16. TMS Agents: Enabling Dynamic Distributed Supply Chain Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Thomas

    Phelps Honeywell Laboratories, 3660 Technology Drive, MN65-2600, Minneapolis, MN 55418 Tom.Wagner@honeywell on Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, 2003, Elsevier. Effort sponsored by Honeywell International, either expressed or implied, of Honeywell International. Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science #12;flow

  17. The fluid dynamics of an underfloor distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Qing

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    convection problems in building ventilation. However, forthe room. This problem in a natural ventilation system hasproblem gives good agree- ments with the experimental data when the leakage rate is (a) 0 (displacement ventilation); (

  18. High-Performance Computation of Distributed-Memory Parallel 3D Voronoi and Delaunay Tessellation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterka, Tom; Morozov, Dmitriy; Phillips, Carolyn

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Computing a Voronoi or Delaunay tessellation from a set of points is a core part of the analysis of many simulated and measured datasets: N-body simulations, molecular dynamics codes, and LIDAR point clouds are just a few examples. Such computational geometry methods are common in data analysis and visualization; but as the scale of simulations and observations surpasses billions of particles, the existing serial and shared-memory algorithms no longer suffice. A distributed-memory scalable parallel algorithm is the only feasible approach. The primary contribution of this paper is a new parallel Delaunay and Voronoi tessellation algorithm that automatically determines which neighbor points need to be exchanged among the subdomains of a spatial decomposition. Other contributions include periodic and wall boundary conditions, comparison of our method using two popular serial libraries, and application to numerous science datasets.

  19. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  20. Field determination of dispersivity of comingling plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Van Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This gives a wor king basis to extend the same style analysis to a real mass distribution. The real analysis is carried out upon a landfill leachate plume emanating from the Babylon Landfill occurring in Long Island, New York. The plume is described... of Iteration Diagrams Ideal Plume Parameter Determination. Sensitivity Analysis for Iteration Diagrams. PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK FOR REAL ANALYSIS. Description of Landfill. Chemistry of Leachate. Hydrogeology of Babylon Site Well Control Three Dimensional...

  1. Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1 Isabelle Larocque, A distribution of epilimnetic algae on patterns of algal sedimentation was determined in lake enclosures under the mean length of algae in fish-free enclosures and reduced the mean length in the enclosures to which

  2. Topics in Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jadczyk

    1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper consists of two parts. In the first part Schroedinger's equation for a charged quantum particle in a Galilei-Newton curved space-time is derived in a fully geometrical way. Gravitational and electromagnetic fields are coded into space metric and space-time connection. The fundamental geometrical object is a quantum connection in a Hermitian line bundle over the 7-dimensional jet space of 3-velocities. The secondary object is the bundle of Hilbert spaces over absolute time. Time appears as a superselection quantity while Shroedinger equation is interpreted as parallel transport in this bundle. In the second part the problem of measurement in quantum theory is discussed as a part of a more general problem of coupling between quantum and classical systems. The standard framework of quantum theory is extended so as to allow for dynamical central observables within dissipative dynamics. It is shown that within this approach one obtains not only Liouville equation that describes statistical ensembles, but also a piecewise-deterministic random process describing sequences of "events" that can be monitored by a continuous observation of the single, coupled classical system. It also describes "quantum jumps" or "wave packet reductions" that accompany these events. Two example are worked out in some details. The last one deals with the problem oof "how to determine the wave function ?".

  3. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis 1998 Annual Report Grand Challenge Projects biocatalysis.gif A model of the Michaelis complex for the TEM-1...

  4. Robust Growth Determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doppelhofer, Gernot; Weeks, Melvyn

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the robustness of determinants of economic growth in the presence of model uncertainty, parameter heterogeneity and outliers. The robust model averaging approach introduced in the paper uses a flexible and parsimonious...

  5. Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

  6. Dynamic slip velocity correlation using non-spherical particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pecore, Douglas Wilkin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRAMS FIGURE 39: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, STATIC, MUD WEIGHT RANGE: 0. 5 - 0. 6 GRAMS FIGURE 40: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, STATIC, MUD WEIGHT RANGE: 0. 6 - 0. 7 GRAMS FIGURE 41: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, STATIC, MUD WEIGHT RANGE: 0. 7 - 0, 8 GRAMS... of Advisory Committee: Dr. Hans C. Juvkam-Wold This research proposes a method for calculating the slip velocity of irregularly shaped particles falling in non-Newtonian fluids in a vertical flow conduit under static and dynamic flow conditions. A...

  7. The structure of tame minimal dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eli Glasner

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical version of the Bourgain-Fremlin-Talagrand dichotomy shows that the enveloping semigroup of a dynamical system is either very large and contains a topological copy of $\\beta \\N$, or it is a "tame" topological space whose topology is determined by the convergence of sequences. In the latter case the dynamical system is called tame. We use the structure theory of minimal dynamical systems to show that, when the acting group is Abelian, a tame metric minimal dynamical system (i) is almost automorphic (i.e. it is an almost 1-1 extension of an equicontinuous system), and (ii) admits a unique invariant probability measure such that the corresponding measure preserving system is measure theoretically isomorphic to the Haar measure system on the maximal equicontinuous factor.

  8. Carp@ Managing Dynamic JiniTM Michael Fahrmair, Chris Salzmann, Maurice Schoenmakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    middleware. The tool Carp@ say Carpet is designed to visualize, analyze and control dynamic and distributed model based on components, ports and connectors. Based on this model the structure within the dynamicCarp@ Managing Dynamic JiniTM Systems Michael Fahrmair, Chris Salzmann, Maurice Schoenmakers

  9. Extensions and evaluations of a general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Extensions and evaluations of a general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics Brian of a quantitative theory for the structure and dynamics of forests under demographic and resource steady state distribution competitive thinning Understanding the key forces that shape the structure, function, and dynamics

  10. The Wigner Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. O'Connell

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to classical physics, the language of quantum mechanics involves operators and wave functions (or, more generally, density operators). However, in 1932, Wigner formulated quantum mechanics in terms of a distribution function $W(q,p)$, the marginals of which yield the correct quantum probabilities for $q$ and $p$ separately \\cite{wigner}. Its usefulness stems from the fact that it provides a re-expression of quantum mechanics in terms of classical concepts so that quantum mechanical expectation values are now expressed as averages over phase-space distribution functions. In other words, statistical information is transferred from the density operator to a quasi-classical (distribution) function.

  11. On the Dynamics of Inclined Neptune's Trojans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Yong Zhou; Rudolf Dvorak; Yi-Sui Sun

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of artificial asteroids on the Trojan-like orbits around Neptune is investigated in this paper. We describe the dependence of the orbital stability on the initial semimajor axis a and inclination i by constructing a dynamical map on the (a,i)-plane. Rich details are revealed in the dynamical map, especially a unstable gap at i=45 deg is determined and the mechanism triggering chaos in this region is figured out. Our investigation can be used to guide the observations.

  12. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  13. New insights on the Dynamic Cellular Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ildefonso M. De la Fuente

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of studies have shown the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by the DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in the self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by the specific input stimuli. The Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in the covalent post-translational modulation so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. Both the metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes) and the enzymatic covalent modifications of determined molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell.

  14. Permit Allocation in Emissions Trading using the Boltzmann Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Ji-Won; Isard, Walter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In emissions trading, the initial permit allocation is an intractable issue because it needs to be essentially fair to the participating countries. There are many ways to distribute a given total amount of emissions permits among countries, but the existing distribution methods such as auctioning and grandfathering have been debated. Here we describe a new model for permit allocation in emissions trading using the Boltzmann distribution. The Boltzmann distribution is introduced to permit allocation by combining it with concepts in emissions trading. A price determination mechanism for emission permits is then developed in relation to the {\\beta} value in the Boltzmann distribution. Finally, it is demonstrated how emissions permits can be practically allocated among participating countries in empirical results. The new allocation model using the Boltzmann distribution describes a most probable, natural, and unbiased distribution of emissions permits among multiple countries. Based on its simplicity and versati...

  15. The Magellanic Stream in Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossein Haghi; Sohrab Rahvar; Akram Hasani-Zonooz

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of the Magellanic Stream (MS) as a series of clouds extending from the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) to the south Galactic pole is affected by the distribution and the amount of matter in the Milky Way. We calculate the gravitational effect of the Galactic disk on the MS in the framework of modified Newtonian dynamics(MOND) and compare with observations of the Stream's radial velocity. We consider the tidal force of the Galaxy, which strips material from the MCs to form the MS, and, using a no-halo model of the Galaxy, we ignore the effect of the drag of the Galactic halo on the MS. We also compare the MONDian dynamics with that in logarithmic and power-law dark halo models and show that the MOND theory seems plausible for describing the dynamics of satellite galaxies such as the MCs. Finally, we perform a maximum likelihood analysis to obtain the best MOND parameters for the Galactic disk.

  16. Syntax of adverb distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelstein, Elspeth Claire

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of adverbs is particularly difficult to account for, given the amount of variation it encompasses. Not only are adverbs typically optional, but any adverb may also appear in several different positions ...

  17. A distributed Hash table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabek, Frank (Frank Edward), 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DHash is a new system that harnesses the storage and network resources of computers distributed across the Internet by providing a wide-area storage service, DHash. DHash frees applications from re-implementing mechanisms ...

  18. Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    We analyze the distributional and efficiency impacts of different allowance allocation schemes for a national cap and trade system using the USREP model, a new recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium model of the ...

  19. Modeling and responding to pandemic influenza : importance of population distributional attributes and non-pharmaceutical interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigmatulina, Karima Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing prevalent approaches to the modeling pandemic influenza transmission, we present a simple distributional model that captures the most significant population attributes that alter the dynamics of the outbreak. ...

  20. Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented a mathematic model for a cylindrical water tank with a cylindrical condenser as its heat source. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, FLUENT, was used to study hot water temperature distribution in the tank of the ASHPWH...

  1. Reconfiguration of a Distributed Information Fusion System Eric Benoit, Marc-Philippe Huget,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is used for only one computation of the outputs, while a param- eter is a sustained value, used for each is to define a runtime framework for Dynamic Distributed Information Fu- sion System (DDIFS). This framework

  2. Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    We analyze the distributional and efficiency impacts of different allowance allocation schemes motivated by recently proposed U.S. climate legislation for a national cap and trade system using a new dynamic computable ...

  3. Equilibrium Distributions and Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashot Vagharshakyan

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article two models for charges distributions are discussed. On the basis of our consideration we put different points of view for stationary state. We prove that only finite energy model for charges' distribution and well-known variation principle explain some well-known experimental results. A new model for superconductivity was suggested, too. In frame of that model some characteristic experimental results for superconductors is possible to explain.

  4. Quantum dense key distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.; Rastello, M.L.; Bovino, F.A.; Colla, A.M.; Castagnoli, G. [Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale G. Ferraris, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); ELSAG SpA, Via Puccini 2, 16154, Genova (Italy)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  5. Localitysensitive hashing using stable distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locality­sensitive hashing using stable distributions 4.1 LSH scheme based s­stable distributions. of work appeared earlier in [DIIM04]. 4.1.1 s­stable distributions Stable distributions [Zol86] defined limits of normalized sums independent identically distributed variables alternate definition follows

  6. Time-resolved reflectivity techniques for dynamic studies of electron beam recrystallization of silicon-on-insulator films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timans, P.J.; McMahon, R.A.; Ahmed, H.

    1988-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) technique has been developed for dynamic studies of swept beam heating of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials. The method exploits the temperature dependence of the reflectivity of SOI films to allow noncontact temperature measurement with high spatial and temporal resolution. This technique is of considerable practical importance for beam processing, since it allows the temperature distribution induced by a beam being scanned across a specimen to be determined. The temperature distribution produced by a line electron beam swept across a SOI specimen was experimentally measured and found to be consistent with a theoretical prediction. The TRR technique can also be used to study melting and will prove useful for characterizing zone melting recrystallization, where thermal modeling is often inadequate for the complex structures involved.

  7. Dynamics of Motivations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knoll, Jörn

    Dynamics of Resonances GSI, 18.05.2005 Motivations Thermal Equilibrium -N- vectormesons Di-leptons Towards dynamics Conserving -functional Gradient ap- proximation Quantum Kinetic Equation Summary Dynamics. Voskresensky1,3 1GSI 2Kurchatov Inst. (Moscow) 3Moscow Ins. for Physics and Engineering #12;Dynamics

  8. Dynamics on Lorentz manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeghib, Abdelghani

    Dynamics on Lorentz manifolds Abdelghani Zeghib Introduction Motivations and questions Examples Results Results Previous results Linear Dynamics General considerations Furstenberg Lemma Lorentz Dynamics://www.umpa.ens-lyon.fr/~zeghib/ (joint work with Paolo Piccione) #12;Dynamics on Lorentz manifolds Abdelghani Zeghib Introduction

  9. Introduction Basic dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    Introduction Basic dynamics The Gulf Stream The thermohaline circulation Ocean currents: some misconceptions and some dynamics Joe LaCasce Dept. Geosciences October 30, 2012 Joe LaCasce Dept. Geosciences Ocean currents: some misconceptions and some dynamics #12;Introduction Basic dynamics The Gulf Stream

  10. The oxygen abundance distribution in M101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The well-observed spiral galaxy M101 was considered. The radial distributions of oxygen abundances determined in three different ways (with the classic Te - method, with the R23 - method, and with the P -- method) were compared. It was found that the parameters (the central oxygen abundance and the gradient) of the radial O/H(P) abundance distribution are close to those of the O/H(Te) abundance distribution. The parameters of the O/H(R23) abundance distribution differ significantly from those of the O/H(Te) abundance distribution: the central O/H(R23) oxygen abundance is higher by around 0.4dex and the gradient is steeper by a factor of around 1.5 as compared to those values in the O/H(Te) abundance distribution. The dispersion in O/H(P) abundance at fixed radius is rather small, around 0.08 dex, and is equal to that in O/H(Te) abundance. The dispersion in O/H(R23) abundance at fixed radius is appreciably larger, around 0.16 dex, compared to that in O/H(Te) abundance. It has been shown that the extra dispersion in O/H(R23) abundances is an artifact and reflects scatter in excitation parameter P at fixed radius.

  11. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  12. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  13. Rotary seal with improved film distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietle, Lannie Laroy; Schroeder, John Erick

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a generally circular rotary seal that establishes sealing between relatively rotatable machine components for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion, and incorporates seal geometry that interacts with the lubricant during relative rotation to distribute a lubricant film within the dynamic sealing interface. The features of a variable inlet size, a variable dynamic lip flank slope, and a reduction in the magnitude and circumferentially oriented portion of the lubricant side interfacial contact pressure zone at the narrowest part of the lip, individually or in combination thereof, serve to maximize interfacial lubrication in severe operating conditions, and also serve to minimize lubricant shear area, seal torque, seal volume, and wear, while ensuring retrofitability into the seal grooves of existing equipment.

  14. LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazhenov, Maxim

    LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS M. V. Bazhenov and E. F. Sabaev UDC employed for analyzing reactor dynamics. Equations of this type are used for analyzing the stability of the reactor power, etc. Among these problems the question of the boundedness of reactor power bursts

  15. Phytoplankton blooms and fish recruitment rate: Effects of spatial distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biktashev, Vadim N.

    Phytoplankton blooms and fish recruitment rate: Effects of spatial distribution V. N. Biktashev a consider the spatio-temporal dynamics of a spatially-structured generalisa- tion of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-fish. In particular, we study the dependence of the fish recruitment on carrying capacities of the plankton subsystem

  16. Remote Stabilization via Communication Networks with a Distributed Control Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Remote Stabilization via Communication Networks with a Distributed Control Law Emmanuel Witrant the problem of remote stabilization via communication networks involving some time- varying delays of known average dynamics. This problem arises when the control law is remotely implemented and leads

  17. Universal Characteristics of Fractal Fluctuations in Prime Number Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequency of occurrence of prime numbers at unit number spacing intervals exhibits selfsimilar fractal fluctuations concomitant with inverse power law form for power spectrum generic to dynamical systems in nature such as fluid flows, stock market fluctuations, population dynamics, etc. The physics of long-range correlations exhibited by fractals is not yet identified. A recently developed general systems theory visualises the eddy continuum underlying fractals to result from the growth of large eddies as the integrated mean of enclosed small scale eddies, thereby generating a hierarchy of eddy circulations, or an inter-connected network with associated long-range correlations. The model predictions are as follows: (i) The probability distribution and power spectrum of fractals follow the same inverse power law which is a function of the golden mean. The predicted inverse power law distribution is very close to the statistical normal distribution for fluctuations within two standard deviations from the mean of the distribution. (ii) Fractals signify quantumlike chaos since variance spectrum represents probability density distribution, a characteristic of quantum systems such as electron or photon. (ii) Fractal fluctuations of frequency distribution of prime numbers signify spontaneous organisation of underlying continuum number field into the ordered pattern of the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern. The model predictions are in agreement with the probability distributions and power spectra for different sets of frequency of occurrence of prime numbers at unit number interval for successive 1000 numbers. Prime numbers in the first 10 million numbers were used for the study.

  18. Dynamic load Variation and Stability Analysis in Distribution Networks with Distributed Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    to the electric energy consumers. Demand for electricity is growing with great rapidity as for nations modernize and economies develop. Due to this development, there is an increased demand in electricity. The increased demand for electricity has outstripped that for other forms of energy. Renewable energy which comes from

  19. Probability distribution functions in the finite density lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ejiri; Y. Nakagawa; S. Aoki; K. Kanaya; H. Saito; T. Hatsuda; H. Ohno; T. Umeda

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase structure of QCD at high temperature and density by lattice QCD simulations adopting a histogram method. We try to solve the problems which arise in the numerical study of the finite density QCD, focusing on the probability distribution function (histogram). As a first step, we investigate the quark mass dependence and the chemical potential dependence of the probability distribution function as a function of the Polyakov loop when all quark masses are sufficiently large, and study the properties of the distribution function. The effect from the complex phase of the quark determinant is estimated explicitly. The shape of the distribution function changes with the quark mass and the chemical potential. Through the shape of the distribution, the critical surface which separates the first order transition and crossover regions in the heavy quark region is determined for the 2+1-flavor case.

  20. Dynamic defense workshop : from research to practice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason J.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  1. Distributed Network Monitoring using Mobile Agents Paradigm Farhad Kamangar, David Levine, Gergely V. Zruba, and Navakiran Chitturi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Záruba, Gergely

    Distributed Network Monitoring using Mobile Agents Paradigm Farhad Kamangar, David Levine, Gergely for distributed and dynamic network monitoring, using mobile agents. We use the IBM Aglets system and show how a Java-based distributed network monitoring application can use this paradigm for efficient data

  2. Innovation flow through social networks: Productivity distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Di Matteo; T. Aste; M. Gallegati

    2004-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed empirical analysis of the productivity of non financial firms across several countries and years shows that productivity follows a non-Gaussian distribution with power law tails. We demonstrate that these empirical findings can be interpreted as consequence of a mechanism of exchanges in a social network where firms improve their productivity by direct innovation or/and by imitation of other firm's technological and organizational solutions. The type of network-connectivity determines how fast and how efficiently information can diffuse and how quickly innovation will permeate or behaviors will be imitated. From a model for innovation flow through a complex network we obtain that the expectation values of the productivity level are proportional to the connectivity of the network of links between firms. The comparison with the empirical distributions reveals that such a network must be of a scale-free type with a power-law degree distribution in the large connectivity range.

  3. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  4. Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

  5. Orchestrating Distributed Resource Ensembles for Petascale Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldin, Ilya; Mandal, Anirban; Ruth, Paul; Yufeng, Xin

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed, data-intensive computational science applications of interest to DOE scientific com- munities move large amounts of data for experiment data management, distributed analysis steps, remote visualization, and accessing scientific instruments. These applications need to orchestrate ensembles of resources from multiple resource pools and interconnect them with high-capacity multi- layered networks across multiple domains. It is highly desirable that mechanisms are designed that provide this type of resource provisioning capability to a broad class of applications. It is also important to have coherent monitoring capabilities for such complex distributed environments. In this project, we addressed these problems by designing an abstract API, enabled by novel semantic resource descriptions, for provisioning complex and heterogeneous resources from multiple providers using their native provisioning mechanisms and control planes: computational, storage, and multi-layered high-speed network domains. We used an extensible resource representation based on semantic web technologies to afford maximum flexibility to applications in specifying their needs. We evaluated the effectiveness of provisioning using representative data-intensive ap- plications. We also developed mechanisms for providing feedback about resource performance to the application, to enable closed-loop feedback control and dynamic adjustments to resource allo- cations (elasticity). This was enabled through development of a novel persistent query framework that consumes disparate sources of monitoring data, including perfSONAR, and provides scalable distribution of asynchronous notifications.

  6. Collective motion in a Hamiltonian dynamical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidetoshi Morita; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillation of macroscopic variables is discovered in a metastable state in the Hamiltonian dynamical system of mean field XY model, the duration of which is divergent with the system size. This long-lasting periodic or quasiperiodic collective motion appears through Hopf bifurcation, which is a typical route in low-dimensional dissipative dynamical systems. The origin of the oscillation is explained, with self-consistent analysis of the distribution function, as the emergence of self-excited ``swings'' through the mean-field. The universality of the phenomena is also discussed.

  7. Protein synthesis driven by dynamical stochastic transcription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilherme C. P. Innocentini; Michael Forger; Fernando Antoneli

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we propose a mathematical framework to couple transcription and translation in which mRNA production is described by a set of master equations while the dynamics of protein density is governed by a random differential equation. The coupling between the two processes is given by a stochastic perturbation whose statistics satisfies the master equations. In this approach, from the knowledge of the analytical time dependent distribution of mRNA number, we are able to calculate the dynamics of the probability density of the protein population.

  8. Dynamics of capillary condensation in aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, R.; Miyashita, W.; Yoneyama, K.; Okuda, Y. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of capillary condensation of liquid {sup 4}He in various density silica aerogels was investigated systematically. Interfaces were clearly visible when bulk liquid was rapidly sucked into the aerogel. Time evolution of the interface positions was consistent with the Washburn model and their effective pore radii were obtained. Condensation was a single step in a dense aerogel and two steps in a low density aerogel. Crossover between the two types of condensation was observed in an intermediate density aerogel. Variety of the dynamics may be the manifestation of the fractal nature of aerogels which had a wide range of distribution of pore radii.

  9. Level dynamics and the ten-fold way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan T. Huckleberry; Marek Kus; Patrick Schuetzdeller

    2007-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the parameter dynamics of eigenvalues of Hamiltonians ('level dynamics') defined on symmetric spaces relevant for condensed matter and particle physics. In particular we: 1) identify appropriate reduced manifold on which the motion takes place, 2) identify the correct Poisson structure ensuring the Hamiltonian character of the reduced dynamics, 3) determine the canonical measure on the reduced space, 4) calculate the resulting eigenvalue density.

  10. Distributed data transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne (Grain Valley, MO); Dunson, David (Kansas City, MO)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  11. Distributed data transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne (Grain Valley, MO); Dunson, David (Kansas City, MO)

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  12. Distributed Radio Interferometric Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing data volumes delivered by a new generation of radio interferometers require computationally efficient and robust calibration algorithms. In this paper, we propose distributed calibration as a way of improving both computational cost as well as robustness in calibration. We exploit the data parallelism across frequency that is inherent in radio astronomical observations that are recorded as multiple channels at different frequencies. Moreover, we also exploit the smoothness of the variation of calibration parameters across frequency. Data parallelism enables us to distribute the computing load across a network of compute agents. Smoothness in frequency enables us reformulate calibration as a consensus optimization problem. With this formulation, we enable flow of information between compute agents calibrating data at different frequencies, without actually passing the data, and thereby improving robustness. We present simulation results to show the feasibility as well as the advantages of distribute...

  13. Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air distribution systems Kisup Lee* Zheng Jiang, Ph.D Qingyan Chen, Ph.D. Student Member ASHRAE Fellow ASHRAE ABSTRACT Stratified air distribution systems such as Traditional Displacement Ventilation (TDV) and Under- Floor Air Distribution (UFAD

  14. Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud) in distri- bution network has significant effects on voltage profile for both customers and distribution on variation of the voltage and the amount of DG that can be connected to the distribution networks. This paper

  15. Hadronic Dynamics in the Studies at B Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss topics in the strong QCD dynamics that are of relevance to studies of the $B$ mesons and to the spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. In particular the limitations from the hadronic dynamics for the determination of the weak-interaction parameters are discussed as well as some models for the newly observed apparently exotic resonances with hidden charm.

  16. A Dynamic Model of Social Network Formation Brian Skyrms 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pemantle, Robin

    A Dynamic Model of Social Network Formation Brian Skyrms 1 Robin Pemantle 2;3 ABSTRACT: We consider a dynamic social network model in which agents play repeated games in pairings determined by a stochastically evolving social network. In- dividual agents begin to interact at random, with the interactions

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Biological Systems Research Team: James E. Evans, Daniel E. Perea, Xiao-Ying Yu, Zihua Zhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structure and Dynamics of Biological Systems Research Team: James E. Evans, Daniel E. Perea, Xiao for atomic resolution structure determination; observe dynamics using a pump-probe regime. Dynamic TEM probe tomography to interrogate the structure and dynamics of biological systems

  18. QCD thermodynamics with dynamical overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Borsanyi; Y. Delgado; S. Durr; Z. Fodor; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Lippert; D. Nogradi; K. K. Szabo

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study QCD thermodynamics using two flavors of dynamical overlap fermions with quark masses corresponding to a pion mass of 350 MeV. We determine several observables on N_t=6 and 8 lattices. All our runs are performed with fixed global topology. Our results are compared with staggered ones and a nice agreement is found.

  19. On dynamic prices: a clash of beliefs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanser, Philip Q

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While insightful essays have been written regarding the moral appropriateness of dynamic pricing, they have an implicit underlying framework for determining justness and fairness that may not necessarily accord completely with the view promulgated in regard to utility rate setting generally. (author)

  20. Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Policies & Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Distributed generation...

  1. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. ”ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions

  2. Improved Load Distribution for Load Rating of Low-Fill Box Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Raju

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . The distribution of live loads on the top slab of a box culvert plays a major role in determining the rating factor of the culvert. The current AASHTO guidelines do not consider the effects of pavements present above the fill while determining the load distribution...

  3. Lognormal distributions and spectra of solar wind plasma fluctuations: Wind 19951998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Lognormal distributions and spectra of solar wind plasma fluctuations: Wind 1995­1998 L. F. Burlaga, and T were double-peaked; nevertheless, the number of observations associated with the fast wind distribution with large tails. There remains a need for dynamical models of the solar wind that incorporate and describe

  4. Voltage and Frequency Stability of Weak Power Distribution Networks with Droop-Controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Michael

    Voltage and Frequency Stability of Weak Power Distribution Networks with Droop analysis, because of coupled network dynamics. Additionally, droop controlled rotational and electronic DG distribution network coupled with droop-controlled DG's, which are based on both fast inverters and SG

  5. Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

  6. Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  7. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  8. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  9. Cook Inlet (CI) distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). During the winter, beluga whales occur in offshore waters associated with pack ice. In the spring RANGE Beluga whales are distributed throughout seasonally ice-covered arctic and subarctic waters of the Northern Hemisphere (Gurevich 1980), and are closely associated with open leads and polynyas in ice

  10. MAIL DISTRIBUTION MAIL PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAIL DISTRIBUTION AND MAIL PRODUCTION OPERATIONS GUIDE November 07 Revised November 07 #12;2 Mail/billing......................................................................................1-5346 Mail Production of the University non-profit permit. 3. All bulk mailings must be coordinated with Mail Production at the earliest

  11. Proceedings Engineering Distributed Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Wolfgang

    -18, 1999 Edited by Wolfgang Emmerich Volker Gruhn #12;#12;Table of Contents Introduction Wolfgang Emmerich;#12;Engineering Distributed Objects (EDO 99) Introduction Wolfgang Emmerich Dept. of Computer Science University College London London WC1E 6BT United Kingdom w.emmerich@cs.ucl.ac.uk Volker Gruhn Informatik 10 Universit

  12. CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an independent cost analysis to interconnect and integrate increased penetration levels of renewable distributed costs. The Energy Commission considers this study a first step toward the 2012 Integrated Energy Policy Generation Integration Cost Study: Analytical Framework. California Energy Commission. CEC2002013007. i

  13. Distributed analysis in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, Alastair; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment accumulated more than 140 PB of data during the first run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The analysis of such an amount of data for the distributed physics community is a challenging task. The Distributed Analysis (DA) system of the ATLAS experiment is an established and stable component of the ATLAS distributed computing operations. About half a million user jobs are daily running on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. The reliability of the DA system during the first run of the LHC and the following shutdown period has been high thanks to the continuous automatic validation of the distributed analysis sites and the user support provided by a dedicated team of expert shifters. During the LHC shutdown, the ATLAS computing model has undergone several changes to improve the analysis workflows, including the re-design of the production system, a new analysis data format and event model, and the development of common reduction and analysis frameworks. We r...

  14. Tariffs with Dynamic Supply Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Giannini FDN iibrary TARIFFS WITH DYNAMIC SUPPLY RESWNSEpaper studies the optimal tariff in a dynamic framework. Thesellers, the optimal tariff is dynam- ically inconsistent;

  15. Determining physical properties of the cell cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saha; M. Nishikawa; M. Behrndt; C. -P. Heisenberg; F. Jülicher; S. W. Grill

    2015-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Actin and myosin assemble into a thin layer of a highly dynamic network underneath the membrane of eukaryotic cells. This network generates the forces that drive cell and tissue-scale morphogenetic processes. The effective material properties of this active network determine large-scale deformations and other morphogenetic events. For example,the characteristic time of stress relaxation (the Maxwell time)in the actomyosin sets the time scale of large-scale deformation of the cortex. Similarly, the characteristic length of stress propagation (the hydrodynamic length) sets the length scale of slow deformations, and a large hydrodynamic length is a prerequisite for long-ranged cortical flows. Here we introduce a method to determine physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer (in vivo). For this we investigate the relaxation dynamics of the cortex in response to laser ablation in the one-cell-stage {\\it C. elegans} embryo and in the gastrulating zebrafish embryo. These responses can be interpreted using a coarse grained physical description of the cortex in terms of a two dimensional thin film of an active viscoelastic gel. To determine the Maxwell time, the hydrodynamic length and the ratio of active stress and per-area friction, we evaluated the response to laser ablation in two different ways: by quantifying flow and density fields as a function of space and time, and by determining the time evolution of the shape of the ablated region. Importantly, both methods provide best fit physical parameters that are in close agreement with each other and that are similar to previous estimates in the two systems. We provide an accurate and robust means for measuring physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer.It can be useful for investigations of actomyosin mechanics at the cellular-scale, but also for providing insights in the active mechanics processes that govern tissue-scale morphogenesis.

  16. Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison.www.gastechnology.org 2 #12;Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated-Battelle for the Department of Energy Subcontract Number: 4000052360 GTI Project Number: 20441 New York State Energy Research

  17. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogucci, Hironobu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures and they support various biological functions. Previous studies have largely investigated the collective dynamics of rod-like biofilaments; however, the shapes of actual subcelluar componensts are often more elaborate. In this study, we investigated an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents a progression from rod-like biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects and observed several types of dynamics depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, moving density bands that we named 'moving smectic' are reported here for the first time. By using statistical analyses of the orbits of individual objects and the interactions among them, the mechanisms underlying the rise of these dynamics patterns in the system were determined. This study...

  18. Cosmic Ray Spectral Deformation Caused by Energy Determination Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Carlson; Conny Wannemark

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra, falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the Maximum Detectable Rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics in a spatial plankton system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjit Kumar Upadhyay; Weiming Wang; N. K. Thakur

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the complex dynamics of a spatial plankton-fish system with Holling type III functional responses. We have carried out the analytical study for both one and two dimensional system in details and found out a condition for diffusive instability of a locally stable equilibrium. Furthermore, we present a theoretical analysis of processes of pattern formation that involves organism distribution and their interaction of spatially distributed population with local diffusion. The results of numerical simulations reveal that, on increasing the value of the fish predation rates, the sequences spots $\\rightarrow$ spot-stripe mixtures$\\rightarrow$ stripes$\\rightarrow$ hole-stripe mixtures holes$\\rightarrow$ wave pattern is observed. Our study shows that the spatially extended model system has not only more complex dynamic patterns in the space, but also has spiral waves.

  20. Dynamics of structural priming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, Gaurav

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for understanding various aspects of syntactic priming. Cognitive processes are modelled as dynamical systems that can change their behaviour when they process information. We use these dynamical systems to investigate how each episode of language comprehension...

  1. Competitive Dynamics of Web Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian M. Maurer; Bernardo A. Huberman

    2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a dynamical model of web site growth in order to explore the effects of competition among web sites and to determine how they affect the nature of markets. We show that under general conditions, as the competition between sites increases, the model exhibits a sudden transition from a regime in which many sites thrive simultaneously, to a "winner take all market" in which a few sites grab almost all the users, while most other sites go nearly extinct. This prediction is in agreement with recent measurements on the nature of electronic markets.

  2. Enrichment Determination of Uranium in Shielded Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crye, Jason Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Hall, Howard L [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL; Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the enrichment of uranium is required in many safeguards and security applications. Typical methods of determining the enrichment rely on detecting the 186 keV gamma ray emitted by {sup 235}U. In some applications, the uranium is surrounded by external shields, and removal of the shields is undesirable. In these situations, methods relying on the detection of the 186 keV gamma fail because the gamma ray is shielded easily. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has previously measured the enrichment of shielded uranium metal using active neutron interrogation. The method consists of measuring the time distribution of fast neutrons from induced fissions with large plastic scintillator detectors. To determine the enrichment, the measurements are compared to a calibration surface that is created from Monte Carlo simulations where the enrichment in the models is varied. In previous measurements, the geometry was always known. ORNL is extending this method to situations where the geometry and materials present are not known in advance. In the new method, the interrogating neutrons are both time and directionally tagged, and an array of small plastic scintillators measures the uncollided interrogating neutrons. Therefore, the attenuation through the item along many different paths is known. By applying image reconstruction techniques, an image of the item is created which shows the position-dependent attenuation. The image permits estimating the geometry and materials present, and these estimates are used as input for the Monte Carlo simulations. As before, simulations predict the time distribution of induced fission neutrons for different enrichments. Matching the measured time distribution to the closest prediction from the simulations provides an estimate of the enrichment. This presentation discusses the method and provides results from recent simulations that show the importance of knowing the geometry and materials from the imaging system.

  3. Categorical Introduction to Dynamical Systems Symbolic Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Byung-Jay

    Categorical Introduction to Dynamical Systems Symbolic Dynamical Systems Symbolic Embedding Examples Results Embeddings in Symbolic Dynamical Systems Jonathan Jaquette Swarthmore College July 22, 2009 Jonathan Jaquette Embeddings in Symbolic Dynamical Systems #12;Categorical Introduction

  4. Determining Pregnancy in Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, A. M. Jr.; Beverly, J. R.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This should not upset the pal- pator. An indication of rectum damage is a sand- paper or gritty feeling. In this case, the mucosa lining the rectum has been rubbed off in the palpation pro- cess. It is best to stop further palpation when this occurs. A... good land- mark, figure 2. After locating the cervix, the pal- pator can move forward to the uterus to determine pregnancy. The paunch, located directly forward and to the left, may feel like the end of a football and be rather soft and mushy...

  5. Dynamics of Carroll Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Bergshoeff; Joaquim Gomis; Giorgio Longhi

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate particles whose dynamics is invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (`the Carroll particle does not move') we show that there exists non-trivial dynamics for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge the Carroll algebra and couple the Carroll particle to these gauge fields. It turns out that for such a coupled system even a single Carroll particle can have non-trivial dynamics.

  6. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ratigan, Joe L. (Rapid City, SD)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  7. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  8. Cash Flow Projection for Operating Loan Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinefelter, Danny A.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Corkle* *Professor and Extension Economist and Extension Program Specialist?Economic Accountability, The Texas A&M System. CASH FLOW PROJECTION FOR OPERATING LOAN DETERMINATION Name ___________________________________________________ Address...-Sows 191,200 800 47,000 900 47,000 700 45,000 800 49,000 2 3 Crops: Wheat 52,500 26,500 26,000 3 4 Grain Sorghum 2,700 2,700 4 5 5 6 Distributions from cooperatives 400 400 6 7 Agricultural program payments 3,100 1,550 1,550 7 8 Commodity credit loans 8 9...

  9. Decoherence rates for Galilean covariant dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Clark

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a measure of decoherence for a class of density operators. For Gaussian density operators in dimension one it coincides with an index used by Morikawa (1990). Spatial decoherence rates are derived for three large classes of the Galilean covariant quantum semigroups introduced by Holevo. We also characterize the relaxation to a Gaussian state for these dynamics and give a theorem for the convergence of the Wigner function to the probability distribution of the classical analog of the process.

  10. Stochastic dynamic systems fl T. Soderstrom, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    Stochastic dynamic systems Chapter 2 c fl T. S¨oderstr¨om, 1997 1 Some probability theory ffl Basic facts ffl Conditional distributions ffl Complex­valued Gaussian variables c fl T. S¨oderstr¨om, 1997 2) increasing ffl limx!1 F(x) = 1 ffl lim x!\\Gamma1 F (x) = 0 c fl T. S¨oderstr¨om, 1997 3 Random variables

  11. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Perez

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  12. Social Dynamics Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Social Dynamics Introduction Part I: Correlation and the Social Contract Introduction to part I 1: University of Utah Press. 47-69. Part II: Importance of Dynamics Introduction to part II 1. Trust, Risk Significance of Some Simple Evolutionary Models (2000) Philosophy of Science 67: 94-113. 4. Dynamics

  13. Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

  14. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  15. Cybersecurity Dynamics Shouhuai Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Antonio ABSTRACT We explore the emerging field of Cybersecurity Dynamics, a candidate foundation been driving the study of security for decades -- the idea of cybersecurity dynamics emergedCybersecurity Dynamics Shouhuai Xu Department of Computer Science, University of Texas at San

  16. 17. METAPOPULATION DYNAMICS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    17. METAPOPULATION DYNAMICS OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Matt J. Keeling, Ottar N. Bjørnstad, and Bryan T resonances for the dynamics of parasites. This is particularly true for microparasitic infections" growth of the parasite population. Thus, at the scale of the host popu- lation, infectious dynamics bears

  17. Dopant profile modeling by rare event enhanced domain-following molecular dynamics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beardmore, Keith M. (Santa Fe, NM); Jensen, Niels G. (Davis, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-implemented molecular dynamics-based process simulates a distribution of ions implanted in a semiconductor substrate. The properties of the semiconductor substrate and ion dose to be simulated are first initialized, including an initial set of splitting depths that contain an equal number of virtual ions implanted in each substrate volume determined by the splitting depths. A first ion with selected velocity is input onto an impact position of the substrate that defines a first domain for the first ion during a first timestep, where the first domain includes only those atoms of the substrate that exert a force on the ion. A first position and velocity of the first ion is determined after the first timestep and a second domain of the first ion is formed at the first position. The first ion is split into first and second virtual ions if the first ion has passed through a splitting interval. The process then follows each virtual ion until all of the virtual ions have come to rest. A new ion is input to the surface and the process repeats until all of the ion dose has been input. The resulting ion rest positions form the simulated implant distribution.

  18. Slow dynamics and anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics in diverse solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow dynamics and anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics in diverse solids Paul Johnsona) Geophysics study of anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics and slow dynamics in a number of solids. Observations are presented from seven diverse materials showing that anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics ANFD and slow dynamics

  19. Exact solvability, non-integrability, and genuine multipartite entanglement dynamics of the Dicke model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu He; Liwei Duan; Qing-Hu Chen

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the finite size Dicke model of arbitrary number of qubits is solved analytically in an unified way within extended coherent states. For the $N=2k$ or $2k-1$ Dicke models ($k$ is an integer), the $G$-function, which is only an energy dependent $k \\times k$ determinant, is derived in a transparent manner. The regular spectrum is completely and uniquely given by stable zeros of the $G$-function. The closed-form exceptional eigenvalues are also derived. The level distribution controlled by the pole structure of the $G$-functions suggests non-integrability for $N>1$ model at any finite coupling in the sense of recent criterion in literature. A preliminary application to the exact dynamics of genuine multipartite entanglement in the finite $N$ Dicke model is presented using the obtained exact solutions.

  20. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish (; ); Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.